Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ackerman-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paradigm for Testing Cloud Parameterizations Paradigm for Testing Cloud Parameterizations T. P. Ackerman, M. Sengupta, and E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction One of the main goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is improvement of cloud and radiation parameterizations in general circulation models. This problem can be logically addressed within a three-step framework: 1) prediction of clouds from thermodynamic fields, 2) parameterization of microphysical properties of the clouds, and 3) parameterization of radiative properties of the clouds. The information derived from the parameterizations is used in a radiative transfer scheme to calculate heating rates and surface fluxes. An important requirement for improving parameterizations is the availability of a continuous data

2

ackerman-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One-Year Cloud Climatology for the One-Year Cloud Climatology for the Southern Great Plains Site T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The addition of the millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) to the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has provided the necessary observations to produce a cloud climatology. Data from the MMCR are currently being combined with data from the Belfort laser ceilometer (BLC) and micropulse lidar (MPL) to determine cloud occurrence and location using algorithms developed by our research group. These basic cloud statistics should prove useful for comparing with both single-column model (SCM) and general circulation model (GCM) predictions of cloud

3

mace-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar Data G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

4

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman, D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman, R. Bergstrom, and A. Walker National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 Introduction Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) includes radiative transfer modeling, cirrus cloud microphysics, and stratus cloud modeling. These efforts are designed to provide the basis for improving cloud and radiation parameterizations in our main effort: mesoscale cloud modeling. Radiative transfer modeling is described by Kinne et al. (this meeting); stratus and cirrus cloud modeling efforts are described by Toon et al. (this meeting); and mesoscale modeling is described in this abstract. Cloud Models for ARM optical properties. The last class of model listed in the table

5

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale dynamical model and used to simulated cirrus clouds during the First ISCCpCa) Regional Experiment (FIRE) project. One of our goals in performing one-dimensional studies is to develop the microphysics for these three-dimensional simulations. However, since the microphysics itself is computationally very demanding, the one-dimensional simulations are often useful for cloud simulations of microphysics in situations in which dynamics either is not important or can be parameterized. Here we discuss only one-dimensional simulations. Marine stratus are the only clouds for which there are significant data showing effects of aerosols on cloud

6

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cirrus Cloud Statistics from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations Krueger, S.K. (a), Luo, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (a), and Xu, K.-M. (b), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Mace, Clothiaux, and Ackerman (2000; MCA) determined the properties of cirrus clouds derived from one year (December 1996 to November 1997) of MMCR data collected at the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma. They also used additional measurements to retrieve the bulk microphysical properties of thin cirrus cloud layers. We sampled CRM results in a way that allows direct comparison to MCA's observations and retrievals of cirrus cloud properties. This allows evaluation, in a statistical sense, of the CRM's

7

GG&A Hoofed Stock Price Year low high Comments 1971 97 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. GG&A Hoofed Stock Price Year low high Comments 1971 97245 Bad year. 72 245245 Light trading due to a heavy winter. ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

X:\\ARM_19~1\\P185-192.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micropulse lidar cloud base frequency. A One-Year Cloud Climatology Using Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site Micropulse Lidar G. G. Mace and T. P. Ackerman Penn State...

9

Equivariant Kaehler Geometry and Localization in the G/G Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze in detail the equivariant supersymmetry of the $G/G$ model. In spite of the fact that this supersymmetry does not model the infinitesimal action of the group of gauge transformations, localization can be established by standard arguments. The theory localizes onto reducible connections and a careful evaluation of the fixed point contributions leads to an alternative derivation of the Verlinde formula for the $G_{k}$ WZW model. We show that the supersymmetry of the $G/G$ model can be regarded as an infinite dimensional realization of Bismut's theory of equivariant Bott-Chern currents on K\\"ahler manifolds, thus providing a convenient cohomological setting for understanding the Verlinde formula. We also show that the supersymmetry is related to a non-linear generalization (q-deformation) of the ordinary moment map of symplectic geometry in which a representation of the Lie algebra of a group $G$ is replaced by a representation of its group algebra with commutator $[g,h] = gh-hg$. In the large $k$ limit it reduces to the ordinary moment map of two-dimensional gauge theories.

Matthias Blau; George Thompson

1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

First Measurement of sigma(gg -> ttbar)/sigma(ppbar -> ttbar)  

SciTech Connect

The work presented here is the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use an integrated luminosity of 0.96 {+-} 0.06 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. We select t{bar t} candidates by identifying a high-p{sub T} lepton candidate, a large missing E{sub T} as evidence for a neutrino candidate and at least four high E{sub T} jets, one of which has to be identified as originating from a b quark. The challenge is to discriminate between the two production processes with the identical final state, gg {yields} t{bar t} and q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t}. We take advantage of the fact that compared to a quark, a gluon is more likely to radiate a low momentum gluon and therefore, one expects a larger number of charged particles with low p{sub T} in a process involving more gluons. Given the large uncertainties associated with the modeling of the low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity, a data-driven technique was employed. Using calibration data samples, we show there exists a clear correlation between the observed average number of low p{sub T} charged particles and the average number of gluons involved in the production process predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Given the correlation, one can identify low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions associated with specific average number of gluons. The W + 0 jet sample and dijets sample with leading jet E{sub T} in the range of 80-100 GeV are used to find no-gluon and gluon-rich low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions, respectively. Using these no-gluon and gluon-rich distributions in a likelihood fit, we find the fraction of gluon-rich events in t{bar t} candidates. This fraction has contributions from the signal and background events. Taking into account these contributions and the gg {yields} t{bar t} and q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} production channel acceptances, we find {sigma}(gg {yields} t{bar t})/{sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}) = 0.07 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst) in agreement with the theoretical predictions of 0.15 {+-} 0.05. This measurement is a stepping stone towards a better understanding of the production mechanism of top quark pairs and implies that at least 67% of the t{bar t} events are consistent with q{bar q} production at 95% C.L, leaving little room for non SM processes which are not similar to the q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} in their gluon radiation. The result confirms our current understanding of the SM high p{sub T} production mechanism and the relative gluon PDFs at relatively high Q{sup 2} and x.

Pashapour Alamdari, Shabnaz; /Toronto U.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microsoft Word - TP Ackerman Whilte Paper.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two...

12

Tropical Western Pacific T. Ackerman Pennsylvania Sate University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

details on this operation in PROBE, see the paper by Westwater et al. in this volume. Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment As the ARM Program's first field campaign, we...

13

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements at the DOE ARM NSA Site Dong, X. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Arctic plays...

14

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Vernon, E.N. and Mace, G.G., Department of Meteorology, Unviversity of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The extensive...

15

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Radar and Microwave Radiometer Data Dong, X. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A new algorithm...

16

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Mask Products (MOD35) with MMCR Data Zhang, Q. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The...

17

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cases Sampled During the 2000 Cloud IOP Sonntag, K. and Mace, G.G., University of Utah Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Quantities...

18

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cirrus Cloud Property Retrieval Algorithms Mace, G.G. and Zhang, Y., University of Utah Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The problem of...

19

REFRIGERATIONREFRIGERATION ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E424503 E 20102010 #7#7 --rzrz 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers7. Air conditioning, cooling towersg, gg, g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the top of the tower An (earlier) alternative is to use a spray pond to cool water; disadvantages. Air conditioning, cooling towers7. Air conditioning, cooling towersg, gg, g Ron Zevenhoven ??bo, is the hi htemperature at which condensation begins when air is cooled at constant pressurecooled

Zevenhoven, Ron

20

REFRIGERATIONREFRIGERATION ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E 2010 #6424503 E 2010 #6 --rzrz 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and quality of life, population growth, consumption Cooling and freezing of food gives important alternatives 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g Ron Zevenhoven ??bo Akademi, , nutricity, change taste, etc. Special considerations in food freezing and cooling are, for l h f i d bl i

Zevenhoven, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

22

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mining the ARM Data Set: A WWW-Staged Prototype Relational Database of ARM Data Mace, G.G. and Hudach, D.P., University of Utah Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)...

23

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Large-Scale Meteorology Benson, S., Mace, G.G., and Vernon, E.N., University of Utah Cirrus cloud properties are influenced by the large-scale meteorology in which they...

24

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Display Sassen, K., and Mace, G.G., Department of Meteorology, University of Utah; Arnott, W.P., and Hallett, J., Desert Research Institute; Liou, K.N., and Takano, Y.,...

25

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A WWW-Staged Prototype ARM Database Utility Mace, G.G. and Hudach, D., University of Utah Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Counting from when...

26

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds: Application to Climate Research Liou, K.N. (a), Ou, S.C. (a), Rolland, P. (a), Gu, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (b), and...

27

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

28

(References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ground-based radar-lidar retrievals are depicted by "S" and "W." Implications for Ice-Phase Cloud Microphysics for Next-Generation Climate Models As high-performance...

29

WALLACE E. TYNER Professor Tyner is an energy economist and James and Lois Ackerman Professor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chapters. His past work in energy economics has encompassed oil, natural gas, coal, oil shale, biomass

Ginzel, Matthew

30

Session GG: III-Nitrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2011 ... Long-wavelength light emitting diode (LED) structures were grown on top of partially relaxed InGaN layers, resulting in reduced strain in the...

31

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effects of Rooting via Outgroups on Ingroup Topology in Phylogeny Margareta Ackerman, Dan Brown, and David Loker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explore which algorithms retain ingroup topology when distant outgroups are included (a proper algorithms to the inclusion of distant outgroups. We prove that linkage-based algorithms, which include UP arbitrarily distant outlier. Moreover, including multiple outliers can lead to an arbitrary topology

Ackerman, Margareta

33

GG6, Thermomagnetic Transport Properties of (Ag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L6, PECVD-SiN, Si or Si/Al2O3-Capped ED-Mode AlN/GaN Inverters Hide details for [

34

GG4, Investigations of Charge Transport and Bias Stress in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Film microstructure was characterized at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). X-ray diffraction experiments confirm the unique in-plane and ...

35

FE HH GG DC CF BA AB ED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S S S S S S Michael R. Mark Michael R. Terrance M. Alan G. Julia Kenneth D. Bloomberg Green Bloomberg Gray Hevesi Willebrand Schaeffer ...

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

Section 120  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Platt Platt r Platt r e r Platt r e r Platt Session Papers 543 Verification of Cirrus Cloud Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction An evaluation of several diagnostic cirrus cloud parameteriza- tions is presented in this study using data from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We consider three parameterizations of ice water content (IWC) proposed by Heymsfield and Donner (HD 1990), Stephens et al. (ST 1990), and Slingo and Slingo (SL 1991), each coupled with parameterizations of the ice particle size characteristics by Heymsfield and Platt (HP 1984), Mitchell (MI 1994) and Platt

37

Section 77  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature, and saturation equiva- lent potential temperature for a) the decou- pled boundary-layer observed over the ARM SGP site and b) the well-mixed boundary- layer observed over central Pennsylvania. Observational Studies of Continental Stratus-Implications for Modeling B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H. Verlinde and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have tremendous potential for providing statistical descriptions of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus.

38

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

39

X:\ARM_19~1\PGS1-8.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Data B. Albrecht, G. Mace, X. Dong, W. Syrett, and T. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus- are closely coupled to the water and energy budgets of land surfaces. This coupling involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds

40

dong-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties 25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site X. Dong Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Ackerman, E. E. Clothiaux, and C. N. Long Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. C. Liljegren Ames Laboratory Ames, Iowa Introduction Boundary layer stratiform clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and play an important role in climate over both land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Boundary layer stratus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Section 9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Monthly mean values of clear-sky irradiance (solid), observed irradiance (long dash), and surface cloud forcing (short dash) at the ARM SGP site. A Two-Year Climatology of Radiation Budget and Cloud Properties for the ARM SGP Site T. P. Ackerman and S. G. Strum Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah C. N. Long NOAA/ERL/Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction One of primary reasons for the establishment of the ARM Southern Great Plains research site was to obtain long-term records of surface radiation data and the impact of clouds on these data (Stokes and Schwartz 1994). This research project focuses on the creation of a two-year climatology of the sur-

42

Section 68  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern An Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations Using Southern Great Plains Data D. A. Sovchik, G. C. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Parameterization of cirrus in large-scale models is a challeng- considerably. A detailed analysis of the resulting distributions ing problem for a number of reasons. Among the most has not yet been carried out, but will be used to identify important of these has been the lack of quantifiable tests of systematic variations. parameterization results. However, the necessary testing can now be carried out using the data stream from the Atmos- The radiative parameterization developed by Ebert and Curry pheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern

43

Microsoft Word - SPARTICUS_Science_Plan_DOE-SC-ARM-1001.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator E Jensen D Mitchell G McFarquhar X Liu J Comstock T Garrett T Ackerman October 2009 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

44

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific Cirrus Radiative Properties in the Tropical Western Pacific J. M. Comstock and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Cirrus clouds in tropical regions are often located high in the cold upper troposphere and have low optical depths. In addition, tropical cirrus often extend in large sheets up to 1000 km horizontally, which may have a large influence on the energy budget of the atmosphere. Characterizing the location and radiative properties of cirrus clouds is an important step in understanding the processes that generate and maintain these cold, thin cirrus clouds and their impact on upper tropospheric dynamics. In this paper, we present cirrus radiative properties derived using a combination of Micropulse Lidar

45

X:\ARM_19~1\P185-192.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational Figure 1. Schematic diagram of an operational methodology for cloud parameterization testing. The upper portion depicts the data analysis procedure, while the lower portion depicts parameterization forcing and evaluation. A Comparison of Radiometric Fluxes Influenced by Parameterized Cirrus Clouds with Observed Fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site G. G. Mace, T. P. Ackerman, and A. T. George Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania As the data stream from the ARM Southern Great Plains on an hourly basis from the National Meteorological (SGP) site matures, the value of this resource is becoming Center. The MAPS profiles serve as input to a radiative more readily apparent. For the first time, research on the

46

kato-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Aerosol Thickness Derived from the Aerosol Thickness Derived from Ground-Based and Airborne Measurements S. Kato Hampton University Hampton, Virginia M. H. Bergin Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Charlock and R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia N. S. Laulainen and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. J. Michalsky State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Introduction The extinction optical thickness of the atmosphere can be computed by measuring the attenuation of direct solar radiation (DSR). The aerosol extinction optical thickness in selected wavelength regions by

47

Section 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A One-Year Cloud Climatology Derived from the Micro Pulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology, University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania J. D. Spinhirne and V. S. Scott NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Abstract A cloud detection algorithm that attempts to identify all of the significant power returns from the vertical column above the micro pulse lidar at all times was applied to one year of micro pulse lidar data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The results of this analysis are presented, and the

48

X:\ARM_19~1\P155-184.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffuse Diffuse ratio (diffuse)/(diffuse direct) Session Papers 173 (1) A Simple Formula for Determining Globally Clear Skies C. N. Long, A. T. George, G. G. Mace, and T. P. Ackerman Penn State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Surface measurements to serve as "ground truth" are of primary importance in the development of retrieval algorithms using satellite measurements to predict surface irradiance. The most basic algorithms of this type deal with clear sky (i.e., cloudless) top-to-surface shortwave (SW) transfer, serving as a necessary prerequisite towards treating both clear and cloudy conditions (Cess et al. 1991). Recently, Cess et al. (1995) have used a ratio of surface and top of atmosphere SW cloud forcing to infer

49

The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

Brooks, Benjamin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

Potter, Katherine Ellison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter α as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ω such

52

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

53

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

54

Microsoft PowerPoint - GG_DOE_Annual_Review_DE-FE0002386.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002386 DE-FE0002386 Geo-Chemo-Mechanical Studies for Geo Chemo Mechanical Studies for Permanent CO 2 Storage in Geologic Reservoirs Columbia University P t D J M tt Presenter: Dr. Juerg Matter February 24, 2011 Project Participants PI: Prof Peter Kelemen PI: Prof. Peter Kelemen Dept. of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Columbia University Co-PI: Prof. Juerg Matter Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Co-PI: Prof. Ah-Hyung Alissa Park D t t f E th & E i t l E i i C l bi Department of Earth & Environmental Engineering, Columbia University Graduate Students: Greeshma Gadikota (Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University Columbia University Amelia Paukert (Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Columbia University

55

Derivation of the Verlinde Formula from Chern-Simons Theory and the G/G model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a derivation of the Verlinde formula for the $G_{k}$ WZW model from Chern-Simons theory, without taking recourse to CFT, by calculating explicitly the partition function $Z_{\\Sigma\\times S^{1}}$ of $\\Sigma\\times S^{1}$ with an arbitrary number of labelled punctures. By a suitable gauge choice, $Z_{\\Sigma\\times S^{1}}$ is reduced to the partition function of an Abelian topological field theory on $\\Sigma$ (a deformation of non-Abelian BF and Yang-Mills theory) whose evaluation is straightforward. This relates the Verlinde formula to the Ray-Singer torsion of $\\Sigma\\times S^{1}$. We derive the $G_{k}/G_{k}$ model from Chern-Simons theory, proving their equivalence, and give an alternative derivation of the Verlinde formula by calculating the $G_{k}/G_{k}$ path integral via a functional version of the Weyl integral formula. From this point of view the Verlinde formula arises from the corresponding Jacobian, the Weyl determinant. Also, a novel derivation of the shift $k\\ra k+h$ is given, based on the index of the twisted Dolbeault complex.

M. Blau; G. Thompson

1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

SU?GG?J?18: A Surface?Based Respiratory Surrogate for 4D Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Real?time acquisition of three?dimensional surface tracking has potential as an external surrogate for respiratory correlated CTimaging and radiation therapy. This study assesses the GateCT surfacetracking system (VisionRT

C Noel; E Klein; K Moore

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

G.G. Wicks, L.K. Heung and R.F. Schumacher  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems for a variety of applications, such as sol-gel glasses including xerogels and aerogels- and phase-separated glass compositions. These can be treated later to produce...

58

Rock Art at the Kanaka-Briggs Creek Locality (10-GG-307), Gooding County, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. 1976 Buffalo Jump Complexes in Owyhee County, Idaho.Miscellaneous Papers of the Idaho State University Museiunof Archaeological Resources. Idaho State Museum of Natural

Murphey, Kelly A

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Microsoft PowerPoint - GG_DOE_Annual_Review_DE-FE0002386.ppt...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cleaned sample to determine the yield 8 Place the cleaned mineral samples in a vacuum oven at 120 o C for 24 hours 9 Columbia River Flood Basalt Basalt Particle Size...

60

GG4, Isothermal Method for Rapid, Steady-State Measurement of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I4, Electrical Spin Injection in a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Spin-Polarized Light Emitting Diode (Spin-LED) I5, Properties of MnAs/GaMnAs/MnAs Magnetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GG2, Epitaxial Growth of Transition Metal Nitrides on MgO via DC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L6, PECVD-SiN, Si or Si/Al2O3-Capped ED-Mode AlN/GaN Inverters Hide details for [

62

The TWP-ICE CRM Intercomparison Specification and First Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TWP-ICE CRM Intercomparison Specification and First Results Ann Fridlind (ann.fridlind@nasa.gov), Andrew Ackerman (andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov), Adrian Hill (adrian.hill@metoffice.gov...

63

Other Locales W. Clements Los Alamos National Laboratory Los...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory .Site Scientist: Tom Ackerman, The Pennsylvania State University .Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) Coordinator: Dave Renne, National Renewable...

64

Federalism and Economic Development in India: An Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Political Economy (forthcoming, Oxford University Press). Rodden, Jonathan and Susan Rose-Ackerman, (1997), Does

Singh, Nirvikar; SRINIVASAN, T N

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT Title: Estimate the Indirect Aerosol Effect and Retrieval of Related Parameters from Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cloud liquid water [Ackerman et al. 1995]. Another mechanism may lead to desiccation of clouds due to aerosol-cloud interaction is by enhanced solar absorption [e.g., Ackerman and Toon, 1996]. Calculations clouds. J. Geophys. Res., 100, 7121-7133. Ackerman, A. S., and O. B. Toon, 1996: Unrealistic desiccation

66

DOE/SC-ARM-TR-099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

099 099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED) C Zhao MP Jensen S Xie GG Mace SA Klein SA McFarlane R McCoy EJ O'Connor JM Comstock A Protat J Delanoë MD Shupe M Deng D Turner M Dunn Z Wang RJ Hogan September 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

67

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Facility Clough, S.A. (a), Delamere, J.S. (a), Mlawer, E.J. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Revercomb, H. (c), Tobin, D. (c), Turner, D.D. (c), Knuteson, R.O. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Kiedron, P.W. (d), Ellingson, R.G. (e), Krueger, S.K. (f), Mace, G.G. (f), Shippert, T. (g), and Zhang, M.H.(h), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b), University of Wisconsin-Madison (c), State University of New York, Albany (d), University of Maryland (e), University of Utah (f), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (g), State University of New York, Stony Brook (h) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Accurate representations of the cooling rate profile, the surface flux and

68

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Science Team Meeting 8 Science Team Meeting 1998 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1998, March 1998 Tucson, Arizona For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). History and Status of the ARM Program - March 1998 Session Papers A Cloud Climatology of the ARM CART Site S.M. Lazarus, S.K. Krueger, and G.G. Mace A Combination of the Separation of Variable and the T-Matrix Method for Computing Optical Properties of Spheroidal Particles*

69

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

70

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes Large-Scale Cloud Properties and Radiative Fluxes over Darwin during Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment P. Minnis, L. Nguyen, and W.L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. Palikonka, J.K. Ayers, D.R. Doelling, M.L. Nordeen, D. Spangenberg, D.N. Phan, and M. Khaiyer Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia G.G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was conducted from 23 January - 13 February 2006 in Darwin, Australia, to characterize the properties of tropical cirrus and the convection that leads to their

71

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Comparison of Boundary Layer Cloud Properties using Surface and GOES Measurements at the ARM SGP Site Dong, X. (a), Minnis, P. (b), Smith, W.L., Jr. (b), and Mace, G.G. (a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Boundary layer cloud microphysical and radiative properties derived from GOES data during March 2000 cloud IOP at ARM SGP site are compared with simultaneous surface-based observations. The cloud-droplet effective radius, optical depth, and top-of-atmoshpere (TOA) albedo are retrieved from a 2-stream radiative transfer model in conjunction with ground-based measurements of cloud radar, laser ceilometer, microwave and solar radiometers. The satellite results are retrieved from GOES visible and

72

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

73

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system emerged from this interaction. Joule enables the chief financial officer and senior DOE management to track annual performance on a quarterly basis. Joule scores are reported as success, goal met (green light in PART), mixed results, goal partially met (yellow light in PART), and unsatisfactory, goal not met (red light in PART). Joule links the DOE strategic plan to the underlying base program targets.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Roche, Kenneth J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SU?GG?T?509: Development of a Database and Software Tools for Outcome Analysis of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose:Dose?volume response data for breast cancerradiotherapy (RT) are generally lacking. The purpose of this work is to develop a database and software tools to facilitate the analyses of short? and long?term radiationdose?volume responses of breast cancer RT. Method and Materials: As a part of the project aiming to develop the Research Analysis Platform and IGRTDatabases (RAPID)

P Prior; G Chen; X Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ackerman, T.P.(a), and Clothiaux, E.E.(b), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), The Pennsylvania State University (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

77

Poster Abstract of Eighteenth ARM STM: Sort by Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z., Marchand, R., and Ackerman, T. A Comparison of Water Uptake by Aerosols Using Two Thermodynamic Models ABSTRACT, POSTER Xu, L. and Penner, J. ACRF Data Acquisition and...

78

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, WW Grabowski, AA Hill, TR Jones, MM Khaiyer, G Liu, P Minnis, H Morrison, L Nguyen, S...

79

hinkelman-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Radiative Processes and Cloud Prediction in the Eta Forecast Model L. M. Hinkelman, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

80

NSLS Committees | ALARA Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toward making radiation exposure As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Reports to NSLS Chairman. Membership A. Ackerman R. Casey - Chairman N. Gmur E. Haas R. Heese X. Yang...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM - Field Campaign - SUbsonic Aircraft: Contrail & Cloud Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

future subsonic aircraft fleet on Earth's radiation budget and climate. SUCCESS Mission Home Page Additional Information Tom Ackerman Address: Pennsylvania State University...

82

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

83

mather-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Derived from the Manus Micropulse Lidar with ECMWF Analyses J. H. Mather and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University...

84

NEAC Policy Sub-Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal - - plentiful, but major GG emitter plentiful, but major GG emitter - - Natural gas Natural gas - - less GG, but prices rising less GG, but prices rising - - Nuclear...

85

SU?GG?J?180: The Role of MRS in Radiation Therapy: Correlation Between T2?Weighted MRI, Biopsy and MRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the possibility of using objective parameters in MRS of the prostate to identify areas of viable cancer that might need higher radiation therapydose. Clinically

M Hossain; L Chen; M Buyyounouski; B Milestone; T Richardson; C Ma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Hinkelman, L.M.(a), Evans, K.F.(b), Clothiaux, E.E.(a), and Ackerman, T.P.(c), The Pennsylvania State University (a), University of Colorado (b), Pacific Northwest National...

87

jensen-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Event at the Manus Island ARM Site M. P. Jensen, J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The 1997-1998...

88

Yerslt:V of IHaho _9;~cv ~~W~cv~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.C., Updated November 24, 1998. nle/clim-15.html> [Hereinafter Ackerman] 42 Vienna's review process must not search for a single scientific study that fully supports the Administrator

O'Laughlin, Jay

89

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative Importance of Size Distribution and Liquid Water Path to Solar Radiation in the Presence of Continental Stratus Sengupta, M.(a), Ackerman, T.P.(a), and Clothiaux, E.E.(b),...

90

marchand-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ninth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 22-26, 1999 1 A Two-Year Cloud Climatology for the Southern Great Plains Site R. T. Marchand, T. P. Ackerman,...

91

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle Journal Reference: Varble AC, AM Fridlind, EJ Zipser, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, A Hill, SA McFarlane, J Pinty, and B Shipway. 2011. "Evaluation of cloud-resolving...

92

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, P Zuidema, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, G de Boer, J Fan, AM Fridlind, T Hashino, JY Harrington, Y Luo, M Ovchinnikov, and B Shipway. 2011....

93

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mrowiec AA, C Rio, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, AD Del Genio, OM Pauluis, AC Varble, and J Fan. 2012. "Analysis of cloud-resolving simulations of a tropical mesoscale convective...

94

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan University and ALS), J.D. Bozek and G.D. Ackerman (Shining light on met als in the environment," EleinentsStray field reduc tion of als eddy current septum magnets,"

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

JOM Table of Contents: July 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrometallurgically Treating Metal, Oxide, and Al Alloy Spent Nuclear Fuel Types [pp. 22-25] C.C. McPheeters, E.C. Gay, E.J. Karell, and J.P. Ackerman.

96

Steering control of an autonomous ground vehicle with application to the DARPA Urban Challenge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental to the design of an Ackerman steered autonomous ground vehicle is the development of a low-level controller that effectively performs trajectory or path tracking. Though ample literature is available on various ...

Campbell, Stefan F. (Stefan Forrest)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

chang-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Models and Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Satellite Observations F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada S. A. Ackerman Department of...

98

Kato-S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampton University Hampton, Virginia G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

99

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulence Properties Derived from MMCR Doppler Moments Mace, G. G., University of Utah Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We are developing an...

100

dong(2)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Center Hampton, Virginia G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of cirrus statistics produced by general circulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced by general circulation models using ARM data Hartsock, Daniel University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Category: Modeling Our...

102

Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Modeling The tropical anvil cirrus formation...

103

Lessons Learned: Measuring Program Outcomes and Using Benchmarks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boulder County Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) New York State Energy Research & Development Authority...

104

Maureen Dunn | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cruises at sea and in research expeditions through rainforests of the Amazonas, Venezuela and Costa Rica Selected Publications Huang, D., Zhao, C., Dunn, M., Dong, X., Mace,...

105

Microsoft Word - H2_calibration_2013_v01.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC) in Jena, Germany (Jordan and Steinberg, 2011). * For Mace Head, a preliminary link to this MPI scale was...

106

2008 Technology Transfer Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conductivity than pure copper. Sensor Development and Advanced Concepts for Oil Shale Recovery Jonathan L. Mace (DE-6) Develop new methods that are based on combinations...

107

BioMed Central Research article DArT markers: diversity analyses and mapping in Sorghum bicolor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Mace et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Bmc Genomics; Emma S Mace; Ling Xia; David R Jordan; Kirsten Halloran; Dipal K Parh; Eric Huttner; Peter Wenzl; Andrzej Kilian; Peter Wenzl; Andrzej Kilian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interactive Uses of the NSDL: .Atmospheric Visualization Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T. R. Gobble, H. M. Anthony, and D. Johnson Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois K. Andrew Eastern Illinois University Charleston, Illinois G. G. Mace University of...

109

System description: IVY  

SciTech Connect

IVY is a verified theorem prover for first-order logic with equality. It is coded in ACL2, and it makes calls to the theorem prover Otter to search for proofs and to the program MACE to search for countermodels. Verifications of Otter and MACE are not practical because they are coded in C. Instead, Otter and MACE give detailed proofs and models that are checked by verified ACL2 programs. In addition, the initial conversion to clause form is done by verified ACL2 code. The verification is done with respect to finite interpretations.

McCune, W.; Shumsky, O.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

!"#$%"&'()*%+,(-.%/0% 1-2),(34(&5%&.%6700%%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer Subsidy that varies with the price of crude oil or gasoline Subsidy based at least in part Biofuels Policy Alternatives Wallace E. Tyner James and Lois Ackerman Professor Purdue University In the US. The blend wall is due to the 10 percent ethanol blend used in the US today [1]. We consume about 138 billion

Ginzel, Matthew

111

Procrastinator Theater, MSU-Bozeman 282B Strand Union Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professor, Dept. of Agricultural Economics & Economics 2:00 ­ 2:20 Coal Bed Methane & Water Quality Issues:20 Agricultural Policy Update Vince Smith, Professor, Dept. of Agricultural Economics & Economics 10:25 ­ 10 Alternative Policies and Pathways to our Energy Future Wallace Tyner, James and Lois Ackerman Professor

Dyer, Bill

112

SSchedule of Classes Spring 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

office in A233 Ackerman Union. In addition to stamp sales, the post office handles services such as money deadline, payments must be made in person at 1125 Murphy Hall and are assessed an additional $50 late fee and is in addition to the amount due each term. To request MIP, students must select it by marking that item

Grether, Gregory

113

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Chris Schwartz 1 , Jay Mace 1 , Roger Marchand 2 , Sally M c Farlane 2 , Matt Shupe 3 , Sergey Matrosov 3 , Min Deng 1 , Yuying Zhang 1 1. University of Utah, 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3. University of Colorado Satellite-derived fluxes provided by Pat Minnis and Surface Radiation Analysis provided by Chuck Long Source Description Name Used in Plots G. Mace VZ, extinction constrained by Raman lidar Mace Bimodal Mace et al, 2006 Combination of retrieval algorithms, parameterizations, and empirical equations Ciret4 Yuying Zhang Retrieval based on reflectivity and radiance Zhang ZR Roger Marchand Retrievals base on reflectivity and Doppler velocity, parameterized for several different ice

114

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Layer Thickness and Temperature Vernon, E.N.(a) and Mace, G.G.(b), University of Utah (a), University of Utah (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

115

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOD06 Cloud Products and the ARM SGP Zhang, Y.(a) and Mace, G.G.(b), University of Utah (a), University of Utah (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

116

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Field Campaigns The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP ICE) was conducted near...

117

lazarus-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ARM CART Site S. M. Lazarus, S. K. Krueger, and G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Pro-...

118

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Experiment (WB57 MidCiX) Mace, G.G.(a) and Heymsfield, A.J.(b), University of Utah (a), National Center for Atmospheric Research (b) Cloud property retrieval algorithms,...

119

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

120

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June, 2012 1. The original ADS GCMS instruments at Mace Head and Cape Grim were retired in December 2004, and replced by new generation of improved GC-MS system. The new GC-MS...

122

Microsoft PowerPoint - McFarquhar_2007.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Ice Crystals during TWP-ICE Greg M. McFarquhar 1 , Junshik Um 1 , Matt Freer 1 , Darrel Baumgardner 2 , Gregory L. Kok 3 and Gerald G. Mace 4 1 Department of Atmospheric...

123

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Parameters Using AVHRR and MODIS Data Coupled With Radar and Lidar Measurements Ou, S.C.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Takano, Y.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), Sassen, K.(b),...

124

Herwig++ 2.0 Release Note.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The transverse momentum of the Z0 boson at the Tevatron calculated by HERWIG6.5 and Herwig++ compared with run I CDF data taken from [7] with and without matrix element corrections. Photon plus jet production, i.e. qq ? ?g, qg ? ?q; Higgs boson production, i... .e. qq/gg ? h0; Higgs boson plus jet production, i.e. gg ? gh0, qg ? qh0 and qq ? gh0; Heavy quark pair production, i.e. qq/gg ? QQ; QCD 2 ? 2 scattering processes, i.e. gg ? gg, gg ? qq, qq ? gg, qg ? qg, qq ? qq, qq ? qq; in addition the W...

Gieseke, Stefan; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Ribon, Alberto; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H; Stephens, Phil; Webber, Bryan R

125

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variability Across the ARM SGP Area Variability Across the ARM SGP Area by Temporal and Spatial Scale C. N. Long and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory J. E. Christy Columbia University New York, New York Introduction The Surface Cloud Grid (SfcCldGrid) value-added product (VAP) uses the output of the Shortwave Flux Analysis VAP (Long and Ackerman 2000, Long et al. 1999, Long 2001) at 15-minute resolution for each of the 21 surface radiometer sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) network area as input. The SfcCldGrid VAP uses the Analytic Approximation interpolation technique of Caracena (1987) to produce a 0.25° × 0.25° grid across the ARM SGP area at 15-minute resolution. (More information about the SfcCldGrid VAP, and an analysis of the interpola-

126

Research Highlights Sorted by Submitter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitter Submitter A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, A. Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance above Arctic Stratus ARM To Be or Not To Be Liquid? The Challenge of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Modeling ARM Tropical Rain Clouds Still a Challenge to Cloud-Resolving Models ARM ASR Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC ARM Ackerman, T. P. Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models ARM Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption ARM Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds ARM Structure of Cirrus Properties and its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere ARM The k-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model ARM Ahlgrimm, M.

127

Ground-Based Radar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Measurement (ARM) Program A Laboratory for the Study of Clouds and Atmospheric Radiation The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program A Laboratory for the Study of Clouds and Atmospheric Radiation Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Why Study Clouds and Radiation? Why Study Clouds and Radiation? * Clouds control the radiation balance of the planet - top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface - Solar reflectivity at TOA and surface transmission - Infrared loss at TOA and surface heating * Cloud feedback processes (how cloud properties change in response to changes in climate forcing) are the most important and least understood component of climate change simulations * Clouds control the radiation balance of the

128

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

129

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

130

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

131

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

132

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Project Descriptions-Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Descriptions-Archive Project Descriptions-Archive Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric J Ackerman (former PNNL) (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

133

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, and P. Yang, 2003: "Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA," Journal of Applied Meteorology 42(6):701-715. The SHEBA experiment in Barrow, Alaska used data collected by the ground-based radiation observations from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). (Photo Credit: SHEBA Project Office) Key Contributors: S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, P. Yang, In the frigid environs of the Acrtic, ARM scientists at the North Slope of

134

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Meeting 2002 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2002, April 2002 St. Petersburg, Florida For proper viewing, extended abstracts should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, S.A. Cloud Phase Determination in the Arctic Using AERI Data ERBE OLR and Cloud Type by Split Window* Ackerman, T.P. A Climatology of Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Using Ground-Based Broadband Radiometric Time-Series*

135

Evaluating the MMF Using CloudSat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi - - scale scale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Tropical Western Pacific Tropical Western Pacific Tom Ackerman Tom Ackerman University of Washington University of Washington Collaborators on the ARM Project Collaborators on the ARM Project Roger Marchand, U. Washington Roger Marchand, U. Washington Steve Klein, LLNL Steve Klein, LLNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Kuan Kuan - - Man Man Xu Xu , NASA Langley , NASA Langley Anning Anning Chen, Hampton University Chen, Hampton University Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Yunyan Zhang, LLNL Yunyan Zhang, LLNL

136

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM2008_norfolk.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties from CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island Zheng Zheng Liu, Roger Liu, Roger Marchand Marchand , and Thomas Ackerman , and Thomas Ackerman University of Washington Sally McFarlane Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 Motivation * Radiative heating is important * Cloud vertical differential heating affects local convective dynamics * Horizontal differential heating helps to maintain large scale tropical dynamics * Challenge and solution * Radiative heating calculation requires information about vertical structures of cloud properties * CloudSat mission: a cloud radar in space provide opportunity to observe vertical structure of cloud in global coverage. * Together with ARM surface measurements, it enable us to compare the heating rates retrievals from different perspectives.

137

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Aerosol Forcing Calculated at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Direct Aerosol Forcing Calculated at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Ackerman, T.P., Flynn, D.M., and Long, C.N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The continuous measurements of direct and diffuse solar radiation, water vapor column amount, and aerosol optical depth provided at the ARM SGP site permit us to calculate directly the actual magnitude of the direct aerosol forcing. Our methodology employs the clear sky detection algorithm of Long and Ackerman (2000) to identify cloudless periods. We then fit the downward solar flux at the surface during these periods with an empirical function, which provides us with a continuous mathematical representation of the surface flux under aerosol conditions. The flux under completely clear

138

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Current Funded Project Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funded Project Descriptions Funded Project Descriptions Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Jointly funded by NASA and DOE Eric J Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

139

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Above Arctic Stratus Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, B van Diedenhoven, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, A Mrowiec, H Morrison, P Zuidema, and MD Shupe. 2012. "A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA case study of mixed-phase Arctic boundary-layer clouds: Entrainment rate limitations on rapid primary ice nucleation processes." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-052.1. Observed and simulated histograms of MMCR radar reflectivity (left) and

140

Microsoft Word - LS-ESH-0052rev 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject: Devalving of compressed gas cylinders Number: LS-ESH-0052 Revision: 2 Effective: 08/05/2008 Page 1 of 1 Prepared By: Keith Klaus Approved By: John Aloi Approved By: Andrew Ackerman *Approval signatures on file with master copy. 1. Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance on safely removing valves (devalving) from empty, inert compressed gas cylinders. Sudden releases of energy have been associated with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resolved Power capture and conversion in line with prediction 11 CF16539GG 1 OCEAN POWER DELIVERY LTD PROJECTS 12 CF16539GG 1 Enersis - Project 1 Enersis Portugal's largest...

142

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information General Guideline  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GG-5, is a record of decisions made by the Director, OC, as to what general subject areas are UCNI. Note: GG-5 may only be used by the Director, OC, to make determinations as to whether information...

143

M1, Material and Electronic Properties of CVD Graphene Grown on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GG6, Thermomagnetic Transport Properties of (AgxSbTex/2+1)15(GeTe)85 Thermoelectric Materials GG7, Thermoelectric Properties of Sn-Rich Pb1?xSnx

144

AA2, O-H-Li-Complex in Hydrothermally Grown Single Crystalline ZnO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GG6, Thermomagnetic Transport Properties of (AgxSbTex/2+1)15(GeTe)85 Thermoelectric Materials GG7, Thermoelectric Properties of Sn-Rich Pb1?xSnx

145

Detection of Cloud-Base Height Using Jenoptik CHM15K and Vaisala CL31 Ceilometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve case studies of multilayer cloud-base height (CBH) retrievals from two collocated ceilometers (Vaisala CL31 and Jenoptik CHM15K) have been analyzed. The studies were performed during the period from September to December 2008 at the Mace ...

Giovanni Martucci; Conor Milroy; Colin D. ODowd

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY performed at sea · Energy density estimated using bomb calorimetry for samples from BASIS and MACE surveys · Confirm ages of age-0 and age-1 pollock using otoliths · Distribution of age-1's further north than age-0

147

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microphysical and Optical Properties from Microphysical and Optical Properties from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers E. Kassianov, J. Barnard, T. Ackerman, C. Flynn, and D. Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) provide measurements of the total and diffuse solar irradiances at six wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, 870 and 940 nm). Direct solar irradiances are inferred by finding the difference between the two measured irradiances, and the direct irradiances are used to derive spectral values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD; Harrison and Michalsky 1994; Alexandrov et al. 2002). Single-scattering albedos (SSAs) can be obtained from diffuse irradiances (Petters et al. 2003).

148

pavloski-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Using a Sun Photometer as a Narrow Field of View, Vertically Pointing, Narrowband Radiometer: Instrument Design and Concept Verification C. F. Pavloski, T. P. Ackerman, S. Kato, and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Sun Photometer, deployed as a vertically pointing, 2° field of view (FOV), shortwave spectral instrument, is capable of recording zenith cloud variability at high temporal resolution. Although the instrument is designed to directly view the sun, the instrument photodiode amplifier can increase the instrument sensitivity sufficiently that it can measure radiances as much as five orders of magnitude smaller than the direct solar

149

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Synchrotron Light Source National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: NSLS Conduct of Operations Manual Number: LS-CO-0001 Revision: B Effective: 10/22/2007 Page 1 of 38 M. Buckley E. Zivogel A. Ackerman S. Dierker Prepared By: Approved By: J. Murphy C-C. Kao Revision Log *Approval signatures on file with master copy. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ........DOE Order 5480.19...........................................................................................2 CHAPTER I ..................OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION ......................3 CHAPTER II.................SHIFT ROUTINES & OPERATING PRACTICES .........................................6 CHAPTER III ...............CONTROL AREA ACTIVITIES......................................................................9

150

EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

EPA Redesigns EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's Enforcement Office. The meeting, attended by representatives of more than 60 organizations, was held to discuss actions addressing AFV emission certification. Specifically, topics included * Conversion emissions perfor- mance data * Status of environmental laws pertaining to alternative fuel

151

Section 19  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite visible satellite image 0530 UTC 27 November 1995 showing the development of the convective cell over Aspley Strait and the westward development of the cirrus anvil. Figure 2. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite visible satellite image 0630 UTC 27 November 1995 showing the westward movement of the convective cell and the further development of the cirrus anvil. Anvil Cirrus Outflow During the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment M. P. Jensen, T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. M. Sekelsky and R. E. McIntosh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts W. L. Ecklund and K. S. Gage

152

Mechanism of G1 arrest in the Drosophilaeye imaginal disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drosophila PCNA gene function. Curr Biol 2003, 13:53-58. 22. Jarman AP, Grau Y, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is a proneural gene that directs chordotonal organ formation in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. Cell 1993, 73:1307-1321. 23. Jarman AP, Grell EH... , Ackerman L, Jan LY, Jan YN: atonal is the proneural gene for Drosophila photoreceptors. Nature 1994, 369:398-400. 24. Gibson MC, Schubiger G: Drosophila peripodial cells, more than meets the eye? Bioessays 2001, 23:691-697. 25. Knoblich JA, Sauer K, Jones...

Escudero, Luis M; Freeman, Matthew

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

OVERVIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER-MIST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by the expansion of the water mist to steam. ... of Operational Parameters for Low Pressure Water Mist ... Back, GG, and Beyler, C. L., A Model for ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Light Scattering Characteristics and Size Distribution of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ian Thomas at CESARE. REFERENCES ... [19] Mulholland, GW, Hartman, AW, Hembree, GG, Marx, E., and Lettieri, T. R., "Development of a one ...

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Impact of Primary Gleason Grade on Risk Stratification for Gleason Score 7 Prostate Cancers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the primary Gleason grade (GG) in Gleason score (GS) 7 prostate cancers for risk of non-organ-confined disease with the goal of optimizing radiotherapy treatment option counseling. Methods: One thousand three hundred thirty-three patients with pathologic GS7 were identified in the Duke Prostate Center research database. Clinical factors including age, race, clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen at diagnosis, and pathologic stage were obtained. Data were stratified by prostate-specific antigen and clinical stage at diagnosis into adapted D'Amico risk groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed evaluating for association of primary GG with pathologic outcome. Results: Nine hundred seventy-nine patients had primary GG3 and 354 had GG4. On univariate analyses, GG4 was associated with an increased risk of non-organ-confined disease. On multivariate analysis, GG4 was independently associated with seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) but not extracapsular extension. Patients with otherwise low-risk disease and primary GG3 had a very low risk of SVI (4%). Conclusions: Primary GG4 in GS7 cancers is associated with increased risk of SVI compared with primary GG3. Otherwise low-risk patients with GS 3+4 have a very low risk of SVI and may be candidates for prostate-only radiotherapy modalities.

Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: bridget.koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tsivian, Matvey [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mouraviev, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sun, Leon [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moul, Judd [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Prostate Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery George G. JudgeSome Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery George G.G. Judge. ed. 2013. An Information Theoretic Approach to

Judge, George G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NIST Part 3.pmd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ilavsky, J., Long, GG, Multiple Small- Angle ... a Symmetrical Segregating Polymer Blend Film Above ... of PVDF/ Acrylic Copolymer Blends Before and ...

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Last Name First Name DeptID Dept Email Phone NSLS-II Site Access Qualified  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Qualified Access Qualified Abel Bruce PSGUEST Photon Sci. Guest bruce_abel@mail.aesys.net Q8095 Auto-Term BNL ESH 5/20/2013 PS ESH 7/2/2012 ESH-740 7/1/2013 GERT 11/26/2012 Abel Donald LSUGUEST LSU GUEST dabel@bnl.gov X9000 Auto-Term BNL ESH 11/5/2012 PS ESH 4/4/2012 ESH-740 1/8/2013 GERT 11/5/2012 Abela Emmanuel PSGUEST Photon Sci. Guest eabela@bnl.gov 344-7150 E8971 Auto-Term BNL ESH 7/9/2008 PS ESH 4/4/2012 ESH-740 5/15/2013 GERT 5/15/2013 Abramowitz Glenn SIUC Union Custodial abramowi@bnl.gov 344-4010 20999 Active BNL ESH 5/16/1994 PS ESH 4/29/2013 ESH-740 3/4/2013 GERT 8/27/2013 Abramowitz Randy LSUGUEST LSU GUEST randy@bnl.gov 344-5464 A0271 Auto-Term BNL ESH 8/9/2012 PS ESH 4/4/2012 ESH-740 8/12/2013 GERT 7/31/2012 Ackerman Andrew PSAB ES&H ackerman@bnl.gov 344-5431 19551 Active BNL ESH 7/27/2012 PS ESH 1/17/2012 ESH-740 5/14/2013

159

ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation govCampaignsColorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Campaign Links STORMVEX Website Related Campaigns Colorado: CFH/CMH Deployment to StormVEx 2011.02.01, Mace, AMF Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx 2010.11.15, Sedlacek, AMF Colorado : Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift 2010.11.15, Massoli, AMF Colorado: Infrared Thermometer (IRT) 2010.11.15, Mace, AMF Colorado: StormVEX Aerosol Size Distribution 2010.11.15, Hallar, AMF Colorado: Direct Measurements of Snowfall 2010.11.15, McCubbin, AMF Colorado: Thunderhead Radiative Flux Analysis Campaign 2010.11.15, Long, AMF Colorado: Ice Nuclei and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Characterization 2010.11.15, Cziczo, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA.

160

Section 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in in ' c n I o n exp (&T in / µ i ) T i,n ' µ i log (I o n / I i,n ) % µ i log (c n ) Session Papers 145 (1) (2) Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction Analysis of Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements A.A. Lacis and B.E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Abstract MACE Analysis of MFRSR Multi-spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements yield detailed time series information on the variations of the column amounts of atmospheric NO 2 and ozone and of aerosol optical depth, including the effective

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Monte Carlo simulation of ion trajectories in the modified PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved design for the present PDX thermal charge exchange analyzer (MACE) has been proposed by one of the authors, in which the five cylindrical electrostatic plates for mass separation are replaced by a single flat, electrostatic deflection plate. An existihg Monte Carlo code that simulated the passage of ions through the MACE analyzer was modified to examine the feasibility of this change. The resulting calculations were used to optimize detector positions and collimation requirements. The first analyzer to be placed on PDX will be of the old design, similar to the present PLT analyzer. However, if the design reported here is successful on the test stand, the future PDX analyzers will all be of the new, single electrostatic plate variety. A further advantage will be the ability to install as many as ten detectors instead of the current five, thus providing twice as many energy channels for each shot. Also, both mass species (H, D) can be measured concurrently, if desired.

Kaita, R.; Davis, S.L.; Medley, S.S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018  

SciTech Connect

We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

Bond, T.C.; Bhardwaj, E.; Dong, R.; Jogani, R.; Jung, S.K.; Roden, C.; Streets, D.G.; Trautmann, N.M. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Performance Analysis Integration in the Uintah Software Development Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], SPASS [32], Vampire [31], and E [22]. Despite these individual achievements, the extreme difficulty (expend more energy in directions that are successful). Second, for unaware observers, a lack of progress 0.6 SPASS 0.99T Vampire 0.24 Bliksem 1.01 SNARK 990218 OtterMACE 4.5 S-SETHEO 0.0 SCOTT 4.4.2 FDP 0

Utah, University of

164

Strong effect of weak diffusion on scalar turbulence at large scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive scalar turbulence forced steadily is characterized by the velocity correlation scale, $L$, injection scale, $l$, and diffusive scale, $r_d$. The scales are well separated if the diffusivity is small, $r_d\\ll l,L$, and one normally says that effects of diffusion are confined to smaller scales, $r\\ll r_d$. However, if the velocity is single scale one finds that a weak dependence of the scalar correlations on the molecular diffusivity persists to even larger scales, e.g. $l\\gg r\\gg r_d$ \\cite{95BCKL}. We consider the case of $L\\gg l$ and report a counter-intuitive result -- the emergence of a new range of large scales, $L\\gg r\\gg l^2/r_d$, where the diffusivity shows a strong effect on scalar correlations.

M. Chertkov; I. Kolokolov; V. Lebedev

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Poster Abstract of Seventeenth ARM STM: Sort by Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Science Team Meeting 7 Science Team Meeting 2007 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Category Cover image Poster Abstract of the Seventeenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2007, March 2007 Monterey, California View poster abstract by Author or Category or Title. 10 Years of External Data ABSTRACT, POSTER Ma, L., Wagener, R., Gregory, L., Liang, M., Tilp, A., and Cialella, A. A Comparison of Broad-band Fluxes at the Main and Auxiliary AMF Sites During the RADAGAST Campaign. ABSTRACT, POSTER Settle, J. A Comparison of Cloud Radar Profiles of Cloud Occurrence with MMF Simulated Radar Profiles as a Function of the Large-Scale Atmospheric State ABSTRACT, POSTER Marchand, R., Beagley, N., and Ackerman, T.

166

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Arctic Stratocumulus Clouds A. Fridlind and A. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California S. Menon and I. Sednev Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California Introduction The October 2004 Multi-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's (ACRF's) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale focused on measuring the properties of autumn transition-season arctic stratus and the environmental conditions controlling them, including concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our work aims to use a large-eddy simulation (LES) code with embedded size-resolved cloud

167

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM AERI with Trent FTS Spectra for the ARM AERI with Trent FTS Spectra for the Measurement of Greenhouse Radiative Fluxes W. F. J. Evans and E. Puckrin Trent University Peterborough, Ontario T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction For the past several years, measurements of the atmospheric thermal infrared spectra have been made at the mid-latitude site of Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, at a high resolution of 0.25 cm -1 . These measurements are similar to those conducted with the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) instrument at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, which has a lower resolution of 1 cm -1 . We compare the ARM AERI spectra with those measured at Trent University for clear-sky conditions, and use the same analysis techniques on both spectra to derive

168

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

169

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water measurements were obtained during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) by Eugene Clothiaux and Tom Ackerman of Penn State University using an ARM microwave radiometer. The radiometer was deployed at Pularumpi, Melville Island (11.55 S, 130.56 E) off the north coast of Australia for November-December 1995. Time series of these results are shown in Figure 1. Time series of integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) and liquid

170

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

171

Progress on an ARM/GCSS/SPARC TWP-ICE Monsoon Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Progress on an ARM/GCSS/SPARC TWP-ICE Monsoon Case Study Ann Fridlind and Andrew Ackerman ann.fridlind@nasa.gov * www.giss.nasa.gov/∼fridlind Introduction Source: Lori Chappel, Australian BOM The Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) assembled aircraft and ground instruments at the DOE-ARM long-term site in Darwin, Australia during the 2005/2006 monsoon, and the early part of the campaign encountered active monsoon conditions (left). The goal of this work is to help develop a model intercomparison case study that can be carried out jointly by three organizations: the ARM cloud modeling working group, the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) deep convective clouds group, and the Stratospheric Processes and Their Role in Climate (SPARC) group. Case description ◮ idealized maritime convection (specified SST) ◮ large-scale forcing data from

172

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. G. Ellingson and E. E.Takara Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction We are concerned with three-dimensional (3D) effects of longwave (LW) radiative transfer (RT) through inhomogeneous clouds. In cloud models, LW RT is typically calculated under the independent

173

ARM Science Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0402 ER-ARM-0402 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program Thomas P. Ackerman, Lead Author Anthony D. Del Genio Gregory M. McFarquhar Robert G. Ellingson Peter J. Lamb Richard A. Ferrare Charles N. Long Steve A. Klein Johannes Verlinde October 2004 United States Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Executive Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative

174

hagan-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerobot-based Measurements of the Profile of Aerobot-based Measurements of the Profile of Downwelling Shortwave Irradiance D. Hagan, J.-F. Blavier, and D. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California L. Di Girolamo University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois T. P. Ackerman The Pennsylvania State University College Park, Pennsylvania Summary Using a helium plus reversible fluid balloon system as the observing platform, multiple profiles of shortwave irradi- ance between 4 km and 10 km were recently obtained over the Los Angeles basin. Measurements of downwelling hemispheric broadband irradiance were made over a period of 6 hours in conditions that could be characterized by a mid-latitude, summer model atmosphere. These data are described and compared to model computations using a

175

An Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of MWR Retrievals Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor R. T. Marchand and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction This paper offers some observations on the quality of Microwave Radiometer (MWR) retrievals of precipitable water vapor (PWV) and liquid water path (LWP). The paper shows case study comparisons between the standard "statistical" approach and those obtained using an iterative solution of the microwave radiative transfer equations. These examples show how improvements in the retrieval of LWP can be obtained by using an iterative approach, but that possible improvements are limited by the accuracy of the forward model absorption coefficients and errors in the brightness temperature measurements. Each of these effects limits the

176

Microsoft Word - McFarlane-SA.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Water Cloud Retrievals - A Bayesian Approach Liquid Water Cloud Retrievals - A Bayesian Approach S. A. McFarlane and K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado A. S. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffet Field, California Introduction We developed a new algorithm to retrieve properties of non-precipitating liquid water clouds from millimeter wave radar and Microwave Radiometer (MWR) data using Bayes' theorem of conditional probability. Bayes' theorem relates the inverse problem (retrieving cloud properties from remote- sensing observations) to the forward problem (modeling remote-sensing observations given a set of cloud properties). It also formally includes prior information about cloud microphysics, with this information explicitly modeled by a probability distribution function in the parameter space, not hidden

177

Section 26  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Applications of Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Measurements W. L. Smith, S. A. Ackerman, D. H. DeSlover, W. F. Feltz, S. Ho, R. O. Knuteson and H. E. Revercomb Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin S. A. Clough Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data systems may not be available (e.g., the boundary sites of the are being used to study meteorological processes in the Southern Great Plains [SGP] CART). This technique Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), the quasi-continuous sound associates temperature and water vapor structure in an

178

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Energetics of Clustered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Energetics of Clustered Damage Sites Molecular Energetics of Clustered Damage Sites Authors and Institutions: Principal Investigator: Dr. Michel Dupuis (PNNL) Co-investigators: Professor John H. Miller (WSU Tri-Cities), Professor Robert D. Stewart (Purdue University), Dr. Maciej S. Gutowski (PNNL), Dr. Eric J. Ackerman (PNNL); Collaborators: Mr. Matt Hernst (WSU Tri-Cities), Dr. Vladimir A. Semenenko (Purdue University), Mr. Maciej Haranczyk (Gdansk University , Poland), Mr. Rafal A. Bachorz (Poznan University, Poland), and Ms. Iwona Dabkowska (Gdansk University, Poland). Project: The goal of this project is to provide critical information to help characterize clustered damage sites relative to singly damaged sites with respect to their susceptibility to DNA repair. The premise is that differences in base pairing rules and mutagenic properties of singly and

179

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHOTON SCIENCES PHOTON SCIENCES Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Environmental Management Systems Number: PS-ESH-0059 Revision: 1 Effective: 6/6/2012 Page 1 of 3 The only official copy of this document is on line on the PS website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the effective date on the PS website. Lori Stiegler Approved By: Andrew Ackerman *Approval signatures on file with master copy. Revision Log Frequently Asked Questions about Environmental Management Systems Background: BNL's location in the heart of the L.I. Pine Barrens and in a deep ground water recharge area provides strong incentive to ensure proper control of the environmental aspects of all work done on site. BNL management has committed to an Environmental Management

180

Section 46  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Water Vapor Continuum Absorption on Tropical Effects of Water Vapor Continuum Absorption on Tropical Atmosphere Destabilization J.H. Mather, T.P. Ackerman, and G.S. Young Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The stability of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropi- cal western pacific has been an issue of considerable interest. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this stability including the egulation of solar radiation by cirrus clouds (Ramanathan and Collins 1991). The feedback between SST and cloud cover in the cirrus regulation scheme To study the hypothesis that the IR cooling profile can is an enhanced column absorption of infrared (IR) radiation destabilize the tropical atmosphere, clear sky radiative transfer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Progress on a TWP-ICE Monsoon Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25-mb 25-mb large-scale forcing 10-mb large-scale forcing Tracers Future work Progress on a TWP-ICE Monsoon Case Study Ann Fridlind and Andrew Ackerman * NASA GISS thanks to Jon Petch * ECMWF Shaocheng Xie * LLNL TWP-ICE and ACTIVE Science Teams DOE ARM Program and Data Archive NASA Radiation Sciences Program NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division 18th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 10 March 2008 Outline Introduction 25-mb large-scale forcing 10-mb large-scale forcing Tracers Future work 1 Introduction TWP-ICE monsoon period GISS set-up 2 25-mb large-scale forcing Initial results Comparison with ECMWF forcing style Tropopause moisture analysis 3 10-mb large-scale forcing Tropopause moisture analysis Final results 4 Tracers Measurements Model results 5 Future work Outline Introduction 25-mb large-scale forcing 10-mb large-scale forcing Tracers Future work TWP-ICE monsoon

182

poster.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POSTER POSTER #8C * ANVIL PROPERTIES OF MONSOONAL AND BREAK DEEP CONVECTION DURING TWP-ICE Ann Fridlind and Andrew Ackerman * ann.fridlind@nasa.gov * NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 INTRODUCTION We aim to simulate four casees of deep convection observed during the TWP-ICE IOP with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) that includes size-resolved aerosol, liquid, and ice particle types. We begin here with liquid-phase bulk micro- physics [Wyant et al., 1997]. Monsoon cases are prone to midlevel saturated layer formation due to large-scale forcings. Break (Hector) anvil fluxes are sensitive to closed versus open boundary conditions, but peak updrafts reached are not. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS * Satellite images courtesy Pat Minnis/NASA Langley * Soundings courtesy Christian Jakob/Australian BoM * Large-scale forcings courtesy Shaocheng Xie/LLNL * Surface

183

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2011. "Influence of humidified aerosol on lidar depolarization measurements below ice-precipitating Arctic stratus." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(10), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-037.1. Correlated MMCR radar reflectivities and DABUL lidar depolarizations below cloud base calculated with a reasonably low number of large, coarse-mode

184

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817, doi:10.1029/2006GL027869. In March 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility recorded the strongest Saharan dust storm to reach the Niamey area in two years. The storm lasted several days, and visibility was reduced to 15 percent of normal. Observations (solid lines and star symbols) and results from two models

185

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Abstract Title: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair (PNNL Project # 42699) Authors: Eric J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Institutions: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA We developed a functional assay to measure the effects of LDR on repair of many different lesions representative of those found in cells as consequences of normal oxidative metabolism, as well as those caused by radiation. Currently only 1/10th attomole =105 damaged molecules/cell and 3000 cells/measurement are required. We have found that even low doses (10 rad) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. Interestingly, the amount of DNA repair increases at 10-50 rads, plateaus, and then increases even further at higher doses well below doses where radiation-induced lethality

186

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

187

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data in Niamey E. Kassianov, T. Ackerman, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction One of the key uncertainties in the earth's radiation balance is the effect of dust on radiative fluxes (aerosol radiative forcing), which in turn affects climatic processes on both planetary and local scales (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2001; Sokolik et al. 2001). Since Saharan dust is one of the main sources of dust over the globe, its radiative effect has long been the subject of intensive studies. Recently, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed to Niamey, Niger, to participate in a large field campaign directed at elucidating the radiative effect of Saharan dust

188

Published Research 2013 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published Research 2013 Published Research 2013 Most publications are in Adobe Portable Document Format. Download Adobe Reader. For more information about any of these publications, please contact the Neutrons Sciences Communications Office. Primary Author Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman D., Heberle F. A., Feigenson G. W., "Limited perturbation of a DPPC bilayer by fluorescent lipid probes: a molecular dynamics study", Journal of Physical Chemistry B 117, 4844-4852. Aczel A. A., Bugaris D. E., Li L., Yan J.-Q., Cruz C. dela, Loye H.-C. zur, Nagler S. E., "Frustration by competing interactions in the highly distorted double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B'=Ru, Os)", Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics 87, 014435. Aczel A. A., Bugaris D. E., Yeon J., Cruz C. dela, Loye H.-C. zur,

189

dong(2)-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Validation of Cloud Microphysical Retrievals from Surface- and Satellite-Based Measurements Obtained During the Fall of 96 Penn State Aircraft Experiment X. Dong Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, Virginia E. E. Clothiaux, N. Miles, J. Verlinde, and T. P. Ackerman The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania P. Minnis NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Comparisons with aircraft in situ measurements are critically needed to quantify the uncertainties in Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) surface-and satellite-band retrievals of cloud properties. During the fall of 1996, measurements were made from a ground-based remote sensing site in central Pennsylvania in conjunction

190

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of High Spectral Resolution Infrared Cloud Boundary Algorithms A Comparison of High Spectral Resolution Infrared Cloud Boundary Algorithms using S-HIS and AERI Measurements Holz, R.E.(a), Antonelli, P.(a), Ackerman, S.(a), McGill, M.J.(a), Nagel, F.(a), Feltz, W.F.(a), and Turner, D.D.(b), Univeristy of Wisconsin, Madison (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud top pressure is an important parameter in determining the radiative impact of clouds on climate. In addition, atmospheric temperature and moister retrievals of cloudy scenes using high spectral resolution data require the cloud altitude be known. The S-HIS is scheduled to fly on the Proteus during the upcoming M-PACE experiment. In addition to the SHIS a lidar system and an imager will accompany the SHIS during MPACE. This paper

191

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiance Using Remotely Sensed Cloud Properties From Irradiance Using Remotely Sensed Cloud Properties From ARM's SGP Site Barker, H.W., Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada; Li, Z., Canada Centre for Remote Sensing; Clothiaux, E.E., and Ackerman, T.P., The Pennsylvania State University; Kato, S., National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Time series of profiles of cloud water content and droplet effective radii have been inferred from data obtained by a 35-GHz radar and a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. These profiles initialize a Monte Carlo algorithm that predicts time series of broadband surface solar irradiance, which in turn are compared with coeval measurements. Special attention is

192

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds K. Ivanova Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Ausloos University of Liège B-4000 Liège, Belgium Abstract We present a method on how to derive an underlying mathematical (statistical or model free) equation for a liquid water path (LWP) signal directly from empirical data. The evolution of the probability density functions (PDFs) from small to large time scales is explicitly derived in the framework of Fokker-Planck equation. A drift and a diffusion term describing the deterministic and stochastic influences on the non-Gaussian fat tails of the liquid water probability distributions are obtained from

193

BNL | Deborah Keszenman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deborah Keszenman Deborah Keszenman Research Interests Clustered DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation of different LET and energies. Lethal and mutagenic effects induced by oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells. Characterization and analysis of the repair pathways involved in the processing of DNA damage induced by oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells. Interrelation between stress responses in eukaryotic cells. Recent News Women @ Energy: Deborah Keszenman Pereyra Sarah Ackerman Explores How Cells Fare in Space Selected Publications Keszenman D.J., B.M. Sutherland Yields of Clustered DNA Damage Induced by Charged-Particle Radiations of Similar Kinetic Energy per Nucleon: LET Dependence in Different DNA Microenvironments. Radiation Research, 174:238-250 (2010). Bracesco N., Candreva E.C., Keszenman D., Sanchez A.G., Soria S.,

194

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Materials Science Staff Chemical and Materials Science Staff The Chemical and Materials Science staff members at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory work within one of five groups: the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, the Materials Science Group, the Process Technology and Advanced Concepts Group, and the Fuel Cells Group. Access the staff members' background, areas of expertise, and contact information below. Jao van de Lagemaat Director Marisa Howe Project Specialist Chemical & Nanoscale Science Group Nicole Campos Administrative Professional Paul Ackerman Natalia Azarova Brian Bailey Matthew C. Beard Matt Bergren Raghu N. Bhattacharya Julio Villanueva Cab Rebecca Callahan Russ Cormier Ryan Crisp Alex Dixon Andrew J. Ferguson Arthur J. Frank

195

Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6/6/12 Page 1 of 2 The only official copy of this file is the one on-line in the PS website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document effective date on the PS website Prepared By: L. Stiegler Approved By: A. Ackerman Revision Log Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Background: Everyone benefits from having a safe and healthy workplace. Laboratory management is strongly committed to operating BNL in a manner that ensures the health and safety of all personnel, and has

196

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level cloud, and upper troposphere water vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D16105, doi:10.1029/2008JD009905. Figure 1: Diurnal anomalies for tropical (left) ocean and (right) land: (top) the precipitation index (PI), high-level cloud (CLD) and upper

197

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, S. A. Ackerman, H. E. Revercomb, H. Woolf, and H. Howell Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Inter- ferometer (AERI) have been analyzed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Fourier Transform Data Analysis Tools science team project under the direction of William L. Smith of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The data consist of observations of the downwelling infrared emission at the surface from gaseous atmospheric constituents and from cloud and particulate aerosols. The observations are at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution over the

198

clements-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru: The Second ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site Nauru: The Second ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site W. E. Clements, F. J. Barnes, and L. Jones ARM Tropical Western Pacific Program Office University of California Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico M. Ivey Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California A. Koontz Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington T. P. Ackerman and J. H. Mather The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania P. Lefale South Pacific Regional Environmental Progamme Apia, Western Samoa A. Pitcher and J. Cain Nauru Department of Island Development and Industry Nauru Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation (a) Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 as part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric

199

Section 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerobot Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerobot Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Shortwave Irradiance D. Hagan, J. Blavier, M. Heun, J. Jones, D. McGee, K. Nock, R. West, J. Wu and A. Yavrouian Jet Propulson Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California T. P. Ackerman and E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania We have used a reversible fluid helium balloon system to test flight was to characterize the instrument response that obtain measurements of global shortwave irradiance with resulted from platform motion, and radiometer orientation height. A reversible fluid balloon is a type of robotic sensors were mounted near the shortwave sensors. The aerovehicle or "aerobot" that comprises a primary helium aerobot was launched from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

200

barker-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overlapping Cloud: What Radars Give Overlapping Cloud: What Radars Give and What Models Require H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Ontario, Canada E. E. Clothiaux, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Q. Fu Dalhousie University Halifx, Nova Scotia, Canada Introduction Large-scale models (LSMs) of earth's atmosphere parameterize clouds and radiative transfer for domains measuring thousands of square kilometers. For domains this large, assumptions regarding vertical structure of non-overcast clouds are crucial for radiation budgets. Uni-directional cloud- profiling radars (CPRs) can yield information about the vertical structure of clouds but regardless of whether they are at the surface or on a satellite, they sample clouds very differently than how they are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft PowerPoint - Zheng_roj_edits_v3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties from Properties from A Comparison of Heating Rates and Related Cloud Properties from CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island Zheng Liu, Roger Marchand, Thomas Ackerman University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean Introduction Introduction Radiative heating is an important processes linking cloud, water vapor and tropical dynamics in both local and large-scale circulation. Here we analyze retrieved cloud properties and radiative heating rates from both ARM and CloudSat. These retrievals differ due to both the different measurement perspectives and retrieval schemes used. Ze Ze comparison: comparison: Categorized heating rates and cloud water content Categorized heating rates and cloud water content

202

Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area J. E. Christy, C. N. Long, and T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Interpolation Grids Across the SGP Network Area The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a network of surface radiation measurement sites across north central Oklahoma and south central Kansas. This Southern Great Plains (SGP) network consists of 21 sites unevenly spaced from 95.5 to 99.5 degrees west longitude, and from 34.5 to 38.5 degrees north latitude. We use the technique outlined by Long and Ackerman (2000) and Long et al. (1999) to infer continuous estimates of clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) irradiance, SW cloud effect, and daylight fractional sky cover for each

203

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Broken Clouds: Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Broken Clouds: Validation Tests E. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction An approach for the stochastic description of the solar radiation transfer through broken fields with the arbitrary horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity have been introduced (Kassianov 2000). Different combinations of the random and maximum cloud overlap can be treated by the suggested approach. We derived the approximated equations for both the mean direct and diffuse solar radiance on the basis of the stochastic transfer equation and a new statistically inhomogeneous Makovian model of broken clouds. In this paper we estimate the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations by using

204

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Absorption of NIR Solar Radiation by Precipitation The Absorption of NIR Solar Radiation by Precipitation Evans, W.F.J.(a) and Puckrin, E.(b), Physics Department, Trent University (a), DRDC,Canada (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting It has recently been shown by Ackerman (Physics Today; 2003) that good radiation codes can model the absorption of up to 100 W/m2 of short wave by clouds. However, spectral measurements of the transmission of solar infrared radiation through clear and cloudy skies with FTIR spectroscopy have indicated that still are certain clouds which absorb unexpectedly large amounts of near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The amounts are unexpected in the sense that radiation codes, including sophisticated algorithms such as MODTRAN4, do not model this strong NIR absorption effect. The absorption

205

BERAC Meeting December 3-4, 2002 Washington, DC | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

3-4, 2002 Washington, DC 3-4, 2002 Washington, DC Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting December 3-4, 2002 Washington, DC Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting December 3-4, 2002 Washington, DC Agenda .pdf file (6KB) Presentations Genomes to Life Facilities Marvin Frazier, DOE .ppt file (5.0MB), User Facilities for 21st Century Systems Biology Eric Ackerman, PNNL .ppt file (1.9MB), Facility I: Production and Characterization of Proteins Michelle Buchanan, ORNL .ppt file (4.3MB), Facility II: Whole Proteome Analysis Lee Makowski, ANL .ppt file (8.5MB), Characterization and Imaging of

206

carlson-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Spectral Cloud Property Retrieval Multi-Spectral Cloud Property Retrieval B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York R. Lynch Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts Introduction Despite numerous studies to retrieve cloud properties using infrared measurements the information content of the data has not yet been fully exploited. Nonetheless, infrared retrievals provide the best means to examine diurnal variations in cloud properties as well as to examine seasonal changes at high latitudes. Thermal infrared brightness temperature (T b ) difference techniques, such as the split-window (Inoue 1985; Prabhakara et al. 1988) and the tri-spectral (Ackerman et al. 1990; Strabala et al. 1994), have been used for years to estimate the optical depth (τ) and/or effective radius (r

207

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions of Cirrus Cloud Formation Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock, J. M., T. P. Ackerman, and D. D. Turner, 2004: Evidence of high ice supersaturation in cirrus clouds using ARM Raman lidar measurements. Geophys. Res. Letters, doi:10.1029/2004GL019705. To illustrate their findings, a continuous nine-hour segment of Raman lidar measurements showed upper tropospheric RHI measurements ranging from 120% near cloud tops and decreasing to about 70% at cloud base. To study the link between water vapor, cirrus cloud formation (homogenous and heterogenous) mechanisms, and their potential climatic impacts,

208

ARM - VAP Process - sfccldgrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productssfccldgrid Productssfccldgrid Documentation & Plots Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Surface Cloud Grid (SFCCLDGRID) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models The Surface Cloud Grid VAP uses as input the 15-minute output from the Shortwave Flux Analysis VAP (Long, 2001; Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long et al., 1999) from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central and Extended Facilities. It applies a multi-pass weighted sum analytic approximation technique (Caracena, 1987), which uses Gaussian weighting and an imposed scale length, to interpolate to a 0.25 degree by 0.25 degree lat/long grid

209

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? Even low doses (0.1 Gy) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. The first-known oxidative lesion repaired only by nucleotide excision repair found in normal cells is cyclo-dA. This lesion is found in normal cells and thought to be a byproduct of oxidative metabolism. When this lesion occurs, it stimulates repair. If repair is stimulated by low dose radiation, there are some implications for human health. For example, do some individuals exhibit a greater, lower, or no stimulation to certain DNA lesions? If there are population polymorphism that influence DNA repair, then it would be possible to use our assay for screening individuals for repair sensitivity.

210

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling Shortwave and Longwave C.N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Previous work (Long and Ackerman 2000; Long 2004) has concentrated on estimating the downwelling clear-sky irradiances and calculating the effect of clouds on the downwelling radiative energy budget. However, cloud forcing is defined for the difference between clear- and cloudy-sky net radiation, which includes the upwelling components. Thus, if we are to estimate the surface radiative cloud forcing, the means must be developed to estimate what the upwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance would be if the clouds were not present. Estimating the upwelling longwave (LW) is particularly troublesome in

211

Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Advanced Search Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Documents Found: 4418 Title Keyword LBNL Number Author - Any - Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, J W Adams, Carl Adamson, Bo Addy, Nathan Addy, Susan E Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari,

212

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation S. Kinne and R. Bergstrom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinne and R. Bergstrom Kinne and R. Bergstrom NASA-Ames Research Center Moffett Field. CA 94035-1000 T. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802 Abstract Radiation measurements at the surface and simultaneous ground-based measurements of the atmosphere during the FIRE'91 (a) cirrus field experiment provided an opportunity to identify essential measurements and deficiencies in parameterizations of current cloud-radiation models. Comparisons between measured and calculated broadband surface fluxes demonstrate the need for 1) accurate humidity and temperature vertical profiles, 2) data that capture the 3-dimensional structure and vertical extinction of clouds, and 3) additional airborne measurements. in-situ cloud microphysical measurements and radiation measurements near the tropopause (taken

213

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building 725 Fire Hazard Analysis/Fire Hazard Assessment Number: LS-ESH-0068 Revision: 1 Effective: 7/15/2009 Page 1 of 18 Prepared By: Robert Chmiel Approved By: Andrew Ackerman Approved By: Joe Levesque *Approval signatures on file with master copy. Revision Log Purpose/Scope The purpose of this Assessment is to comprehensively and qualitatively assess the risk from fire within the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to ensure DOE fire safety objectives are met. DOE fire protection criteria are outlined in DOE Order 420.1. The Fire Protection Assessment includes identifying the risks from fire and related hazards (direct flame impingement, hot gases, smoke migration, fire-fighting water damage, etc.). A Fire Hazard

214

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Science Team Meeting 6 Science Team Meeting 1996 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Proceedings of the Sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting DOE CONF-9603149, March 1996 San Antonio, Texas For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. Poster abstracts are not available online for this year. However, if you would like to request a copy of a specific poster abstract, please contact the Web Administrator. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, T.P. A Comparison Between Clear Sky Shortwave Flux Calculations and Observations During ARESE

215

Section 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Observed Clear-Sky Surface Irradiance with Theoretical Computations S. Kato, T. P. Ackerman, E. E. Clothiaux and J. H. Mather Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The accuracy to which clear sky shortwave fluxes can be com- puted is not well known. We performed a detailed compari- son between the measured and modeled downward shortwave irradiances at the surface, including the total, direct beam, and diffuse field irradiance. We also compared modeled and measured values of the diffuse-total ratio. Data and Model We used radiation data taken during the Atmospheric Radia- tion Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). We constructed the total irradiance by adding the

216

Microsoft Word - luo-y1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Detrainment and Microphysics Evaluation of Detrainment and Microphysics Parameterization in the NCEP GFS Single-Column Model Y. Luo National Institute of Aerospace Hampton, Virginia S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Representation of clouds in current General Circulation Models (GCMs) needs evaluation and improvement for climate prediction (e.g., Cess et al. 1996). Cloud Resolving Models (CRM) and Single Column Models (SCMs) along with new valuable observational datasets are useful tools for this objective (Randall et al. 1996, Randall 2003). Large-scale forcing data produced by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM; Stokes and Schwartz 1994, Ackerman and Stokes 2003) program at the Southern Great Plains site for the summer 1997 Intensive Operation Period (IOP) were used to drive a

217

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase Determination in the Arctic Using AERI Data Phase Determination in the Arctic Using AERI Data D. D. Turner and S. A. Ackerman Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin - Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Cloud-radiative processes in the Arctic have a large and significant effect on the global energy budget. Curry et al. (1996) have identified cloud phase as one of the primary unknowns, which affects the radiation budget in the Arctic. To correctly determine cloud properties, such as particle size and condensed water path that dictate the cloud's radiative effects, the cloud phase must be accurately determined. However, the presence of highly reflecting snow and ice, together with a persistent temperature inversion that exists much of the year, hampers the ability to remotely detect cloud phase.

218

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Fair-Weather Cumulus Cloud Field Effect of Fair-Weather Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Radiative Surface Fluxes L. M. Hinkelman and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania K. F. Evans Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Recently, substantial efforts have been made to determine the impact of three-dimensional (3D) cloud structure on atmospheric radiative transfer. Unfortunately, 3D high-resolution measurements of cloud field structure are not available for use in these studies. As a result, research in this area has frequently been based on simple stochastic cloud models (e.g., bounded cascades) or extrapolations of two-

219

Microsoft PowerPoint - KLEIN_ARM_STM08_POSTER.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

average both SCMs average both SCMs and CRMs underestimate the amount of supercooled water by a factor of 3. Models simulations of ice water path are more consistent with observations. Liquid Water Path Versus Ice Water Path Liquid Water Path Versus Ice Water Path liquid water path (g m -2 ) ice water path (g m -2 ) 171 A = Aircraft S = Radar/Lidar retrievals (Shupe) W = Radar/Lidar retrievals (Wang) Observational Uncertainty Rectangle Symbol Key for Models Symbol Key for Observations LLNL-POST-401952 This work is supported by the Office of Science of the United States Department of Energy as part of the ARM program. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Co-Authors Andy Ackerman, Alex Avramov, Gijs

220

sekelsky-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radar Calibration Validation for the SGP CART Radar Calibration Validation for the SGP CART Summer 1998 DC-8 Cloud Radar Experiment S. M. Sekelsky, L. Li, and G. A. Sadowy University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts S. L. Durden, S. J. Dindardo, and F. K. Li National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, California A. C. Huffman III and G. L. Stephens Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado H. W. Rosenberger, D. M. Babb, and T. P. Ackerman The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction During June 1998, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the University of Massachusetts (UMass), and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) participated in a joint field program designed to intercompare the calibrations of 95-GHz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

222

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Science Team Meeting 2 Science Team Meeting 1992 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Proceedings of the Second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting DOE CONF-9110336, October 26-30, 1992 Denver, Colorado For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, T. An Integrated Cloud Observation and Modeling Investigation in Support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Tropical Western Pacific Project: Status Albrecht, B.

223

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

224

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Science Team Meeting 7 Science Team Meeting 1997 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Seventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1997, March 1997 San Antonio, Texas For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. Poster abstracts are not available online for this year. However, if you would like to request a copy of a specific poster abstract, please contact the Web Administrator. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Acharya, P. Spectral Resolution Effects on Solar Irradiance Calculations Ackerman, S.A.

225

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Science Team Meeting 4 Science Team Meeting 1994 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Proceedings of the Fourth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting DOE CONF-940277, March 1994 Charleston, South Carolina For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abreu, L.W. MODTRAN3: Suitability as a Flux-Divergence Code Acharya, P. MODTRAN3: Suitability as a Flux-Divergence Code Ackerman, S.A. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods

226

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and the Residual Clear-Sky Aerosols and the Residual Clear-Sky Insolation Discrepancy T. P. Charlock National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia F. G. Rose and D. A. Rutan Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Abstract The "clear-sky insolation discrepancy" surfaced a few years ago: several well-regarded theoretical simulations (sound radiative transfer codes and carefully measured inputs for them) produced values for clear-sky shortwave (SW) insolation that exceeded measurements from 20 to 30 Wm -2 . Now, by both carefully screening (Long-Ackerman) the radiometer observations and including the record of the newly installed Eppley Black and White (B&W) pyranometer, we find theory exceeding observations by

227

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

228

kato-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface A Comparison of Modeled and Measured Surface Shortwave Irradiance for a Molecular Atmosphere S. Kato* and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania *Now at Hampton University Hampton, Virginia E. G. Dutton NOAA-Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory Boulder, Colorado N. Laulainen and N. Larson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction There is a growing body of evidence that models overestimate clear-sky downward shortwave surface irradiances (Charlock and Alberta 1996, Kato et al. 1997, Kinne et at. 1997, Wild et al. 1981). Kato et al. (1997) showed that their model, with the best available gaseous absorption cross section data, accurately computes direct irradiance provided that the model has as input accurate

229

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heating Rates in Mid-Latitude Cirrus Cloud Heating Rates in Mid-Latitude Cirrus Cloud Calculated from Retrieved Cirrus Microphysical Properties Z. Wang Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center University of Maryland, Baltimore County College Park, Maryland K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Cirrus clouds affect the surface and top-of-atmosphere energy budgets strongly through albedo and greenhouse effects, and can produce large local variations in atmospheric heating with heating at cloud bottom and cooling at cloud top (Liou 1986; Webster and Stephens 1980). Starr and Cox (1985) found that radiative modulation of local buoyancy through horizontal structure affects the structure and bulk properties of cirrus. Ackerman et al. (1988) have indicated that heating rates in tropical anvils are more

230

X:\ARM_19~1\P273-281.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RH RH c ) RH c RH c RH c Session Papers 273 Evaluation of Cloud Prediction and Determination of Critical Relative Humidity for a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model N. L. Seaman, Z. Guo, and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Predictions of cloud occurrence and vertical location from the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) were evaluated statistically using cloud observations obtained at Coffeyville, Kansas, as part of the Second International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment campaign. Seventeen cases were selected for simulation during a November-December 1991 field study. MM5 was used to produce two sets of

231

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Model Development Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Smith-Mrowiec, A. A., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mrowiec AA, C Rio, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, AD Del Genio, OM Pauluis, AC Varble, and J Fan. 2012. "Analysis of cloud-resolving simulations of a tropical mesoscale convective system observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical fluxes and draft properties in convective and stratiform regions." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D19201, doi:10.1029/2012JD017759.

232

TWP93.0100104 DOC#: TWP-DOC-1.4 SCIENCE AND SITING STRATEGY FOR THE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TWP93.0100104 TWP93.0100104 DOC#: TWP-DOC-1.4 SCIENCE AND SITING STRATEGY FOR THE TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC ARM CART LOCALE Thomas P. Ackerman The Pennsylvania State University Bill Clements Fairley Barnes Los Alamos National Laboratory David S. Renné National Renewable Energy laboratory Science and Siting Strategy for the Tropical Western Pacific ARM CART Locale Ackennan, T., B. Clements, F. Barnes, and D. Renne DISCLAIMER This is a working document of the Tropical Western Pacific Program of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. It is updated periodically and this release may not reflect the most current status of the program. It should not be quoted without consultation with the authors and specific reference to this disclaimer.

233

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lidar Remote Sensing of Cirrus Clouds at the Southern Great Plains Site: Lidar Remote Sensing of Cirrus Clouds at the Southern Great Plains Site: Comparisons of Extinction and Backscatter Coefficients Derived Using Raman and Backscatter Lidar Technique Comstock, J.M.(a), Fu, Q.(b), Turner, D.D.(c), and Ackerman, T.P.(a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington (b), University of Wisconsin/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory(c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity of cirrus clouds is an important issue in radiation modeling and the representation of cirrus clouds in general circulation models (GCMs). Lidar remote sensing is a useful tool for determining the vertical structure of cirrus clouds. Backscatter

234

Microsoft Word - kassianov_3_-ei.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brightness Fields in Statistically Inhomogeneous Clouds Brightness Fields in Statistically Inhomogeneous Clouds E. I. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The angular structure of reflected and transmitted radiation provides important information needed for remote sensing of a cloudy atmosphere. The model angular distributions of radiation can be obtained by direct numeric simulation of three-dimensional (3D) clouds and radiation (numerical averaging), and the equations for the mean radiance (analytical averaging). The advantage of numerical averaging is that the needed statistical parameters of a radiation field may be obtained for any cloud model with accuracy as high as necessary. This makes it possible to use this direct method to estimate the accuracy

235

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of Boundary-Layer Cloud Field Anisotropy Studies of Boundary-Layer Cloud Field Anisotropy for Radiative Transfer L. M. Hinkelman and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania K. F. Evans Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado T. P. Ackerman Environmental and Health Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Radiative transfer and heating in the cloudy atmosphere depend on the specific three-dimensional (3D) structure of the cloud field in question. However, detailed 3D cloud field measurements are rare. As a result, studies of 3D radiative transfer through clouds have frequently assumed that the spatial characteristics of cloud fields are isotropic in the horizontal dimensions. To investigate the validity of

236

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Angle Remote Sensing of Cumulus Geometry Multi-Angle Remote Sensing of Cumulus Geometry E. I. Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington and Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia T. P. Ackerman and R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Satellite remote sensing is the major source for statistics of cloud properties; however, accurate and robust methods for extracting both optical and geometrical characteristics of broken clouds have yet to be fully developed. Currently, most broken cloud retrieval schemes rely on spectral (e.g., microwave, visible, or infrared [IR]) observations from near-vertically pointing remote sensors (Rossow 1989; Minnis et al. 1992). Although the multi-spectral techniques can provide accurate retrievals of cloud

237

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar and Microwave Radiometer Data From the Southern Great Plains M. Sengupta and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Clouds are important players in the global radiation budget with low-level water clouds being one of the most influential types. Classified as stratocumulus and stratus, these water clouds cover 34% of oceans and 18% of land at any given time (Considine et al. 1997). A 50% plus global coverage, a high albedo when compared to the ocean, and temperatures comparable to the surface causes the low stratiform clouds to provide about 60% of the annually averaged net cloud radiative forcing (Hartmann et al.

238

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Abstracts sorted by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Meeting 2005 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Fifteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2005, March 2005 Daytona Beach, Florida For proper viewing, extended abstracts should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). View session papers by Author or Title. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou, W. Determination of Aerosol and Surface Reflectance Characteristics at the ARM CART Site Using MISR Observations* Ackerman, A. Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Arctic

239

Section 41  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Figure 1. WSI cloud fraction for algorithm identified clear sky from April 1994 IOP. Detection of Clear Skies Using Total and Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance: Calculations of Shortwave Cloud Forcing and Clear Sky Diffuse Ratio C.N. Long and T.P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania The effect of clouds on the shortwave (SW) irradiance near the surface is of interest for surface radiative energy budget studies (Long et al. 1994) and investigation of the recently suggested excess SW cloud absorption (Cess et al. 1995; Ramanathan et al. 1995; Pilewski and Valero 1995). One measure of the effect of clouds is cloud forcing: the difference between clear (i.e., cloudless) sky irradiance and measured irradiance. One way of estimating the surface clear sky

240

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Radiative Properties of Uniform and Broken Stratus: An Observational The Radiative Properties of Uniform and Broken Stratus: An Observational and Modelling Study Utilizing the Independent Column Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer Clothiaux, E.E., The Pennsylvania State University; Barker, H.W., Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada; Kato, S., Hampton University; Dong, X., Analytical Service and Materials, Inc. Ackerman, T.P., The Pennsylvania State University; Liljegren, J.C., Ames Laboratory Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) has operated continuously at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site since November 11, 1996. As yet, much of the early data has not been calibrated correctly and insect contamination in the boundary layer is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Monday, Dec. 15 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Adrienne Erickcek, California Institute of Technology Title: Structure Beyond the Horizon: Inflationary Origins of the Cosmic Power Asymmetry 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topic: First Beam Down the Muon Test Area Line; CDMS Cryogenic System Upgrades Tuesday, Dec. 16 2:30 p.m. Special Particle Astrophysics Seminar - Curia II (NOTE DATE) Speaker: Lotty Ackerman, California Institute of Technology Title: Dark Matter and Dark Radiation 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - One West

242

Working Group Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K. Zorika G. Zhang Focus of Discussion The session convened on March 2, with brief introductions by Bill Clements. The purpose of the session was to discuss the scientific merits of retrofitting TOGA/TAO buoys with shortwave radiometers. Three questions were posed at the outset of the session to focus the discussion.

243

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds K. Ivanova, H. N. Shirer, and E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The state variables of the atmosphere exhibit correlations at various spatial and temporal scales. These correlations are crucial for understanding short- and long-term trends in climate. Cirrus clouds are important phenomena in the troposphere affecting climate. To improve future parameterization of cirrus clouds in climate models, we must understand the cloud properties and how they change within the cloud. We consider fluctuations of cloud radar signals obtained at isodepths within cirrus clouds

244

Microsoft Word - fridland_a.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Constrain Mechanisms of Ice Formation During the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment Intensive Operational Period A. Fridlind and A. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction Mechanisms of ice formation in supercooled clouds that are too warm to allow the homogeneous nucleation of water remain poorly constrained by measurements (e.g., Cotton and Field 2002). Ice mass and number concentrations have long been thought to exceed what can be quantitatively explained by simultaneous measurements of ice nuclei (e.g., Koenig 1963; Beard 1992). In late 2004 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's North Slope of Alaska site, the Mixed-Phase Arctic

245

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ERBE OLR and Cloud Type by Split Window ERBE OLR and Cloud Type by Split Window Inoue, T.(a) and Ackerman, S.A.(b), Meteorological Research Institute (a), University of Wisconsin (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Using collocated ERBE and split window/AVHRR on board NOAA-9, we studied the relationship between cloud type and OLR. NOAA operational OLR estimation is based on flux equivalent temperature defined by the narrow band TBB. We found the relationship between ERBE OLR and brightness temperature (TBB) was different depending on cloud type classified by the split window. The brightness temperature difference between the split window (BTD) is a good indicator of water vapor amount and cloud optical properties. Therefore, we use the TBB and BTD to determine the regression

246

Section 42  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Rotating Shadow Arm for Broadband Hemispheric A Rotating Shadow Arm for Broadband Hemispheric Radiometers: Instrument Design and Concept Verification Using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Radiometer Measurements C.N. Long, C.F. Pavloski, and T.P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Measurement of the components of downwelling broadband The total and diffuse irradiance measurements are output shortwave (SW) irradiance at the surface can be difficult to every minute. These values include 30 seconds of measure- accomplish. Because the diffuse irradiance under clear (i.e., ments for the total irradiance average and 17 seconds for the cloudless) skies is typically only about 10% of the magnitude diffuse. Information on whether the shading arm was

247

Section 50  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from the First Tropical Western Pacific Data from the First Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station J. H. Mather and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania W. E. Clements and F. J. Barnes Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico M. D. Ivey Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico L. D. Hatfield Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) was installed during September 1996 in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. The site is located at 2.06 south, 147.42 east in the heart of the Western Pacific warm pool region. This region is characterized by strong solar heating, high water vapor concentrations, and active convection. The sea

248

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Meeting 2003 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2003, April 2003 Broomsfield, Colorado For proper viewing, extended abstracts should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou, W.A. Intercomparison of MISR Aerosol Retrievals with Sunphotometer and MODIS Results* Ackerman, T.P. Comparison of Observed and Modelled Liquid Water Path for Stratus and Stratocumulus Clouds at the SGP*

249

jensen-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Anvil Outflow During the Maritime Impacts of Anvil Outflow During the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment M. P. Jensen and T. P. Ackerman Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. M. Sekelsky Department of Electrical Engineering University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Introduction The Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) took place from November 13 to December 10, 1995, on the Tiwi Islands, Australia (Figure 1). The primary objective of the field experiment was to study the life cycles of the thunderstorms, which occur almost daily on these islands during the transition between wet and dry seasons. As part of this experiment, a suite of remote sensing instruments including a dual wavelength millimeter radar consisting of 3-mm (W-band) and 9-mm (Ka-

250

Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data at the ARM TWP Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data at the ARM TWP Site E. I. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The multi-angle imaging spectrometer (MISR), a sensor on board the earth observing system (EOS) Terra satellite platform, observes reflected radiation in nine directions with high resolution (~0.275 km). The overall mission of the MISR is to provide continuous, global multi-angle measurements of the reflected radiation from the earth's atmosphere and surface, and thereby create a valuable resource for studying their physical properties (Diner et al. 1999). For single-layer marine cumulus clouds, we have demonstrated that satellite-derived basic statistics (mean, variance) of vertical cloud size match closely

251

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Publications Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Show only items where Author Type Term Year Keyword is Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, Carl Adams, J W Adamson, Bo Addy, Susan E Addy, Nathan Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari, Sarina Adilov, Nodir

252

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter over Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, and B Cairns. 2012. "Evaluation of hydrometeor phase and ice properties in cloud-resolving model simulations of tropical deep convection using radiance and polarization measurements." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(11), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-0314.1. Liquid index (LI) values are directly derived from multi-directional polarized reflectances. POLDER measurements (dashed line envelop) show

253

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Meeting 1999 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1999, March 1999 San Antonio, Texas For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abshire, J.B. Development of a Compact Lidar to Profile Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere Ackerman, T.P. A 25-Month Database of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site

254

Microsoft Word - long-cn.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Flux Analysis: Adding Clear-Sky LW Next Generation Flux Analysis: Adding Clear-Sky LW and LW Cloud Effects, Cloud Optical Depths, and Improved Sky Cover Estimates C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The original Shortwave Flux Analysis (SWFA), based on Long and Ackerman (2000) and Long et al. (1999), deals only with daylight shortwave (SW) data. The SWFA algorithm produces continuous estimates of clear-sky downwelling diffuse, direct, and total SW; estimated fractional sky cover; and identification of when the sky was cloudless. This algorithm package is being produced as an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) value-added product (VAP), as described in Long and Gaustad (2001). Subsequent efforts for analysis of surface broadband radiation and meteorological measurements now

255

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Science Team Meeting 5 Science Team Meeting 1995 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Proceedings of the Fifth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1995, March 1995 San Diego, California For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, T.P. A Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Data A Comparison of Radiometric Fluxes Influenced by Parameterized Cirrus Clouds with Observed Fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud

256

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A Bootstrap Technique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Beagley, Nathaniel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Limitations in the ability of Global Climate Models (GCMs) to predict clouds create significant uncertainties in predicting and understanding climate. Comparison studies have demonstrated that clouds are among the largest source of uncertainty in global climate model simulations [Cess et al., 1990; Potter and Cess, 2003]. Comparisons of model output and observational data generally require averaging (or aggregating) the observations in an attempt to put them on the same large spatial scale as

257

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Radiative Heating Profiles in the Multi- Tropical Radiative Heating Profiles in the Multi- Scale Modeling Framework: A Comparison to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Observations S.A. McFarlane, J.H. Mather, and T.P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Radiative heating associated with the distribution of water vapor and clouds in the atmosphere is an important driver of both local-scale and large-scale circulations in the tropics. One of the difficulties in producing accurate cloud and radiative heating rate profiles with a general circulation model (GCM) is the sub-grid scale nature of cloud processes and their interaction with radiation. The multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) is a new approach to climate modeling (Grabowski 2001; Khairoutdinov

258

shippert-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 87 Spectral Cloud Emissivities from LBLRTM/AERI QME T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington S. A. Clough and P. D. Brown Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts W. L. Smith NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. O. Knuteson and S. A. Ackerman University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Using spectral radiance measurements from the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) and calculations from the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), cloud emissivities can be derived in the window region from 700 cm -1 to 1250 cm -1 . The AERI/LBLRTM Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) (Brown 1998) is currently designed to run under clear-sky conditions; the LBLRTM does not calculate the effects of

259

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

260

Optimum Synthesis of Mechanism for single- and hybrid-tasks using Differential Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this document the optimal dimensional synthesis for planar mechanisms using differential evo- lution (DE) is shown. Four study cases are presented: in the first case, the synthesis of a mechanism for hybrid-tasks, considering path generation, function generation, and motion generation, is car- ried out. The second and third cases deal with path generation with and without prescribed timing. Finally, the synthesis of an Ackerman's mechanism is performed. The order defect problem is addressed by manipulating individuals instead of penalizing or discretizing the searching space for the parameters, as was proposed by other authors. A new technique which consists of applying a transformation in order to satisfy the Grashof and crank conditions to generate an initial elitist population is introduced. As a result, the evolutionary algorithm increases its efficiency.

Penunuri, F; Villanueva, C; Pech-Oy, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling Shortwave and Longwave  

SciTech Connect

Previous work (Long and Ackerman 2000; Long 2004) has concentrated on estimation of the downwelling clear-sky irradiances and the calculation of the effect of clouds on the downwelling radiative energy budget. However, cloud forcing is defined for the difference between clear- and cloudy-sky net radiation, which includes the upwelling components. Thus, if we are to estimate the surface radiative cloud forcing, the means must be developed to estimate what the upwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance would be if the clouds were not present. Estimation of the upwelling longwave (LW) is particularly troublesome in that the emitted upwelling LW is a function of the total surface energy exchange including latent and sensible heat, which is related to but not necessarily always totally driven by the radiative exchange alone, but also involves the evolving soil and vegetation properties and changes in soil moisture amounts.

Long, C.N.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

g4{?3?!e5*??A?3rl*m^?e  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x???}*?*?gg???

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Dresden Bombing as Portrayed in German Accounts, East and West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

part of the strategy.n14 sng_QQyg~nmgn~, UCLA HISTORICALand Nagasaki, Hi~Qhimft_sng Nggft~i~_Thg_hYil~_Mggi

Corwin, Elizabeth C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the time of preparation, the calculated americium ingrowth from the decay of 241 Pu present in small amounts in the CRM is 21 gg plutonium as of October 1,1984, and...

266

1 993~ ~3 Wl C~,~ 18 IUD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

} , PP. 17-24 .1984. [3 J M. N. ~1f gg:R: ~ , lftr §l~w, ~{~~, j@j~'H.fff.'f:l!l&t±. 1983 "f.' [4] 1f

Zhang, Yuwen

267

Quarterly title list for the period ending June 1975  

SciTech Connect

A list of the laboratory reports issued the publications made, the articles submitted for publication as well as the lectures held are dealt with. Abstracts of the works are to a large extent included with the titles. (GG/LH)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Engineering online and in-person social networks to sustain physical activity: application of a conceptual model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GG, Ives A, Foster GD: Using facebook and text messaging toComing and Going on Facebook. http://www.pewinternet.org/~/Behav Neurosci 2010, 43. Facebook Reports First Quarter 2013

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High-fidelity national carbon mapping for resource management and REDD+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parker GG, Harding DJ: Lidar remote sensing for ecosystemaccuracies with a simple LiDAR metric. Remote Sens Environ.detection and ranging (LiDAR) for three- dimensional studies

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

U  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION (UCNI) GENERAL GUIDELINE GG-5 February 2004 Information Classification and Control Policy Security Policy Staff Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA) Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Department of Energy UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION General Guideline GG-5 February 2004 Change Date _____________New Pages____________ Approved and Issued by: Joan G. Hawthorne Director Information Classification and Control Policy Security Policy Staff Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance (SSA) Washington, DC 20585 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................... 1

271

Williams et al. Reply (to the Comment by Dumin on "Progress in Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of Relativistic Gravity")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A decreasing gravitational constant, G, coupled with angular momentum conservation is expected to increrase a planetary semimajor axis, a, as \\dot a/a=-\\dot G/G. Analysis of lunar laser ranging data strongly limits such temporal variations and constrains a local (~1 AU) scale expansion of the solar system as \\dot a/a=-\\dot G/G =-(4\\pm9)\\times10^{-13} yr^{-1}, including that due to cosmological effects.

James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) State Kentucky Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of equipment and installation cost Provider Kentucky Solar Partnership The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans cover the full equipment and installation cost. Flexible rate loans and terms are available. They

273

ARM - News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ColoradoNews from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace News from the Steamboat Springs Deployment Releases WPSD (Paducah, KY) "STORMVEX Cloud Study" January 19, 2011 The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction "Steamboat project gives scientists unique, grounded look at clouds" December 12, 2010 Steamboat Pilot & Today "Steamboat cloud study to help create better global climate models" Image Gallery December 12, 2010 Also picked up by:

274

Electron 83 Rb / 83m Kr Source for the Energy Scale Monitoring in the KATRIN Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment investigates the endpoint region of the tritium ??spectrum aiming for the sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.). A spectrometer of the MAC?E filter (Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic filter) type will be used for a total time of at least 5 years. An unrecognized shift of the filtering potential would directly influence the resulting neutrino mass. To continuously monitor the filtering potential the high voltage (HV) will be simultaneously applied to an additional MAC?E filter spectrometer. In this monitor spectrometer suitable electron sources based on atomic/nuclear standards will be utilized. As one of such monitoring tools the solid 83 Rb / 83m Kr source is intended. It provides conversion electrons from 83m Kr (t 1/2 ?=?1.83? h ) which is continuously generated by 83 Rb (t 1/2 ?86? d ). The Calibration and Monitoring task of the KATRIN project demands the long?term energy stability ?E/E of the K?32 conversion electron line (E?=?17.8? keV ???=?2.7? eV ) of 1.6? ppm / month .

Miroslav Zbo?il; The KATRIN collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

doi:10.1155/2012/372371 Clinical Study The Avantgarde Carbostent in Patients Scheduled for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2012 Carlo Briguori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Treatment of patients who need coronary revascularization before undelayable non-cardiac surgery is challenging. Methods. We assessed the safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) using the Avantgarde TM Carbostent (CID, Italy) in patients undergoing PCI before undelayable non-cardiac surgery. The Multiplate analyzer point-of-care was used to assess residual platelet reactivity. One major cardiac events (MACE, defined as death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis and major bleeding) were assessed. Results. 42 consecutive patients were analyzed. Total stent length ?25 mm was observed in 16 (37%) patients. Multivessel stenting was performed in 11 (31.5%) patients. Clopidogrel was interrupted 5 days before surgery in 35 patients, whereas it was stopped the day of the surgery in 7 patients. Surgery was performed after 27 9 (742) days from PCI. MACE occurred in one patient (2.4%; 95 % confidence interval: 0.0113%), who had fatal acute myocardial infarction 3 days after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery and 12 days after stent implantation. No case of major bleeding in the postoperative phase was observed. Conclusions. The present pilot study suggests that, although at least 1014 days of dual antiplatelet therapy remain mandatory, the Avantgarde TM stent seems to have a role in patients requiring undelayable surgery. 1.

Undelayable Noncardiac Surgery; Carlo Briguori; Gabriella Visconti; Francesca De Micco; Amelia Focaccio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pseudoscalar boson and standard model-like Higgs boson productions at the LHC in the simplest little Higgs model  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of the simplest little Higgs model, we perform a comprehensive study for the pair productions of the pseudoscalar boson {eta} and standard model-like Higgs boson h at LHC, namely gg(bb){yields}{eta}{eta}, gg(qq){yields}{eta}h, and gg(bb){yields}hh. These production processes provide a way to probe the couplings between Higgs bosons. We find that the cross section of gg{yields}{eta}{eta} always dominates over that of bb{yields}{eta}{eta}. When the Higgs boson h which mediates these two processes is on-shell, their cross sections can reach several thousand fb and several hundred fb, respectively. When the intermediate state h is off-shell, those two cross sections are reduced by 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The cross sections of gg{yields}{eta}h and qq{yields}{eta}h are about in the same order of magnitude, which can reach O(10{sup 2} fb) for a light {eta} boson. Besides, compared with the standard model prediction, the cross section of a pair of standard model-like Higgs bosons production at LHC can be enhanced sizably. Finally, we briefly discuss the observable signatures of {eta}{eta}, {eta}h, and hh at the LHC.

Wang Lei; Han Xiaofang [Department of Physics, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lectures on 2d Gauge Theories: Topological Aspects and Path Integral Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These are lecture notes of lectures presented at the 1993 Trieste Summer School, dealing with two classes of two-dimensional field theories, (topological) Yang-Mills theory and the G/G gauged WZW model. The aim of these lectures is to exhibit and extract the topological information contained in these theories, and to present a technique (a Weyl integral formula for path integrals) which allows one to calculate directly their partition function and topological correlation functions on arbitrary closed surfaces. Topics dealt with are (among others): solution of Yang-Mills theory on arbitrary surfaces; calculation of intersection numbers of moduli spaces of flat connections; coupling of Yang-Mills theory to coadjoint orbits and intersection numbers of moduli spaces of parabolic bundles; derivation of the Verlinde formula from the G/G model; derivation of the shift k to k+h in the G/G model via the index of the twisted Dolbeault complex.

Matthias Blau; George Thompson

1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mining the SDSS archive. I. Photometric redshifts in the nearby universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a supervised neural network approach to the determination of photometric redshifts. The method was tuned to match the characteristics of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and it exploits the spectroscopic redshifts provided by this unique survey. In order to train, validate and test the networks we used two galaxy samples drawn from the SDSS spectroscopic dataset: the general galaxy sample (GG) and the luminous red galaxies subsample (LRG). The method consists of a two steps approach. In the first step, objects are classified in nearby (ztrained on objects belonging to the two redshift ranges. Using a standard MLP operated in a Bayesian framework, the optimal architectures were found to require 1 hidden layer of 24 (24) and 24 (25) neurons for the GG (LRG) sample. The presence of systematic deviations was then corrected by interpolating the resulting redshifts. The final results on the GG dataset give a r...

Raffaele, D A; Giuseppe, L; Massimo, B; Maurizio, P; Elisabetta, D F; Roberto, T; Antonino, Staiano; Giuseppe, Longo; Massimo, Brescia; Maurizio, Paolillo; Elisabetta, De Filippis; Roberto, Tagliaferri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

An Ecient Input Method for Visual Programming Systems Jiro TANAKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Tsukuba GHC Tcl/Tk 1 (Visual Language) 2 GHC [Ueda85] y1 3 ( 1) |1| #12;Buttons Predicate Name select select select select select select 4 Tcl/Tk [Ousterhout94] Tcl f f g f gg f f g f gg 2 #12;1 2 3 4 56 2 append(A,B,:,C):- A=[X|A1]; append(A1,B,:,C1), [X|C1]=C. Tcl {{append/0/1 {A/0/1 B/0/2} C/0

Tanaka, Jiro

280

Heavy-quark production at large rapidities at hadron colliders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to those partonic subprocesses that feature a gluon exchange in the t-channel; this happens for gg ? QQg and qg ? QQq, and it is peculiar to the NLO computations of quark pair production, as opposed to Born-level predictions, in which only fermions... -energy limit is QQ+1 jet production. In this case the partonic subprocesses gg ? QQg and qg ? QQq, which feature a gluon exchange in the t-channel, are O(?3S) at the Born level. This can also be considered as a reformulation of the standard Mueller...

Andersen, Jeppe R; Del Duca, Vittoria; Frixione, Stefano; Maltoni, Fabio; Stirling, W James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

bin.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Using Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations to Constrain Mechanisms of Ice Formation During the M-PACE IOP Ann Fridlind and Andy Ackerman, NASA GISS DOE ARM Science Team Meeting Albuquerque, New Mexico, 29 March 2006 Observations Image source: AVHRR, Pennsylvania State University M-PACE website Observations -20 -15 -10 -5 0 Temperature, C 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Altitude, m 0 1 2 3 4 Moisture, g/kg 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Altitude, m q v q v,sat q t Data source: Hans Verlinde, ARM Archive Observations 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Cloud Top, m 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 Cloud Top T, C 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 0 200 400 600 800 1000 Cloud Thickness, m 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 0 100 200 300 400 500 LWP, g/m2 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 Date 0 5 10 15 20 Wind Aloft, m/s 1008 1009 1010 1011 1012 1013 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Cloud Top, m 1008

287

SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect

From a mass-weighted perspective, cirrus clouds exert an enormous influence on the radiative energy budget of the earths climate system. Owing to their location in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus can significantly reduce the outgoing longwave radiation while, at the same time, remaining relatively transmissive to solar energy. Thus, cirrus clouds are the only cloud genre that can exert a direct radiative warming influence on the climate system (Ackerman et al. 1988). It is not surprising, therefore, that general circulation models (GCMs) are especially sensitive to the presence of cirrus in the model atmosphere. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995), for instance, show that the climate sensitivity can vary by as much as 40% due to the properties of cirrus varying between transparent and opaque limits. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995) also identify a key feedback by cirrus that is often overlooked; on longer time scales cloud heating in the upper troposphere can act to maintain and modulate the general circulation of the atmosphere through accelerating the subtropical and polar jet streams. Understanding these mechanisms and representing them in models is complicated by the fact that cirrus properties vary over an enormous dynamic range compared to most other clouds.

J Mace, E Jensen, G McFarquhar, J Comstock, T Ackerman, D Mitchell, X Liu, T Garrett

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

289

Observed and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART Site A. D. Del Genio and A. B. Wolf National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Despite their potential importance in a long-term climate change, less is known about cirrus clouds than most other cloud types, for a variety of reasons (Del Genio 2001) including: (1) the difficulty of remotely sensing ice water content (IWC), (2) uncertainty in the identities of ice nuclei and the relative importance of different nucleation processes, (3) significant variations in depth and optical thickness caused by formation and sedimentation of large particles, and (4) our relatively poor documentation of

290

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS On the Detection and Analysis of Multilayered Clouds: Comparison of MODIS Analyses with ARM CART Site Cloud Products Baum, B.A.(a), Nasiri, S.L.(b), and Mace, G.G.(c), NASA Langley Research Center (a), University of Wisconsin-Madison (b), University of Utah (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We will present new ideas regarding the detection and analysis of multilayered clouds in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery. Over the past year, the MODIS cloud property retrieval effort has matured considerably as algorithms have been improved and the instrument performance has been characterized more accurately. Errors caused by noise, striping, and out-of-band response have been reduced. We have developed and tested different approaches for daytime and nighttime

291

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the The March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observing Period; The Evolution of the Synoptic-Scale Atmosphere and the Associated Cloud Radiative Forcing Mace, G.G.(a), Sonntag, K.L.(b), Kato, S.(c), Poellot, M.(d), Twohy, C.(e), Troth, S.(a), Zhang, Q.(a), and Minnis, P.(c), University of Utah (a), Unviersity of Oklahoma (b), NASA Langley Research Center (c), University of North Dakota (d), Oregon State University (e) During the first 3 weeks of March 2000, an intensive observing period (IOP) was held near the central facility of the Southern Great Plains ARM site. In conjunction with the ARESE II campaign, the objective of this IOP was to observe the 3-dimensional structure of the cloud field using multiple scanning and vertically pointing millimeter radars. In anticipation of

292

ARM Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value-Added Cloud Products: Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status M. A. Miller, K. L. Johnson, and D. T. Troyan Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a variety of state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensors at its sites. These sensors provide information about the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the structure of the clouds that are present above the site. Families of value- added products (VAPs) that contain geophysically relevant data are produced from the electronic

293

Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations Sensitivities of SCMs to New Parameterizations of Cloud-Radiative Interactions G. M. McFarquhar Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California G. G. Mace and Y. Zhang Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Accurate parameterizations of, and in terms of, ice cloud effective radius (r e ) are crucial for accurate model estimates of upwelling and downwelling radiative fluxes, and of cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Zhang et al. (1999), and Iacobellis and Somerville (2000) have all found that radiative fluxes are sensitive to the specification of r e and fallout, and that the most realistic vertical distribution of clouds is

294

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

295

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

296

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison J. M. Comstock, S. A. McFarlane, and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. d'Entremon Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts D. H. DeSlover University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin G. G. Mace Univerity of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah S. Y. Matrosov and M. D. Shupe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada K. Sassen University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Z. Wang University of Maryland, Baltimore County/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland 1 Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004

297

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval (MICROBASE): Status of SGP Version 1.2 and Prototype TWP Version Miller, M.A.(a), Johnson, K.L.(a), Jensen, M.P.(b), Mace, G.G.(c), Dong, X.(d), and Vogelmann, A.M.(a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), Columbia University (b), University of Utah (c), University of North Dakota (d) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The interaction of clouds with incoming and outgoing radiation streams produces discontinuous regions of heating and cooling within the atmospheric column. These regions can influence the atmospheric circulations at multiple scales, as well as modify the existing cloud structures. The Broadband Heating Rate Project (BBHRP) within ARM has the goal of producing instantaneous snapshots of the heating and cooling rate

298

sekelsky-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Comparison of Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar Measurements for the Fall 1997 Cloud IOP S. M. Sekelsky, L. Li, J. Calloway, and R. E. McIntosh University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts M. A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania S. Haimov University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming G. G. Mace and K. Sassen University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction One of the primary objectives of the fall 1997 intensive observation period (IOP) was to intercompare Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site,

299

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Evaluation of GFDL SCM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Evaluation of GFDL SCM Cloud Fractions and Surface Radiation Fields with Those from the Ground-based Remote Sensing at SGP Kim, Byung-Gon Princeton University Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah The various kinds of approaches to obtain cloud fraction in the model still have the limitations, which accordingly result in the consequent errors in the model radiative fluxes. Because of the different schemes to estimate the cloud fraction by the model and also observation artifacts, the prudent comparisons should be made in order to reach the right answer. This study demonstrates the more revised approaches of comparisons to improve the evaluation of cloud fraction. To do this, a relatively inexpensive and

300

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting and Evaluating the Effect Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus Cloud on MODIS Retrieved Water-Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Cirrus clouds can largely modify the solar reflected and terrestrial emitted radiances. The ubiquitous presence of cirrus clouds has a global coverage of about 20% to30% and more than 70% in the tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The probability of cirrus clouds overlaying a low-level boundary layer cloud system is greater than 50% (Hahn et al. 1982, 1984; Tian and Curry 1989; Mace et al. 1997). They are often optically thin and semitransparent and frequently reside in high altitude overlapping with a low-level

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cirrus properties and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using Cirrus properties and air mean vertical motion retrieval using mm-wavelength Doppler radar moments Deng, Min University of Utah Mace, Gerald University of Utah Vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar provides valuable information on upper tropospheric cloud properties and dynamics. We are developing an innovative algorithm to simultaneously retrieve cirrus microphysical parameters and air mean vertical motion by using the three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The technique utilizes a statement that the observed Doppler spectrum is the convolution of a quiet air reflectivity spectrum with the turbulence PDF (probability density function). The set of equations describing the Doppler spectrum moments are inverted using optimal estimation theory to derive estimates of the

302

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements Validation of TERRA MODIS Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based Measurements at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Xi, B.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Wielicki, B.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(c), Chen,Y.(c), and Mace, G.G.(d), University of North Dakota (a), NASA/Langley Research Center (b), SAIC, Inc. (c), University of Utah (d) Cloud macrophysical and microphysical/optical properties derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during February 2000-December 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used as cloud truth data set in the validation of the CERES Science Team derived

303

Section 44  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the An Automated Cloud Mask Algorithm for the Micropulse Lidar G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania To perform cloud base analysis, an automated technique for sky signal using the standard lidar equation (Spinhirne determination of cloud base height from the raw lidar returns 1993) and midlatitude standard atmospheres. After is needed. Previously, a straightforward signal thresholding normalization, the observations form a swarm of points about algorithm was used to determine cloud base height. The unity with the scatter due to electronic noise, solar background difficulty with this approach is illustrated in Figure 1a. The and cloud and aerosol return. micropulse lidar operates at a wavelength of 523 nm, which is

304

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties and Heating Cloud Properties and Heating Rates in Tropical Cloud Systems Jennifer Comstock and Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Alain Protat Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Motivation Cloud properties retrievals Cloud process understanding Cloud Radiative forcing and heating rates Model evaluation on many scales (LES, CRM, SCM...) Quantified uncertainties are needed... 2 Retrieval Algorithm Evaluation within CPWG Past intercomparisons CLOWD - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (Turner et al. 2007) Ice Clouds - (Comstock et al. 2007) One retrieval does not fit all Present algorithm evaluation BBHRP Ice Cloud Retrievals at SGP - Microbase (Dunn, Jensen, Mace, Marchand) Arctic mixed phase clouds - BBHRP (Shupe, Turner) CLOWD - BBHRP Pt. Reyes AMF deployment

305

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

306

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

307

AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado Steamboat Deployment AMF Home Steamboat Springs Home Storm Peak Lab Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Data Sets Experiment Planning STORMVEX Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan NWS Forecasting Plots STORMVEX Website Outreach STORMVEX Backgrounder (PDF, 1.6MB) News AMF2 STORMVEX Blog Images Contacts Gerald Mace AMF Deployment, Steamboat Springs, Colorado This view shows the instrument locations for the STORMVEX campaign. At the westernmost site is the Valley Floor. Heading east up the mountain is Christy Peak, Thunderhead, and Storm Peak Laboratory at the far east. Valley Floor: 40° 39' 43.92" N, 106° 49' 0.84" W Thunderhead: 40° 39' 15.12" N, 106° 46' 23.16" W Storm Peak: 40° 27' 18.36" N, 106° 44' 40.20" W

308

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Tale of Two Cirrus A Tale of Two Cirrus Poellot, M.R.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), and Arnott, W.P. (c), University of North Dakota (a), University of Utah (b), Desert Research Institute (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting On May 8, 1998, an orographically-forced cirrus layer overspread the DOE ARM Program's Southern Great Plains site and subsequently became mixed with anvil outflow from thunderstorms. These clouds were sampled in situ by the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft and remotely by an array of ground-based radar, lidar and radiometric instrumentation. The first of two aircraft flights sampled the orographic cirrus through a series of step climbs and spirals. During that time, the cloud was relatively uniform in depth and structure. Shortly after the start of the second flight, the

309

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Properties Measured During Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment G. McFarquhar, M. Freer, and J. Um University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois G. Kok Droplet Measurement Technologies Boulder, Colorado R. McCoy and T. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California J. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction In-situ measurements of ice particle sizes, shapes and numbers were made in fresh anvils, aging anvils and in generic cirrus during TWP-ICE. The vertical profiles and horizontal profiles performed by the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft were made on 7 different days as illustrated in Table 1. Table 1. Summary of flights conducted during TWP-ICE; *designates that spiral was conducted over Darwin,

310

X:\ARM_19~1\P283-315.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on Figure 1. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles by the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar on 15 April during the 1994 ARM RCS IOP. Observations of a Cold Front With Strong Vertical Undulations During the ARM RCS-IOP D. O'C. Starr and D. N. Whiteman G. Mace National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Pennsylvania State University Goddard Space Flight Center University Park, Pennsylvania Greenbelt, Maryland S. H. Melfi University of Utah University of Maryland-Baltimore County Salt Lake City, Utah Baltimore, Maryland A. R. Lare Sandia National Laboratories Applied Research Livermore, California Landover, Maryland R. A. Ferrare, B. Demoz, and K. D. Evans Hughes STX Lanham, Maryland K. Sassen S. E. Bisson and J.E.M. Goldsmith Passage of a cold front was observed on the night of

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of High Temperature_Chen_Chonglin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor PhD Students: Erik Enriquez, Shanyong Bao, & Brennan Mace PhD Awarded: Dr. Chunrui Ma (UK) & Dr. Gregory Collins (WVU) PIs: Patrick Nash (retired 2012) and Chonglin Chen (PI) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1644 Phone: 210-458-6427, Email: cl.chen@utsa.edu Grant Number: DE-FE0003780 Project Manager: Dr. Susan M. Maley Performance Period: 09/01/2010-8/31/2013 * Introduction * Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductive LnBaCo 2 O 5.5 Oxides * Full Scale Chemical Sensor Development * Summary OBJECTIVES & GOALS * The objective of this research is: - investigate and understand the mechanisms of mixed ionic electronic conductive LaBaCo 2 O 5+ highly epitaxial

312

DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator S Matrosov B Orr M Shupe R Coulter P Lawson A Sedlacek G Hallar L Avallone I McCubbin C Long R Marchand September 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

313

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Validation of CERES/MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals Using Ground-Based Measurements Obtained at the DOE ARM SGP Site Dong, X.(a), Minnis, P.(b), Sun-Mack, S.(b), and Mace, G.G.(a), University of Utah (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties derived from the NASA TERRA (EOS-AM) Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as part of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project during November 2000-June 2001 are compared to simultaneous ground-based observations. The ground-based data taken by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are used as "ground truth" data set in the validation of the CERES cloud products and to improve the CERES daytime and

314

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific with Tropical Deep Convection Deng, M.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), and Soden, B.J.(b), Univesity of Utah (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) The microphysical and radiative properties of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropics are known to have a substantial influence on climate. Observations from long term cloud radar measurements in the tropics show that upper tropospheric clouds are observed above 10 km as much as 40% of the time depending on location. By combining satellite observations with observations from the tropical ARM site on Nauru and Manus Islands we examine the macro and microphysical properties of these clouds in terms of their association with deep convection. The fundamental questions we will

315

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

316

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] 23, 2008 [Feature Stories and Releases] Field Campaigns for 2010 Range from the Arctic to the Azores Bookmark and Share With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. With the recent awards, the ARM Mobile Facility deployment on Graciosa Island in the Azores is extended from its original 9-month duration, beginning in May 2009 and now lasting through November 2010. The Department of Energy recently announced the selection of major ARM field campaigns that will take place in 2010. Studies led by principal investigators Rob Wood, Hans Verlinde, and Jay Mace will examine marine, mixed-phase, and cirrus clouds in the Azores, Alaska, the Great Plains, and

317

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer 3D Delta-Diffusion and IR Monte-Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer Applied to Inhomogeneous Cirrus over the ARM-SGP Site Chen, Y.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Gu, Y.(a), Ou, S.C.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), University of California, Los Angeles (a), University of Utah (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An efficient method based on a full multigrid approach has been developed to solve the 3D delta-diffusion radiative transfer equation, which utilizes four-term spherical harmonics expansion for the phase function and intensity. This method first solves the inhomogeneous partial differential equation on a number of coarse grids and subsequently performs interpolation to predivided fine grids to speed up the convergence of the solution, particularly useful for cloud radiation parameterization in

318

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description The MERGED_SOUNDING VAP: A Status Report and Description Miller, M.A.(a), Troyan, D.T.(a), and Mace, G.G.(b), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), University of Utah (b) The Value-added Product (VAP) known as MERGED_SOUNDING has been deemed a very desirous component of ARMs suite of VAPs. To have a thermodynamics profile of the atmosphere at one-minute temporal intervals and uniform height levels available for ARM data users eliminates much redundancy and inconsistency as investigators will now have standard atmospheric profiles at their disposal. The values which constitute the thermodynamics profile include: Temperature, Relative Humidity, Vapor Pressure, Barometric Pressure, Wind Speed and Direction, and Dewpoint. The data integrated to form the MERGED_SOUNDING data stream comes from radiosonde launches, model

319

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and OLR Bias Q. Fu and B. Carlin Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada G. G. Mace Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Clouds exhibit dramatic variabilities at spatial scales smaller than typical grid cells of large-scale models used to study climate and weather. These unresolved cloud fluctuations are potentially important for parameterizations of both cloud radiative effects and cloud microphysical processes (e.g., Harshvardhan and Randall 1985; Jacob and Kein 1999). It is now well accepted that neglect of cloud subscale variability can seriously bias model estimates of the disposition of solar radiation in the earth- atmosphere system (e.g., Cahalan et al. 1994a; Barker 1996).

320

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: MICROBASE, A Continuous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future Plans Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Michael, Paul Brookhaven National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah The MICROBASE_PI and MICROBASE_PA value-added products (VAPs) are integral components of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The goal of the BBHRP project is to determine atmospheric heating and cooling rate profiles in the column above the active sensors at each ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and within a larger volume around each site, representative of a global climate model grid cell. To produce the heating rate profiles,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Cirrus Cloud Particle Mass and Terminal Velocity Derived from Airborne 2D-C Probe and Counterflow Virtural Impactor Data for Selected Cases During the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP Benson-Troth, S.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), Twohy, C.(b), and Poellot, M.(c), University of Utah (a), Oregon State University (b), University of North Dakota (c) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting When cirrus cloud particles are sampled by an airborne 2D-C probe, the shadows of the particles on the diode array are preserved. Analysis of the raw 2D-C data provides a size distribution and number concentration of the cloud particles sampled. The airborne counterflow virtural impactor provides the ice water content of the sampled cloud particles. Using the size distribution and the ice water content, we derive the coefficient and

322

Fihl  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fihl Fihl Je~uarg 11, i952 Ga January 9, 1952 I teak tvo 64oot rods, l-l/l6'D, hot rolled at Iadmmnw, to the Tube Reducing Compaqv in Wallingtam, NJ, for the purpeee ofacndudin$nn experlmentlnvhlch enattanptwouldbe nads toreduce bpthe "Rackrite Froaessy the rod to 1" indlanmtm. The opemtion vu8 satlsfactoqy although thb nrnolmt of reduatlan taken amtherodsvam not~ectenoqhto lronouteane of thehesvler laps nnd senms in the Mace. Themnchiwoperated atthalavestspeadvitb a feed c&1/8"per etrokaand8Gatrokea permlnuts. A heavy pasts 8 M&ant was applied bthsrcd prior tc "rockln&'~ a molubh oiltype ocalantwsdirwtad ontothebnrtyaalrculatingp. The henoylutpicantvas G.Whitfield Rlaheni~s 8332, a pcvdered mica in chlorinated parraflne.

323

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

CALIFORNIA COUNCIL ON GERONTOLOGY & GERIATRICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA COUNCIL ON GERONTOLOGY & GERIATRICS CC GG APRIL13,2012 32nd Annual Meeting e University of Southern California Town & Gown Ballroom 665 Exposition Blvd, Los Angeles, CA CAMPUS, COMMUNITY, & INDUSTRY in mind. ABOUT CCGG The California Council on Gerontology and Geriatrics [CCGG] was founded in 1980

de Lijser, Peter

325

Jagiellonian University The Faculty of Mathematics, Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] for comprehensive review. Prospects for observability of eg. the Higgs boson(s), Supersym­ metry particles, Exotic on prospects for observability of the invisibly decaying Higgs boson in the t ? tH production process. Our process the gg # H # ZZ # # 4µ production with the Higgs boson mass of 130 GeV is used. The default

Jagiellonski, Uniwersytet

326

Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for the decay ?(1S)??A[superscript 0], A[superscript 0]?gg or ss? , where A[superscript 0] is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

327

Herwig++ 2.2 Release Note.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(dot-dashed) are shown. of 115GeV and 300GeV are shown in Fig. 1. Only the gg ? h0g, qg ? h0q and qg ? h0q partonic processes are included in the matrix element correction as these are the only processes which have a parton-shower interpretation...

Bahr, M; Gieseke, Stefan; Giggs, M; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Latunde-Dada, Oluseyi; Platzer, S; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H

328

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

329

PERFORMANCE AND APPLICATION OF A DOUBLE CRYSTAL MONOCHROMATOR IN THE ENERGY REGION 800 < hv < 4500 eV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edit. H. Winick and G. Brown, SSRL Report No. 78/04. N. G.G. Tobin, and D. A. Shirley, SSRL Report No. 81/02. 21. Z.E. Umbach, and D. A. Shirley, SSRL Report No. 81/02. 22. S.

Hussain, Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

Barklow, T

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

331

Abstract Electrospraying utilises electrical forces for liquid atomisation. Droplets obtained by this method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the initial mass concentration of the droplets, gg is the gas dynamic viscosity, ql is the liquid density) lithium batteries- luminescence (ZnScoatedCdSe// glass) (1­4mg/CdSe/mL) (100­300°C) CdSe(inZnSmatrix)Acetonitrile+ pyridine(2:1) 3

Haile, Sossina M.

332

Microsoft PowerPoint - Interconnect Development at PNNL.ppt ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l t f SOFC I t t Development of SOFC Interconnects and Coatings J.W. Stevenson, G.G. Xia, J.P. Choi, J.D. Templeton, X. Li, T.K. Oh, and Z. Nie Pacific Northwest National...

333

Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Basis for UCNI | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basis for UCNI Basis for UCNI Basis for UCNI What documents contain the legal and policy foundations for the UCNI program? Section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), is the statutory basis for the UCNI program. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information specifies many detailed policies and requirements concerning the UCNI program. DOE O 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, specifies additional policies and requirements concerning the Department of Energy (DOE) UCNI program. UCNI General Guideline, GG-5, is a record of decisions made by the Director, OC, as to what general subject areas are UCNI. Note: GG-5 may only be used by the Director, OC, to make determinations as to whether

335

Matching NLO QCD and parton showers in heavy flavor production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the LO FEX process Qg ? Qg. Since initial-state quasi-collinear gluon splitting forms part of the evolution of the PDFs of the incoming hadrons implemented through parton showers, we are in danger of double-counting if we include both LO FEX and NLO FCR... (Q,t)qq ? ? ? MC ( tQ ? tQ, z(t)Q ? z (t) Q , ? (t) Q ? ? (t) Q ) (5.9) 20 qg initial state d?(+,t)qg ? ? ? MC = ?S 4? d?(t)+ ?(t)+ dz(t)+ P (0)gq (z (t) + ) d?(t)gg? ( (z(t)+ )2 ? ?(t)+ ) (5.10) d?(+,u)qg ? ? ? MC = d?(+,t)qg ? ? ? MC ( d?(t)gg ? d?...

Frixione, Stefano; Nason, Paolo; Webber, Bryan R

336

Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

Kutasov, I.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Delft University of Technology Department of Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6, and finally the conclusions from Phase I are listed in Chapter 8. My special thanks go out to Mr. H.J. Kremer. This section de­ scribes the simple fault classes following [vdGG97]. Table 1.1 lists the simple faults, and lists the recommendations for the IPTS. ffl Chapter 8 lists the conclusions resulting from the Phase I

Gaydadjiev, Georgi

338

Higgs Boson Resummation via Bottom-Quark Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The region of small transverse momentum in q-qbar- and gg-initiated processes must be studied in the framework of resummation to account for the large, logarithmically-enhanced contributions to physical observables. In this letter, we study resummed differential cross-sections for Higgs production via bottom-quark fusion. We find that the differential distribution peaks at approximately 15 GeV, a number of great experimental importance to measuring this production channel.

B. Field

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Space Time Matter inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a model of power-law inflationary inflation using the Space-Time-Matter (STM) theory of gravity for a five dimensional (5D) canonical metric that describes an apparent vacuum. In this approach the expansion is governed by a single scalar (neutral) quantum field. In particular, we study the case where the power of expansion of the universe is $p \\gg 1$. This kind of model is more successful than others in accounting for galaxy formation.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Contribution of a pure NCG forbidden process to the Z associated Higgs production  

SciTech Connect

The contribution of the pure NCG forbidden subprocess gg{yields}ZHis calculated. It is shown that the cross section becomes important at the LHC energies and depends strongly on the choice of the noncommutativity parameter. Because of the gluons luminosity inside the proton, it becomes comparable to that of the commutative standard model subprocess qq(bar sign)ZH for reasonable values of the NCG parameter.

Bradji, O.; Mebarki, N. [Theoretical Phys. Lab., Faculty of Physics -USTHBB. P. 32 Bab Ezzouar 16079, Algiers (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Subatomique, Mentouri University, Constantine (Algeria)

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Shifts in the Properties of the Higgs Boson from Radion Mixing  

SciTech Connect

We examine how mixing between the Standard Model(SM) Higgs boson, h, and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model modifies the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we demonstrate that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than {approx}<5% for most of the parameter space volume.

Rizzo, Thomas G.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radion Mixing Effects on the Properties of the Standard Model Higgs Boson  

SciTech Connect

We examine how mixing between the Standard Model(SM) Higgs boson, h, and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model modifies the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we demonstrate that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than {approx_equal}5% for most of the parameter region.

Rizzo, Thomas G.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

MINOR DIVISION LEAGUE A LEAGUE B LEAGUE C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEAGUE P LEAGUE Q LEAGUE R Bumble Bee Tuna 4 0 Dime Droppers 4 0 Rack Of Lamb 4 0 Sofa King 3 1 Run-N-Gun Wizards 1 3 Penguins 1 4 Wild Stallions 0 5 #12;LEAGUE AA LEAGUE BB LEAGUE CC The Starr's 3 0 Run-N-Gun 4 Da Warriors 0 4 LEAGUE GG Sale's Abusement Park 3 0 America's Team 2 1 Twenty One Nickel 2 2 Pickle

Yener, Aylin

345

Neutrino Propagation in a Strongly Magnetized Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive general expressions at the one-loop level for the coefficients of the covariant structure of the neutrino self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The neutrino energy spectrum and index of refraction are obtained for neutral and charged media in the strong-field limit ($M_{W}\\gg \\sqrt{B}\\gg m_{e},T,\\mu ,| \\mathbf{p}| $) using the lowest Landau level approximation. The results found within the lowest Landau level approximation are numerically validated, summing in all Landau levels, for strong $B\\gg T^{2}$ and weakly-strong $B \\gtrsim T^{2}$ fields. The neutrino energy in leading order of the Fermi coupling constant is expressed as the sum of three terms: a kinetic-energy term, a term of interaction between the magnetic field and an induced neutrino magnetic moment, and a rest-energy term. The leading radiative correction to the kinetic-energy term depends linearly on the magnetic field strength and is independent of the chemical potential. The other two terms are only present in a charged medium. For strong and weakly-strong fields, it is found that the field-dependent correction to the neutrino energy in a neutral medium is much larger than the thermal one. Possible applications to cosmology and astrophysics are considered.

E. Elizalde; E. J. Ferrer; V. de la Incera

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Neutrino Propagation in a Strongly Magnetized Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive general expressions at the one-loop level for the coefficients of the covariant structure of the neutrino self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The neutrino energy spectrum and index of refraction are obtained for neutral and charged media in the strong-field limit ($M_{W}\\gg \\sqrt{B}\\gg m_{e},T,\\mu ,| \\mathbf{p}| $) using the lowest Landau level approximation. The results found within the lowest Landau level approximation are numerically validated, summing in all Landau levels, for strong $B\\gg T^{2}$ and weakly-strong $B \\gtrsim T^{2}$ fields. The neutrino energy in leading order of the Fermi coupling constant is expressed as the sum of three terms: a kinetic-energy term, a magnetic-field neutrino-induced-magnetic-moment interaction term, and a rest-energy term. The leading radiative correction to the kinetic-energy term depends linearly on the magnetic field strength and is independent of the chemical potential. The other two terms are only present in a charged medium. For str...

Elizalde, E; De la Incera, V

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ultra-stable implanted 83Rb/83mKr electron sources for the energy scale monitoring in the KATRIN experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment aims at the direct model-independent determination of the average electron neutrino mass via the measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta decay spectrum. The electron spectrometer of the MAC-E filter type is used, requiring very high stability of the electric filtering potential. This work proves the feasibility of implanted 83Rb/83mKr calibration electron sources which will be utilised in the additional monitor spectrometer sharing the high voltage with the main spectrometer of KATRIN. The source employs conversion electrons of 83mKr which is continuously generated by 83Rb. The K-32 conversion line (kinetic energy of 17.8 keV, natural line width of 2.7 eV) is shown to fulfill the KATRIN requirement of the relative energy stability of +/-1.6 ppm/month. The sources will serve as a standard tool for continuous monitoring of KATRIN's energy scale stability with sub-ppm precision. They may also be used in other applications where the precise conversion lines can be separated from the low energy spectrum caused by the electron inelastic scattering in the substrate.

M. Zbo?il; S. Bauer; M. Beck; J. Bonn; O. Dragoun; J. Jak\\rubek; K. Johnston; A. Kovalk; E. W. Otten; K. Schlsser; M. Slezk; A. palek; T. Thmmler; D. Vnos; J. emli?ka; C. Weinheimer

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

A comparison of cloud microphysical quantities with forecasts from cloud prediction models  

SciTech Connect

Numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, NCEP) are evaluated using ARM observational data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical quantities, retrieved using a variety of parameterizations. Information gained from this comparison will be utilized during the FASTER project, as models are evaluated for their ability to reproduce fast physical processes detected in the observations. Here the model performance is quantified against the observations through a statistical analysis. Observations from remote sensing instruments (radar, lidar, radiometer and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content, ice effective radius and liquid effective radius. Unfortunately, discrepancies in the derived quantities arise when different retrieval schemes are applied to the observations. The uncertainty inherent in retrieving the microphysical quantities using various retrievals is estimated from the range of output microphysical values. ARM microphysical retrieval schemes (Microbase, Mace) are examined along with the CloudNet retrieval processing of data from the ARM sites for this purpose. Through the interfacing of CloudNet and ARM processing schemes an ARMNET product is produced and employed as accepted observations in the assessment of cloud model predictions.

Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Hogan, R.; OConnor, E.; Huang, D.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Photon Sciences Subject: Photon Sciences Significant Environmental Aspects Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject: Photon Sciences Significant Environmental Aspects Matrix Doument Number: PS-C-ESH-PRC-023 Revision 2 Effective: Page 1 of 2 Approved: Andrew Ackerman Approval Signature on file with master copy. Environmental Aspects 5/10/13 ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION R e g u la te d In d u s tr ia l W a s te H a z a rd o u s W a s te R a d io a c ti v e W a s te M ix e d W a s te R e g u la te d M e d ic a l W a s te W o r k w it h E n g in e e re d N a n o m a te ri a ls A tm o s p h e r ic D is c h a rg e s L iq u id D is c h a r g e s C h e m ic a l ( C ) S to ra g e /U s e o r R a d io a c ti v e M a te ri a l ( R ) W a te r C o n s u m p ti o n P o w e r C o n s u m p ti o n E n g in e e re d N a n o m a te r ia ls H is to r ic a l M o n u m e n ts / C u lt u r a l R e s o u rc e s S e n s it iv e /E n d a n g e r e d S p e c ie s a n d S e n s it iv e H a b it a ts E n v . N o is e H is to r ic a l C o n ta m in a ti o n S o il A c ti v a ti o n Comments Title Number C R PS Experimental Program Experimental Program B725 SAFs a a a a b* f x x x a B725 *HEPA used for nano particulate work

350

Mining the SDSS archive. I. Photometric redshifts in the nearby universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a supervised neural network approach to the determination of photometric redshifts. The method was tuned to match the characteristics of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and it exploits the spectroscopic redshifts provided by this unique survey. In order to train, validate and test the networks we used two galaxy samples drawn from the SDSS spectroscopic dataset: the general galaxy sample (GG) and the luminous red galaxies subsample (LRG). The method consists of a two steps approach. In the first step, objects are classified in nearby (ztrained on objects belonging to the two redshift ranges. Using a standard MLP operated in a Bayesian framework, the optimal architectures were found to require 1 hidden layer of 24 (24) and 24 (25) neurons for the GG (LRG) sample. The presence of systematic deviations was then corrected by interpolating the resulting redshifts. The final results on the GG dataset give a robust sigma_z = 0.0208 over the redshift range [0.01, 0.48] and sigma_z = 0.0197 and sigma_z = 0.0238 for the nearby and distant samples respectively. For the LRG subsample we find a robust sigma_z = 0.0164 over the whole range, and sigma_z = 0.0160, sigma_z = 0.0183 for the nearby and distant samples respectively. After training, the networks have been applied to all objects in the SDSS Table GALAXY matching the same selection criteria adopted to build the base of knowledge, and photometric redshifts for ca. 30 million galaxies having z<0.5 were derived. A catalogue containing photometric redshifts for the LRG subsample was also produced.

D'Abrusco Raffaele; Staiano Antonino; Longo Giuseppe; Brescia Massimo; Paolillo Maurizio; De Filippis Elisabetta; Tagliaferri Roberto

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Uniformly accelerated observer in a thermal bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum field aspects in flat spacetime for an uniformly accelerated observer moving in a thermal bath. In particular, we obtain an exact closed expression of the reduced density matrix for an uniformly accelerated observer with acceleration $a = 2\\pi T$ when the state of the quantum field is a thermal bath at temperature $T^\\prime$. We find that the density matrix has a simple form with an effective partition function $Z$ being a product, $Z = Z_T Z_{T^\\prime}$, of two thermal partition functions corresponding to temperatures $T$ and $T^\\prime$ and hence is not thermal, even when $T = T^\\prime$. We show that, even though the partition function has a product structure, the two thermal baths are, in fact, interacting systems; although in the high frequency limit $\\omega_k \\gg T$ and $\\omega_k \\gg T^\\prime$, the interactions are found to become sub-dominant. We further demonstrate that the resulting spectrum of the Rindler particles can be interpreted in terms of spontaneous and stimulated emission due to the background thermal bath. The density matrix is also found to be symmetric in the acceleration temperature $T$ and the thermal bath temperature $T^\\prime$ indicating that thermodynamic experiments alone cannot distinguish between the thermal effects due to $T$ and those due to $T^\\prime$. The entanglement entropy associated with the reduced density matrix (with the background contribution of the Davies-Unruh bath removed) is shown to satisfy, in the $\\omega_k \\gg T^\\prime$ limit, a first law of thermodynamics relation of the form $T \\delta S = \\delta E$ where $\\delta E$ is the difference in the energies corresponding to the reduced density matrix and the background Davies-Unruh bath. The implications are discussed.

Sanved Kolekar

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chiral Anomaly and Decay of Color Electric Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the formula of chiral anomaly, we discuss the pair production of quarks under color electric field $\\vec{E}$ without addressing explicit formula of quark's wavefunctions. The production is assumed to occur under the effect of color magnetic field $\\vec{B}$ as well as the color electric field. We obtain the life time $t_c$ of the color electric field in the limit of $B\\gg E$. Applying it to the glasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, we find that $t_c\\simeq 10Q_s^{-1}$ with saturation momentum $Q_s$.

Aiichi Iwazaki

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

Conserved genomic organisation of Group B Sox genes in insects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the midline. G-G') Lateral views of stage 13 embryos showing Sox21b expression in abdominal epidermal stripes. H-H') Ventral view of stage 14 embryos showing Sox21b expression in abdominal epidermal stripes.Page 5 of 15 (page number not for citation... of the foregut and hindgut at stage 12 (Figure 2E and 2E') with later expression in specific cells of the midline after stage 14 (Figure 2F and 2F'). Sox21b shows conserved expres- sion in abdominal epidermal stripes from stage 13 (Figure 2G to 2H...

McKimmie, Carol; Woerfel, Gertrud; Russell, Steven R

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REUEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REUEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM REUEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT COPPERWELD STEEL COMPANY 4000 MAHONING AVENUE, N.W. WARREN. OHIO December 1991 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Environmental Restoration Office of Eastern Area Programs CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . &gg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .l BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .l Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS . . :. . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . .2 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ELIMINATION REPORT COPPERWELD STEEL COMPANY 1 4000 MAHONING AVENUE, N.W. WARREN, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration has

355

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

Dunn, John J.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

357

Exploring anomalous top interactions via the final lepton in ttbar productions/decays at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study momentum distributions of the final-state charged lepton in ppbar/pp --> ttbar --> l^+ X (l=e or mu) at hadron colliders, i.e., Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in order to explore possible new-physics effects in the top-quark sector. Assuming general model-independent ttbar g + ttbar gg and tbW interactions beyond the standard model, we first derive analytical formulas for the corresponding parton-parton processes. We then compute the lepton angular, energy and transverse-momentum distributions in ppbar/pp collisions to clarify how they are affected by those anomalous couplings.

Zenro HIOKI; Kazumasa OHKUMA

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on extrinsic J/psi production at sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production in pPb and PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy, taking into account the gluon shadowing and the nuclear absorption. We use the complete kinematics in the underlying 2 to 2 partonic process, namely $g+g \\to \\jpsi + g$ as expected from LO pQCD. The resulting shadowing is responsible for a large J/psi suppression in pPb and PbPb, and shows a strong rapidity dependence.

E. G. Ferreiro; F. Fleuret; J. P. Lansberg; N. Matagne; A. Rakotozafindrabe

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

DNA damage responses in the context of the cell division cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and binds to human Chk1 235 61. Strategy for the design of Rad9-h/ggMCPH1 hybrid constructs 237 LIST OF DIAGRAMS 1. Possible mechanisms of action of the CMG helicase complex during DNA unwinding Pg... helicase. Indeed, the MCM complex remains associated with the fork during S-phase and plays a role ahead of the fork as an helicase to unwind the DNA duplex, with a 3 to 5 polarity shown for the archaeal MCM (Kelman et al., 1999; Chong et al., 2000...

Giunta, Simona

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Infrared safe definition of jet flavor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(energy) and collinear (angular) divergence. For flavour algorithms one should remember that the matrix elements for g ? qq or q ? qg (with a soft quark) have no soft divergence, but just the collinear divergence, [dkj]|M2g?qiqj(kj)| ? ?sTR 2? dEj Ei d?2... energy larger than 1TeV and the two hardest jets to have |?| < 1. Three representative channels, qq ? qq (including qq ? qq), qq ? gg and qg ? qg are shown in fig. 6, as obtained with Herwig [15]. The standard parton showering in Pythia [23] gives...

Banfi, Andrea; Salam, Gavin P; Zanderighi, Giulia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Structure of an n-butane monolayer adsorbed on magnesium oxide (100)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction has been used to characterize the structure of the solid phase of the completed monolayer of n butane on the MgO(100) surface at low temperature. The monolayer is found to adopt a commensurate (7{radical}(2)x{radical}(2)R45 deg. ) structure with lattice constants a=29.47 A ring and b=4.21 A ring , P{sub 2gg} symmetry and four molecules in the unit cell. Excellent agreement with the experimental diffraction pattern is realized, using a Lorenztian profile to describe the line shape.

Arnold, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Chanaa, S.; Cook, R. E. [Department of Chemistry, Buehler Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Clarke, S. M. [BP Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Larese, J. Z. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Buehler Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Higgs Boson Property Shifts from Radion Mixing  

SciTech Connect

We discuss how mixing between the Standard Model Higgs boson, h, and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model can lead to significant shifts in the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we show that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than {approx}< 5% for most of the parameter space volume. Precision measurements of Higgs boson properties at a Linear Collider are shown to probe a large region of the Randall-Sundrum model parameter space.

Rizzo, Thomas G.

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effects of Radion Mixing on the Standard Model Higgs Boson  

SciTech Connect

We discuss how mixing between the Standard Model Higgs boson and the radion of the Randall-Sundrum model can lead to significant shifts in the expected properties of the Higgs boson. In particular we show that the total and partial decay widths of the Higgs, as well as the h {yields} gg branching fraction, can be substantially altered from their SM expectations, while the remaining branching fractions are modified less than about 5% for most of the parameter space volume. Precision measurements of Higgs boson properties at at a Linear Collider are shown to probe a large region of the Randall-Sundrum model parameter space.

Rizzo, Thomas G.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Higgs hunting  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenology of the Higgs boson in the standard SU(2) x U(1) electroweak model is reviewed. We compare signatures and cross sections for various Higgs production mechanisms: (1) toponium radiative decay (xi ..-->.. H/sup 0/..gamma..); (2) gluon gluon fusion (gg ..-->.. H/sup 0/); (3) Compton-like process (gc ..-->.. H/sup 0/c); and (4) bremsstrahlungs at Z/sup 0/ resonance. It is argued that new detection techniques for heavy particle identification could be helpful in triggering the rare Higgs signals from the backgrounds.

Keung, W.Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Remote generation of entanglement for individual atoms via optical fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation of atomic entanglement is discussed in a system that atoms are trapped in separate cavities which are connected via optical fibers. Two distant atoms can be projected to Bell-state by synchronized turning off the local laser fields and then performing a single quantum measurement by a distant controller. The distinct advantage of this scheme is that it works in a regime that $\\Delta\\approx\\kappa\\gg g$, which makes the scheme insensitive to cavity strong leakage. Moreover, the fidelity is not affected by atomic spontaneous emission.

Y. Q. Guo; H. Y. Zhong; Y. H. Zhang; H. S. Song

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

An averaging theorem for FPU in the thermodynamic limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider an FPU chain composed of $N\\gg 1$ particles, and endow the phase space with the Gibbs measure corresponding to a small temperature $\\beta^{-1}$. Given a fixed $Korder $\\beta^{1-a}$, $a>0$) for initial data in a set of large measure. Furthermore, the time autocorrelation function of the energy of each packet does not decay significantly for times of order $\\beta$. The restrictions on the shape of the packets are very mild. All estimates are uniform in the number $N$ of particles and thus hold in the thermodynamic limit $N\\to\\infty$, $\\beta>0$.

Alberto Maiocchi; Dario Bambusi; Andrea Carati

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Shahar Hod

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Hod, Shahar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Production of single top-quark final states at the LHC from supersymmetric FCNC interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the production of single top-quark final states by direct supersymmetric flavor-changing interactions at the LHC. The total cross section pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c is computed at the 1-loop order within the unconstrained MSSM. We prove that SUSY-QCD effects may furnish sizeable production rates amounting up to barely 10^5 t\\bar{c}(c\\bar{t}) events per 100 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity, in full compliance with the stringent low-energy constraints from b->s gamma. Furthermore, we show that the cooperative SUSY-EW effects can be sizeable on their own, regardless of the SUSY-QCD contribution, with maximum production rates of the order of 10^3 events per 100 fb^{-1}. Owing to the fact that FCNC production of electrically neutral heavy-quark pairs is virtually absent within the SM, we conclude that the observation of such pp(gg)->t\\bar{c}+\\bar{t}c processes at the LHC could lead to evidence of new physics - of likely supersymmetric nature.

David Lopez-Val; Jaume Guasch; Joan Sola

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Two-loop renormalization constants and high energy $2\\rightarrow 2$ scattering amplitudes in the Higgs sector of the standard model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the complete matrix of two-body scattering amplitudes for the scattering of longitudinally polarized gauge bosons $W_L^\\pm$, $Z_L$ and Higgs bosons to two loops in the high-energy, heavy-Higgs limit $\\sqrt{s}\\gg M_H\\gg M_W$. Use of the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem reduces the problem to one involving only the scalar fields $w^\\pm$, $z$ (the Goldstone bosons of the original theory) and the Higgs boson. Renormalization of the scattering amplitudes requires the calculation of the self-energy functions $\\Pi _i^0(M_i^2)$, the renormalization constants $Z_i$, and the bare quartic Higgs coupling $\\lambda _0$ to two loops. The results will be useful in other calculations. To facilitate the calculations, we introduce a powerful new technique for evaluating integrals over Feynman parameters in dimensional regularization which is based on a Barnes' type representation of the binomial expansion. We also collect some useful integrals which extend the tables given by Devoto and Duke.

Peter N. Maher; Loyal Durand; Kurt Riesselmann

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Extracting bb Higgs Decay Signals using Multivariate Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For low-mass Higgs boson production at ATLAS at {radical}s = 7 TeV, the hard subprocess gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} dominates but is in turn drowned out by background. We seek to exploit the intrinsic few-MeV mass width of the Higgs boson to observe it above the background in b{bar b}-dijet mass plots. The mass resolution of existing mass-reconstruction algorithms is insufficient for this purpose due to jet combinatorics, that is, the algorithms cannot identify every jet that results from b{bar b} Higgs decay. We combine these algorithms using the neural net (NN) and boosted regression tree (BDT) multivariate methods in attempt to improve the mass resolution. Events involving gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} are generated using Monte Carlo methods with Pythia and then the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) is used to train and test NNs and BDTs. For a 120 GeV Standard Model Higgs boson, the m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstruction width is reduced from 8.6 to 6.5 GeV. Most importantly, however, the methods used here allow for more advanced m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstructions to be created in the future using multivariate methods.

Smith, W Clarke; /George Washington U. /SLAC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Gluon-gluon contributions to W+ W- production and Higgs interference effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we complete our re-assessment of the production of W boson pairs at the LHC, by calculating analytic results for the gg {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}} process including the effect of massive quarks circulating in the loop. Together with the one-loop amplitudes containing the first two generations of massless quarks propagating in the loop, these diagrams can give a significant contribution with a large flux of gluons. One of the component parts of this calculation is the production of a standard model Higgs boson, gg {yields} H and its subsequent decay, H {yields} W{sup +}({yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +})W{sup -}({yields} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}). We will quantify the importance of the interference between the Higgs boson production process and the gluon-induced continuum production in the context of searches for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron and the LHC. For instance, for m{sub H} < 140 GeV the effect of the interference typically results in around a 10% reduction in the expected number of Higgs signal events. The majority of this interference is due to non-resonant contributions. Therefore cuts on the transverse mass such as those currently used by the ATLAS collaboration reduce the destructive interference to about a 1% effect. We advocate that a cut on the maximum transverse mass be used in future Higgs searches in this channel.

Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith; Williams, Ciaran

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Comparison between continuous stirred tank reactor extractor and soxhlet extractor for extraction of El-Lajjun oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction on El-Lajjun oil shale in a continuous stirred tank reactor extractor (CSTRE) and a Soxhlet extractor was carried out using toluene and chloroform as solvents. Solvents were recovered using two distillation stages, a simple distillation followed by a fractional distillation. Gas chromotography was used to test for the existence of trapped solvent in the yield. It was found that extraction using a CSTRE gave a 12% increase in yield on average compared with the Soxhlet extractor, and an optimum shale size of 1.0mm offered a better yield and solvent recovery for both techniques. It was also found that an optimum ratio of solvent to oil shale of 2:1 gave the best oil yield. The Soxhlet extractor was found to offer an extraction rate of 1 hour to complete extraction compared with 4 hours in a CSTRE. The yield in a CSTRE was found to increase on increase of stirring. When extraction was carried out at the boiling point of the solvents in a CSTRE, the yield was found to increase by 30% on average compared to that of extraction when the solvent was at room temperature. When toluene was used for extraction, the average amount of bitumen extracted was 0.032 g/g of oil shale and 76.4% of the solvent recovered, compared with 0.037 g/g of oil shale and 84.1% of the solvent recovered using a Soxhlet extractor.

Anabtawi, M.Z. [Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Calculation of HELAS amplitudes for QCD processes using graphics processing unit (GPU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast calculations of helicity amplitudes of quark and gluon scattering processes in massless QCD. New HEGET ({\\bf H}ELAS {\\bf E}valuation with {\\bf G}PU {\\bf E}nhanced {\\bf T}echnology) codes for gluon self-interactions are introduced, and a C++ program to convert the MadGraph generated FORTRAN codes into HEGET codes in CUDA (a C-platform for general purpose computing on GPU) is created. Because of the proliferation of the number of Feynman diagrams and the number of independent color amplitudes, the maximum number of final state jets we can evaluate on a GPU is limited to 4 for pure gluon processes ($gg\\to 4g$), or 5 for processes with one or more quark lines such as $q\\bar{q}\\to 5g$ and $qq\\to qq+3g$. Compared with the usual CPU-based programs, we obtain 60-100 times better performance on the GPU, except for 5-jet production processes and the $gg\\to 4g$ processes for which the GPU gain over the CPU is about 20.

K. Hagiwara; J. Kanzaki; N. Okamura; D. Rainwater; T. Stelzer

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

He Led Them On  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isngiis ^ -: I,e.ss s , ,!a s sR !.:"5 :'!a S s xt .: s siv . . .s .: II'b R "ra ; E E .- E .S . s[ 6{ 'qg R s F; .s\\ sR b'R :,t a -_ s - :d i.: U E I t* *EFRl.r r 'r'#| F#EE E'ieEi; i,H a;g!ili*f; r:tii ag!;iiE EEg E s... gg iE $ff !E:T5gE EE:E g8";E;g;jfiqgHHEEH;EE flEiE EH F:; e t"5ee iE -E E E f,E H F'i.frfrisf ;;+i; i#,E i;s:ii:: g'E ;sitg N e gg ; gE$iE H EE E iI EirgFqli ii: s;EEi Es;$f,1iiEiE E e 5 * $= Eil i * s E : $F ; H E E ui i...

Whitehorn, John

377

HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH BOTTOM QUARKS.  

SciTech Connect

In the Standard Model, the coupling of the Higgs boson to b quarks is weak, leading to small cross sections for producing a Higgs boson in association with b quarks. However, Higgs bosons with enhanced couplings to b quarks, such as occur in supersymmetric models for large values of tan {beta}, will be copiously produced at both the Tevatron and the LHC in association with b quarks which will be an important discovery channel. We investigate the connections between the production channels, bg {yields} bh and gg {yields} b{bar b}h, at next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbative QCD and present results for the case with two high-p{sub T} b jets and with one high-p{sub T} b jet at both the Tevatron and the LHC. Finally, the total cross sections without cuts are compared between gg {yields} b{bar b}h at NLO and b{bar b} {yields} h at NNLO.

DAWSON, S.; CAMPBELL, J.; DITTMAIER, S.; JACKSON, C.; KRAMER, M.; MALTONI, F.; ET AL.

2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Production of a Higgs boson plus two jets in hadronic collisions  

SciTech Connect

We consider the production of a standard model Higgs boson accompanied by two jets in hadronic collisions. We work in the limit that the top quark is much heavier than the Higgs boson and use an effective Lagrangian for the interactions of gluons with the Higgs boson. In addition to the previously computed four-gluon process, we compute the amplitudes involving two quarks, two gluons, and the Higgs boson and those involving four quarks and the Higgs boson. We exhibit the form of our results in the small-p{sub H} and factorization limits. We present numerical results for {radical}(S)=14 TeV and {radical}(S)=2 TeV. We find that the dominant processes are gg{r_arrow}ggH and qg{r_arrow}qgH with the former (latter) contributing about 60{percent} (40{percent}) of the cross section at {radical}(S)=14 TeV and the two processes each contributing about half the cross section at {radical}(S)=2 TeV. All other processes are negligible at both energies. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Kauffman, R.P.; Desai, S.V.; Risal, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17604 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

CDF's Higgs sensitivity status  

SciTech Connect

The combined sensitivity of CDF's current Standard Model Higgs boson searches is presented. The expected 95% CL limits on the production cross section times the relevant Higgs boson branching ratios are computed for the W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu}b{bar b}, ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}, gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} W{sup {+-}}H {yields} W{sup {+-}}W{sup +}W{sup -} channels as they stand as of the October 2005, using results which were prepared for Summer 2005 conferences and a newer result form the gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} channel. Correlated and uncorrelated systematic uncertainties are taken into account, and the luminosity requirements for 95% CL exclusion, 3{sigma} evidence, and 5{sigma} discovery are computed for median experimental outcomes. A list of improvements required to achieve the sensitivity to a SM Higgs boson as quantified in the Higgs Sensitivity Working Group's report is provided.

Junk, Tom; /Illinois U., Urbana

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Historical (1850-2000) gridded anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of reactive gases and aerosols:methodology and application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present and discuss a new dataset of gridded emissions covering the historical period (1850-2000) in decadal increments at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 in latitude and longitude. The primary purpose of this inventory is to provide consistent gridded emissions of reactive gases and aerosols for use in chemistry model simulations needed by climate models for the Climate Model Intercomparison Program #5 (CMIP5) in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment report. Our best estimate for the year 2000 inventory represents a combination of existing regional and global inventories to capture the best information available at this point; 40 regions and 12 sectors were used to combine the various sources. The historical reconstruction of each emitted compound, for each region and sector, was then forced to agree with our 2000 estimate, ensuring continuity between past and 2000 emissions. Application of these emissions into two chemistry-climate models is used to test their ability to capture long-term changes in atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide and aerosols distributions. The simulated long-term change in the Northern mid-latitudes surface and mid-troposphere ozone is not quite as rapid as observed. However, stations outside this latitude band show much better agreement in both present-day and long-term trend. The model simulations consistently underestimate the carbon monoxide trend, while capturing the long-term trend at the Mace Head station. The simulated sulfate and black carbon deposition over Greenland is in very good agreement with the ice-core observations spanning the simulation period. Finally, aerosol optical depth and additional aerosol diagnostics are shown to be in good agreement with previously published estimates.

Lamarque, J. F.; Bond, Tami C.; Eyring, Veronika; Granier, Claire; Heil, Angelika; Klimont, Z.; Lee, David S.; Liousse, Catherine; Mieville, Aude; Owen, Bethan; Schultz, Martin; Shindell, Drew; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; van Aardenne, John; Cooper, Owen; Kainuma, M.; Mahowald, Natalie; McConnell, J.R.; Naik, Vaishali; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

Comparison of Biological and Thermal (Pyrolysis) Pathways for Conversion of Lignocellulose to Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the limited supply of imported crude oil and environmental degradation, renewable energy is becoming commercially feasible and environmentally desirable. In this research, biological and thermal (pyrolysis) conversion pathways for biofuel production from lignocellulosic feedstocks were compared. For biological conversions of sorghum, ethanol yield was improved using M81-E variety (0.072 g/g juice) over Umbrella (0.065 g/g juice) for first-generation biomass (sorghum juice), and 0.042 g/g sorghum was obtained from the cellulosic portion of second-generation biomass. When ultrasonication was combined with hot water pretreatment, yields increased by 15% and 7% for cellulose to glucose, and hemicellulose to pentose, respectively. Ethanol yield was 10% higher when this pretreatment was combined with Accellerase 1500+XC for saccharification. Biological conversion yielded 1,600?2,300 L ethanol/ha for first-generation biomass, and 4,300?4,500 L ethanol/ha from lignocellulosic biomass. For thermal (pyrolysis) conversion of lignocellulosic switchgrass at 600 degrees C, product yield was 37% bio-oil, 26% syngas, and 25% bio-char. At 400 degrees C, product yield was 22% bio-oil, 8% syngas, and 56% bio-char. Bio-oil from pyrolysis was highly oxygenated (37 wt%). It required chemical transformation to increase its volatility and thermal stability, and to reduce its viscosity by removing objectionable oxygen, so the product could be used as transportation fuel (gasoline). As a consequence of upgrading bio-oil by catalytic hydrogenation, bio-oil oxygen decreased from 37?2 wt%, carbon increased from 50?83 wt%, hydrogen increased from 9?15 wt% and heating value increased from 36?46 MJ/kg, resulting in a fuel that was comparable to gasoline. The upgraded product passed the thermal stability test when kept under an oxygen-rich environment. The upgraded product consisted of 14.8% parrafins, 21.7% iso-parrafins, 3% napthene, 42.6% aromatics, 4.7% olefin, 4.7% DMF, 8% alcohol, and 0.6% ketone on a mass basis. Comparing the two pathways, biological conversion had 11 wt% ethanol yield from sorghum, and thermal conversion had 13 wt% gasoline yield from switchgrass. For process efficiency, thermal conversion had 35% energy loss versus 45% energy loss for biological conversions. For the biological pathway, ethanol cost was $2.5/gallon ($4/gallon, gasoline equivalent), whereas for the thermal pathway, switchgrass gasoline cost was $3.7/gallon, both with 15% before tax profit.

Imam, Tahmina 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tensile Tester Tensile Tester Device: Tensile Tester Use: In-situ transmission SAXS studies of polymer networks under dynamic strain Capacity: Extension rate E: 0.001 mm s -1 < E < 25 mm s -1 ; Strain capability l: 0 % < l < 300% Oven Temp T: 25°C < T < 100°C ±2°C l = 0% l = 300% Showcase Project: Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene in Dynamic Strain W. Wiyatno, J. A. Pople, A.P. Gast, R.M. Waymouth, G.G. Fuller Unstretched elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) reveals a crystalline phase of the R -form isotactic polypropylene (i-PP). (Right top) Under tensile stretching, high-tacticity fractions contribute to the equatorial and off- axis diagonal scatterings, revealing molecular- scale orientation parallel to the strain axis and crystalline phase transformation from the R -

384

Definition: Acoustic Televiewer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Televiewer Televiewer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Acoustic Televiewer The Acoustic Televiewer (ATV) log provides a very-high resolution, sonic image of the borehole wall. The tool consists of an ultrasonic transducer coupled with a downhole inclinometer. These devices are used to generate an oriented image of seismic velocity variation and wave amplitude. These images are then examined and highlighted to reveal fractures, bedding planes and orientation of those features. The log is useful for strata and fracture delineation, and can also be used to evaluate compressional-wave velocity, borehole deviation and eccentricity.[1] References ↑ http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/geotech/gg/atv_log.htm Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

385

ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

em IVIL, u-3 em IVIL, u-3 1' 1L, I -' I ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 1. H.# fL22 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. Sample Nor& 3 Date Collected- 5117 by --Route to CES CES r Location IQJKER-PEMJNS Co- Type of Sample-waternalyzed for F Alpha Remarks -&I GG -- u - Beta Samples of water discharged to river during Steam clean- No, Ra ing of equipment. Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description (RT Please analyze for gm/U/gal. BP-1 P- RO-Kneader BP-2 K- N-Kneader BP-3 Omera Feeder - __-- .___ -- i ___- ------I - 1 I . ----.--- - ------ .-___ _- I I - 3" - 1 ' : i ' Nt! w-d Analytical Chemistry Section: - Date Received 5-21-56 bY %b. Date Reported 5-2 Z-56 by&b. Method of Analysis Fluorimeter

386

Pair creation by a photon in an electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of pair creation by a photon in a constant and homogeneous electric field is investigated basing on the polarization operator in the field. The total probability of the process is found in a relatively simple form. At high energy the quasiclassical approximation is valid. The corrections to the standard quasiclassical approximation (SQA) are calculated. In the region relatively low photon energies, where SQA is unapplicable, the new approximation is used. It is shown that in this energy interval the probability of pair creation by a photon in electric field exceeds essentially the corresponding probability in a magnetic field. This approach is valid at the photon energy much larger than "vacuum" energy in electric field: $\\omega\\gg eE/m$. For smaller photon energies the low energy approximation is developed. At $\\omega\\ll eE/m$ the found probability describes the absorption of soft photon by the particles created by an electric field.

V. N. Baier; V. M. Katkov

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

MECHANICAL PROPERTY AND FORMABILITY STUDIES ON UNALLOYED PLUTONIUM  

SciTech Connect

The effect of temperature and testing speed on the tension and compression properties of unalloyed plutouium was studied in the alpha , beta , gamma , and delta phases. Compressive formability data were obtained for a load of 100,000 lbs in the aforementioned phases. In addition, preliminary creep, tension impact, and torsion data for alpha -phase plutonium are reported. Extrusion constants and pressures for the beta , gamma , and delta phases were obtained. The roomtemperature tension and compression properties of the beta - and #gg-extruded plutonium were determined. Metallo graphic studies were made to determine the effect of tension, compression, and extrusion, in the indicated phases, on the microstructure of as-cast plutonium. (auth)

Gardner, H.R.; Mann, I.B.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

United States Government Department of Energy DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kE FJ325.8 d& * 9 -1 kE FJ325.8 d& * 9 -1 . (8-89) ZFG fO7440 1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE: DEC 2 3 :gg3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program TO: The File I have reviewed the attached site summaries and elimination recommendations for the following sites: e l Mitts & Merrel Co., Saginaw, Michigan l North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina l National Smelt & Refining, Cleveland, Ohio l Sutton, Steele & Steele, Dallas, Texas --------+. Norfolk Naval Station, Virginia In each case, the potential for radiological contamination above applicable guidelines is small. In each case the amounts of radioactive materials handled was small. Based on these considerations, these sites

389

HERA Upgrade Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HERA Upgrade Project HERA Upgrade Project As part of the HERA luminosity upgrade, 6 superconducting Interaction Region quadrupoles were delivered, accepted, and are in service. These 6 layer magnets were designed to include the main quadrupole focus, a skew quad, a normal and skew dipole, and a final sextupole layer. Because of the physical space constraints imposed by the existing detector region components, the DESY magnets were of necessity designed to be very compact. In addition, they are also are required to operate within the solenoidal detector fields at the collision points, so all construction materials had to be non magnetic. Two types of DESY magnets were fabricated. The first, designated as G0, was a two meter long, constant radius magnet. The second, designated GG, is a

390

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cathode contact materials PNNL.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Cathode Contact Development of Cathode Contact Materials for SOFC J.W. Stevenson, G.G. Xia, Z. Lu, X. Li, Z. Nie, T. Oh, and J.D.Templeton Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 July 27-29, 2010 July 27 29, 2010 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA Cathode/Interconnect Contact Materials Cathode/Interconnect Contact Materials Cathode Chromia-forming Protective Coating Contact layer Chromia-forming alloy interconnect 2 Cathode/Interconnect Contact Materials Cathode/Interconnect Contact Materials Requirements: High electrical conductivity to reduce interfacial electrical resistance between cathode and interconnect Contact layer Chemical and structural stability in air at SOFC operating temperature Chemical compatibility with adjacent materials (perovskite cathode,

391

The Honorable Peter J. Sferrazza  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Departnjetit of ,Ehergy ' ' ; Departnjetit of ,Ehergy ' ' ; /~, Washington, DC 20585 ,. z;iN 1; ,:;gg' i. ,, The Honorable Peter J. Sferrazza -490 South.Center Street '. ' .. , j 0 m b,: 0 ".' ..' ,' . Reno, Nevada 89501 .' Dear Mayor'sferrazza: . .,, . .(. ,I .' Secretary of Energy' Wazel O'Leary has,announced ,a'new approach to openness:in the bepartment,of Energy (DOE). and its communications~with,the p.ublic. In support of this' initiative, we' are pleased to forward the enclosed information . : related to the former U.S;"Bureau of Mines site.in your-jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This information is, -provided foryour information, use, and retenti,on. . DOE's~:Formdrly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsible'

392

The Honorable Gene Dean  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Energy' .' Energy' .' Washington, DC 20585 DE! 14 1gg4 The Honorable Gene Dean \ P.O. Box 1659~ L Huntington, West Virginia 25717 _ ',.. : Dear Mayor Dean: Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has'announced,a new approach ,to openness in the'Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this in.itiative, we are pleased,to forward the..enclosed information related to the former Reduction Pilot Plant sitein your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE predecessor agencies. This information is provided.for your information, use,.band retention., DDE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial.Action Program is responsible for identification of sitesused by DOE's predecessor agencies, determini,ng theirs current radiological condition and, where it has authority, performing

393

Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO2: An Integrated Global Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JAF21006.DOC JAF21006.DOC First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory May 15-17, 2001 Washington, D.C. Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO 2 : An Integrated Global Research Program S. H. Stevens (sstevens@adv-res.com, (703) 528 8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe Road, Suite 600 Arlington, VA USA 22201 703-528-8420 J. M. Pearce (jmpe@bgs.ac.uk, (0)115 9363 222) British Geological Survey Nottingham, NG12 5GG, United Kingdom. A. A. J. Rigg (a.rigg@petroleum.crc.org.au, 61-2-9490 8225) Australian Petroleum Cooperative Research Centre Sydney, NSW Australia ABSTRACT Coordinated research efforts are underway on three continents (North America, Europe,

394

NDP-030/R6 (Table 3)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Listing of the primary and secondary fuels from the United Nations 3. Listing of the primary and secondary fuels from the United Nations Energy Statistics Database used in calculating CO2-emission estimates. The two-letter commodity code used by he United Nations for each fuel type is shown in parentheses. Gas Fuels Primary gas fuels Secondary gas fuels Natural gas (NG) Gasworks gas (GG) Coke-oven gas (OG) Refinery gas (RG) Liquid Fuels Primary liquid fuels Secondary liquid fuels Crude petroleum (CR) Aviation gasoline (AV) Natural gas liquids (GL) Plant condensate (CD) Gas-diesel oils (DL) Feedstocks (FS) Jet fuel (JF) Kerosene (KR) Liquefied petroleum gas (LP) Motor gasoline (MO) Natural gasoline (NT) Residual fuel oils (RF) Secondary nonenergy liquid fuels Bitumen/asphalt (BT) Lubricants (LU) Naphthas (NP) Petroleum coke (PK)

395

Microsoft Word - Katin_EDIT_Radiotransponder.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radio-Transponder Systems for Remote Monitoring and Identification of Radio-Transponder Systems for Remote Monitoring and Identification of Containers with Fissile Materials S.V. Katin, G.G. Bakhirev, S.L. Torokhov NIIIS, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Summary: The report presents the main scientific and technical solutions being the basis for the radio- transponder system under development, providing remote state monitoring and identification of fissile materials and radioactive materials containers. Introduction Hazardous substance containers monitoring includes two interrelated tasks. The first is to take the stock of and monitor integrity (availability) of the containers in a storage area or vehicle during transportation. The second task is related to monitoring the containers content state (monitoring the set threshold values overriding by the

396

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

# Xx i' # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoumendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

397

The Honorable Aaron Thompson.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\ \ Departmet? of Energy Washington. DC 20585 j FEB.16 1gg5 ' ~.. The Honorable Aaron Thompson. 6th Market Streets ,, Camden, New, Jersey 08101 :., , _ I / Dear Mayor Thompson: , . . . ...: _ ,. Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has,announced a new.approach to a the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the pub1 support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed , related to then former New York Shipbuilding'corp. site in your juri that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies.- This info provided for your information, use, and retention. DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsibl identification of sites used by DOE's predecessor agencies', determi current radiological condition and, 'where it has authority; perform

398

KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * ?a, a5 fF#LG 44 it .L &=d ,,*, " ~=iL.oeL~~ KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION 101 EAST 42.. STREET $7/$ ,2 : -$ NEW YORU 17, N. Y. AND KOPPERS COMPAN,Y, INC. KOppERS B",'o,,,,G PITTSBURGH 19. PA. Classification Officer, OR0 October ,30, l!% ?!r. S. R. Saptile, Mmagez Oak Ridge Operations Office II. S. Atomic Enerfg Comission P. 0. BOX R. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention; Hr. John It. Moore, Director Contract Dltisloa Subjects Addendum (A) to F~oposal for a Feed Materials Processing Plant, dated September 27, WS6 Dear !&. Moore: In the proposal for a feed materials proce.esGg plaut for the production of uranium hexafluoride that uas submitted ~olntly by, Koppers Cm, Inc. and Kennecott Copper Corporation uuder dateof September 27, W%, we described a

399

DOE F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1325.8. (8-89) EFO IO?-90) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum _._ ._, \\--C' - ,, 0, DATE: AUG 3, 9 !gg4 \c. -7 REPLY TO AlTN OF: Eli-421 (U. A. Williillas, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actieu Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of .these sites, recomaendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

400

DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,111 ,111 DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE *I W INDSOR, CONNECTICUT 111 E. W . ABELQUIST Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy I- II I- .:jj;jiE// .:::=::::: .ipij!li' ,:::i::.:. ..::I::::/. ,:ii~iiiiai, ..' iiiiiiiiii!!liiii~~~~,~:~:. ~i!i.~iii~' :' -' +g?' gg;; ,- ZY :i/ .:;i" .:!! .:::a .(/i?j i:/i;jl? I!kr ' -:~i~jg~;...,.;, ..,::&Si! :(j)//ji//(!: 3.. :jijiiiiiiqi:wi l~,. ,,v..::;:~/j~B/; g#;$ .;::::::::::! :::::::::: ::j/j j/i; :(/;;I . . :/:jij; ,:j:,i/; ::::::: ,i/j//:j ;igg;ij iii:::: ,;(iii$ :::::i:ii. ,,,,,, :i.;ifi;iuij;; ,,:,: ii ,,:::::::::::: .:zy,:l::... Lb. .::i:::. .,:.:::;:. ](i:iii:;!! :.:::::::p "'.'j?'~ fix&$ .ii .:::i .::i;;!jg#ggi& i///jjji_

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) The following is a full listing of ascii file ndp050.dat (File 2), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file ndp050.wk1 (File 3). This file lists the estimated net flux of carbon, in units of 1000 Gg of carbon (1 gigagram = 109 g), to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 through 1990, by year and by region, along with the global totals. The values in this listing replace the values in files netflux.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Year North South and Europe North Tropical Former China South and Pacific TOTAL America Central Africa and Africa Soviet Southeast Developed FLUX America Middle East Union Asia Region

402

Magnetized GRB outflow model: weak reverse shock emission and short energy transfer timescale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the absence of the bright optical flashes in most {\\it Swift} Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) afterglows can be explained, if the reverse shock region is magnetized with a $\\sigma \\sim 1$, or the emission spectrum of the electrons accelerated in the mildly magnetized ($0.1magnetized outflow is sub-relativistic, where $\\sigma$ is the ratio of the magnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux. We also find that for $\\sigma\\gg 1$, the energy transfer between the magnetized ejecta and the forward shock may be too quick to account for the shallow decline phase that is well detected in many {\\it Swift} GRB X-ray afterglows.

Yi-Zhong Fan

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

On the Chvtal-Erd?s triangle game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a graph G and positive integers n and q, let G(G; n, q) be the game played on the edges of the complete graph Kn in which the two players, Maker and Breaker, alternately claim 1 and q edges, respectively. Makers goal is to occupy all edges in some copy of G; Breaker tries to prevent it. In their seminal paper on positional games, Chvtal and Erd?s proved that in the game G(K3; n, q), Maker has a winning strategy if q Breaker has a winning strategy. In this note, we improve the latter of these bounds by describing a randomized strategy that allows Breaker to win the game G(K3; n, q) whenever q ? (2 ? 1/24) ? n. Moreover, we provide additional evidence supporting the belief that this bound can be further improved to ( ? 2 + o(1)) ? n. 1

Jzsef Balogh; Wojciech Samotij

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Threshold corrections in bottom and charm quark hadroproduction at next-to-next-to-leading order.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 04 01 05 6v 1 9 Ja n 20 04 Cavendish-HEP-04/01 LBNL-54251 Threshold corrections in bottom and charm quark hadroproduction at next-to-next-to-leading order Nikolaos Kidonakisa and Ramona Vogtb aCavendish Laboratory, University... be either qq or gg. A more detailed discussion of the kinematics can be found in Ref. [2]. In 1PI kinematics, a single heavy quark is identified so that i(pa) + j(pb) ?? Q(p1) +X[Q](p2) (2.1) where Q is the identified bottom or charm quark of mass m and X...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Vogt, Ramona

405

In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comparison of NNLO DIS scheme splitting functions with results from exact gluon kinematics at small x.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

result such that the complete non-singlet coefficient is negative at small x. However, it is not divergent as x? 0 so that convolution with a suitable non-singlet test function 7 05000 10000 10 -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 x P +(2) ns 0 5000 10000 15000... -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 x x P(2)gg -20000 -10000 0 10000 10 -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 x x P(2)qg -10000 -5000 0 10 -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 x x P(2)gq Figure 3: The singlet splitting functions in the DIS (solid) and MS schemes (dashed...

White, C D; Thorne, Robert S

407

Lepton flavor violating Higgs bosons and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}  

SciTech Connect

We update phenomenological constraints on a two Higgs doublet model with lepton flavor nonconserving Yukawa couplings. We review that tan{beta} is ambiguous in such 'type III' models, and define it from the {tau} Yukawa coupling. The neutral scalars {phi} could be searched for at hadron colliders in {phi}{yields}{tau}{mu} and are constrained by the rare decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. The Feynman diagrams for the collider process, with Higgs production via gluon fusion, are similar to the two-loop ''Barr-Zee'' diagrams, which contribute to {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}. Some ''tuning'' is required to obtain a collider cross section of order the standard model expectation for {sigma}(gg{yields}h{sub SM{yields}{tau}}{sup +{tau}-}), while agreeing with the current bound from {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}.

Davidson, Sacha; Grenier, Gerald [IPNL, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue E. Fermi 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lepton flavour violating Higgs and tau to mu gamma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update phenomenological constraints on a Two Higgs Doublet Model with lepton flavour non-conserving Yukawa couplings. We review that $\\tan \\beta$ is ambiguous in such "Type III" models, and define it from the $\\tau$ Yukawa coupling. The neutral scalars $\\phi$ could be searched for at hadron colliders in $ \\phi \\to \\tau \\bar{\\mu}$, and are constrained by the rare decay $\\tau \\to \\mu \\gamma$. The Feynman diagrams for the collider process, with Higgs production via gluon fusion, are similar to the two-loop "Barr-Zee" diagrams which contribute to $\\tau \\to \\mu \\gamma$. Some "tuning" is required to obtain a collider cross-section of order the Standard Model expectation for $\\sigma (gg \\to h_{SM} \\to \\tau^+ \\tau^-)$, while agreeing with the current bound from $\\tau \\to \\mu \\gamma$.

Sacha Davidson; Gerald Grenier

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Borexino: A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

Lino Miramonti

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Model-independent Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC using the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape  

SciTech Connect

We show that combining a direct measurement of the Higgs total width from the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape with Higgs signal rate measurements allows Higgs couplings to be extracted in a model-independent way from CERN LHC data. Using existing experimental studies with 30 fb{sup -1} at one detector of the 14 TeV LHC, we show that the couplings squared of a 190 GeV Higgs to WW, ZZ, and gg can be extracted with statistical precisions of about 10%, and a 95% confidence level upper limit on an unobserved component of the Higgs decay width of about 22% of the standard model Higgs width can be set. The method can also be applied for heavier Higgs masses.

Logan, Heather E. [Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Salvail, Jeff Z. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Parton distributions for the LHC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.01 ep? jet +X ??g ? qq g 0.01 . x . 0.1 pp? jet +X gg, qg, qq? 2j g, q 0.01 . x . 0.5 pp? (W ? ??)X ud?W, ud?W u, d, u, d x & 0.05 pp? (Z ? ?+??)X uu, dd? Z d x & 0.05 Table 1: The main processes included in the current global PDF analysis... , for example, at O(?S) gives for F2(x,Q2): CFF,n,(1)2,g (Q2/m2H) = C VF,n+1,(0) 2,HH (Q2/m2H)? P (0)qg ln(Q2/m2H) + C VF,n+1,(1) 2,g (Q2/m2H). (22) The GM-VFNS coefficient functions, CVF,nfi,j , are constrained to tend to the massless limits for Q2 ? m2H...

Martin, A D; Stirling, W James; Thorne, Robert S; Watt, G

412

Remarks on double Higgs boson production by gluon fusion at threshold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amplitude of double Higgs boson production by the gluon fusion, $gg \\to hh$, is known to be small due to cancellation between the graphs with the boson trilinear coupling and those with the coupling to the top quark. For this reason a study of this process was suggested as a sensitive probe of the Higgs sector nonlinearity. We calculate in a closed analytical form this amplitude at the threshold of the two bosons, where the cancellation is the strongest, and discuss the origin of the small value of the amplitude. We also note that the cancellation in the double boson production is in fact a part of a more general phenomenon of suppression of similar threshold amplitudes for multiple boson production, which, although not directly relevant to the actual top quark and the Higgs boson, can be useful in other studies.

Xin Li; M. B. Voloshin

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Dark Energy in the Dark Ages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

Eric V. Linder

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

Collinear and soft-gluon corrections to Higgs production at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order  

SciTech Connect

I present analytical expressions for the collinear and soft-gluon corrections to Higgs production via the process bb{yields}H as well as gg{yields}H through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (NNNLO). The soft corrections are complete, while the collinear corrections include leading and some subleading logarithms. Numerical results at the Tevatron and the CERN LHC are presented, primarily for bb{yields}H. It is shown that the collinear terms greatly improve the soft and virtual approximation at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order, especially when subleading terms are included. The NNNLO collinear and soft corrections provide significant enhancements to the total cross section. I also provide expressions for the collinear and soft corrections through NNNLO for the related Drell-Yan process.

Kidonakis, Nikolaos [Kennesaw State University, Physics 1202, 1000 Chastain Road, Kennesaw, Georgia 30144-5591 (United States)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Extent of differential allelic expression of candidate breast cancer genes is similar in blood and breast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lymphocytes), polymorpho- nuclear cells and red blood cells, we compared the allelic expression ratios in cDNA extracted from total mononuclear cells from 59 healthy unrelated donors, with those obtained for pattern (cis- regulation in LD with tSNP or not... 0 20 00 40 00 60 00 BRCA1 Le ve l o f e xp re ss io n in L C L p=0.76 TT CT CC n=5 n=14 n=1 AA CA CC 70 0 80 0 90 0 10 00 BRCA2 Le ve l o f e xp re ss io n in b re as t p=0.58 n=36 n=39 n=11 AA AG GG 0 50 0 10 00 15 00 20 00 C1qA Le ve l o f e...

Maia, Ana-Teresa; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Lee, Alvin J X; O'Reilly, Martin; Jones, Linda; Caldas, Carlos; Ponder, Bruce A J

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Higgs Searches  

SciTech Connect

We present the status and prospects of Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Results from the Tevatron are using up to 5 fb{sup -} of data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors. The major contributing processes include associated production (WH {yields} l{nu}bb, ZH {yields} {nu}{nu}bb, ZH {yields} llbb) and gluon fusion (gg {yields} H {yields} WW{sup (*)}). Improvements across the full mass range resulting from the larger data sets, improved analyses techniques and increased signal acceptance are discussed. Recent results exclude the SM Higgs boson in a mass range of 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV. Searches for the neutral MSSM Higgs boson in the region 90 < m{sub A} < 200 GeV exclude tan {beta} values down to 30 for several benchmark scenarios.

Peters, Krisztian

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism  

SciTech Connect

The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

418

BCL2 major breakpoint region (mbr) may specify an origin of replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have described a minisatellite consensus signal, GC[A/T]GG[A/T]GG, which resembles the prokaryotic activator of recombination, {chi}. The consensus appears frequently at the breakpoints of oncogene translocations, especially those in which the V(D)J recombinase has been implicated. We have investigated this relationship by examining the breakpoint positions and DNA sequence of many mbr translations from human follicular lymphomas. Breakpoints occur in three, evenly-spaced clusters 14-18 bp wide and 50 bp apart; the first cluster begins at the first base 3{prime} to the {chi} signal. At the end of cluster 3, translocations abruptly decline in frequency. We now report that this region is characterized by multiple binding sites for both single- and double-strand DNA binding proteins. Furthermore, the binding sites immediately flank clusters 1 and 3, thus defining the region at risk for translocation. The two single-strand binding proteins, one each for the sense and anti-sense strand of BCL2, bind the {chi} signal that marks the onset of translocation. The second binding site, which begins at the 3{prime} flank of cluster 3, extends a further 80 bp downstream and is absolutely required for the interaction of the mbr with factor(s) which can denature the target DNA in a cell-specific fashion. This process requires energy, as complex formation is inhibited by ATP{gamma}S. One of the two ssDNA binding proteins and, possibly, the helicase activity are expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Finally, helical stability studies of the helicase binding region yield a profile comparable to those previously defined for several viral, yeast, and bacterial origins of replication. These studies indicate that BCL2 translocation may reflect (1) a requirement for removing a replication origin from the gene to promote lymphomagenesis and/or (2) the recombinogenic nature of such structures.

DiCroce, P.A.; Bailey, S.; Hagins, W.C. [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

gravrpp.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October October 2011 by T. Damour (IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, France). Einstein's General Relativity, the current "standard" theory of gravitation, describes gravity as a universal deformation of the Minkowski metric: g µν (x λ ) = η µν + h µν (x λ ) , where η µν = diag(-1, +1, +1, +1) . (20.1) General Relativity is classically defined by two postulates. One postulate states that the Lagrangian density describing the propagation and self-interaction of the gravitational field is L Ein [g µν ] = c 4 16πG N √ gg µν R µν (g) , (20.2) R µν (g) = ∂ α Γ α µν - ∂ ν Γ α µα + Γ β αβ Γ α µν - Γ β αν Γ α µβ , (20.3) Γ λ µν = 1 2 g λσ (∂ µ g νσ + ∂ ν g µσ - ∂ σ g µν ) , (20.4) where G N is Newton's constant, g = - det(g µν ), and g µν is the matrix inverse of g µν . A second postulate states that g µν couples universally, and minimally, to all the fields of the

422

C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C om pact S uperconducting F F Q uadrupole M agnet O utline. S uperconducting M agnets for the H E R A -II L um inosity U pgrade. NLC -The NextLi nearCol l i derPr oj ect I P Cur r entLead & Hel i um Feed Poi nt Det ect orCom ponent s + Sol enoi d GO ( Lef t ) GG ( Ri ght ) Cur r entLead & Hel i um Feed Poi nt Minicryostat * Superconducting magnets installed into existing ZEUS and H1 detectors (solenoid, so no iron yoke). * Coils for separating beams and reducing e-ring β* (dipole, quad, skew-quad, skew-dipole & sextupole). * Met extremely tight radial budget for cryostat. * Met demanding field harmonic requirements. * Technology now will be used for BEPC-II Upgrade and possibly the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory Upgrade. Endcan GO Endcan S uperconducting M agnets for the H E R A -II L um inosity U pgrade. He Cont ai nm ent Coi lSuppor tTube 102 m m I D 5 m m W al l Vacuum Flange Connection to Experimental Beam Pipe Warm-to-Cold

423

crosssecrpp.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cross-section Cross-section formulae for specific processes 1 44. CROSS-SECTION FORMULAE FOR SPECIFIC PROCESSES Revised October 2009 by H. Baer (University of Oklahoma) and R.N. Cahn (LBNL). PART I: STANDARD MODEL PROCESSES Setting aside leptoproduction (for which, see Sec. 16 of this Review), the cross sections of primary interest are those with light incident particles, e + e - , γγ, qq, gq , gg, etc., where g and q represent gluons and light quarks. The produced particles include both light particles and heavy ones - t, W , Z, and the Higgs boson H. We provide the production cross sections calculated within the Standard Model for several such processes. 44.1. Resonance Formation Resonant cross sections are generally described by the Breit-Wigner formula (Sec. 18 of this Review). σ(E) = 2J + 1 (2S 1 + 1)(2S 2 + 1) 4π k 2 Γ 2 /4 (E - E 0 ) 2 + Γ 2 /4 B in B out , (44.1) where E is the c.m. energy, J is the spin of

424

Group Publications-Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis (SEE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEE Group Publications 2009 - present SEE Group Publications 2009 - present 2013 Ordered Bilayer Ruthenium-Platinum Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Carbon Monoxide-Tolerant Fuel Cell Catalysts, Y.-C. Hsieh, Y. Zhang, D. Su, V. Volkov, R. Si, L. Wu, Y. Zhu, W. An, P. Liu, P. He, S. Ye, R. R. Adzic, and J.X. Wang, Nature Communications, in press. Pt Monolayer on Au-Stabilized PdNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction, K.A. Kuttiyiel, K. Sasaki, D. Su, M.B. Vukmirovic, N.S. Marinkovic, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, in press. Oxygen Reduction Activity of IrCu Core Platinum Monolayer Shell Nano-electrocatalysts, Y.M. Choi, K.A. Kuttiyiel, J. P. Labis, K. Sasaki, G.-G. Park, T.-H. Yang, R.R. Adzic, Topics in Catalysis, in press. The Role of Rhodium and Tin Oxide in the Platinum-based Electrocatalysts for Ethanol Oxidation to CO2, M. Li, W.-P. Zhou, N.S. Marinkovic, K. Sasaki, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, 104 (2013) 454-461.

425

gravrpp.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September September 2013 by T. Damour (IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, France). Einstein's General Relativity, the current "standard" theory of gravitation, describes gravity as a universal deformation of the Minkowski metric: g µν (x λ ) = η µν + h µν (x λ ) , where η µν = diag(-1, +1, +1, +1) . (20.1) General Relativity is classically defined by two postulates. One postulate states that the Lagrangian density describing the propagation and self-interaction of the gravitational field is L Ein [g µν ] = c 4 16πG N √ gg µν R µν (g) , (20.2) R µν (g) = ∂ α Γ α µν - ∂ ν Γ α µα + Γ β αβ Γ α µν - Γ β αν Γ α µβ , (20.3) Γ λ µν = 1 2 g λσ (∂ µ g νσ + ∂ ν g µσ - ∂ σ g µν ) , (20.4) where G N is Newton's constant, g = - det(g µν ), and g µν is the matrix inverse of g µν . A second postulate states that g µν couples universally, and minimally, to all the fields of

426

LAX XXlCfl jX?iK, Idd+?KYLViG?IA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f f , : I~&l, samtier cipwati8Aa CffUm - . Jiux.lCJ d,# 1754 - - _- - .- t :; . Jesse e. ahizmn*~*ter -2.' -------- - _ &tV' hi@A l f izau Bkteriala ;' . . 1 -7 I _' i' . Fpr&G& r&Q Q,&& fu &fI& L;&& -l&d 2;,i' iI,;/Qi' rIGN CQ&GgJy p;E& p;~p>gyf LAX XXlCfl jX?iK, Idd+?KYLViG?IA i-icfer~~o is &o ta yaw rwarandu3;: l P iimwmbec L?, 1953, reque&in~ a d&q.&ti of khority tA A&sister prog= for th+zz developmrrrl, Ii-&k& & acyui8itti ef c;uYletit*type and reswitlitc-type urtim bi:aPing eres and far t3-u jx*uctim and acquisitian 6f W ;aniU CCm- csa:ratc~ fhzi awes wit2n Lhe Six&e of Pemlsyzvania. 1 da not b&i- the projscrt fmr the pkcch2670 +S eroa from i&d.&

427

Electric charge in the field of a magnetic event in three-dimensional spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the motion of an electric charge in the field of a magnetically charged event in three-dimensional spacetime. We start by exhibiting a first integral of the equations of motion in terms of the three conserved components of the spacetime angular momentum, and then proceed numerically. After crossing the light cone of the event, an electric charge initially at rest starts rotating and slowing down. There are two lengths appearing in the problem: (i) the characteristic length $\\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, where $q$ and $m$ are the electric charge and mass of the particle, and $g$ is the magnetic charge of the event; and (ii) the spacetime impact parameter $r_0$. For $r_0 \\gg \\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, after a time of order $r_0$, the particle makes sharply a quarter of a turn and comes to rest at the same spatial position at which the event happened in the past. This jump is the main signature of the presence of the magnetic event as felt by an electric charge. A derivation of the expression for the angular momentum that uses Noether's theorem in the magnetic representation is given in the Appendix.

Claudio Bunster; Cristian Martinez

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Detecting a Higgs Pseudoscalar with a Z Boson Produced in Bottom Quark Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the prospects of detecting a Higgs pseudoscalar ($A^0$) in association with a $Z$ gauge boson produced from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A general two Higgs doublet model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model are adopted to study the discovery potential of $pp \\to ZA^0 \\to \\ell \\bar{\\ell} b\\bar{b} +X (\\ell = e, \\mu)$, via $b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$ with physics backgrounds and realistic cuts. Promising results are found for $m_A \\alt 400$ GeV in a general two Higgs doublet model when the heavier Higgs scalar ($H^0$) can decay into a $Z$ boson and a Higgs pseudoscalar ($H^0 \\to ZA^0$). We compare the production rates from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) and gluon fusion ($gg \\to ZA^0$) and find that they are complementary processes to produce $ZA^0$ in hadron collisions. While gluon fusion is the major source for producing a Higgs pseudoscalar associated with a $Z$ boson at the LHC for $\\tan\\beta \\alt 10$, bottom quark fusion can make dominant contributions for $\\tan\\beta \\agt 10$.

Chung Kao; Shankar Sachithanandam

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cross-section  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cross-section Cross-section formulae for specific processes 1 39. CROSS-SECTION FORMULAE FOR SPECIFIC PROCESSES Revised September 2005 by R.N. Cahn (LBNL). Setting aside leptoproduction (for which, see Sec. 16), the cross sections of primary interest are those with light incident particles, e + e - , γγ, qq, gq , gg, etc., where g and q represent gluons and light quarks. The produced particles include both light particles and heavy ones - t, W , Z, and the Higgs boson H. We provide the production cross sections calculated within the Standard Model for several such processes. 39.1. Resonance Formation Resonant cross sections are generally described by the Breit-Wigner formula (Sec. 16 of this Review). σ(E) = 2J + 1 (2S 1 + 1)(2S 2 + 1) 4π k 2 Γ 2 /4 (E - E 0 ) 2 + Γ 2 /4 B in B out , (39.1) where E is the c.m. energy, J is the spin of the resonance, and the number of polarization states of the two incident particles

430

David_practical_calc.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prac%cal Prac%cal c alcula%ons o f s emiconductors a nd m etals David A . S trubbe Department o f M aterials S cience a nd E ngineering, Massachuse8s I ns:tute o f T echnology BerkeleyGW t utorial 22 November 2013 Outline 1. Screening m odels f or E psilon 2. Construc%on o f k ---grids 3. Special t reatment f or m etals i n E psilon 4. Symmetry a nd d egeneracy 5. Linearizing t he D yson e qua%on 6. Real a nd c omplex v ersion Mean-Field φ MF nk , E MF nk WFN , V xc vxc.dat , ρ RHO epsilon -1 G,G (q, E) eps0mat,epsmat sigma E QP nk eqp.dat kernel K vck,v c k bsedmat,bsexmat absorption A s vck , Ω s , eigenvectors,eigenvalues.dat (ω), JDOS(ω) absorption eh.dat k co k fi Screening m odels: H ow d o w e u se ε? Screening m odels: H ow d o w e u se ε? Sigma i ntegrates o ver q w ith ε ---1 (q) Absorp%on i

431

Lignocellulose Recalcitrance Screening by Integrated High Throughput Hydrothermal Pretreatment and Enzymatic Saccharification  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel 96-well multiplate reactor system for comparative analysis of lignocellulose recalcitrance via integrated hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. The system utilizes stackable nickel/gold-plated 96-well aluminum reactor plates, a clamping device fit to a standard Parr reactor, and robotics for efficient liquids and solids handling. A capacity of 20 plates allows up to 1,920 separate hydrothermal reactions per run. Direct and rapid analysis of key end-products, glucose and xylose, is facilitated by the use of glucose oxidase/peroxidase and xylose dehydrogenase-linked assays. To demonstrate efficacy, a set of 755 poplar core samples from the US Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center was tested. Total sugar release ranged from 0.17 to 0.64 g/g of biomass and correlated strongly with the ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignins in the samples. Variance among sample replicates was sufficiently minimal to permit clear assignment of differences in recalcitrance throughout this large sample set.

Selig, M. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Sykes, R. W.; Reichel, K. L.; Brunecky, R.; Himmel, M. E.; Davis, M. F.; Decker, S. R.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

Buzatu Adrian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

433

Possibility of early Higgs boson discovery in nonminimal Higgs sectors  

SciTech Connect

Particle physics models with more than one Higgs boson occur in many frameworks for physics beyond the standard model, including supersymmetry, technicolor, composite Higgs, and ''little Higgs'' models. If the Higgs sector contains couplings stronger than electroweak gauge couplings, there will be heavy Higgs particles that decay to lighter Higgs particles plus heavy particles such as W, Z, and t. This motivates searches for final states involving multiple W, Z, t, and bb pairs. A two Higgs doublet model with custodial symmetry is a useful simplified model to describe many of these signals. The model can be parameterized by the physical Higgs masses and the mixing angles {alpha} and {beta}, so discovery or exclusion in this parameter space has a straightforward physical interpretation. We illustrate this with a detailed analysis of the process gg{yields}A followed by A{yields}hZ and h{yields}WW. For m{sub A}{approx_equal}330 GeV, m{sub h}{approx_equal}200 GeV we can get a 4.5{sigma} signal with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider.

Chang, Spencer [Physics Department, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Evans, Jared A.; Luty, Markus A. [Physics Department, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Higgs Boson Production and Decay in Little Higgs Models with T-parity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study Higgs boson production and decay in a certain class of Little Higgs models with T-parity in which some T-parity partners of the Standard Model (SM) fermions gain their masses through Yukawa-type couplings. We find that the Higgs boson production cross section of a 120 GeV Higgs boson at the CERN LHC via gg fusion process at one-loop level could be reduced by about 45%, 35% and 20%, as compared to its SM prediction, for a relatively low new particle mass scale f = 600, 700 and 1000 GeV, respectively. On the other hand, the weak boson fusion cross section is close to the SM value. Furthermore, the Higgs boson decay branching ratio into di-photon mode can be enhanced by about 35% in small Higgs mass region in certain case, for the total decay width of Higgs boson in the Little Higgs model is always smaller than that in the SM.

Chuan-Ren Chen; Kazuhiro Tobe; C. -P. Yuan

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Entangling photons via the quantum Zeno effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum Zeno effect describes the inhibition of quantum evolution by frequent measurements. Here, we propose a scheme for entangling two given photons based on this effect. We consider a linear-optics set-up with an absorber medium whose two-photon absorption rate $\\xi_{2\\gamma}$ exceeds the one-photon loss rate $\\xi_{1\\gamma}$. In order to reach an error probability $P_{\\rm error}$, we need $\\xi_{1\\gamma}/\\xi_{2\\gamma}based on coherent excitations of many atoms and exploits the fact that $\\xi_{2\\gamma}$ scales with the number of excitations but $\\xi_{1\\gamma}$ does not. The third mechanism envisages three-level systems where the middle level is meta-stable ($\\Lambda$-system). In this case, $\\xi_{1\\gamma}$ is more strongly reduced than $\\xi_{2\\gamma}$ and thus it should be possible to achieve $\\xi_{2\\gamma}/\\xi_{1\\gamma}\\gg1$. In conclusion, although our scheme poses challenges regarding the density of active atoms/molecules in the absorber medium, their coupling constants and the detuning, etc., we find that a two-photon gate with an error probability $P_{\\rm error}$ below 25% might be feasible using present-day technology.

Nicolai ten Brinke; Andreas Osterloh; Ralf Schtzhold

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Content and chemical form of mercury and selenium in Lake Ontario salmon and trout  

SciTech Connect

The content and chemical form of mercury and selenium were determined in the edible tissue of salmon (coho, chinook) and trout (lake, brown) taken offshore from Lake Ontario near Rochester, New York. For all species, total mercury content ranged from 0.3 to 0.8 micro g/g (fresh-weight), which is similar to concentrations commonly found in canned tuna. Most of the total mercury (63 to 79%) was present as methylmercury, the remainder being divalent inorganic mercury. For all species, 6 to 45% of the total selenium content was present as selenate (SeVI), the remainder being selenite (SeIV) and selenide (SEII). On a molar basis, total selenium content usually exceeded that of total mercury. Samples of smoked and unsmoked brown trout fillets were also examined. Based on the results of this study there is no immediate human health hazard from mercury and selenium. However, there is a need to report specific forms of these metals in Lake Ontario salmonid fish so that elevated concentrations can be better evaluated. 42 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Cappon, C.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Recoil-range studies of heavy products of multinucleon transfer from /sup 18/O to /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf  

SciTech Connect

Recoil range distributions were measured for alpha and spontaneous fission activities made in the bombardment of /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf with /sup 18/O from 6.20 MeV/nucleon down to the interaction barrier. The shape of the distributions indicates tht transfers of up to four protons take place via a combination of quasi-elastic (QET) and deep inelastic (DIT) mechanisms, rather than complete fusion-de-excitation (CF) or massive transfer (MT). Angular distributions constructed from recoil range distributions, assuming QET/DIT, indicate that the QET component contributes more significantly to the heavy product residue cross section than the DIT, even though primary cross sections are expected to be higher for DIT than for QET. This may be explained qualitatively as a result of the high excitation energies associated with DIT; the very negative Q/sub gg/ of projectile stripping for these systems combined with the lower expected optimal Q/sub rxn/ of QET compared to DIT can give QET products comparatively low excitation.

McFarland, R.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Theory of localization and resonance phenomena in the quantum kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analytic theory of quantum interference and Anderson localization in the quantum kicked rotor (QKR). The behavior of the system is known to depend sensitively on the value of its effective Planck's constant $\\he$. We here show that for rational values of $\\he/(4\\pi)=p/q$, it bears similarity to a disordered metallic ring of circumference $q$ and threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux. Building on that correspondence, we obtain quantitative results for the time--dependent behavior of the QKR kinetic energy, $E(\\tilde t)$ (this is an observable which sensitively probes the system's localization properties). For values of $q$ smaller than the localization length $\\xi$, we obtain scaling $E(\\tilde t) \\sim \\Delta \\tilde t^2$, where $\\Delta=2\\pi/q$ is the quasi--energy level spacing on the ring. This scaling is indicative of a long time dynamics that is neither localized nor diffusive. For larger values $q\\gg \\xi$, the functions $E(\\tilde t)\\to \\xi^2$ saturates (up to exponentially small corrections $\\sim\\exp(-q/\\xi)$), thus reflecting essentially localized behavior.

C. Tian; A. Altland

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nickel (II) Ions Interaction with Polynucleotides and DNA of Different GC Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the work was to study the role of GC alternative dimmers in the binding of DNA with Ni (II) ions. The method of ultraviolet difference spectroscopy has been applied to investigate Ni (II) ions interactions with DNA extracted from Clostridium perfringens, Mice liver (C3HA line), Calf thymus, Salmon sperm, Herring sperm, E.coli, Micrococcus luteus and polynucleotides Poly (dA-dT)xPoly (dA-dT), Poly (dG)x Poly (dC), Poly (dG-dC)xPoly (dG-dC). It is shown that Ni (II) ions at outer-spherical binding with DNA double helix from the side of the major groove choose more stable dimmers 3^'-C-G-5^' . . 5^'-G-C-3^' and get bound with N7 atoms of both guanines in dimmer forming G-G interstrand crosslink. It directly correlates to the process of forming point defects of Watson-Crick wrong pair type (creation of rare keto-enolic and amino-imino tautomeric forms) and depurinization.

Bregadze, Vasil G; Melikishvili, Sophie Z; Melikishvili, Zaza G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

New quantum gravity effect, dark energy, accelerating universe, black hole and experimental scheme using superfluid Helium and atom interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable attention has been focused on Verlinde's recent work, claiming that Newton's gravity is not a fundamental force. In a recent work (arXiv:1012.5858), we give further the logic basis and basic clues to derive the Newton's gravity, inertia law and Einstein's weak equivalence principle. In this work, we show that if the gravity is not a fundamental force, in special case, it could be repulsive when quantum wavepacket effect is considered. This quantum gravity effect leads to several physical effects: (1) It is consistent with the universe with accelerating expansion, if the gravity and quantum effect of the fluctuating 'vacuum' (dark energy) is considered. The role of the cosmological constant is naturally interpreted when the gravity and quantum effect of the whole 'vacuum' background is considered. (2) It leads to new idea about black hole information paradox, no-hair theorem and Hawking radiation. (3) With a sphere full of superfluid Helium, we propose a feasible experimental scheme to test our idea with an atom interferometer placed in the sphere. Our calculations show that the accuracy Delta g/g below 10^(-8) could be used to test our idea, which satisfies the present experimental technique of atom interferometer.

Hongwei Xiong

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Stability and semiclassics in self-generated fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider non-interacting particles subject to a fixed external potential $V$ and a self-generated magnetic field $B$. The total energy includes the field energy $\\beta \\int B^2$ and we minimize over all particle states and magnetic fields. In the case of spin-1/2 particles this minimization leads to the coupled Maxwell-Pauli system. The parameter $\\beta$ tunes the coupling strength between the field and the particles and it effectively determines the strength of the field. We investigate the stability and the semiclassical asymptotics, $h\\to0$, of the total ground state energy $E(\\beta, h, V)$. We formulate a conjecture concerning the $h\\to 0$ asymptotic behavior of $E(\\beta, h, V)$ uniformly in $\\beta$ and we prove the corresponding upper bound. We are able to prove the matching lower bound only in the weak field regime where $\\beta\\gg h^{-1}$. In the strong field regime our lower bound is not optimal, but we can show that the inclusion of the field energy with a sufficiently small $\\beta$ does affect the...

Erdos, Laszlo; Solovej, Jan Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Physical aging and relaxation of residual stresses in a colloidal glass following flow cessation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilute Laponite suspensions in water at low salt concentration form repulsive colloidal glasses which display physical aging. This phenomenon is still not completely understood and in particular, little is known about the connection between the flow history, as a determinant of the initial state of the system, and the subsequent aging dynamics. Using a stress controlled rheometer, we perform stress jump experiments to observe the elastic component of the flow stress that remains on cessation of flow or flow quenching. We investigate the connection between the dynamics of these residual stresses and the rate of physical aging upon quenching from different points on the steady state flow curve. Quenching from high rates produces a fluid state, G">G', with small, fast relaxing residual stresses and rapid, sigmoidal aging of the complex modulus. Conversely, quenching from lower shear rates produces increasingly jammed states featuring slowly relaxing stresses and a slow increase of the complex modulus with system age. Flow cessation from a fixed shear rate with varying quench durations shows that slower quenches produce smaller residual stresses at short times which relax at long times by smaller extents, by comparison with faster quenches. These smaller stresses are correlated with a higher modulus but slower physical aging of the system. The characteristic time for the residual stress relaxation scales inversely with the quench rate. This implies a frustrated approach to any ideal stress-free state that succinctly reflects the frustrated nature of these glassy systems.

Ajay Singh Negi; Chinedum O. Osuji

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Natural gas storage on activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is a good fuel for internal combustion engines, but its low energy density is a significant drawback. The energy density can be increased by adsorption on a high surface area activated carbon. But with usage, some of the constituents in the natural gas composition accumulate on the carbon and reduce its adsorptivity. The adsorption desorption of natural gas on 9LXC activated carbon was investigated to 100 cycles at 21/sup 0/C and pressures of up to 12 MPa. The decrease in the capacity, G, as a function of the number of cycles, N, was found to follow the empirical correlation: G/G /SUB o/ = 1 - 0.085Log(N). Analysis of the activated carbon after 100 cycles showed accumulation of C/sub 4/ and higher hydrocarbons but not of C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/. For automotive applications, activated carbon appears practical in a narrow pressure range, centering around 7 MPa (1000 psig). The preferred storage is at a pressure of 17 MPa or higher, without the use of activated carbons.

Golovoy, A.; Blais, E.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Higgs friends and counterfeits at hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

We consider the possibility of 'Higgs counterfeits' - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving 'Higgs friends,' fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW,ZZ,{gamma}{gamma}, or even {gamma}Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs friend or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs friend). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with 'effective Z's,' where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs friends, and associated charged fields at the LHC.

Fox, Patrick J.; /Fermilab; Tucker-Smith, David; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Williams Coll. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Weiner, Neal; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Higgs friends and counterfeits at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of "Higgs counterfeits" - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving "Higgs friends," fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW, ZZ, gamma gamma, or even gamma Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs friend or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs friend). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with "effective Z's," where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs friends, and associated charged fields at the LHC.

Patrick J. Fox; David Tucker-Smith; Neal Weiner

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Charged Higgs Production in Association With W^{\\pm} at Large Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many new physics models beyond the standard model, such as the littlest higgs models and the left right twin higgs models, predict the existence of the large charged higgs couplings H^-q\\bar b and H^+b\\bar q, where q=t or the new vector-like heavy quark T; On the other hand, some new physics models like the littlest higgs also predict the gauge-higgs couplings. Such couplings may have rich collider phenomenology. We focus our attention on these couplings induced by the littlest higgs models and the left right twin higgs models models and consider their contributions to the production cross section for W^\\pm H^\\mp production at the large hadron colliders. We find that the cross sections, in the littlest higgs models, on the parton level gg \\to W^\\pm H^\\mp and q\\bar q \\to W^\\pm H^\\mp (q=u,d,s,c,b) may reach tens of several dozen femtobarns in reasonable parameters space at the collision energy of 14 TeV and that the total cross section can even reach a few hundred femtobarns in certain favored space. While in the left right twin higgs models, the production rates are basically one order lower than these in littlest higgs. Therefore, due to the large cross sections of that in the littlest higgs, it may be possible to probe the charged higgs via this process in a large parameter space.

Guo-Li Liu; Fei Wang; Shuo Yang

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W{sup +}W{sup -}, although acceptance for decays into {tau}{sup |+} {tau}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg {yields} H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158 < m{sub H} < 173 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A Combined Neutron and Gamma-Ray Multiplicity Counter Based on Liquid Scintillation Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray (g) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times needed when using more measurables. We present measurement results of n, g, nn, ng, gg, nnn, nng, ngg, and ggg multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples is discussed. Successful measurements of multiples rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Jennifer Dolan; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

QCD matrix elements + parton showers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? Q Q1 dq? ?q(q?, Q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?g(q?, q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?f(q?)?f (Q1, q?) } (2.4) where ?q,g,f are q ? qg, g ? gg and g ? qq branching probabilities ?q(q, Q... ) = 2CF pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 3 4 ) (2.5) ?g(q, Q) = 2CA pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 11 12 ) (2.6) ?f(q) = Nf 3pi ?S(q) q , (2.7) CF = (N2c ?1)/2Nc and CA = Nc for Nc colours, Nf is the number of active flavours, and ?q,g are the quark and gluon Sudakov form...

Catani, S; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Webber, Bryan R

454

Coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard series of two staged gas generators (GG) has been developed in the United States for producing gas with a combustion heat from 4,700 to 7,600 kilojoules per cubic meter from coal (U). The diameter of the gas generators is from 1.4 to 3.65 meters and the thermal capacity based on purified cold gas is from 12.5 to 89 million kilojoules per hour. Certain standard sized gas generators have undergone experimental industrial tests which showed that it is most expedient to feed the coal into the gas generators pneumatically. This reduces the dimensions of the charging device, makes it possible to use more common grades of structural steels and reduces the cost of the gas. A double valve reliably prevents ejections of the gasification product and promotes the best distribution of the coal in the gas generator. The gas generators may successfully operate on high moisture (up to 36 percent) brown coal. Blasting with oxygen enriched to 38 percent made it possible to produce a gas with a combustion heat of 9,350 kilojoules per cubic meter. This supports a combustion temperature of 1,700C.

Rainey, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Pi-Josephson Junction and Spontaneous Superflow in Rings from Ultracold Fermionic Atomic Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BCS-like pairing in ultracold fermionic atomic ($UCFAG$) gases is studied in the model of "isotopic-spin" pairing proposed in 1991 \\cite% {Ku-Hof-SSC}. This model assumes a mismatch ($\\delta $) in chemical potentials of pairing fermionic atoms. It is shown that a $\\pi $-Josephson junction can be realized in $UCFAG$ systems, where the left and right banks $% S$ are the $UCFAG$ superfluids. The weak link $M$ consists from the normal $% UCFAG$ with the finite mismatch $\\delta $. If the $\\pi $-junction is a part of a closed ring the superfluid mass-current flows spontaneously in the ring, i.e., the time-reversal symmetry is broken spontaneously. This is realized if the radius of the ring $R$ is larger than the critical one $% R_{c} $. All these effects exist also in the case when $\\delta \\gg \\Delta $, where $\\Delta $ is the superfluid gap, but with the reduced thickness of the weak link. It is also discussed, that if junctions $SM_{1}M_{2}S$ and trilayers $% M_{1}SM_{2}$ from $UCFAG$ are realizable this renders a possibility for a novel electronics - \\textit{hypertronics}.

Miodrag L. Kulic

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fowler-Nordheim Electron Cold Emission Formalism in Presence of Strong Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formalisms for both non-relativistic as well as relativistic versions of field emission of electrons in presence of strong quantizing magnetic field, relevant for strongly magnetized neutron stars or magnetars are developed. In the non-relativistic scenario, where electrons obey Schr{$\\ddot{\\rm{o}}$}dinger equation, we have noticed that when Landau levels are populated for electrons in presence of strong quantizing magnetic field the transmission probability exactly vanishes unless the electrons are spin polarized in the opposite direction to the external magnetic field. On the other hand, the cold electron emission under the influence of strong electrostatic field at the poles is totally forbidden from the surface of those compact objects for which the surface magnetic field strength is $\\gg 10^{15}$G (in the eventuality that they may exist). Whereas in the relativistic case, where the electrons obey Dirac equation, the presence of strong quantizing magnetic field completely forbids the emission of electrons from the surface of compact objects if $B >10^{13}$G.

Arpita Ghosh; Somenath Chakrabarty

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Parallel electric field generation by Alfven wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{This work aims to investigate the spectral structure of the parallel electric field generated by strong anisotropic and balanced Alfvenic turbulence in relation with the problem of electron acceleration from the thermal population in solar flare plasma conditions.} {We consider anisotropic Alfvenic fluctuations in the presence of a strong background magnetic field. Exploiting this anisotropy, a set of reduced equations governing non-linear, two-fluid plasma dynamics is derived. The low-$\\beta$ limit of this model is used to follow the turbulent cascade of the energy resulting from the non-linear interaction between kinetic Alfven waves, from the large magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s}\\ll 1$ down to the small "kinetic" scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s} \\gg 1$, $\\rho_{s}$ being the ion sound gyroradius.} {Scaling relations are obtained for the magnitude of the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, as a function of $k_{\\perp}$ and $k_{\\parallel}$, showing that the electric field develops ...

Bian, N H; Brown, J C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Combined SM Higgs Limits at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D{sup 0} on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b} have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D{sup 0}, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Krumnack, N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Suggestions for benchmark scenarios for MSSM Higgs Boson searches at hadron colliders.  

SciTech Connect

The Higgs boson search has shifted from LEP2 to the Tevatron and will subsequently move to the LHC. Due to the different initial states, the Higgs production and decay channels relevant for Higgs boson searches were different at LEP2 to what they are at hadron colliders. They suggest new benchmark scenarios for the MSSM Higgs boson search at hadron colliders that exemplify the phenomenology of different parts of the MSSM parameter space. Besides the m{sub h}{sup max} scenario and the no-mixing scenario used in the LEP2 Higgs boson searches, they propose two new scenarios. In one the main production channel at the LHC, gg {yields} h, is suppressed. In the other, important Higgs decay channels at the Tevatron and at the LCH, h {yields} b{bar b} and h {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, are suppressed. All scenarios evade the LEP2 constraints for nearly the whole M{sub A}-tan {beta}-plane.

Carena, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Weiglein, G.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with 2.1 - 5.4 fb-1 of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-4.8 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 2.1-5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.70 (0.94) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. The corresponding median upper limits expected in the absence of Higgs boson production are 1.78 (0.89). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs is 163 < m{sub H} < 166 GeV/c{sup 2}, with an expected exclusion of 159 < m{sub H} < 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Collaboration, The CDF; Collaboration, the D0; Physics, the Tevatron New; Group, Higgs Working

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs-Boson Production with up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Data  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination more data have been added, additional new channels have been incorporated, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 6.7 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are factors of 1.56 and 0.68 the values of the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2} and 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. We exclude, at the 95% C.L., a new and larger region at high mass between 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV/c{sup 2}.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Signal and background in NLO QCD for the search of the intermediate mass Higgs boson at the SSC  

SciTech Connect

The signal and background for the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the intermediate mass range 80 GeV < m{sub H} < 2M{sub Z} is studied based on calculations of the cross sections in next-to-leading order QCD perturbation theory for the production of the Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion and for the hadronic two-photon production. The method of Monte-Carlo integration allows the application of realistic cuts (p{sub T}, rapidity, photon isolation) to the cross section. Results are given for the K-factors of the signal and the background. It turns out that the NLO corrections improve the situation for a Higgs boson mass in the range of 80--120 GeV. Furthermore, the influence of a cut on the transverse momentum of the additional jet produced in the processes gg {yields} Hg, gq {yields} Hq, q{bar q} {yields} Hg is compared to a similar cut for the background.

Bailey, B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Vacuum polarization of scalar fields near Reissner-Nordstrm black holes and the resonance behavior in field-mass dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study vacuum polarization of quantized massive scalar fields $\\phi$ in equilibrium at black-hole temperature in Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m background. By means of the Euclidean space Green's function we analytically derive the renormalized expression $phi^{2}>_{H}$ at the event horizon with the area $4\\pi r_{+}^{2}$. It is confirmed that the polarization amplitude $phi^{2}>_{H}$ is free from any divergence due to the infinite red-shift effect. Our main purpose is to clarify the dependence of $phi^{2}>_{H}$ on field mass $m$ in relation to the excitation mechanism. It is shown for small-mass fields with $mr_{+}\\ll1$ how the excitation of $phi^{2}>_{H}$ caused by finite black-hole temperature is suppressed as $m$ increases, and it is verified for very massive fields with $mr_{+}\\gg1$ that $phi^{2}>_{H}$ decreases in proportion to $m^{-2}$ with the amplitude equal to the DeWitt-Schwinger approximation. In particular, we find a resonance behavior with a peak amplitude at $mr_{+}\\simeq 0.38$ in the field-mass dependence of vacuum polarization around nearly extreme (low-temperature) black holes. The difference between Scwarzschild and nearly extreme black holes is discussed in terms of the mass spectrum of quantum fields dominant near the event horizon.

Akira Tomimatsu; Hiroko Koyama

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Optimal Decoherence Control in non-Markovian Open, Dissipative Quantum Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the optimal control problem for non-Markovian open, dissipative quantum system. Optimal control using Pontryagin maximum principle is specifically derived. The influences of Ohmic reservoir with Lorentz-Drude regularization are numerically studied in a two-level system under the following three conditions: \\omega_0\\ll\\omega_c, \\omega_0\\approx\\omega_c or \\omega_0\\gg\\omega_c, where \\omega_0 is the characteristic frequency of the quantum system of interest, and \\omega_c the cut-off frequency of Ohmic reservoir. The optimal control process shows its remarkable influences on the decoherence dynamics. The temperature is a key factor in the decoherence dynamics. We analyze the optimal decoherence control in high temperature, intermediate temperature, and low temperature reservoirs respectively. It implies that designing some engineered reservoirs with the controlled coupling and state of the environment can slow down the decoherence rate and delay the decoherence time. Moreover, we compare the non-Markovian optimal decoherence control with the Markovian one and find that with non-Markovian the engineered artificial reservoirs are better than with the Markovian approximation in controlling the open, dissipative quantum system's decoherence.

Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 7, 23 December 2005 - 3 January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

af]Ng'ePsf] lyof] . cfd;efdf hg ufos ?ljg uGwe{, h]jL 6'x'/], gGbs[i0f hf]zL, /fds[i0f b'jfn cfbLn] lg/+s'ztGq la?4 uLt ufpbf pk:yLt hgtf gfr]sf lyP . g]skf Pdfn] sf]zL c~rn ;dGjo ;dLtLsf] cfof]hgfdf ;DkGg ;f] lazfn cfd ;efdf Ps nfv eGbf a9L... {ssf] Wofg dxf]T;j lt/ tfgL/ x]sf5g . pgLx? ;+u} dxf]T;jsf] d~rdf /fli6o tyf :yfgLo VoftL k|fKt ufos ufoLsf xfF:o snfsf/x? k|:t't ePsflyP . dxf]T;j cjwLe/ b}lgs ?kdf ;Fem b'O{ 306f ;Dd x'g] dgf]/~hgfTds sfo{qmddf km]zg zf], ;fFuLtLs sfo{qmd, a8L laN8L...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

466

Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review  

SciTech Connect

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Xylose fermentation to ethanol  

SciTech Connect

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to tau tau using 7.8 fb^-1 of pp collisions at 1.96 TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one tau decay leptonically, and another decay, hadronically, are considered. Two novel techniques are developed and used in the search. A Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm is used for energy measurements of the hadronic tau candidates. The signal is discriminated from backgrounds by the Missing Mass Calculator, which allows for full invariant mass reconstruction of tau tau pair. The data are found to be consistent with the background only hypothesis. Therefore a 95% confidence level upper limit on the Standard Model Higgs boson cross section was set. At M_H=120 GeV/c^2 observed limit is 14.9 x sigma_SM x Br(H -> tau tau).

Elagin, Andrey

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Capacity and Character Expansions: Moment generating function and other exact results for MIMO correlated channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a promising new method from the field of representations of Lie groups to calculate integrals over unitary groups, which are important for multi-antenna communications. To demonstrate the power and simplicity of this technique, we first re-derive a number of results that have been used recently in the community of wireless information theory, using only a few simple steps. In particular, we derive the joint probability distribution of eigenvalues of the matrix GG*, with G a semicorrelated Gaussian random matrix or a Gaussian random matrix with a non-zero mean (and G* its hermitian conjugate) . These joint probability distribution functions can then be used to calculate the moment generating function of the mutual information for Gaussian channels with multiple antennas on both ends with this probability distribution of their channel matrices G. We then turn to the previously unsolved problem of calculating the moment generating function of the mutual information of MIMO (multiple input-multiple output) channels, which are correlated at both the receiver and the transmitter. From this moment generating function we obtain the ergodic average of the mutual information and study the outage probability. These methods can be applied to a number of other problems. As a particular example, we examine unitary encoded space-time transmission of MIMO systems and we derive the received signal distribution when the channel matrix is correlated at the transmitter end.

Steven H. Simon; Aris L. Moustakas; Luca Marinelli

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pilot-scale production of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) and filtrate recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant is introducing the use of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) into the Molten Salt Extraction Process (MSE). DCHP (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) extracts americium from molten plutonium metal into a molten calcium chloride matrix. The DCHP is produced by precipitating plutonium (IV) from hydrochloric acid with cesium chloride. Before production of the DCHP began, we performed a pilot-scale test to determine yields, track impurities, and test filtrate recovery for the proposed process. In the course of this study, we determined that impure plutonium oxide (0.80 g/g) dissolved in concentrated HCl is an acceptable source of plutonium for the DCHP. We also determined that dissolved oxide and chloride anion exchange eluate can be mixed for DCHP preparation. We found that DCHP yields average 92-95% at 8M total chloride and are independent of sparging rate and time. Furthermore, we found that drying at 150/degree/C for 5 hr gives <0.1% water in the DCHP only if it is preceeded by extensive air drying. Finally, we proved the efficiency of chloride anion exchange for the recovery of above-discard plutonium from the filtrate. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Stevens, J.R.; Killion, M.E.; Valdez, J.D.; Ames, R.L.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Micellar solubilization of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal tar-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Solubilization of PAHs from a coal tar-contaminated soil obtained from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was evaluated using nonionic polyoxyethylene surfactants at dosages greater than cmc. Up to 25% of Soxhlet-extractable PAHs could be solubilized at surfactant loadings of 0.3 g/g of oil in 16 days in completely stirred batch reactors. Longer periods were required to reach equilibrium at higher surfactant dosages. Raoult`s law satisfactorily described the partitioning of constituent PAHs between the weathered coal tar and the micellar solution. An equilibrium model was developed to predict the solubilization of PAHs from coal tar-contaminated soils for given properties of the soil, surfactant, and component PAHs. The model predicted solubilization of constituent PAHs reasonably well at low surfactant dosages. At extremely high surfactant dosages, the model failed to reliably predict solubilization. Presumably, mass transfer mass transfer limitations prevented the attainment of equilibrium during the duration (380h) of solubilization experiments. 25 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Yeom, I.T.; Ghosh, M.M.; Cox, C.D.; Robinson, K.G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy in field line diffusion by anisotropic magnetic turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kolmogorov-Sinai (KS) entropy in turbulent diffusion of magnetic field lines is analyzed on the basis of a numerical simulation model and theoretical investigations. In the parameter range of strongly anisotropic magnetic turbulence the KS entropy is shown to deviate considerably from the earlier predicted scaling relations [Rev. Mod. Phys. {\\bf 64}, 961 (1992)]. In particular, a slowing down logarithmic behavior versus the so-called Kubo number $R\\gg 1$ ($R = (\\delta B / B_0) (\\xi_\\| / \\xi_\\bot)$, where $\\delta B / B_0$ is the ratio of the rms magnetic fluctuation field to the magnetic field strength, and $\\xi_\\bot$ and $\\xi_\\|$ are the correlation lengths in respective dimensions) is found instead of a power-law dependence. These discrepancies are explained from general principles of Hamiltonian dynamics. We discuss the implication of Hamiltonian properties in governing the paradigmatic "percolation" transport, characterized by $R\\to\\infty$, associating it with the concept of pseudochaos (random non-chaotic dynamics with zero Lyapunov exponents). Applications of this study pertain to both fusion and astrophysical plasma and by mathematical analogy to problems outside the plasma physics. This research article is dedicated to the memory of Professor George M. Zaslavsky

Alexander V. Milovanov; Rehab Bitane; Gaetano Zimbardo

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

1 Modules and exactness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppose that R is an associative ring with 1. In most commutative cases, R is either the integers Z or some field k. Example: Suppose that k is a field and G is a group. The group-algebra k(G) over k is the direct sum k(G) = ? k, g?G with elements written as finite sums ? g?G ?g g, with ?g ? k and all but finitely many ?g = 0. The rule (?g g)(?h h) = (?g?h) (gh) defines the algebra structure on k(G), with multiplicative identity 1 = 1 e, where e is the identity element of G. A k(G)-module M is a k-vector space M, with bilinear map ? : k(G) M ? M with (r, m) ? ? r?m, such that r?(s?m) = (rs)? m and 1 ? m = m, or equivalently M is a k-vector 1 space equipped with a group homomorphism G ? Autk(M). k(G)-modules are often called G-modules for that reason. Not even that is the most enlightened way to describe a k(G)-module. A group G can be thought of as a category (actually a groupoid) with one object ? and a morphism ? g ? ? ? for every g ? G. Then a k(G)-module is a functor M: G ? k ? Mod which takes values in the category of k-vector spaces. NB: Ive only based these notions on fields k and their vector spaces to make them seem real. The object k could be a ring; then k(G) is a k-algebra still and a k(G)-module is a k-module M equipped with a group homomorphism G ? Autk(M). Now we recall some basic definitions and facts about R-modules. Suppose that f: M ? N is an R-module homomorphism. Then the kernel ker(f) of f is defined by ker(f) = {all x ? M such that f(x) = 0}. ker(f) is plainly a submodule of M. The image 2 im(f) of f is the submodule of N consisting of all y ? N such that y = f(x) for some x ? M. The cokernel of f cok(f) is defined to be the quotient A sequence cok(f) = N / im(f). M f ? ? M ? g ? ? M of R-module homomorphisms is said to be exact if ker(g) = im(f). Equivalently, the sequence is exact if g f = 0 and for all y ? M ? with g(y) = 0 there is an x ? M such that f(x) = y. A sequence M1 ? M2 ? ? Mn of R-module homomorphisms is said to be exact if ker = im everywhere. Example 1.1. The sequence 0 ? ker(f) ? M f ? ? N ? cok(f) ? 0 is exact for all R-module homomorphisms f. Note that 0 ? M f ? ? N is exact if and only if f is a monomorphism (injective), and that

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The ground state of the Kondo model with large spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we prove that the ground state of the Kondo model with large spin is nondegenerate, apart from a SU(2) spin degeneracy in the case of half filling. The ground state spin is found for the system, and the energy level orderings are discussed. Finally, the existence of ferrimagnetism in some cases is proved. PACS numbers: 75.10.Lp 75.30.Mb, 75.50.Gg The Kondo models, or single and lattice impurity models, are one of the most challenging subjects in strongly correlated systems 13. Recent developments of reflection positivity technique in the spin space make it possible to establish some rigorous results for the half-filled strongly correlated electron systems 49. Theory of reflection positivity in the spin space for the single- and multi-channel Kondo models with spin 1/2 was developed recently and a series of rigorous results on the ground state properties were proved 8,9. However some materials are described by the Kondo models with large spin, such as (La1?xXx)MnO3 with X = Ba, Ca, Sr etc. and the localised spin s = 3/2 10. Due to more degrees of freedom in the case of large spin than in the case of spin 1/2, usually it is very hard to extract rigorous results for those systems. As a generalisation of the theory for the Kondo model with spin 1/2, we will investigate the Kondo model with large spin and provide some rigorous results on the ground state of the Kondo model in the case of half filling. Let us first write down the Hamiltonian we will investigate:

Shun-qing Shen; Jisi Sci; Kijsi Sj

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Connecting the Physical Properties of Galaxies with the Overdensity and Tidal Shear of the Large-Scale Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the correlations between the large-scale environment of galaxies and their physical properties, using a sample of 28,354 nearby galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the large-scale tidal field reconstructed in real space from the 2Mass Redshift Survey and smoothed over a radius of $\\sim 6 h^{-1}$Mpc. The large-scale environment is expressed in terms of the overdensity, the ellipticity of the shear and the type of the large-scale structure. The physical properties analyzed include $r$-band absolute magnitude $M_{^{0.1}r}$, stellar mass $M_\\ast$, $g-r$ colour, concentration parameter $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and surface stellar mass density $\\mu_\\ast$. Both luminosity and stellar mass are found to be statistically linked to the large-scale environment, regardless of how the environment is quantified. More luminous (massive) galaxies reside preferentially in the regions with higher densities, lower ellipticities and halo-like structures. At fixed luminosity, the large-scale overdensity depends strongly on parameters related to the recent star formation history, that is colour and D(4000), but is almost independent of the structural parameters $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and $\\mu_\\ast$. All the physical properties are statistically linked to the shear of the large-scale environment even when the large-scale density is constrained to a narrow range. This statistical link has been found to be most significant in the quasi-linear regions where the large-scale density approximates to an order of unity, but no longer significant in highly nonlinear regimes with $\\delta_{\\rm LS}\\gg 1$.

Jounghun Lee; Cheng Li

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

477

On Diagonalization in Map(M,G)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by some questions in the path integral approach to (topological) gauge theories, we are led to address the following question: given a smooth map from a manifold $M$ to a compact group $G$, is it possible to smoothly `diagonalize' it, i.e.~conjugate it into a map to a maximal torus $T$ of $G$? We analyze the local and global obstructions and give a complete solution to the problem for regular maps. We establish that these can always be smoothly diagonalized locally and that the obstructions to doing this globally are non-trivial Weyl group and torus bundles on $M$. We show how the patching of local diagonalizing maps gives rise to non-trivial $T$-bundles, explain the relation to winding numbers of maps into $G/T$ and restrictions of the structure group and examine the behaviour of gauge fields under this diagonalization. We also discuss the complications that arise for non-regular maps and in the presence of non-trivial $G$-bundles. In particular, we establish a relation between the existence of regular sections of a non-trivial adjoint bundle and restrictions of the structure group of a principal $G$-bundle to $T$. We use these results to justify a Weyl integral formula for functional integrals which, as a novel feature not seen in the finite-dimensional case, contains a summation over all those topological $T$-sectors which arise as restrictions of a trivial principal $G$ bundle and which was used previously to solve completely Yang-Mills theory and the $G/G$ model in two dimensions.

Matthias Blau; George Thompson

1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

478

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate the potential application of these novel materials for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGV). The focus of the project is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed the performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons of adsorbent could be consumed in natural gas vehicles by year 2000. If successful, the results obtained in this project could lead to the use of Illinois coal in a sowing and profitable market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. During this reporting period, a series of experiments were made to evaluate the effect of coal pre-oxidation, coal pyrolysis, and char activation on the surface area development and methane adsorption capacity of activated carbons/chars made from IBC-102. The optimum production conditions were determined to be: coal oxidation in air at 225C, oxicoal (oxidized coal); devolatilization in nitrogen at 400C; and char gasification in 50% steam in nitrogen at 850C. Nitrogen BET surface areas of the carbon products ranged from 800--1100 m{sup 2}/g. Methane adsorption capacity of several Illinois coal derived chars and a 883 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon were measured using a pressurized thermogaravimetric analyzer at pressures up to 500 psig. Methane adsorption capacity (g/g) of the chars were comparable to that of the commercial activated carbon manufactured by Calgon Carbon. It was determined that the pre-oxidation is a key processing step for producing activated char/carbon with high surface area and high methane adsorption capacity. The results to date are encouraging and warrant further research and development in tailored activated char from Illinois coal for natural gas storage.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States); Fatemi, M. [Sperry Univac, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Model-independent extraction of $|V_{tq}|$ matrix elements from top-quark measurements at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current methods to extract the quark-mixing matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from single-top production measurements assume that $|V_{tb}|\\gg |V_{td}|, |V_{ts}|$: top quarks decay into $b$ quarks with 100% branching fraction, s-channel single-top production is always accompanied by a $b$ quark and initial-state contributions from $d$ and $s$ quarks in the $t$-channel production of single top quarks are neglected. Triggered by a recent measurement of the ratio $R=\\frac{|V_{tb}|^{2}}{|V_{td}|^{2}+|V_{ts}|^{2}+|V_{tb}|^{2}}=0.90 \\pm 0.04$ performed by the D0 collaboration, we consider a $|V_{tb}|$ extraction method that takes into account non zero d- and s-quark contributions both in production and decay. We propose a strategy that allows to extract consistently and in a model-independent way the quark mixing matrix elements $|V_{td}|$, $|V_{ts}|$, and $|V_{tb}|$ from the measurement of $R$ and from single-top measured event yields. As an illustration, we apply our method to the Tevatron data using a CDF analysis of the measured single-top event yield with two jets in the final state one of which is identified as a $b$-quark jet. We constrain the $|V_{tq}|$ matrix elements within a four-generation scenario by combining the results with those obtained from direct measurements in flavor physics and determine the preferred range for the top-quark decay width within different scenarios.

H. Lacker; A. Menzel; F. Spettel; D. Hirschbhl; J. Lck; F. Maltoni; W. Wagner; M. Zaro

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

480

Polarization radiation of vortex electrons with large orbital angular momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex electrons, - freely propagating electrons whose wavefunction has helical wavefronts, - could become a novel tool in the physics of electromagnetic radiation. They carry a non-zero intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM) $\\ell$ with respect to the propagation axis and, for \\ell \\gg 1, a large OAM-induced magnetic moment, \\mu ~ \\ell \\mu_B (\\mu_B is the Bohr magneton), which influences the radiation of electromagnetic waves. Here, we consider in detail the OAM-induced effects by such electrons in two forms of polarization radiation, namely in Cherenkov radiation and transition radiation. Thanks to the large \\ell, we can neglect quantum or spin-induced effects, which are of the order of \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\ll 1, but retain the magnetic moment contribution \\ell \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\lesssim 1, which makes the quasiclassical approach to polarization radiation applicable. We discuss the magnetic moment contribution to polarization radiation, which has never been experimentally observed, and study how its visibility depends on the kinematical parameters and the medium permittivity. In particular, it is shown that this contribution can, in principle, be detected in azimuthally non-symmetrical problems, for example when vortex electrons obliquely cross a metallic screen (transition radiation) or move nearby it (diffraction radiation). We predict a left-right angular asymmetry of the transition radiation (in the plane where the charge radiation distributions would stay symmetric), which appears due to an effective interference between the charge radiation field and the magnetic moment one. Numerical values of this asymmetry for vortex electrons with E_e = 300keV and \\ell = O(100-1000) are O(0.1-1%), and we argue that this effect could be detected with existing technology. The finite conductivity of the target and frequency dispersion play the crucial roles in these predictions.

Igor P. Ivanov; Dmitry V. Karlovets

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ackerman gg mace" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Bioeconomy Initiative at MBI International  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Di-carboxylic acids have the potential to replace petrochemicals used in the polymer industry (Werpy and Petersen, 2004). MBI developed a process for the production of succinic acid using a proprietary organism. During this work MBI assessed the feasibility to produce other carboxylic acids either using A. succinogenes or other organisms. The development of recombinant A. succinogenes strain derivatives for a mono-carboxylic acid through over-expression of enzymatic activities was successful. Fermentations achieved titers of 58 g/L for this organic acid. Recombinant strains that produced the same acid, but a different stereoisomer, reached titers of 10 g/L. Attempts to increase the titers for this isomer as well as other organic acids were unsuccessful. MBI is looking for commercial partners to pursue the development of recombinant A. succinogenes strains for the production of other organic acids. Attempts to develop recombinant strains of A. succinogenes for fumaric acid production through introduction of various antisense RNA constructs were unsuccessful. Alternative suitable organisms were evaluated and Rhizopus oryzae, a natural fumaric acid producer with potential for process improvements, was selected. A novel fermentation and one-step recovery process was developed that allowed capture of IP, produced titers of >80 g/L with a productivity of 1.8 g/L-h and 57% (g/g glucose) yield. The process was scaled to 2000 L pilot scale. The economic analysis projected a production cost of 72 c/lb. Recycling and re-use of the base was demonstrated and incorporated into the process. The ability of the organism to produce fumaric acid from other carbon sources and biomass hydrolysate was demonstrated. The production of other organic acids was evaluated and techno-economic de-risking roadmap documents were prepared.

Kleff, Susanne, Ph.D.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Ethanol Production from Rice-Straw Hydrolysate Using Zymomonas Mobilis in a Continuous Fluidized-Bed Reactor (FBR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice-straw hydrolysate obtained by the Arkenol's concentrated acid hydrolysis process was fermented to ethanol using a recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain capable of utilizing both glucose and xylose in a continuous fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). The parameters studied included biocatalyst stability with and without antibiotic, feed composition, and retention time. Xylose utilization in the presence of tetracycline remained stable for at least 17 days. This was a significant improvement over the old strain, Z. mobilis CP4 (pZB5), which started to lose xylose utilization capability after seven days. In the absence of tetracycline, the xylose utilization rate started to decrease almost immediately. With tetracycline in the feed for the first six days, stability of xylose utilization was maintained for four days after the antibiotic was removed from the feed. The xylose utilization rate started to decrease on day 11. In the presence of tetracycline using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 48 g/L glucose and 13 g/L xylose at a retention time of 4.5 h, 95% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion occurred. The ethanol concentration was 29 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.48 g/g sugar consumed or 94% of the theoretical yield. Using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 83 g/L glucose and 28 g/L xylose, 92% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion were obtained. The ethanol concentration was 48 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.45 g/ g sugar consumed or 88% of the theoretical yield. Maximum productivity of 25.5 g/L-h was obtained at a retention time of 1.9 h. In this case, 84% xylose conversion was obtained.

deJesus, D.; Nghiem, N.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z