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Sample records for ackerman gg mace

  1. Ackerman, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful Smart GridAchille, Oklahoma:Ackerman,

  2. ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde2mace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks)

  3. A note on light geometric graphs Eyal Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jacob

    A note on light geometric graphs Eyal Ackerman Jacob Fox Rom Pinchasi March 19, 2012 Abstract Let G be a geometric graph on n vertices in general position in the plane. We say that G is k-light if no edge e of G than k edges of G. We extend the previous result in [1] and with a shorter argument show that every k-light

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants Prev Next Title: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula...

  5. GG 309 COURSE SYLLABUS SPRING 2015 GG 309 -SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY -SPRING, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPRING 2015 GG 309 - SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY - SPRING, 2015 GG 309 - SEDIMENTOLOGY Assistant: TBA WHY SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY? This course is devoted to understanding the environmental and processes from the sedimentary record. Sedimentology encompasses the study of modern sediments and earth

  6. Characterisation of individual airborne particles by using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) at Mace Head, Ireland, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C S; Kinnersley, Robert P; Harrison, Roy M; Donovan, Robert J; Heal, Mathew R

    2004-01-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer was deployed at Mace Head (Ireland) during August 2002. The measurements provide qualitative chemical composition and size distribution (0.3–3 ?m) information for single ...

  7. Molecular emission from GG Car's circumbinary disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Michaela; Nickeler, Dieter; Muratore, Florencia; Fernandes, Marcelo Borges; Aret, Anna; Cidale, Lydia; de Wit, Willem-Jan

    2012-01-01

    The appearance of the B[e] phenomenon in evolved massive stars such as B[e] supergiants is still a mystery. While these stars are generally found to have disks that are cool and dense enough for efficient molecule and dust condensation, the origin of the disk material is still unclear. We aim at studying the kinematics and origin of the disk in the eccentric binary system GG Car, whose primary component is proposed to be a B[e] supergiant. Based on medium- and high-resolution near-infrared spectra we analyzed the CO-band emission detected from GG Car. The complete CO-band structure delivers information on the density and temperature of the emitting region, and the detectable 13CO bands allow us to constrain the evolutionary phase. In addition, the kinematics of the CO gas can be extracted from the shape of the first 12CO band head. We find that the CO gas is located in a ring surrounding the eccentric binary system, and its kinematics agrees with Keplerian rotation with a velocity, projected to the line of si...

  8. OCN-GG 644 syllabus only.xls Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline --Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCN-GG 644 syllabus only.xls Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline -- Spring 2015 Date to be covered 14-Jan W 2 Components and Distribution of Marine Sediment Types 19-Jan M -- Holiday: MLK Day 21-Jan W 3 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment Accumulation Rates and Sediment Transport Processes

  9. COURSE SYLLABUS GG425 --ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY -Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    groundwater composition. Natural radioactivity; Radioactive waste composition, storage and disposal. Grading natural processes of Earth's surface and the impacts of human activities on environments. Both global more about the chemistry of phenomena in the environment around them plan to pursue the new GG MGeo

  10. GG671b Remote Sensing Planets Gillis-Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG671b Remote Sensing ­ Planets Gillis-Davis Wednesday 1:30-4:20 POST 544 Description: This course will teach end-to-end principles of remote sensing across electromagnetic spectrum with application state-of-the art remote sensing methods and basic concepts of how to use such data to derive information

  11. StrongantimicrobialactivityofLactobacillusrhamnosus GG against Salmonella typhimurium is due to accumulation of lactic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    StrongantimicrobialactivityofLactobacillusrhamnosus GG against Salmonella typhimurium is due Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG; probiotics; Salmonella typhimurium; lactic acid; antimicrobial compound; organic had been reported to exert antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhimurium. However

  12. GG101 Lab, Fall Semester 2015 SYLLABUS GG101L is where you learn how to learn Geology and Geophysics (i.e., learning by doing). We will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG101 Lab, Fall Semester 2015 SYLLABUS GG101L is where you learn how to learn Geology and Geophysics (i.e., learning by doing). We will teach you geological and geophysical content, teach you how Handout 2, 3, 5 8, Oct. 12 #8: Earthquakes (in the field) Chapter 16 1, 2, 3, 5 9, Oct. 19 #9: Geologic

  13. ackerman | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamedGroup! !aboesenbNETLachatman

  14. ackerman-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamedGroup! !aboesenbNETLachatmanOne-Year

  15. ackerman-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamedGroup!

  16. ackerman_radar.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamedGroup!

  17. Department of Geology & Geophysics, Spring 2015 GG304: Physics of the Earth and Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Department of Geology & Geophysics, Spring 2015 GG304: Physics of the Earth and Planets The Earth's shape, orbit, interior structure, and geological evolution are all the result of the interaction

  18. mace-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryM aterialsmFUSE: Function Sequencer formac |7

  19. GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec@hawaii.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG 711: Theoretical Fluid Mechanics Fall 2015 Instructor: Janet Becker (janetbec and Reid · Additional References: 1. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics by Rick Salmon 2. Perturbation reference and (2) as a fluids course where advanced mathematical tech- inques are used to solve problems

  20. GG101 Lab, Spring Semester 2015 SYLLABUS GG101L is where you learn how to learn Geology and Geophysics (i.e., by doing rather than by watching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG101 Lab, Spring Semester 2015 SYLLABUS GG101L is where you learn how to learn Geology geological and geophysical content, teach you how geologists and geophysicists know this content, give you (partly in the field; M. holiday) Chapter 5 2, 3, 5 8, Mar. 2 #8: Geologic Time and Structural Geology

  1. The investigation of the gg->WW including electromagnetic corrections at the TESLA kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfin, I B; Shishkina, T

    2003-01-01

    The WW production in gamma-gamma scattering is considered in the Standard Model. The main contribution to radiative effects for the process gg->WW has been calculating and analyzing. It is found the latter is considerable at high energies and greatly contributes to the differential cross section $d\\sigma$ at various polarizations of initial photons and final bosons. Monte-Carlo generator built based on TESLA kinematics.

  2. Jennifer Ackerman | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted Attic9: What(CSC) |Jeff

  3. GG/OCN 312: Geomathematics Instructor: Garrett Apuzen-Ito (gito@hawaii.edu, POST 810); T.A.: TBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG/OCN 312: Geomathematics Instructor: Garrett Apuzen-Ito (gito@hawaii.edu, POST 810); T.A.: TBA-long learning CLASS FORMAT The class meets 9:30 am ­ 10:20 pm, MWF, POST 708. The lectures videos sets. HOMEWORK Homework must be turned in on Fridays at 3:30 p.m. at the instructor's office (POST 810

  4. A Cultural Resources Survey for the Type V GG Liquid Waste Processing Facility in Washington County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-31

    A Phase I cultural resources survey for a proposed type V GG liquid waste processing facility on a 7.73 acre site in south-central Washington County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates on December 28, 2011. The project area...

  5. Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors -Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Information Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors - Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Approved Level II Remote Sensing III Geology Summer Sch GIS for Environmental Management III Geophysics Semester 1 Tectonics III Igneous & Metamorphic Geology III Geophysics III Exploration Methods III Semester

  6. Dynamic Earth GG101 -Fall 2015 HIG 101, Lecture MWF 9:30 ~ 10:20 am

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Earth GG101 - Fall 2015 HIG 101, Lecture MWF 9:30 ~ 10:20 am Dr. Fletcher, POST 802A, 956 of Earth, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fletcher, C. Optional - If you want a hard copy, pick up the "Binder of postings from other students. Week Reading Weekly Topic Aug 24 1, 2, 3 What is the origin of Earth

  7. Dynamic Earth GG101 -Spring 2015 POST 723, Lecture MWF 9:30 ~ 10:20 am

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Earth GG101 - Spring 2015 POST 723, Lecture MWF 9:30 ~ 10:20 am Dr. Fletcher, POST 802A: The Science of Earth, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fletcher, C. Optional - If you want a hard copy, pick up the "Binder of postings from other students. Week Reading Weekly Topic Jan 12 1, 2, 3 What is the origin of Earth

  8. GG399 Mechanics in the Environmental Instructor: Janet Becker POST812 x66514; janetbec@hawaii.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG399 Mechanics in the Environmental Sciences Instructor: Janet Becker POST812 x66514; janetbec@hawaii.edu Fall, 2015 Syllabus Details and Information: Mechanics is the study of the motion of bodies under the action of forces. In this course, we focus on the mechanics of solids and fluids with an emphasis

  9. GG 302 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology SPRING, 2015 Instructor: Michael Garcia, Email: mogarcia@hawaii.edu, Office: POST 617D;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @hawaii.edu, Office: POST 617D; Prerequisites: GG 301 and Chemistry 162 and lab (all with C or better grade) Books with other geologists you need your tool box of basic terms: chemistry (common elements and their valances-rock petrologists for grad school or mining jobs. Lectures provide an overview of selected topics

  10. GG655 --Groundwater Modeling (also offered as CEE623) Course Meets: TR, 1200-1315 POST 733

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG655 -- Groundwater Modeling (also offered as CEE623) Course Meets: TR, 1200-1315 POST 733-6331, elkadi@hawaii.edu Extra Readings: List of textbooks http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=groundwater Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport (Theory and Applications of Transport in Porous Media), Springer

  11. GG 711 FALL 2015 M 1:30-4:20 pm, POST 702 "Cosmogenic Nuclides in Earth and Planetary Science"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 GG 711 FALL 2015 M 1:30-4:20 pm, POST 702 "Cosmogenic Nuclides in Earth and Planetary Science a foundational understanding of the principles of cosmogenic nuclide research. ***have developed an ability to make sound assessments of applications of the presented cosmogenic nuclide measurement modalities

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceaemore »(20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.« less

  13. Study of gluon versus quark fragmentation in ??gg? and e(+)e(-)?qq? events at s?=10 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1997-07-01

    extract the mean multiplicities as a function of gg or q q¯ mass, for pure ggg and q q¯g samples. As shown in Fig. 4, the ratio of ^ Nchrg& resulting from gluon fragmentation to ^Nchrg& from quark fragmentation is Rchrg51.0460.02, after all the afore...& for gluons to ^Nchrg& for quarks mea- sured here is smaller than those found by the OPAL, ALEPH, SLD, and DELPHI experiments, at As;MZ0. The ratios compare as follows. Collaboration ^ N &g /^N&q Kinematic regime CLEO 96 1.0460.05 ^ E jet&,7 GeV DELPHI @4# 1...

  14. Recent WSU Anthropology Faculty Books: Ackerman, Lillian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    . McGraw-Hill. Duff, Andrew 2002 Western Pueblo Identities: Regional Interaction, Migration on the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Lipe, William D. 1999 (senior

  15. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

  16. GG250 ~ Scientific Programming ~ (3 Credits) Course meets: Monday & Wednesday 12:301:20, Thursday 1:304:20 in POST 733.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 GG250 ~ Scientific Programming ~ (3 Credits) Fall 2015 Course meets: Monday & Wednesday 12 of Geology and Geophysics, Technical knowledge, Scientific method, Oral and written skills, and Evaluating disciplines (math, physics, chemistry, biology) to solve real-world problems in geology and geophysics. · SLO3

  17. Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline --Fall 2015 Introduction and Fundamentals: General Diagenesis, Organic Matter Diagenesis, Mineral Precipitation & Dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment Geochemistry (OCN/GG 644) Course Outline -- Fall 2015 Date Day Lectu re # Topic Components and Distribution of Marine Sediment Types 1-Sep Tu 3 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment Accumulation Rates and Sediment Transport Processes 3-Sep Th 4 Physical Properties of Sediments, Sediment

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.

  19. ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde1mace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better

  20. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg?H?W^(+)W^(?) and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, C.; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2010-07-15

    Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg! H! WþW#1; and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models T. Aaltonen,15,a V.M. Abazov,48,b B. Abbott,116,b M. Abolins,101,b B. S. Acharya,35,b M. Adams,79,b T. Adams,75,b J. Adelman...,78,a E. Aguilo,7,b G.D. Alexeev,48,b G. Alkhazov,52,b A. Alton,99,ii B. A´lvarez Gonza´lez,56,aa G. Alverson,94,b G. A. Alves,2,b S. Amerio,39a,a D. Amidei,99,a A. Anastassov,81,a L. S. Ancu,47,b A. Annovi,37,a J. Antos,53,a M. Aoki,77,b G. Apollinari...

  1. Studying Neutrinos with the EXO Experiment Nicole Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    .2948, July 2008. NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY Similar to 'normal' double beta decay, except no neutrinos to neutrinoless double beta decay is given by: S0 1/2 a A MT B 1/2 =efficiency, a=isotopic abundance A Tritium Endpoint meNeutrinoless double

  2. Tropical Western Pacific T. Ackerman Pennsylvania Sate University

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  3. Microsoft Word - TP Ackerman Whilte Paper.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana Cox (803) TO:1NUCLEAR2P.O.9

  4. GG455 --Hydrogeology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions · Pore pressure & tension · Aquifers Groundwater Flow · Darcy's law · Hydraulic head & fluid flow Groundwater Flow Applications · Analytic solutions to simple flow problems · Radial flow to wells on availability) 1. Well drilling site 2. Springs 3. Board of Water Supply (BWS) Beretania pump station and Halawa

  5. A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4 Abstract A soil erosion risk map was developed for the State of New Mexico using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), a fuzzy logic model (FuzzyCell) and ArcGIS Desktop 9.3 software. Soil

  6. Physical Geology GG101: Spring 2015 POST 723, Lecture MWF 11:30 am -12:20 pm Dr. Hammer, POST 617B, 956-5996, jhammer@soest.hawaii.edu Office hrs: TH 1:30-3 pm and by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Geology GG101: Spring 2015 POST 723, Lecture MWF 11:30 am -12:20 pm Dr. Hammer, POST 617B, 956-5996, jhammer@soest.hawaii.edu Office hrs: TH 1:30- 3 pm and by appointment TEXT Physical Geology: The Science of Earth, 2011, Fletcher, C. Welcome to Physical Geology! In this 3 credit course you will learn

  7. WALLACE E. TYNER Professor Tyner is an energy economist and James and Lois Ackerman Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    chapters. His past work in energy economics has encompassed oil, natural gas, coal, oil shale, biomass

  8. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Technical Sessions T. Ackerman, B. Albrecht, D. Lamb, N. Seaman, D. Thomson, and T. Warner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliersmillion Technical SessionsM.P.S.T.

  10. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARMD. Westphal, B. Toon, E.

  11. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARMD. Westphal, B. Toon,

  12. %&$')(10243 5)(16 &$7$8 9 @A B C D)0)E1F(2 8 6( G$HI2 9 C EI0)3 6& $GG %P$0)712 9 C 6( Q)6 &)DEI6 HI')HI($RS%&$T C %)&)'U(1V$W 6& Q)F)DH 3 2 X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    ¦(2 8 6( G$HI2 9 C EI0)3 6& $GG %¦P$0)712 9 C 6( Q)6 &)DEI6 HI')HI($RS%¦&$T C %)&)'U(1V$W 6& Q)F)D¦H 3 2 X Ya` b c d e f c g46 h¦i p qr s t s u v tIv u w u h ixy ¦s v s ru ¦i 1$r it uI4 u x ip uIu h i vp qh t x p qs s w t 4s t x x sS HI13 qrI4 q u ¦i ) v t$ u h u vt x w 4s it iq h t x 4 u x

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Mace_Poster_ARM-ATrain_Comparison [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widely usingOverviewRepresentativeness of

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein...

  15. GG106 : Humans and the Environment Fall 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 11/2 Water Resources 13 11/7 Exam 2 12 11/9 Water Pollution, the use of natural resources and environmental pollution. The class will consist

  16. Page 1 of 2 GG 301 Mineralogy Fall 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edition ok, but page numbers of assignments may differ) Optional Texts and Resources available in POST 703 will also use calculations, computer programs, and physical models to learn concepts. Labs

  17. Geology of the Hawaiian Islands GG103 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Magmatic Differentiation 3, 5 Soils and Soil Formation 1, 3, 5 Kohala, Streams, Water Erosion (P Topics due to water to soils. The goal is to achieve a basic understanding of the geological interpretations of our followed. Please read the guidelines (http://www.catalog.hawaii.edu/about-uh/campus-policies1.htm

  18. Research in GG Department, SOEST, University of Hawaii Earth's Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    and Environmental Geology Aly El Kadi Professor, Hydrology Eric Gaidos Professor Geobiology, Astrobiology, Planetary Geochemistry, Paleoceanography #12;Julia Hammer Associate Professor Experimental Petrology Bruce Houghton Garcia Professor Petrology, Volcanology Eric Hellebrand Associate Specialist Petrology Jasper Konter

  19. In With the Old, Out With the New: Transition Policy in Environmental Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    Ackerman & William Hassler, Clean Coal / Dirty Air (1981).William T. Hassler. 1981. Clean Coal/Dirty Air. New Haven:Ackerman & William Hassler, Clean Coal / Dirty Air (1981),

  20. The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Benjamin M

    2005-01-01

    Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

  1. Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Katherine Ellison

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

  2. The influence of N-dimethyl amino succinamic acid on the growth and development of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Poellnitz cv. 'Mace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warminski, Norman Charles

    1968-01-01

    , for her assistance and constant encouragement. TABLE OF CONTFNTS Chapter Page I I '. IV INTRODUCT'0!4 AND RF VIEN OF LITEPACURF NATERIALS AND NETI-!ODS RLSULTS DISCUS IDN 24 V SUlgl!ART LITERA'!URE CITED APFE!'iDI'/ VITA 30 3'I 34 41 Vl... quaterna, y a iinioniuia carbar ates v!ere reported and we. e the first comip &unde fo rr ce, ve ex't naive trials. The most active material in this group was Aran 1618 (3, 4, ZO). Few test plants, o+her than clnrysiln+has"'ms, showed lilarlred . espouse...

  3. [1] W. B. Ackerman. Data flow languages. IEEE Computer, 15(2):15--25, Febru [2] Gregory R. Andrews. Concurrent Programming: Principles and Practice.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programming language. Technical Report CS­TR­92­01, Computer Science Department, California Institute sequential processes. Technical report, Tech­ nological University, Eindhoven, 1965. [6] James Gosling, Bill Database () -- //mutexR and rw implicitly initialized to 1 nr = 0; try -- mutexR = new Semaphore (1); rw

  4. Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard A. Frey, Steven A. Ackerman, Yinghui Liu, Kathleen I. Strabala, Hong Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard.frey@ssec.wisc.edu August 2007 #12;ABSTRACT Significant improvements have been made to the MODIS cloud mask (MOD35 and MYD35 to the 3.9-12 m and 11-12 m cloud tests. More non-MODIS ancillary input data has been added. Land and sea

  5. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC using full analytic results for gg -> 2e 2?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John M. Campbell; R. Keith Ellis; Ciaran Williams

    2013-11-14

    We revisit the hadronic production of the four-lepton final state, e^- e^+ \\mu^- \\mu^+, through the fusion of initial state gluons. This process is mediated by loops of quarks and we provide first full analytic results for helicity amplitudes that account for both the effects of the quark mass in the loop and off-shell vector bosons. The analytic results have been implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM and are both fast, and numerically stable in the region of low Z transverse momentum. We use our results to study the interference between Higgs-mediated and continuum production of four-lepton final states, which is necessary in order to obtain accurate theoretical predictions outside the Higgs resonance region. We have confirmed and extended a recent analysis of Caola and Melnikov that proposes to use a measurement of the off-shell region to constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. Using a simple cut-and-count method, existing LHC data should bound the width at the level of 25-45 times the Standard Model expectation. We investigate the power of using a matrix element method to construct a kinematic discriminant to sharpen the constraint. In our analysis the bound on the Higgs width is improved by a factor of about 1.6 using a simple cut on the MEM discriminant, compared to an invariant mass cut m_{4l} > 300 GeV.

  6. Page 1 of 1 GG 170 Physical Geology CRN 75826 Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    effects of global warming? Why do some places have oil and others don't? Is groundwater safe to drink% Labs ­ comprised of problem sets, demonstrations, and practice with geological methods, students · give practice working with concepts · assess what is being learned The purposes of the lab

  7. 25.9.2014 ETHZ-LAV, GG PhD Position in Energy Systems Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    is the development of strategies for sustainable energy systems; but our mission is also one of technology scouting a technological guidance project embedded into SCCER mobility. What is in it for you? · An original challenge is also the head of SCCER mobility. Who we are looking for · You hold an MSc in engineering (or comparable

  8. 29 September --2nd October 1998 Editors: MP Zalucki, RAI Drew and GG White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    patterns, a Shin-Etsu rope formulation spaced 2 m apart and a widely-spaced (35 m) pattern using a high

  9. GG695 BAYESIAN DATA ANALYSIS [3 CR] (former title: Geophysical Inverse Theory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation and Inverse Problems, 2nd edition, Academic Press. Tarantola, A. (2005) Inverse Problem Theory, Oxford University Press. Gelman et al. (2014) Bayesian Data Analysis, 3rd edition, Chapman and Hall objectives, respectively, for the MS and PhD graduate degree programs, relating to technical knowledge

  10. Modeling Bystander Effects Using a Microdosimetric ApproachModeling Bystander Effects Using a Microdosimetric Approach R.D. Stewart, E.J. Ackerman, J.K. Shultis*, and X.C. Lei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Dose Radiation Research Program grant to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from the U there is increasing evidence that bystander effects play a role in low dose radiation responses, few models have been Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 * Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 Research supported by a Low

  11. Product (a) Type (b) Time of Harvest Gear Code (c) Area of catch (d) Net Weight No. of Fish F/FR RD/GG/DR/FL/OT (mm/yy) (kg) (when RD, GG or DR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Product (a) Type (b) Time of Harvest Gear Code (c) Area of catch (d) Net Weight No. of Fish F/FR RD=Other (describe the type of product; ____________________.) (c): If the Gear Code is OT, describe the type of gear

  12. Dynamic Earth GG101 -Spring 2015 Class Times: Tue/Thu, 9:30-10:20, POST 723

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from? Feb. 3 Chapter 6 What creates volcanoes? What is the origin of the Hawaiian Islands? First Exam does pressure and heat change rocks? Where does oil come from? Feb. 24 Chapter 11 How are mountains

  13. GG 450L: Geophysical Methods Lab LAB 1: Using the Gravimeter and Measuring the Free-Air Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    to the HIG building. Near this location would be a great place to define your base or reference station. b as elevation of each measurement site above your base station. d) Make two measurements at your base station KNOB is locked (rotated fully clockwise). 2. Use the eyepiece fixture to lift the gravimeter out

  14. GG--TEAMS 4TEAMS 4thth Grade Elvira Elementary School SUSDGrade Elvira Elementary School SUSD Fellow: Megan Alexander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    , mass, and capacity using metric units. ·Convert within the same measurement system using both metric and area ·Explain the difference between perimeter and area ·Apply measurement skills to measure length and U.S. customary units. L Cool Combinations Change It Up ·Representing all possibilities

  15. GG130 Geologic Hazards (Spring 2015) Scott Rowland, POST 716A, 956-3150, scott@hawaii.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landslides and Mega Tsunami Handout 1, 3, 5 Apr. 23 Soil Problems and Sinkholes Chapter 7 1, 5 Apr. 28

  16. GG 711 Special Topics: Seminar in Stable Isotope Ecology Tu-Th 1:30-2:45 pm, POST 702

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outcomes: 1) Improve critical thinking 2) Gain qualitative and quantitative data interpretation skills 3. The course will benefit those planning to use stable isotope analyses in their thesis research. Learning

  17. UNIVERSIT DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA "LA SAPIENZA" Rip.II Sett. I AA.GG. Presenze Roma 28 GIU 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    rilevazione degli orari di lavoro e di raggiungere, pertanto, una maggiore efficienza organizzativa gestionale

  18. LL I N KI N K AA GG EE The newsletter of the John Scott Dailey Florida Institute of Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    12 Public Speaking 101 for Code Enforcement Officials April 19 Certificate Program in Public Records January 2012 CODE ENFORCEMENT CERTIFICATION CLASSES AND EXAMINATIONS Through the Florida Association of Code Enforcement (F.A.C.E.) LEGAL ISSUES OF CODE ENFORCEMENT (LEVEL III) January - March Fort

  19. Beaches, Reefs, and Climate Change GG420 -Rm POST 708 -T, Th 1:30 ~ 2:45 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change Pick focus area ­ give 6 Climate change talk in class 7 Reefs Goat Island Trip 8 Reefs 9 Reefs Exam Field Trips: Kaena Pt., Goat Island, Kailua Bay Text: Fletcher, Living on the Shores of Hawaii, UH in coastal geologic systems in order to effectively manage coastal resources in a time of rising sea level

  20. GG407 Energy & Mineral Resources Fall 2015 Lecture: M W F 9:30 10:20 POST 708

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unconventional Fossil Fuel Resources ­ petroleum. 7 Unconventional Fossil Fuel Resources ­ natural gas. 8 Coal, Photosynthesis & Energy Resources 3 Composition of natural hydrocarbons: Petroleum and Natural Gas 4 Petroleum and Natural Gas: Reserves & Genesis 5 Petroleum And Natural Gas: Conventional Exploration & Recovery 6

  1. FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Roche, Kenneth J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system emerged from this interaction. Joule enables the chief financial officer and senior DOE management to track annual performance on a quarterly basis. Joule scores are reported as success, goal met (green light in PART), mixed results, goal partially met (yellow light in PART), and unsatisfactory, goal not met (red light in PART). Joule links the DOE strategic plan to the underlying base program targets.

  2. QER Public Meeting Santa Fe, NM Electricity Infrastructure Transmissio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    QER Public Meeting Santa Fe, NM Electricity Infrastructure Transmission, Storage, and Distribution - Jurisdictional issues and priorities Remarks of Susan Ackerman, Chair, Oregon...

  3. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    scales and evolution of stormwater plumes in Santa Monicascales and evolution of stormwater plumes in Santa MonicaAckerman, D. , 2005. Stormwater runoff plumes observed by

  4. GG 461 Geospatial Information The goals of this course are to convince students that they should collect field data in a spatially-quantitative manner (i.e.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @hawaii.edu Office Hours: W 10:00-12:00 or by appointment text: Mastering ArcGIS (7th Edition), by Maribeth Price, 5 2b 9/3 Map Datums Chapter 11 2 3a 9/8 GPS Utility Chapter 2 2 3b 9/10 Shape files, tables, raster, ancillary data Mapping handout 2, 3, 5 10b 10/29 Tables, Joins Chapters 5, 6 2 11a 11/3 Geologic Map V

  5. GG102 "Introduction to Global Change" Syllabus Spring Semester, 2015 T-Th 3:00-4:15 p.m. Classroom: POST 723 3 credits (DP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than 7,000,000,000 (seven billion) people. At a minimum, each of these people needs food, water resources are currently being used, and which types? How is this resource use affecting the other animals topic affects the state of Hawaii. Topics include: Energy (pertroleum, natural gas, biofuels, wind

  6. GG 710 Sec. 2: Using the Cameca ims 1280 Ion Microprobe Tentative meeting time: T-Th 3:00 -3:50 pm (2 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    petrology, sedimentology, isotope geochemistry, cosmochemistry, radiochronology, experimental petrology

  7. Steering control of an autonomous ground vehicle with application to the DARPA Urban Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Stefan F. (Stefan Forrest)

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental to the design of an Ackerman steered autonomous ground vehicle is the development of a low-level controller that effectively performs trajectory or path tracking. Though ample literature is available on various ...

  8. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Solar Water Heater Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans...

  10. U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cochrane, P. Mace, R. Merrick, M. Miller, S. Rumsey, B. Taylor, G. Thompson, and R. Waples #12;#12;U. Rumsey, B. Taylor, G. Thompson, and R. Waples Recommendations to NOAA Fisheries: ESA Listing Criteria, P. Mace, R. Merrick, M. Miller, S. Rumsey, B. Taylor, G. Thompson, and R. Waples. 2004

  11. BB UU LL GG AA RR II AA NN AA CC AA DD EE MM YY OO FF SS CC II EE NN CC EE SS IINNSSTTIITTUUTTEE OOFF IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN AANNDD CCOOMMMMUUNNIICCAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGIIEESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Library (ITIL) ­ essence development, open problems Abstract: This article aims to give an overview over the ITIL framework objective. It is going to explain the rapidly growing IT business needs which had caused the development of this library. We are also going to follow the ITIL evolution history and find the circumstances

  12. Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries 95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark S.

    Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries Ô95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library Mark S. Ackerman Roy T. Fielding Information and Computer Science Maintenance will be critical to digital libraries, especially those that promote broad access to diverse

  13. Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra-and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra- and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain James D.H. Ackerman,1,2,5 and Jeffrey J. Neil2,6* This report describes the measurement of water preexchange lifetimes and intra/extracellular content in intact, functioning mammalian brain. Intra- and extracellular water

  14. Austin, P. H., Y. Wang, R. Pincus and V. Kujala, 1995: Precipitation in stratocumulus clouds: Ob-servation and modeling resuts. J. Atmos. Sci., 52, 23292352.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    1 REFERENCES Austin, P. H., Y. Wang, R. Pincus and V. Kujala, 1995: Precipitation in stratocumulus: A general mathematical formalism. J. Atmos. Ocean. Techn., 6, 575­584. Bretherton, C.S. and R. Pincus. 1995, B. A. Albrecht, T. P. Ackerman, J. Verlinde, D. M. Babb, R. M. Peters and W. J. Syrett, 1995

  15. T H E JOURNALOF BIOLOGICALCHEMISTRY Vol. 256. No.22, Issue of November 25, pp. 11787-11790, 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonath, Ada E.

    and Bacillus stearothermophilusRibosome* (Receivedfor publication, July 15, 1981) Krzysztof Appelt, Jan Dijk with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734solely to indicate this fact. ' Dijk, J., Littlechild, J., Freund, A.M., Pouyet., Malcolm,A. L., Paterakis, K., Ackerman, I. & Dijk, J . (1981)Eur. J. Biochem., submitted for publication

  16. Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Ard

    Chapter 3 Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen 3.1.1 Some background on dense hydrogen Hydrogen, out of it the Universe evolved, every atom and leaf, marine iguana and apricot­smelling chanterelle. But my, my, what alchemy: nondescript H 2 --Diane Ackerman 1 -- Hydrogen

  17. The Astrophysical Journal, 571:L151L154, 2002 June 1 2002. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Burgasser,1,2 Mark S. Marley,3 Andrew S. Ackerman,3 Didier Saumon,4 Katharina Lodders,5 Conard C. Dahn,6 Observatory, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002-1149; dahn@nofs.navy.mil, hch@nofs.navy.mil. 7 Infrared

  18. Causes and Consequences of Corruption Dr. Bonnie Palifka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, David M.

    -Ackerman, Susan. 1999. Corruption and Government: Causes, Consequences, and Reform. Cambridge: Cambridge of Economic Issues XLI,4: 1043-1061. How is corruption measured? Assignment: browse the websites of Transparency International (http://www.transparency.org/) and the World Bank (http://www1.worldbank

  19. habitat 21 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 ?0. 2 ?0. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 After Transformation f(y|?=?0.05531) Residua l G GGG GG G GGG G G G G G G G G GGGGG GGG G G G GG G G G GG... GG GG GG G G G GG G G GGG G G G G G GG G 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 3. 5 4. 0 4. 5 5. 0 5. 5 f(y|?=?0.05531) Model estimat e Figure 2: (Left column:) The results with no transformation, and the (Right columns:) results after...

  20. Measurement of Organophosphate Pesticides, Organochlorine Pesticides, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Household Dust from Two Rural Villages in Nepal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cizmas, Leslie; Ackerman, Lani; Donnelly, Danielle A.; Donnelly, Kirby C.; McDonald, Thomas J.

    2015-01-16

    January 16, 2015 Citation: Cizmas L, Ackerman L, Donnelly DA, Donnelly KC, McDonald TJ (2015) Measurement of Organophosphate Pesticides, Organochlorine Pesticides, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Household Dust from Two Rural Villages in Nepal..., and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Measurement of Organophosphate Pesticides, Organochlorine Pesticides, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Household Dust from Two Rural Villages in Nepal Leslie Cizmas1...

  1. Corruption and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aidt, Toke S.

    the exploitation of natural resources to corruption is also abundant, ranging from kick-backs associated with logging concessions in Malaysia and Indonesia to oil concessions in Nigeria. (Rose-Ackerman (1999, chapter 3) provides many more examples... . It is used to account for energy depletion, mineral depletion, and net forest depletion by subtracting an estimate of the relevant resource rents from net national savings. These rents are calculated as the market price of the resource minus average...

  2. Mitigating Amphibian Disease: Strategies to maintain wild populations and control chytridiomycosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    186. Marten GG: Dengue hemorrhagic fever, mosquitoes, andmosquito larvae suppres- sing the vectors of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

  3. VOLUME 37 MARCH 1998J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 1998 American Meteorological Society 241

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    - tistics were obtained by Mace (1997) based on the 94- GHz radar returns data. During a number of field ex multilayer cirrus cloud systems using AVHRR data. It is based on the physical properties of the AVHRR 0.63- m ground-based lidar and radar im- ages, balloon-borne replicator data, and NCAR­CLASS humidity soundings

  4. The following are considered prohibited articles and are prohibited at SRS and its facilities unless in the possession of a person who has obtained specific authorization for them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    unless in the possession of a person who has obtained specific authorization for them: · weapons (cross-bows, bows and arrows, martial arts weapons such as butterfly knives, other fixed blade knives not intended, vials and pipes designed to smoke hashish or marijuana. · tear gas, chemical mace, and devices

  5. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE Stimulus duration and diversity do not reverse the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the well-established basic-level entry point for object repre- sentation, Mace et al. (2009) used a go-level categorization has long been thought to be the entry level for object representations. However, this view is now processing scheme for visual stimuli, with the basic level as an entry step to reach a more abstract

  6. Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    1 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments by Ian Bateman, Georgina Mace, Carlo Fezzi, Giles Atkinson and Kerry Turner CSERGE Working Paper EDM 10-10 #12;2 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Turneri,2 i. Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), School

  7. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  8. habitat 58 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Binders (Lion through Valero) .................................................... 30 Figure II-9. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged PMAs and Base Binders (Wright through MnRoad) ........................... 32... xii Page Figure II-10. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged PMAs and Base Binders (Lion through Valero) .................................. 32 Figure II-11. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged...

  9. Jimmy Bell's Experience Brings Valuable Input to Federal Advisory Board |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to Apply for an PATRICIA HOFFMAN|Jennifer AckermanJeremyDepartment of

  10. Air pollution and childhood respiratory allergies in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, JD; Akinbami, LJ; Woodruff, TJ

    2008-01-01

    GG. 2006. Ambient air pollution and asthma exacerbations inallergic symptoms and air pollution among a nationwideincreases in indices of air pollution have been found to

  11. On Subjects and Topics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noonan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Schachter, P. : 1976: ‘The subject in Philippine Langu-German can easily separate subject and orien- tation, itstill has a dummy subject gg. Irish does not make regular

  12. An Interaction Region for Gamma-Gamma and Gamma-Electron Collisions at TESLA/SBLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brinkmann; I. Ginzburg; N. Holtkamp; G. Jikia; O. Napoly; E. Saldin; E. Schneidmiller; V. Serbo; G. Silvestrov; V. Telnov; A. Undrus; M. Yurkov

    1997-07-08

    Linear colliders offer unique opportunities to study gamma-gamma (gg), gamma-electron (ge) interactions. Using the laser backscattering method one can obtain gg, ge colliding beams with an energy and luminosity comparable to that in e+e- collisions. This work is a part of the Conceptual Design of TESLA/SBLC linear colliders describing a second interaction region for gg, ge collisions. We consider here possible physics in high energy gg, ge collisions, e -> g conversion, requirements to lasers, collision schemes, attainable luminosities, backgrounds, possible lasers, optics at the interaction region and other associated problems.

  13. THE RATIONAL EXPLOITATION OF THE SEA FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0000000900000000 30 gg» Whiting OOOODOOOOOOOOOQI hho Tongschar, Scharretong, Witje ooo 81 X i o nfi OKo o o o o o o

  14. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric ?-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  15. Does cellular aging relate to patterns of allostasis?. An examination of basal and stress reactive HPA axis activity and telomere length.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    telomerase, stress, and aging. In: Benton, GG. ; Cacioppo,7. Edo MD, Andres V. Aging, telomeres, and atherosclerosis.for accelerated cellular aging? Hormones (Athens). 2009; 8:

  16. Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07

    The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ~4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

  17. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode02v0061cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation

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  1. Defect level characterization of silicon nanowire arrays: Towards novel experimental paradigms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carapezzi, Stefania; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-02-21

    The huge amount of knowledge, and infrastructures, brought by silicon (Si) technology, make Si Nanowires (NWs) an ideal choice for nano-electronic Si-based devices. This, in turn, challenges the scientific research to adapt the technical and theoretical paradigms, at the base of established experimental techniques, in order to probe the properties of these systems. Metal-assisted wet-Chemical Etching (MaCE) [1, 2] is a promising fast, easy and cheap method to grow high aspect-ratio aligned Si NWs. Further, contrary to other fabrication methods, this method avoids the possible detrimental effects related to Au diffusion into NWs. We investigated the bandgap level diagram of MaCE Si NW arrays, phosphorous-doped, by means of Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. The presence of both shallow and deep levels has been detected. The results have been examined in the light of the specificity of the MaCE growth. The study of the electronic levels in Si NWs is, of course, of capital importance in view of the integration of Si NW arrays as active layers in actual devices.

  2. The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Lei

    2012-10-19

    , which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

  3. March 16, 2010March 16, 2010 Introduction to Seismic ExplorationIntroduction to Seismic Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    3/15/2010 1 GG450GG450 March 16, 2010March 16, 2010 Introduction to Seismic ExplorationIntroduction to Seismic Exploration andand Elementary Digital AnalysisElementary Digital Analysis Some of the material IIntroduction AsAs more than 90% of geophysicalmore than 90% of geophysical exploration utilizes seismic methods

  4. Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleere, Jason James

    1998-01-01

    was significant for all traits and SEX was significant for all traits excluding FG. Birth year and birth season were significant effects for WW, GG, FG, and SW. Classes set according to industry standards were BW (4 kg increments), WW (50 kg increments), GG (40 kg...

  5. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  6. Basketball - Mens - 1951-1960 - 6 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-04-18

    of the Trinity Aquifer, Mace and others (2000)........7 Figure 4. Water Level Elevations in Middle Trinity Aquifer, Aug., 2000 .............8 Figure 5. Water Level and Rainfall, Hays County, 57-56-710, 1999-2000..........24 Figure 6. Water Level and Rainfall..., Hays County, 57-64-705, 1999-2000..........25 Figure 7. Water Level and Rainfall, Blanco County, 57-53-305, 1999-2000 ......30 Figure 8. Water Level and Rainfall, Blanco County, 57-53-614, 1999-2000 ......31 Figure 9. Water Level and Rainfall, Comal...

  7. ARM - VAP Product - microbasepi

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management Facility Plots

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management Facility

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management Facility11cloth Documentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth Documentation Data

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth Documentation

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth Documentation91cloth

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth11cloth Documentation

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  1. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode02v0031cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA BetterProductsmergesondemergesonde2mace Documentation Data Management61cloth11cloth31cloth

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  1. ARM - VAP Product - mmcrmode1st200309091cloth

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  10. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. !"#$%&'$"()'"*$+&,$'"+%-"#./0+&$"1$2$+'3,4"5"6+'&%$'2,/6")("&,$"""" 78'$+8")("9$&$)').):;"+%-"#4"9$.?)8'%$4"582&'+./+"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brassington, Gary

    "a$+]"+%-"C'$"3$+2$-" SH"K)Q$0?$'""A"bGG4HHH"./&'$2"MGVS4HHH"./&'$2")/.N")("6')-83&" " " "" "'$3)Q$'$-"" S"T$3

  12. Blood and Ink: Russian and Soviet Jewish Chroniclers of Catastrophe from World War I to World War II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavadivker, Polly

    2013-01-01

    Antisemitizm i pogromy na Ukraine 1917-1918 gg. Berlin: Izd.pogromov. Pogromy na Ukraine, v Belorussii i evropeiskoiDieter. "The Murder of Ukraine's Jews under German Military

  13. Rethinking optimal control of human movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huh, Dongsung

    2012-01-01

    movements”. In: Human muscle power, pp. 131–150. Todorov,movements”. In: Human muscle power, pp. 131–150. Todorov,movements”. In: Human muscle power, pp. 131–150. Sutton, GG

  14. E cient Approximation of General Product Distributions Guy Eveny Oded Goldreichz Michael Lubyx Noam Nisan{ Boban Velickovic k

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldreich, Oded

    by a n-by-m probability matrix Pn;m = fpi;v : i 2 f1;:::;ng;v 2 f0;:::;m 1gg, which is a matrix of non

  15. E cient Approximation of Product Distributions Guy Eveny Oded Goldreichz Michael Lubyx Noam Nisan{ Boban Velickovic k

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldreich, Oded

    by a n-by-m probability matrix Pn;m = fpi;v : i 2 f1;:::;ng;v 2 f0;:::;m 1gg, which is a matrix of non

  16. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosh K Das; Jan-e Alam

    2011-06-14

    The shear ($\\eta$) and bulk ($\\zeta$) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, $gg \\rightarrow gg$ and the inelastic, number non-conserving, $gg\\rightarrow ggg$ processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous co-efficients to entropy density ($s$) ratios. Recently the processes: $gg \\rightarrow ggg$ has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The $\\eta$ and $\\zeta$ have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula derived recently. The sensitivity of the quantity, $\\eta/s$ on the running coupling constant is also discussed. At $\\alpha_s=0.3$ we get $\\eta/s=0.24$ which is close to the value obtained from the analysis of the elliptic flow at RHIC experiments.

  17. Active Hypothermic Growth: A Novel Means For Increasing Total Interferon-? Production by Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R., Fox

    When grown under hypothermic conditions, Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells become growth arrested in the G?/G? phase of the cell cycle and also often exhibit increased recombinant protein production. In this study, we ...

  18. Integrating 40 Ar, U-Pb, and astronomical clocks in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    , Wisconsin 53706, USA 3 British Petroleum, Houston, Texas 77079-2696, USA 4 Faculty of Geology, University, British Geological Survey, Keyworth NG12 5GG, UK 6 U.S. Geological Survey, MS 980, Denver, Colorado 80225

  19. American Journal of Science DECEMBER 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grotzinger, John P.

    , California 91125, USA ***Current Address: NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratories, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, NG12 5GG, United Kingdom § Petroleum Development Oman, Box 81, Muscat, PC 113, Oman §§ Current

  20. 2007/08/1747

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-10-06

    V . The group average of an element v ? V is defined as 1. |G| ?g?G g(v). 2 ..... the eigenvalue ?1 is spanned by the remaining eight double-indexed matrices.

  1. JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, July 2005, p. 43814391 Vol. 187, No. 13 0021-9193/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/JB.187.13.43814391.2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when adminis- tered regulator HilA. One mechanism by which probiotics may antagonize intestinal pathogens is by influencing

  2. sdx?? sex??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sex?? H G(d). G(g). H. G(e). commutes. In other words, an H-clone of F is another diagram in the homotopy category which is. built from essentially the same ...

  3. Advanced MOSFET Designs and Implications for SRAM Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Changhwan

    2011-01-01

    Notchless QP Notchless QP Planar Bulk 120a 100a 100a 80a80a 60a 60a C gg (F) 120a 40a V DD (V) QP Bulk ( T si =

  4. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    ) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences enquiries Dr Emilia Ferraro, Department of Geography & Sustainable Development E: gg. Resources Very few universities currently offer undergraduate degrees in Sustainable Development. Uniquely

  5. Last Revised:10-11-2013 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES -FALL 2013 Enr CRN CRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Problem Solving 8/8 73175/ 71474 3 OCN 312 GG 312 Geomathematics Powell MWF 9:30-10:20 POST 703 **GG to Deep-Sea Biology Drazen*/Smith TR 12:00-1:15 POST 708 18/15 74755/ 74625 3 OCN 450 ANSC 450 Aquaculture Drazen*/Smith TR 12:00-1:15 POST 708 7 78810 3 OCN 633 Biogeochemical Methods in Oceanography De

  6. Global warming commitment concept and its application for relative evaluation of greenhouse gas current and future radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karol, I.L.; Frolkis, V.A.; Kiselev, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Global Warming Commitment (GWC) of gas X relative to standard gas A for time period T is proposed, as determined by the formula GWC{sub X}{sup T} = {integral}RF{sub X}(t)dt/{integral}RF{sub A}(t)dt both integrals between limits 0 and T, where RF{sub X}(t) = {Delta}F{sub X}(t) is the Radiative Forcing (RF) of gas X (the net total radiation flux change at the tropopause level caused by the gas X content variation during the 0 to t time period). The well known Global Warming Potential (GWP) is determined by the same formula, where {Delta}F{sub x}(t) is due to instantaneous releases into the atmosphere of the same definite mass (1 kg) of gas X and of standard gas A. In GWC the actual measured or modeled gas contents evolutions are used for estimation of gas X relative input into the current and future greenhouse warming. GWC of principal Greenhouse Gases (GG) are calculated and analyzed for the time period before 1990, based on observed GG content evolution. For periods from now to 2050 the modeled global GG content projections from radiative photochemical atmospheric model are used for several of IPCC-94 scenarios of GG anthropogenic emissions up to 2050. The GWC of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and CFCs with CO{sub 2} as standard GG are 2--4 times lower, and they are much more accurately reflecting the reality in the above periods than the widely used RFs of these GG relative to GG of CO{sub 2}, when the GG content evolutions during the time period T is not considered.

  7. Identifying Critical Success Factors for Efficient Consumer Response based on the Australian Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnia, Sherah

    . The mailing list of these organisations was obtained from the Grocery Industry Marketing Guide 1998, ignoring costs 0.00 m -0.39 m -0.77 gg Marketing (promotion) costs 0.25 -0.07 -0.77 g Administrative costs 0 impact on the adoption of ECR. Factors Gamma Education 0.65 g Size 0.82 gg Professionalism 0

  8. Color structure for soft gluon resummation - a general recipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malin Sjodahl

    2009-07-31

    A strategy for calculating the color structure needed for soft gluon resummation for processes with any number of colored partons is introduced using a N_c --> infinity inspired basis. In this basis a general formalism can be found at the same time as the calculations are simplified. The advantages are illustrated by recalculating the soft anomalous dimension matrix for the processes gg --> gg, q\\qbar --> q \\qbar g and q\\qbar --> ggg.

  9. Computing Model Variance Without Computing the Complete Generalized Inverse Bill Menke, February 19. 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    trivially. 4. The damped least squares generalized inverse has the form Note that since is symmetric, its least squares generalized inverse % GMG = (G'*G + epsi*eye(M,M)) \\ G' epsi = 0.1; A = (G'*G + epsi data kernel s=0.1; G=random('Normal',0, s, N, M ) + eye(N,M); % stddev of data sigmad = 1; % use damped

  10. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01

    3&0.OQ t~~~ ~:g~g ~: g8~ g:88~ 8: 8g 8:ggX _. --. ---l-120"-00£+ O~ 2 • 12-04-0G-O~+G8 2.0500000E+Oo -1. 3106622E+1.1,h414t3E+Q8 1.G.. 321'o3E+G8 1.00,+9266E+08 1.07691,+3E+

  11. Maternal Transfer of Contaminants to Eggs in Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscala) Nesting on Coal Fly Ash Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Fly Ash Basins A. L. Bryan, Jr., W. A. Hopkins, J. A. Baionno, B. P. Jackson Savannah River Ecology common grackles (Quiscalus quis- cala) nesting in association with coal fly ash settling basins concentrations in ash basin eggs (x 5.88 0.44 g/g DW) than in reference eggs (x 2.69 0.13 g/g DW). Selenium

  12. The trace on the K-theory of group C Thomas Schick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The trace on the K-theory of group C -algebras Thomas Schick FB Mathematik -- Uni M to be countable. The trace trG : CG C : gG gg 1 (where e-mail: thomas.schick@math.uni-muenster.de www: http #12;2 Thomas Schick 1 is the neutral element of G) extends to a trace on the reduced C-algebra of G

  13. Radon induced background processes in the KATRIN pre-spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fränkle, F M; Drexlin, G; Glück, F; Görhardt, S; Käfer, W; Mertens, S; Wandkowsky, N; Wolf, J

    2011-01-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a next generation, model independent, large scale tritium beta-decay experiment to determine the effective electron anti-neutrino mass by investigating the kinematics of tritium beta-decay with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c2 using the MAC-E filter technique. In order to reach this sensitivity, a low background level of 0.01 counts per second (cps) is required. This paper describes how the decay of radon in a MAC-E filter generates background events, based on measurements performed at the KATRIN pre-spectrometer test setup. Radon (Rn) atoms, which emanate from materials inside the vacuum region of the KATRIN spectrometers, are able to penetrate deep into the magnetic flux tube so that the alpha-decay of Rn contributes to the background. Of particular importance are electrons emitted in processes accompanying the Rn alpha-decay, such as shake-off, internal conversion of excited levels in the Rn daughter atoms and Auger electrons. While low-energy electrons (<...

  14. Radiative Decay of Vector Quarkonium: Constraints on Glueballs and Light Gluinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Cakir; G. R. Farrar

    1994-02-04

    Given a resonance of known mass, width, and J^{PC}, we can determine its gluonic branching fraction, b(R->gg), from data on its production in radiative vector quarkonium decay, V -> gamma+R. For most resonances b(R->gg) is found to be O(10%), consistent with being q-qbar states, but we find that both pseudoscalars observed in the 1440 MeV region have b(R->gg) ~ 1/2 - 1, and b(f_0^{++}->gg) ~ 1/2. As data improves, b(R->gg) should be a useful discriminator between q-qbar and gluonic states and may permit quantitative determination of the extent to which a particular resonance is a mixture of glueball and q-qbar. We also examine the regime of validity of pQCD for predicting the rate of V -> gamma+eta_gluino, the ``extra'' pseudoscalar bound state which would exist if there were light gluinos. From the CUSB limit on peaks in Upsilon -> gamma X, the mass range 3 GeV < m(eta_gluino) < 7 GeV can be excluded. An experiment must be significantly more sensitive to exclude an eta_gluino lighter than this.

  15. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  16. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  17. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  18. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  19. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

  20. Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Deborah J; Howson, Joanna M M; Payne, Felicity; Maier, Lisa M; Bailey, Rebecca; Holland, Kieran; Lowe, Christopher E; Cooper, Jason D; Hulme, John S; Vella, Adrian; Dalhman, Ingrid; Lam, Alex C; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Twells, Rebecca C J; Todd, John A

    2006-03-06

    .00 [ref] A/G 1.02 [0.87–1.18] G/G 0.99 [0.82–1.20] CFH A>G rs1061170 0.38 823 (541/517) 0.46 0.96 [0.85–1.08] A/A 1.00 [ref] A/G 1.00 [0.85– 1.17] G/G 0.88 [0.68–1.14] 0.38 3149/ 3485 0.87 0.99 [0.92–1.07] A/A 1.00 [ref] A/G 1.07 [0.96–1.19] G/G 0.94 [0...

  1. Isoreticular Series of (3,24)-Connected Metal-Organic Frameworks: Facile Synthesis and High Methane Uptake Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barin, G; Krungleviciute, V; Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK

    2014-03-11

    We have successfully used a highly efficient copper-catalyzed "click" reaction for the synthesis of a new series of hexacarboxylic acid linkers with varying sizes for the construction of isoreticular (3,24)-connected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-namely, NU-138, NU-139, and NU-140. One of these MOFs, NU-140, exhibits a gravimetric methane uptake of 0.34 g/g at 65 bar and 298 K, corresponding to almost 70% of the DOE target (0.5 g/g), and has a working capacity (deliverable amount between 65 and 5 bar) of 0.29 g/g, which translates into a volumetric working capacity of 170 cc(STP)/cc. These values demonstrate that NU-140 performs well for methane storage purposes, from both a gravimetric and a volumetric point of view. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 along with simulated isotherms are also reported.

  2. A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aminikashani, Mohammadreza; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

  3. Dimension Reduction and Covariance Structure for Multivariate Data, Beyond Gaussian Assumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2012-10-19

    G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 ?0. 2 ?0. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 After Transformation f(y|?=?0.05531) Residua l G GGG GG G GGG G G G G G G G G GGGGG GGG G G G GG G G G GG... on the multiple- probe information. The so-called Li-Wong Reduced (LWR) model was proposed based on the di erences between PM and MM intensities. Since the MM probes are de- signed originally for measuring the background/nonspeci c intensities, the di erences...

  4. Measurement of the fraction of top quark pair events produced via gluon-gluon fusion at the Tevatron in lepton+jets final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sungwoong Cho; Suyong Choi; Sehwook Lee; JaeHoon Lim; SungWoo Youn

    2014-11-30

    We report a measurement of the fraction of top quark pair events produced via gluon-gluon fusion in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96 ~\\rm TeV$ in lepton+jets final states using the full RunII data set corresponding to $9.7 ~\\rm fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the D\\O\\ experiment. We utilize a boosted decision tree to distinguish top quark pair events produced by $q\\bar{q}$ annihilation and $gg$ fusion. We perform a template fit to extract the $t\\bar{t}$ production fraction via $gg$ fusion and find $f_{gg} = 0.096 \\pm 0.039 ~(\\rm stat.) ~^{+0.077}_{-0.062} ~(\\rm syst.)$.

  5. A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadreza Aminikashani; Murat Uysal; Mohsen Kavehrad

    2015-02-02

    In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

  6. Rooting characteristics of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) in relation to soil fragipans in the flatwoods section of southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, Charles David

    1975-01-01

    82t(x) 8 A2 821t BO IRO xx 4 xx ROQ BR2t ROO Flg. 5-" HGF1ZGGBt1GG 1G (h6 SG11 PRdGG Of BBCh SCUdt( PIGt. . Fig. 6-- Soil profile ot plots F6 and F7 showing extensive tongueing end cregflsh krotovines* 33 the description was written... distribution by diameter classes. 5 Soil classification 49 65 6 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot Fl . . lpl 7 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot F2 . . lp2 8 Physical and chemical soil properties for plot F3 . . lp3 9 Physical...

  7. Universal anomalous dimensions at large spin and large twist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apratim Kaviraj; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2015-06-09

    In this paper we consider anomalous dimensions of double trace operators at large spin ($\\ell$) and large twist ($\\tau$) in CFTs in arbitrary dimensions ($d\\geq 3$). Using analytic conformal bootstrap methods, we show that the anomalous dimensions are universal in the limit $\\ell\\gg \\tau\\gg 1$. In the course of the derivation, we extract an approximate closed form expression for the conformal blocks arising in the four point function of identical scalars in any dimension. We compare our results with two different calculations in holography and find perfect agreement.

  8. The feasibility of a helicopter passenger service in the Dallas-Fort Worth area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Nelson Lane

    1965-01-01

    I Psx'sf, el Kw~X& l;Snab af '@e rejeigmedte %aj. 'phd Be+em 'og 5 By. EMsrm Xapa Kathy Approved hs 00 @~ale ~ qmCeha. by& M-5R $8gQR~B&) ' r Hl59g , ' ' G:-G 'K 5 5:. 'N 'g S ':" 5 :''''I-. . 1. 05t$8ctf vog... - -- - ? ' ? - - 1, S XXX SVAMNXGS AMS SEEN' GP Sg~ ??- - . ' ' 19 QQXI XGS ~ ??? ~ ? R?? 79 Xg S 55??' ?' ?? ~ ~' . ? ? ' ' ? 3R S Qfto1 XG7 V S~gg l XV RKXSSIUG'~ 'AMG FG'g5555XQ GF TIE QN8d@ VGA 'BGSXH ~ Qx' ?sg S-'M?' ea...

  9. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2013-08-06

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)·B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10?² for A? masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  10. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-08-01

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)·B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10?² for A? masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  11. A study of kinematic components in frontogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Ledolph

    1955-01-01

    dreidheecwieaal tcacdccagcfeccds ccettceracaclyae, &oL 5, Ro, 6c Oslo, 1928. Bferhnasc V~p B3cndcnssc 4~ c So@large Sec and Rergeronp To c BmNS@aSha Sde&~ R rli . yy ~~06. 19? RDiott, &. P?and Broccnc R, d. c XIIRgggg~gc gg gg~gy QQgILt~ ~ QRRMI~ ~II.... Sedcnctifio Reyart Ro 3, Contrast ky 2$(604}+59, (QQ, dPSRS), Deyt, af Qeeanograykqr 'Pease L and R ~ec ~r, 1953. 4mb, R. H. c Rsasgr on frontegenasis and frontolyais, %steer. jhcg. , &ol. 80? yy 35~c 65-&lc 9&~. 1953 RLGsrc g. E, c...

  12. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

  13. How close is Earth to a runaway greenhouse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Ramses M; Lindner, Valerie; Kasting, James F

    2013-01-01

    Recent calculations suggest that the inner edge of the habitable zone around the Sun could be as far out as 0.99 astronomical units (AU)- much closer to the orbit of Earth than had been thought. This reopens the question of whether future increases in atmospheric CO2 might trigger a runaway or moist greenhouse. A runaway greenhouse implies complete ocean vaporization; a moist greenhouse implies that the stratosphere becomes wet, leading to ocean loss via hydrogen escape to space. Previous studies (Kasting and Ackerman, 1986) had indicated that neither a moist nor a runaway greenhouse could be triggered by CO2 increases of any magnitude. Here, we revisit this question with a 1-D climate model that includes updated absorption coefficients for CO2 and H2O, along with an improved parameterization of tropospheric relative humidity. We find that a runaway greenhouse is still precluded. However, a moist greenhouse could conceivably be triggered by an 11-fold increase in atmospheric CO2, and humans could be subject t...

  14. ! " #$ %&'()01234'56078924@ACB259'3DEFG0HI@PPQ&AR2)SG9T07U3705(29V03W')X30G0YT234PT89'(8A`'G79a3V1'58V9T07W')X30G0YTAB' H'Gb'YcAdedfg``'G79A9X'h'9X'5G2348A9'GipqrsrtsdufvdrtA72wipqrsrtsdufudttA'(2VGi&ExE1234'56078924yV98E9S4'G79E3GIg'395'705xV5'G'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofstad, Remco van der

    'GipqrsrtsdufvdrtA72wipqrsrtsdufudttA'(2VGi&ExE1234'56078924yV98E9S4'G79E3GIg'395'705xV5'G'88'58032Gg0((S3V)29V038AU

  15. COS: A new tracer to constrain photosynthetic CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    COS: A new tracer to constrain photosynthetic CO2 fluxes Dan Yakir1, Max Berkelhammer2, Hulin Chen2 COS (110-190) Indirect CS2, DMS (149-330) Unknown (~600) Stratosphere COSàSO2 OH uptake (82-110) Global COS Budget (Gg S a-1; Kettle et al., 2002; Montzka et al., 2007; Berry et al., 2013 ) Mean

  16. i i 'i i WWW--i i http://www.icmp.lviv.ua/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' & $ % T. Patsahan, M. Holovko Molecular dynamics study of aqueous uranyl in hydrophilic mesoporous, 68.43.Jk, 82.70.Gg Molecular dynamics study of aqueous uranyl in hydrophilic mesoporous confinement simulations are used to study structural and dynamic properties of water and aqueous uranyl ion adsorbed

  17. College of Geosciences Texas &M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comp. Meth in G&G SUUPPORTING COURSEWORK 15HRS. Tech elect. any Science, Math or Engineering course CSCE Computer Sci. elect 3 TECH 3 TECH 3 TECH 3 TECH 3 COMMUNICATION 6 HRS.* ENGL 104 Comp. & Rhetoric be in the major. Foreign Language requirement pg.25 Two units of the same foreign language high school or one year

  18. Linear Algebra MATH 110 : 2006-07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehlau, David

    MATH 110 Linear Algebra MATH 110 : 2006-07 Home Policies Fall Winter WebCT Instructor: G.G. Smith: MATH 111, 112 Lectures: (slot 014) Tuesday, 11:30-12:30 in 210 Walter Light Hall Wednesday, 13:30-14:30 in 210 Walter Light Hall Friday, 12:30-13:30 in 210 Walter Light Hall Tutorials: Wednesday, 8

  19. Sdor dm (Csillagszat) 1. Csak B , Kovacs J , Szabo GM , Kiss LL , Dozsa A , Sodor A , Jankovics I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    J , Neiner C , Briquet M , Lampens P , Dukes R J , Henry G W , Williamson M H , Brunsden E , Pollard Függ idéz: 2 �sszesen: 2 4. Sódor Á , De Cat P , Wright D J , Neiner C , Briquet M , Dukes R J , Fekel

  20. The effects of protein level and feeding methods on egg production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, James Cecil

    1952-01-01

    credo pxcteia aash gaxe satisfbctorp egg pxodsclkaag gcrth (1958) xeported oa six xxxthcds of fsediag lapisg hens ixxclxs&ag all~ah asd sash asd ~ sdxtcres?aad focsd that the all~ spstea of feediag hoss for ?gg pxodestioa gaea sX1gtrtdg hetter results...

  1. Potential for storage of carbon dioxide in the rocks beneath the East Irish Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Research and British Geological Survey Keyworth Nottingham NG12 5GG Email: klsh@bgs.ac.uk Tyndall CentrePotential for storage of carbon dioxide in the rocks beneath the East Irish Sea Karen Kirk February 2006 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 100 #12;Potential for storage

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER Diatom-inferred late Pleistocene and Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK M. Gierga Á S. M. Bernasconi Mountains. Keywords Diatoms Á Stable carbon isotopes Á Ioannina Á Lake-level change Á Late Pleistocene Á Holocene Introduction The eastern Mediterranean is a key region for palaeoclimatological research

  3. 7, 605639, 2007 Mass, chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , and V. Gianelle 7 1 Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, T.P. 290, Ispra (VA) 21020, Italy 2 British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK particles", which accounts for >80% of fine par- ticles). Organic matter (OM) and black-carbon (BC

  4. ORDER ADDRESSING PENDING MOTIONS AND DISMISSING ACTION -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploration (Alaska) ("BP") to authorize seismic surveys during the summer and fall of 2008 in the Chukchi SERVICE, et al., Defendants, and SHELL OFFSHORE INC.; BP EXPLORATION (ALASKA) INC., Intervenor- Defendants. The OCSLA authorizes MMS to issue geological and geophysical ("G&G") exploration permits

  5. Published Ahead of Print 26 November 2012. 10.1128/AEM.02736-12.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    , Biochemistry, and Bioengineering,c Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA Balancing the flux of a heterologous metabolic pathway by tuning the expression-product formation as low as 0.06 g/g xylose without compromising cell growth. The results also suggested

  6. 4/5/2014 Micro-windmill Charger | DailyHome Decor Ideas http://www.dailyhomedecorideas.com/stunning-ideas/micro-windmill-charger/ 1/4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Turbine Education GG Design Inspirations Lidar Power Supply Affordable Area Rugs factoryoutletrugs://www.dailyhomedecorideas.com/stunning-ideas/micro-windmill-charger/ 3/4 Where there is the wind, there is the electrical power. Researchers in University of Texas Arlington have developed a ultra-small micro-windmill that is capable of making enough wind power

  7. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  8. New methodology for estimating biofuel consumption for cooking: Atmospheric emissions of black carbon and sulfur dioxide from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    carbon and sulfur dioxide from India Gazala Habib,1 Chandra Venkataraman,1 Manish Shrivastava,2 Rangan a narrower bound than in previous works. From this new activity data and currently used black carbon emission factors, the black carbon (BC) emissions from biofuel combustion were estimated as 220 (65­760) Gg yrÀ1

  9. ICCAT BIGEYETUNA STATISTICAL DOCUMENT EXPORT SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type (*1) F/FR RD/GG/DR/FL/OT Time of Harvest (mm/yy) Gear Code(*2) NetWeight (kg) *1 F=Fresh, FR When the Gear Code is OT, describe the type of gear: ) 6. EXPORTER CERTIFICATION: Icertifythattheabove: Fill in the time of harvest (in month and year) of the 0tuna in the shipment. (3) Gear

  10. Thursday, December 27, 2012 Federal Processor Permit 1 of 4 NOAA Fisheries Service -Alaska Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOMER, AK CARROLL, GLEN SHP 5520 COAL POINT TRADING, CO. HOMER, AK HILLSTRAND, JOHN W SHP 5435 COASTAL SMOKERY INC DBA G&G ALASKA SHP 27989 GLOBAL SEAFOODS NORTH AMERICA, LLC KODIAK, AK GLOBAL SEAFOODS NORTH AMERICA, LLC SHP 5335 HOONAH COLD STORAGE HOONAH, AK DIGNON, WILLIAM A SHP 32927 HOONAH COLD STORAGE

  11. Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for double-glycine-motif- containing peptides Secreted-positive bacteria, the double-glycine (GG) motif plays a key role in many peptide secretion systems involved Microbiology Comment #12;peptides and class II bacteriocins, produced by streptococci and lactic acid bacteria

  12. 1. Batch reaction experiment Cu, Ni and Zn show increased concentrations with the addition of CO2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity by pressure relief, or from CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery. Currently, produced waters from oil and gas sandstone shows that total concen- trations of the eight metals of interest are low ( 30 g/g), with leached%) are also low. Figure 2. Batch experiment metal concentrations through time for Captain, Cormorant

  13. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A[superscript 0], A[superscript 0]?gg or ss? , where A[superscript 0] is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of ...

  14. ICCAT BIGEYE TUNA RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE RE-EXPORT SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix DOCUMENT NUMBER ICCAT BIGEYE TUNA RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE RE-EXPORT SECTION: 1. RE-EXPORTING COUNTRY / ENTITY / FISHING ENTITY 2. POINT OF RE-EXPORT 3. DESCRIPTION OF IMPORTED FISH Product Type(*) F OF FISH FOR RE-EXPORT Product Type(*) F/FR RD/GG/DR/FL/OT Net Weight (Kg) * F=FRESH, FR=Frozen, RD

  15. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Group Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Group Seminar Series University 2355 GG Brown This lecture is funded by the Network for Women in Civil and Environmental Engineering (NeWinCEE) #12;Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept. 2350 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Note

  16. Variation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    distribution, in situ saturated hydraulic conductivity (measured using an Amoozemeter com- pact constant headVariation of surficial soil hydraulic properties across land uses in the southern Blue Ridge of Geography, 204 GG Building, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2502, United States b Ecosystems

  17. Proceedings of FUELCELL2006 The 4th International Conference on FUEL CELL SCIENCE, ENGINEERING and TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Proceedings of FUELCELL2006 The 4th International Conference on FUEL CELL SCIENCE, ENGINEERING and TECHNOLOGY June 19-21, 2006, Irvine, CA, USA FUELCELL2006-97161 OPTIMAL DESIGN OF HYBRID FUEL CELL VEHICLES Engineering, University of Michigan G.G. Brown Bldg., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 ABSTRACT Fuel cells are being

  18. Ryan Fellini e-mail: rfellini@umich.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    , University of Michigan, G.G. Brown Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 Platform Selection Under Performance performance. A family of automotive body side frames is used to demonstrate the approach. DOI: 10.1115/1.1899176 1 Introduction A product platform is defined as the set of components and manufacturing and assembly

  19. Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming; Zhang, B. W.

    2007-01-01

    Quark and gluon jets traversing through a quark-gluon plasma not only lose their energies but also can undergo flavor conversions. The conversion rates via the elastic q((q) over bar )g -> gq((q) over bar )and the inelastic q (q) over bar gg...

  20. Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a, , G.H. Mack b Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA c NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK d Geochronology Research Laboratory, New Mexico Bureau

  1. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2010) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, West Mains Road, Edinburgh,, EH9 3JW, UK 2 British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK 3 British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West 6 Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK 7 Senergy (GB

  2. Reveille IV - 36 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    of a food borne illness. The supply chain is modeled utilizing a G/G/1 queuing system at the processing center and an order- up to policy at the retailer(s). This research develops and compares multi-stage supply chain models with varying number...

  3. Multiprotein DNA Looping Jose M. G. Vilar* and Leonor Saiz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiz, Leonor

    symmetric counterpart on the other operator if DNA is looped. The typical way to obtain the statistical, and telomere maintenance. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.238103 PACS numbers: 87.14.Gg, 05.50.+q, 87.15.He, 87 [7], replication [4], and telomere maintenance [8]. Disruption or alteration of these processes often

  4. Energy, Technology, and Society (APHY S120, PHYS S120, ENAS S120, EVST S121, Instructor: Prof. D.E. Prober, Becton 417

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, David M.

    Energy, Technology, and Society (APHY S120, PHYS S120, ENAS S120, EVST S121, G&G S120) Instructor and impacts of energy on the environment, climate, security and economy. Basic engineering principles plant ­ treated in the course 1. Rationale This course content emphasizes the technology, use

  5. The trace on the Ktheory of group C # algebras Thomas Schick #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The trace on the K­theory of group C # ­algebras Thomas Schick # FB Mathematik --- Uni M to be countable. The trace tr G : CG # C : P g#G # g g ## # 1 (where # e­mail: thomas.schick stay at Penn State University funded by the DAAD 1 #12; 2 Thomas Schick 1 is the neutral element of G

  6. April 20, 2010 Seismic Reflection V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    ? Vertical Resolution How thin a layer can we resolve? Dependent on seismic wavelength Reflectors are barely is an example of a "fully interpreted" seismic profile. What is the event history here? #12;4/19/2010 3 Here4/19/2010 1 GG450 April 20, 2010 Seismic Reflection V Data Interpretation I Today's material comes

  7. Visitor Ofc Conference Room

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2117 2301 CUPS LAB VISITOR OFFICE PRIYA'S LAB YC 2211 CC 2210 BC 2209 KL 2208 GG 2207 LC 2206 Conf/ AM) G2222 2222 A (CZ) (XX) C B (SW) (XX) D F (RS) (IP) H E (MP) (SS) G2221 2221 CZ A (YL) (XX) C B

  8. Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites in the United States #12;Why to estimates based on this work (Gg/yr) Production emissions reported in 2011 greenhouse gas inventory (annual is methane important? The role of methane in the national greenhouse gas inventory · Most recent national

  9. APPLICATION OF CENTRIFUGE MODELING IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    APPLICATION OF CENTRIFUGE MODELING IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Dr. Liming Li Manager of Centrifuge, Dec 5, 2012 4:00 PM GG Brown 2355 ABSTRACT: This seminar addresses the application of centrifuge may be obtained by substituting a centrifugal force to form the gravitational field, i.e., placing

  10. Vision 2020 Progress ReportVision 2020 Progress Report GeosciencesGeosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of GeosciencesGeosciences #12;Academic DepartmentsAcademic Departments · Atmospheric Sciences · Geography;Year 3Hydrogeologist (G&G, Assist) InterviewingWatershed processes/resources (GEOG, Full) InterviewingAtmospheric remote sensing (ATMO, Assist) Year 4Assistant: Surficial processes; water resources Year 3Environmental

  11. Appendix 1. RFLP patterns and locations of ITS region from Daphnia dentifera (d), Daphnia galeata mendotae (gm), Daphnia galeata galeata (g) and their hybrids. The RFLP pattern designators are the same as in Figure 4. Locations are listed alphabetically.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Derek

    mendotae (gm), Daphnia galeata galeata (g) and their hybrids. The RFLP pattern designators are the same as in Figure 4. Locations are listed alphabetically. Location Taxon C1 (d) C1+C2 (dxgm) C2 (gm) B+C2 (ggxgm) B (gg) rare Political region Latitude Longitude Alder Pond GM 1 1 Alaska 60.806983 -148

  12. Neutrino Propagation and Oscillations in a Strong Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efrain J. Ferrer; Vivian de la Incera

    2004-08-08

    We review the results on neutrino propagation in neutral and charged media under strong magnetic fields $M_{W}^{2}\\gg B\\gg m_{e}^{2}$. It is shown that the neutrino energy density gets a magnetic contribution in both charged and neutral media, which is linear in the magnetic field, of first order in $G_{F}$, and independent of the charge density. This new term enters as a correction to the neutrino kinetic energy and produces an anisotropic contribution to the neutrino index of refraction. As a consequence, in a neutral medium a highly anisotropic resonant level-crossing condition takes place for the oscillation between electron-neutrinos and the other neutrino species. Possible cosmological applications are presented.

  13. Multi-Higgs boson production in the standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Rueckl, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present a calculation of the loop-induced processes gg{yields}HH and gg{yields}HHH, and investigate the observability of multi-Higgs boson production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model (SM) and beyond. While the SM cross sections are too small to allow observation at the LHC, we demonstrate that physics beyond the SM can lead to amplified, observable cross sections. Furthermore, the applicability of the heavy top quark approximation in two- and three-Higgs boson production is investigated. We conclude that multi-Higgs boson production at the SuperLHC is an interesting probe of Higgs sectors beyond the SM and warrants further study.

  14. The influence of biotin on reproduction in the white rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, William Anderson

    1957-01-01

    ??G?????G? ??G?? ???i?????i G? 6i??G?? 0??? ??ifi?G? r?A?? ?i?A???1G?? ?i?A?? 0???G? 3???GfGA???f ??? 3???G??i????f ???????G?? ?? 4??i???i???f ??? 9G???Gf 0??? 3i??? ????i? 7??i? ?5?98??5r6 ?6? 9r6978?5r6? ?8???0? ?7?Y4? 75Y40?Y804 95Y4? ???46?5? 5 9... ????? ??? ?? ?? ?G??G? ??? ??? ?? 3? 3G????? G? ??i 1?GfGA? ?i?????i??? ??? ?? 0? 9G??? ??? ??? ?? ?? ??i??G?? G? ??i ?i?????i?? G? 1?G??i?????? ??? 6??????G?? ??? ??? ?? 7? ???G? G? ??i ??f?f??i ????Ai?i?? ?i?????i??? ?ff G? ??i ?A????f????f ??? ?i???????f 9Gffi...

  15. On the prediction of far field computational aeroacoustics of advanced propellers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    by the following expressions: 10 4. P, (?, t) = ? J' . drd. cI f p a V? at Jt=o It sin vR g=g (4) 4 P, '(, , t) = ? J, dl'd + J, dpd (5) f lR f a lR ot Jt=o RsinvR Jt=o fir sin vR O=O g=g where r is the source time, t, is the observer time and vR is the angle... between the radiation vector and the surface outer normal. For panels where 1IR is less than 0. 98 corresponding to the subsonic region, the thickness and loading noise are given by: 4CCPT(x? t) = ? cfgl (6) a~ &9t f o ftl1 ? clfR rgc f=ct & Il '&f...

  16. The Jet Energy Profile: A BSM Analysis Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivukula, R Sekhar; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2015-01-01

    A new heavy di-jet resonance could be discovered at the 14 TeV LHC. In this talk we present a strategy to reveal the nature of such a particle; in particular to discern whether it is a quark-antiquark (q qbar), quark-gluon (qg), or gluon-gluon (gg) resonance. The strategy is based on the study of the energy profiles of the two leading jets in the di-jet channel. Including statistical uncertainties in the signal and the QCD backgrounds, we show that one can distinguish between gg, qg, and q bar resonances; an evaluation of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the jet energy profile will require a detailed detector study once sufficient 14 TeV di-jet data is in hand.

  17. The Jet Energy Profile: A BSM Analysis Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sekhar Chivukula; Elizabeth H. Simmons; Natascia Vignaroli

    2015-07-23

    A new heavy di-jet resonance could be discovered at the 14 TeV LHC. In this talk we present a strategy to reveal the nature of such a particle; in particular to discern whether it is a quark-antiquark (q qbar), quark-gluon (qg), or gluon-gluon (gg) resonance. The strategy is based on the study of the energy profiles of the two leading jets in the di-jet channel. Including statistical uncertainties in the signal and the QCD backgrounds, we show that one can distinguish between gg, qg, and q bar resonances; an evaluation of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the jet energy profile will require a detailed detector study once sufficient 14 TeV di-jet data is in hand.

  18. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 11, 8 March 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    FOR DETAILS AND IMMEDIATE WORK OPPORTUNITIES: 136- 89 ROOSEVELT AVE. #303, FLUSHING, NY 11354 PHONE: 718- 762- 4001 7Nepali Aawaz | Falgun 25.2062 Politics 6f9f /x]sfn] cfGbf]ngn] lng' kg]{ htL ultL lng g;s]sf] o'jf g]tf uug yfkf atfp5g . k|:t't 5, nf]s tfl... Gg] sfdgf ug'{ Aoy{ x'G5 . pgLx?sf] s'/f ;'Gg' k5{ / xfd|f] s'/f a'‰fpg'k5{ . clxn] eO{/x]sf] cfGbf]ng klg o'jfx?n] g} l6sfO{ /x]sf5g, c‰ of] lgl:qmo ;d'xnfO{ ;lqmo kfg]{ xf] eg] s:tf] utL lnG5 lnG5 . clxn] klg cf...

  19. Inverse magnetic catalysis in holographic models of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiminad A. Mamo

    2015-05-11

    We study the effect of magnetic field $B$ on the critical temperature $T_{c}$ of the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in hard-wall AdS/QCD, and holographic duals of flavored and unflavored $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang Mills theories on $\\mathbb{R}^3\\times \\rm S^1$. For all of the holographic models, we find that $T_{c}(B)$ decreases with increasing magnetic field $B\\ll T^2$, consistent with the inverse magnetic catalysis recently observed in lattice QCD for $B\\lesssim 1~GeV^2$. We also predict that, for large magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$, the critical temperature $T_{c}(B)$, eventually, starts to increase with increasing magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$ and asymptotes to a constant value.

  20. Kinetics for Tautomerizations and Dissociations of Triglycine Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, Chi-Kit; Zhao, Junfang; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K.; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2009-06-01

    Fragmentations of tautomers of the ?-centered radical triglycine radical cation, [GGG*]+, [GG*G]+, and [G*GG]+, are charge-driven, giving b-type ions; these are processes that are facilitated by a mobile proton, as in the fragmentation of protonated triglycine (Rodriquez, C.F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006 - 3012). By contrast, radical centers are less mobile. Two mechanisms have been examined theoretically utilizing density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus modeling: (1) a direct hydrogen-atom migration between two ?-carbons, and (2) a two-step proton migration involving a canonical [GGG]*+ as an intermediate. Predictions employing the latter mechanism are in good agreement with results of recent CID experiments (Chu, I.K. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 7862 - 7872).

  1. Quantum limit of the laser linewidth in chaotic cavities and statistics of residues of scattering matrix poles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Schomerus; K. M. Frahm; M. Patra; C. W. J. Beenakker

    1999-11-01

    The quantum-limited linewidth of a laser cavity is enhanced above the Schawlow-Townes value by the Petermann factor K, due to the non-orthogonality of the cavity modes. We derive the relation between the Petermann factor and the residues of poles of the scattering matrix and investigate the statistical properties of the Petermann factor for cavities in which the radiation is scattered chaotically. For a single scattering channel we determine the complete probability distribution of K and find that the average Petermann factor $$ depends non-analytically on the area of the opening, and greatly exceeds the most probable value. For an arbitrary number N of scattering channels we calculate $$ as a function of the decay rate $\\Gamma$ of the lasing mode. We find for $N\\gg 1$ that for typical values of $\\Gamma$ the average Petermann factor $\\propto \\sqrt{N}\\gg 1$ is parametrically larger than unity.

  2. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  3. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  4. Spatial Variability of Surface Irradiance Measurements at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-05-16

    The location of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site on Manus island in Papua New Guinea was chosen because it is very close the coast, in a geographically at, near-sea level area of the island, minimizing the impact of local island effects on the meteorology of the measurements [Ackerman et al., 1999]. In this study, we confirm that the Manus site is in deed less impacted by the island meteorology than slightly inland by comparing over a year of broadband surface irradiance and ceilometer measurements and derived quantities at the standard Manus site and a second location 7 km away as part of the AMIE-Manus campaign. The two sites show statistically similar distributions of irradiance and other derived quantities for all wind directions except easterly winds, when the inland site is down wind from the standard Manus site. Under easterly wind conditions, which occur 17% of the time, there is a higher occurrence of cloudiness at the down wind site likely do to land heating and orographic effects. This increased cloudiness is caused by shallow, broken clouds often with bases around 700 m in altitude. While the central Manus site consistently measures a frequency of occurrence of low clouds (cloud base height less than 1200 m) about 25+4% regardless of wind direction, the AMIE site has higher frequencies of low clouds (38%) when winds are from the east. This increase in low, locally produced clouds causes an additional -20 W/m2 shortwave surface cloud radiative effect at the AMIE site in easterly conditions than in other meteorological conditions that exhibit better agreement between the two sites.

  5. A B C D E GF H A B C D E GF H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhar, Gur Saran

    Lot I Lot R2 Lot R1 Lot SLot T Service Lot Field or Event Parking V V V Field or Event Parking V Lot TR NA NX HA JA SM LH MO WA CS Lot U KA Building Code V Visitor Parking Key Not UNCW Property SeahawkLandingDrive LionfishDrive Lot SS Lot SS Lot HH Lot SS Lot II LotFF Lot EE Lot GG Lot CC Lot AA Lot

  6. The specific heat of superfluids near the transition temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Schultka; E. Manousakis

    1995-02-15

    The specific heat of the $x-y$ model is studied on cubic lattices of sizes $L \\times L \\times L$ and on lattices $L \\times L \\times H$ with $L \\gg H$ (i.e. on lattices representing a film geometry) using the Cluster Monte Carlo method. Periodic boundary conditions were applied in all directions. In the cubic case we obtained the ratio of the critical exponents $\\alpha/\

  7. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 7, 23 December 2005 - 3 January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    {qmddf clwjQmf lbg]z lqkf7Ln] dfgj clwsf/ s'g} jfb xf]Og, ;j} gful/ssf] st{Jo / clwsf/ xf] eGg'xb} ;Eo ;dfh / ;d'Ggt /fi6« agfpg /fli6«o d"No / dfGotfsf ljsNkx? vf]lhg'kg]{ s'/f atfpg' eof] . pxfFn] hgtfsf] cfjfh /f]s]/ aGb'sn] zflGt sfod x'g g...

  8. Low-mass dilepton production in $pp$ and $AA$ collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Bo Kang; Jian-Wei Qiu; Werner Vogelsang

    2009-09-23

    We adopt a factorized QCD formalism to describe the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass lepton pairs produced in $pp$ collisions, when the pair transverse momentum $Q_T \\gg Q$, with the pair's invariant mass $Q$ as low as $Q \\sim \\Lambda_{\\mathrm{QCD}}$. We extend this formalism to dilepton production in $AA$ collisions by including the nuclear-dependent power correction due to parton multiple scattering.

  9. Higgs Boson Resummation via Bottom-Quark Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Field

    2004-07-21

    The region of small transverse momentum in q-qbar- and gg-initiated processes must be studied in the framework of resummation to account for the large, logarithmically-enhanced contributions to physical observables. In this letter, we study resummed differential cross-sections for Higgs production via bottom-quark fusion. We find that the differential distribution peaks at approximately 15 GeV, a number of great experimental importance to measuring this production channel.

  10. Proof of the optimality of the empirical star J.-Y. Audibert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audibert, Jean-Yves

    To achieve (1.1), we propose the following algorithm. Let ^g(erm) be an empirical risk minimizer among the reference functions: ^g(erm) argmin g{g1,...,gd} r(g). For any measurable functions g , g from X to R, let of functions, precisely: ^g(star) argmin g[^g(erm),g1]···[^g(erm),gd] r(g). 3. THE MAIN RESULT THEOREM 1

  11. Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-03-05

    As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

  12. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  13. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13, PAGES 2637-2640, JULY 1, 2001 Ocean release of fossil fuel CO2: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    of Norway at 65o N (see Fig. 3). The CO2 source can be deep water installations on the shelf or point sources on land [Eliasson et al., 1999; Broecker, 1997]. In both cases liquid CO2 can be piped or shipped are 200, 400 and 800 Gg-CO2, corresponding to CO2 emissions from conventional 55-220 MW gas power plants

  14. Attachment 4 DOCUMENT NUMBER ICCAT SWORDFISH RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attachment 4 DOCUMENT NUMBER ICCAT SWORDFISH RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE RE-EXPORT SECTION: 1. RE-EXPORTING COUNTRY/ENTITY/FISHING ENTITY 2. POINT OF RE-EXPORT 3. DESCRIPTION OF IMPORTED FISH Product Type(*) F OF FISH FOR RE-EXPORT Product Type(*) F/FR RD/GG/DR/ST/FL/OT Net Weight (Kg) * F=FRESH, FR=Frozen, RD

  15. Amount of vitamin D required in commercial chick rations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couch, James Russell

    1934-01-01

    . Bnperiasat I. Relstioa of Vitescia D La ye?4 to Weights of Chiehenee ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ e ~ e i ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ld Rccperiaeat Ii Relation of Vitaaia D to Rich?to ead Cthac Eff sobs oa Chiehenso ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s o ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ gg Tsble de... Rsyericmt II. Relation of viteain D ia ye?4 so weights of Ohio hens e ~ e ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ IQ Rxyericccat II. Relation of Viteain D t? Bi?hats ead Cthe j Bffeets oa Chiehensa ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ gd Bccperineat I...

  16. Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exner, Mary Elizabeth

    1972-01-01

    URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972... Major Subject: Oceanography URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) , 1 (Head of Department)' p (Member ) (Member) August, 1972 gg...

  17. Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas : The effect of highly damped modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merav Opher; Luis O. Silva; Dean E. Dauger; Viktor K. Decyk; John M. Dawson

    2001-05-09

    The effects of the highly damped modes in the energy and reaction rates in a plasma are discussed. These modes, with wavenumbers $k \\gg k_{D}$, even being only weakly excited, with less than $k_{B}T$ per mode, make a significant contribution to the energy and screening in a plasma. When the de Broglie wavelength is much less than the distance of closest approach of thermal electrons, a classical analysis of the plasma can

  18. The Isomorphism Conjectures in general (Lecture Wolfgang Lck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lück, Wolfgang

    -homotopy precisely one G-map Y EF (G). We abbreviate EG := EFin(G) and call it the universal G-CW-complex for proper G-actions. We abbreviate EG := ET r(G) and EG := EVCyc(G). Wolfgang Lück (HIM) The Isomorphism in general Bonn, August 2013 6 / 34 #12;A model for EAll(G) is G/G; EG BG := G\\EG is the universal principal

  19. The Isomorphism Conjectures in general (Lecture III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lück, Wolfgang

    -homotopy precisely one G-map Y EF (G). We abbreviate EG := EFin(G) and call it the universal G-CW-complex for proper G-actions. We abbreviate EG := ET r(G) and EG := EVCyc(G). Wolfgang Lück (HIM) The Isomorphism in general Berlin, June 20, 2012 6 / 34 #12;A model for EAll(G) is G/G; EG BG := G\\EG is the universal

  20. Bounds on the Lyapunov exponent via crude estimates on the density of states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mira Shamis; Thomas Spencer

    2014-07-24

    We study the Chirikov (standard) map at large coupling $\\lambda \\gg 1$, and prove that the Lyapounov exponent of the associated Schroedinger operator is of order $\\log \\lambda$ except for a set of energies of measure $\\exp(-c \\lambda^\\beta)$ for some $1 Lyapunov exponent (outside a small exceptional set of energies) for a large family of ergodic Schroedinger operators, the prime example being the $d$-dimensional skew shift.

  1. A study of contact resistance as applied to resistance commutation of D.C. dynamos 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Leroy Eugene

    1959-01-01

    to 72 hours of running. After the contact AI I 'd Z I?- Oc ~O g ~7~9' ? 7~ &inIg LMP(gg +~ CWj8fpf f 7itp/g ggg Sow G V~KPAIIP t I CoH~p I &der~ I drop has ~bkLRRSL?a-. , iyhahOgrsyh FISuaa g 1 ~ taken of the voltage and current traces. A...

  2. Polarization test of Higgs spin and parity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arash, Firooz

    2015-04-10

    Photon polarization measurements provide a model independent determination of the spin and the parity of the Higgs resonance. The test described here is based on very general principles and is completely independent of dynamical assumptions. A set of observables are identified that discriminate resonances with J{sup P} = 0{sup +}, 0{sup ?}, 2{sup ?} and 2{sup +}. Furthermore, the same set can be used to gain useful and important information on the magnitude of each helicity amplitude contributing to the gg ? ?? process.

  3. Mean field approximation for noisy delay coupled excitable neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikola Buric; Dragana Rankovic; Kristina Todorovic; Nebojsa Vasovic

    2010-03-26

    Mean field approximation of a large collection of FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable neurons with noise and all-to-all coupling with explicit time-delays, modelled by $N\\gg 1$ stochastic delay-differential equations is derived. The resulting approximation contains only two deterministic delay-differential equations but provides excellent predictions concerning the stability and bifurcations of the averaged global variables of the exact large system.

  4. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  5. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 15, 7 June 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    lbg Go'of]s{df ls/f+t /fO{ x?sf] kj{ r08Lgfr eJo ?kdf ;DkGg eof] . Go'of]s{sf] SjLG; af]/f] a|Lh kfs{ / HofS;g xfO6df ul/ b'O r/0fdf ul/Psf] pSt sfo{s|ddf ljleGg jStfx?n] dGtJo z[esfdgf cfbfg k|bfg k|z+;f kq ljt/0f ug{' ePsf] lyof] . pSt kj... ckmo'P;P sf pkfWoIf ;"o{ tfdfª, ls/+ft r'dn'ª o'P;P sf cWoIf Zofd lnDa', z]kf{ lsb'ssf cWoIf nK;fª z]k{f, soflnkmf]lg{ofsf k|ltlglw ;'/]z rfdlnª, Go'of]s{df /fO{x?sf] r08Lgfr kj{ eJotfsf ;fy ;DkGg Dof;fr';]6;\\ sf xf]d/fh /fO{, Sofgf8fsL k...

  6. Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Dong

    2007-05-01

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isotopes with the AMS techniques.

  7. Study of a zirconium getter for purification of xenon gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobi, A; Hall, C; Kaufman, L; Langford, T; Slutsky, S; Yen, Y R

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and methane purification efficiencies for a common zirconium getter are measured in 1050 Torr of xenon gas. Starting with impurity concentrations near 10^{-6} g/g, the outlet impurity level is found to be less than 120*10^{-12} g/g for O2 and less than 950*10^{-12} g/g for N2. For methane we find residual contamination of the purified gas at concentrations varying over three orders of magnitude, depending on the purifier temperature and the gas flow rate. A slight reduction in the purifier's methane efficiency is observed after 13 mg of this impurity has been absorbed, which we attribute to partial exhaustion of the purifier's capacity for this species. We also find that the purifier's ability to absorb N2 and methane can be extinguished long before any decrease in O2 performance is observed, and slower flow rates should be employed for xenon purification due to the cooling effect that the heavy gas has on the getter.

  8. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Qingsong; Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin ; Wei, Qingyi; Xu, Ting; Yuan, Xianglin; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Levy, Lawrence B.; Liu, Zhensheng; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Li-E.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ?2 or ?3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ?3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ?3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  9. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 ×more »109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.« less

  10. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jan-Show [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Pin [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsiu-Yuan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  11. Evaluation of measurement accuracies of the Higgs boson branching fractions in the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ono; A. Miyamoto

    2013-03-19

    Precise measurement of Higgs boson couplings is an important task for International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments and will facilitate the understanding of the particle mass generation mechanism. In this study, the measurement accuracies of the Higgs boson branching fractions to the $b$ and $c$ quarks and gluons, $\\Delta Br(H\\to b\\bar{b},\\sim c\\bar{c},\\sim gg)/Br$, were evaluated with the full International Large Detector model (\\texttt{ILD\\_00}) for the Higgs mass of 120 GeV at the center-of-mass (CM) energies of 250 and 350 GeV using neutrino, hadronic and leptonic channels and assuming an integrated luminosity of $250 {\\rm fb^{-1}}$, and an electron (positron) beam polarization of -80% (+30%). We obtained the following measurement accuracies of the Higgs cross section times branching fraction ($\\Delta (\\sigma \\cdot Br)/\\sigma \\cdot Br$) for decay of the Higgs into $b\\bar{b}$, $c\\bar{c}$, and $gg$; as 1.0%, 6.9%, and 8.5% at a CM energy of 250 GeV and 1.0%, 6.2%, and 7.3% at 350 GeV, respectively. After the measurement accuracy of the cross section ($\\Delta\\sigma/\\sigma$) was corrected using the results of studies at 250 GeV and their extrapolation to 350 GeV, the derived measurement accuracies of the branching fractions ($\\Delta Br/Br$) to $b\\bar{b}$, $c\\bar{c}$, and gg were 2.7%, 7.3%, and 8.9% at a CM energy of 250 GeV and 3.6%, 7.2%, and 8.1% at 350 GeV, respectively.

  12. Young Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in IC 348

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. Luhman

    1999-05-21

    I present new results from a continuing program to identify and characterize the low-mass stellar and substellar populations in the young cluster IC 348 (1-10~Myr). Optical spectroscopy has revealed young objects with spectral types as late as M8.25. The intrinsic J-H and H-K colors of these sources are dwarf-like, whereas the R-I and I-J colors appear intermediate between the colors of dwarfs and giants. Furthermore, the spectra from 6500 to 9500 A are reproduced well with averages of standard dwarf and giant spectra, suggesting that such averages should be used in the classification of young late-type sources. An H-R diagram is constructed for the low-mass population in IC 348 (K6-M8). The presumably coeval components of the young quadruple system GG~Tau (White et al.) and the locus of stars in IC 348 are used as empirical isochrones to test the theoretical evolutionary models. For the models of Baraffe et al., an adjustment of the temperature scale to progressively warmer temperatures at later M types, intermediate between dwarfs and giants, brings all components of GG~Tau onto the same model isochrone and gives the population of IC 348 a constant age and age spread as a function of mass. When other observational constraints are considered, such as the dynamical masses of GM~Aur, DM~Tau, and GG~Tau~A, the models of Baraffe et al. are the most consistent with observations of young systems. With compatible temperature scales, the models of both D'Antona & Mazzitelli and Baraffe et al. suggest that the hydrogen burning mass limit occurs near M6 at ages of <10 Myr. Thus, several likely brown dwarfs are discovered in this study of IC 348, with masses down to ~20-30 M_J.

  13. Determination of the astrophysical S factor for C-11(p,gamma)N-12 from the N-12 -> C-11+p asymptotic normalization coefficient 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, XD; Azhari, A.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Pirlepesov, F.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Carstoiu, F.

    2003-01-01

    ; s t i , ( fm s estimates e produced S PHYSICAL REVIEW C 67, 015804 ~2003! material available consisted of hydrogen and helium nuclei. In 1986, Fuller, Woosley, and Weaver @1# studied the evolu- tion of radiation-dominated super-massive stars.... derived a value Gg52.6 meV for the radiative width of the first excited state in 12N. Since no experimental g transition data were available for the higher excited states, they used the Weisskopf limit as an estimate for the radiative width...

  14. A B C D E GF H A B C D E GF H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    T Service Lot Field or Event Parking M M Field or Event Parking M LotB Lot C Lot D Lot G M Lot F Lot E M LotDrive Lot SS Lot SS Lot HH Lot SS Lot II LotFF Lot EE Lot GG Lot CC Lot AA Lot AA Lot BB Lot O Lot O Extension Lot P Lot L Lot M LotN Lot K Lot K Extension Lot A Lot Q Lot H Lot I Lot R2 Lot R1 Lot SLot

  15. G Subject: Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletter » Fuel CellFun FactProcess forF, TitleGG Subject:D,G

  16. Control of Strongylidae in horses by pasture rotation and chemotherapy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Marvin Lafayette

    1964-01-01

    period. lg&0p&9g6 g7T ~ 99glgf ~ 103 Xt is sigaificaat however, Chat all who have published papers on stroagylosis in horses seem to agree chat the pre psts e p et a o sll spa tas ot laeg esoagplos ~ge oa 1 ~ ~oat ost ~ g gg to ~ a, ~ lo e el ) ts ~ e... seasonal variation ia Chs number of eggs which are passed in the fecesg&7p6gp93 b?e sufficient numbers are passed by infected aaimsls during all. ssssoas of the year to contamiaats a past?rs to the smtene thee constant reinfection occurs. 4 ' ggp99g...

  17. Klein-Gordon and Dirac Equations with Thermodynamic Quantities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altug Arda; Cevdet Tezcan; Ramazan Sever

    2015-10-21

    We study the thermodynamic quantities such as the Helmholtz free energy, the mean energy and the specific heat for both the Klein-Gordon, and Dirac equations. Our analyze includes two main subsections: ($i$) statistical functions for the Klein-Gordon equation with a linear potential having Lorentz vector, and Lorentz scalar parts ($ii$) thermodynamic functions for the Dirac equation with a Lorentz scalar, inverse-linear potential by assuming that the scalar potential field is strong ($A \\gg 1$). We restrict ourselves to the case where only the positive part of the spectrum gives a contribution to the sum in partition function. We give the analytical results for high temperatures.

  18. QTL mapping of high digestibility trait in sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, Jennifer Ann

    2009-05-15

    lines using SSR primers. Individuals were scored as being of the LD parental genotype, HD parental genotype, or heterozygous. 37 Annealing Temperature (?C) 53 53 53 55 55 55 55 55 Oligo Sequence GTT TTC CCA GTC... ACG CGT GAA TCA GCG AGT GTT GG GTT TTC CCA GTC ACG AGA AAT TCA CCA TGC TGC AG GTT TTC CCA GTC ACG AGT CAC AGC ACA CTG CTT GTC GTT TTC CCA GTC ACG ACA AGC TCG AGA AAT TCA ACA TGC TG GTT TTC CCA GTC ACG ACA AGC GAC CCA TAT GTG GTT TAG TCG CAA AG GTT...

  19. Biochemistry of ethylene in plants and other problems related to leaf abscission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrero, Fay Alberto

    1959-01-01

    OXG&MSM?&CrS GF?a&LG? r*GC&GG&Mw &w CMFXSLaMwrTX CMFFMw L?eSrwFG rwa &FG TL? SrF&Mw FM r wrF?TrS eTMa?CF eTLGLwF &w GLwLGCLwF CMFFMw e?S?&w& ??????????????? ???? ? &wFTMa?CF&Mw?????????????????????????? ?????? TL?&L? MA S&FLTrF?TL ???????????????????????? Er... 4. Concentration experiments with NAA on the ab? scission of cotton explants................30 5. Concentration-gradient experiment with NAA on the abscission of cotton explants .......... 31 6. Concentration experiment with DCP on abscis? sion...

  20. An alternative robustness measure with applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellison, Floyd Wesley

    1990-01-01

    measures differ by as much as a factor of 5. 7. 27 Table II. Robustness Measures For Various (Ly Ls) Pairs p(z) z gg censored at Lr Lg g(z) = z: censored at L, Lr 1. 000 . 5465 1. 100 . 5441 1. 200 . 5431 1. 300 . 5432 1. 400 . 5439 1. 500... corresponding to this distribution. In particular, a popular distribution-free estimator which draws inspiration from laws of large numbers is obtained by choosing g(z) = z for sll z E B. However, the performance of this estimator can depend on the underlying...

  1. Effect of soil temperature on resistance of rice to seedling blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weerapat, Praphas

    1964-01-01

    I":". . -"';-'. , ;::::, RP9?C2 '|GZ - GGt'W "ZR%Zh&'~I'Tgfi *" zo?: 3~Gh'&IPWI|tG! Eh QZ 'BXCAK. - TQ '-, ';: ?' ! ', -':;, i", , ;. :;?-i;'!:G :. BGGZZIIG BBIZGGG, ':G"G", Kl'GZ' h il 'ZZZIIGXIIXGLGZGBZZ;::"BGG. ''::, . :":G ';"', . '?'i... . ". -", "!4&, ";;. . "-TQj:. :. W$4'j@"+hg4ja, " gp, . '. ~@@i"-W? i:RICO, ". "keX5 q -4X'q '. "' ~= ', , '- -', '-' ", . ' ' '-, , . ?' Sxe ?-:. yx4tib&"-Mph'ig. . :t0. :-py$e'gi&Xg' 4hagpk- 'Qg ' . "; P...

  2. Structure of an n-butane monolayer adsorbed on magnesium oxide (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, T.; Chanaa, S.; Cook, R. E.; Clarke, S. M.; Larese, J. Z.

    2006-08-15

    Neutron diffraction has been used to characterize the structure of the solid phase of the completed monolayer of n butane on the MgO(100) surface at low temperature. The monolayer is found to adopt a commensurate (7{radical}(2)x{radical}(2)R45 deg. ) structure with lattice constants a=29.47 A ring and b=4.21 A ring , P{sub 2gg} symmetry and four molecules in the unit cell. Excellent agreement with the experimental diffraction pattern is realized, using a Lorenztian profile to describe the line shape.

  3. The total nucleon-nucleon cross section at large N_c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2012-03-26

    It is shown that at sufficiently large $N_c$ for incident momenta which are much larger than the QCD, the total nucleon-nucleon cross section is independent of incident momentum and given by $\\sigma^{\\rm total}=2 \\pi \\log^2(N_c) / (m^2_{\\pi})$. This result is valid in the extreme large $N_c$ regime of $\\log(N_c) \\gg 1$ and has corrections of relative order $\\log (\\log(N_c))/\\log(N_c)$. A possible connection of this result to the Froissart-Martin bound is discussed.

  4. The influence of awns on yield and certain morphological characters of wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Milton J

    1951-01-01

    functions of awns+ They cite several experiments whexe the inexeased transpiration rate of awned heads 'ever awnlsss heals have been demonstrated, aC, km NI, Xiel4 Wheat growers and breedors in the Great Plains generally bolievi that awned varieties ate...)', fowy'f kh4 kQijkla ~";o~e'd eyQres Wished less than @hose from uae14yye4 ay&ac ~ 8e holieved , tract y~of, , thd'e. ~g&oicee, gg~ ~e hoon case+. ~ in]wry cjf the epochs im roaring 'th? ccaAe& . . 'lo avoid this ocscyxicsL- tiom he eoayarek- kielj5...

  5. Parametric study and dynamic analysis of compliant piled towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moog, Karl Heinz

    1990-01-01

    the Tower. . . . . . . . . . Vl. g Shear Force and Overturning Moment 65 GG 69 75 79 83 84 90 VII CONC'LUSIONS . F(EFERENC'ES . l 02 APPENDIX A 5IODE SHAPES 104 P a. ge APPENDIX A MODE SHAPES 104 APPENDIX B DYNAMIC RESPONSE FOR A SINGLE WAVE..., 3q, " Kgss = Gl, 5 CW, Kgss? 10 4C'W, l, p, " lr ? CIV, I, qr" ls 30 60 6C'W; 33i" Kgss = + 5l, 5 ? CW, It g 5 s 10 ? CW; pr" l, 10 10 4CW;I, 30 10 (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) In order to represent...

  6. Specimen Catalog, Numbers 6092-9501 (1961-1975) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    - H /g,g>? - 2 - -? -/ ? TrfJi ? - 7 - 17 *7.3' > - * ) - / % ?h jz J j j j l r_z3 _sJA 7 .2 " - - 9 - / 8 M l z3. - IS__ ? 3 ,f| . Ur. j y 'F.'8 .?aJ*,. L i 13 g (a n d S t bleC*b ? J t3 / Parb.JL. c a tjZ J k s. Uuditk? ?JLt?CJL ___________ 3?/^/grMge (/H$Ue SPE CICMNSA?Q JTWO.ftR ;o :./7...

  7. Higgs Boson Production via Gluon Fusion: Soft-Gluon Resummation including Mass Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Timo

    2015-01-01

    We analyze soft and collinear gluon resummation effects at the N$^3$LL level for Standard Model Higgs boson production via gluon fusion $gg\\to H$ and the neutral scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension at the N$^3$LL and NNLL level, respectively. We introduce refinements in the treatment of quark mass effects and subleading collinear gluon effects within the resummation. Soft and collinear gluon resummation effects amount to up to about 5% beyond the fixed-order results for scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson production.

  8. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on extrinsic J/psi production at sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Ferreiro; F. Fleuret; J. P. Lansberg; N. Matagne; A. Rakotozafindrabe

    2011-04-06

    We evaluate the Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production in pPb and PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy, taking into account the gluon shadowing and the nuclear absorption. We use the complete kinematics in the underlying 2 to 2 partonic process, namely $g+g \\to \\jpsi + g$ as expected from LO pQCD. The resulting shadowing is responsible for a large J/psi suppression in pPb and PbPb, and shows a strong rapidity dependence.

  9. Nonlinear and distributed sensory estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugathevan, Suranthiran

    2005-08-29

    !tdt (2.3) where ! is frequency in rad/sec. Fff(t)g is also known as the spectrum of f(t). De nition 4 Inverse Fourier Transform: The Inverse Fourier Transform (F 1f:g) recovers the function f(t) from its Fourier Transform Fff(t)g. F 1fFff(t)gg = f(t) = 12...=ISO-8859-1 NONLINEAR AND DISTRIBUTED SENSORY ESTIMATION A Dissertation by SURANTHIRAN SUGATHEVAN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May...

  10. Single-top hadroproduction in association with a W boson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Motylinski, Patrick; Webber, Bryan R; White, C D

    as the perturbative order increases. At the leading order (LO) in the SM, O(g2W?S), such a set is empty, and the underlying partonic process is bg ?? tW . (2.2) When next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections in ?S are considered, contributions (e.g. gg ? tW b... - order result in gW. Thus, the inclusion of higher-order QCD corrections forces one to include electroweak corrections to all orders so as to avoid divergences, and this potentially spoils the power counting in gW, according to which eq. (2.2) is the LO...

  11. ( ) 0132547680@9 ACB 2 D 04E0FG9 H0@9PI HGQSR A 0T9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    ¼¨i!©g¬È ·¥± PÁĬgig¶ù¾°©¦"à|gÉ !# #þÁÅ¥±À"©%t iÃ¥¦ Pg¶ g¬¸¬Æ¦qúÓgP! #¾g·ç !è dqÊ¥¦ # ¬gc"¨©gÀ"¥¦g ¥¦¬g£g¥¦ ÅÁÅhig P| e·|giÁÄ¥¦ ¥¦©ì©!ÿ ©!#¶|¥¦©ù¾»5½±g©ù¤ù{ g½©ig ¤±©g!ϾgÎç i!è ¦ #¤i¥±32t¥±½g¹ ©¹£gѽ©¦g©g Ï hÁ²¹S»¤!#Ñ©gΤ©¦±¥±¬¤ ¶g!i|©g í ©! ±À"ög!i|©g v

  12. The quadratic stochastic Euclidean bipartite matching problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Caracciolo; Gabriele Sicuro

    2015-10-08

    We propose a new approach for the study of the stochastic Euclidean bipartite matching problem with quadratic cost between two sets of $N$ points, $N\\gg 1$. The points are supposed independently randomly generated on a domain $\\Omega\\subset\\mathbb R^d$ with a given generic distribution $\\rho(\\mathbf x)$ on $\\Omega$. In particular, we derive a general expression for the correlation function and for the average optimal cost of the optimal matching. A previous ansatz, for the case of uniform distribution on the flat hypertorus, is derived as particular case.

  13. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2013-11-26

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  14. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  15. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J.

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  16. 4657575758575757958575757575757@ (true, ) ( ,true)( , ) ( , )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godefroid, Patrice

    I 9 I # " '1 G !#" $&% # ! 7 ! '! % 9! e( g % 8 F S )f# & 63@ 6 # "' # 30 ' 6 ' 1 " ( " e10 2g3 $ gG A ' 8 %C BHI P E G8 %ACG " I '1 1 % & %A4 6 1@ 1 ( I " I # " %54 BHI P E G@ %A4 # ! 7 %AC 0 %A4 G A ' 8 %54 BCDE G@ %A4 G " I '1 1 % & %AC 6 18 1 ( I " I # " %C BCDE G8 %AC# ! 7 %AC 0 %A4S e

  17. An environmental study of the subsurface Miocene of Matagorda County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trenchard, Walter Howard

    1961-01-01

    in Natagorda County, Texas. 2. De~ the envtronmental conditions which ex1sted at the time of depos1tion of the Niocene sed1ments i, n Natagorda County. 3. Interpret and evaluate the environmental patterns as seen in a series of tests located in a line.... L-l, is located ln the Gulf of Mexico 5000 feet from the east line and 900 Figure 1. Location of tests, N 883 CCC't FICCA Oe 0 G~ cP~ O~ C3 + 0 ~yC 0 0 Gg'v I HAMMOND CLEVELAND Np 2. TEXAS GULF, WAOSWORTH NO. I 3. DEEP ROCK, PETRUCHA...

  18. Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wharton, Amy Laura

    1986-01-01

    , Aurora 1 (H12), Hryhor field. . . . . . . . . Sedimentary structures in vertical sequence of the Canyon granite wash conglomerate in the Jay Taylor 8-1 (L2) core Sedimentary structures in vertical sequence of the Canyon granite wash conglomerate... on the top of the Canyon granite wash conglomerate. Contour interval is 100 feet. Cored wells are circled. The type log is from the H12 well and indicated as a star. +. F800 D U LGE 317 D U 3f gg 315 LGE 316 S27 ~ p' 4 + U& D 3QQ0 ~4 4 82...

  19. Tensor renormalization group analysis of ${\\rm CP}(N-1)$ model in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawauchi, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    We apply the higher order tensor renormalization group to lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of CP($N-1$) model is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the $\\theta$-term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region $\\beta \\gg 1$ and that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of $\\beta$.

  20. Tensor renormalization group analysis of ${\\rm CP}(N-1)$ model in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hikaru Kawauchi; Shinji Takeda

    2015-11-02

    We apply the higher order tensor renormalization group to lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of CP($N-1$) model is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the $\\theta$-term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region $\\beta \\gg 1$ and that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of $\\beta$.

  1. Genetic studies in Ringnecked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudelman, John Robert

    1977-01-01

    . ? Poorly ringed ? only a few white tipped feathers B. ? Very uniform and moderately ringed C. ? Distinctive wide ring , I C @ay~. . ,~pc, &x!p(Key. . ~~pi~!!!!i'i;;j~j jplQ$&gg LITERATURE REVIEW The Neck-rin of th Rin necked Pheasant Although... 1977 ABSTRACT Genetic Studies in the Ringnecked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) (August 1977) John Robert Gudelman, Jr. , B. S. , Texas AUf University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John Richard Cain Neck-ring inheritance in male Ringnecked...

  2. A New Action for Heavy Lattice Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14

    I describe a unified formalism for lattice fermions, in which the relativistic action of Wilson and the nonrelativistic and static actions appear as special cases. It is valid at all values of $m_q a$, including $m_q a \\approx 1$. In the limit $m_q a \\ll 1 $, the formulation reduces to the light quark action of Wilson. In the limit $m_q a \\gg 1 $, the formulation reduces to the nonrelativistic action of Thacker and Lepage, and to the static action of Eichten.

  3. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT

  4. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON

  5. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON"

  6. STATEMENT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENT Expires:e r/o2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON":

  7. STATEMENT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENT OMB Control Number: 9000-0014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF

  8. STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE PAYROLL NUILBER PAYROLL PAYMENT DATE CONTRACT NUMBER 382246

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OFCOMPLIANCE PAYROLL

  9. STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OFCOMPLIANCE

  10. STATUS OF THE DUAL POLARIZATION UPGRADE ON THE NOAAs RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT WSR-88D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE

  11. STAY CONNECTED: In This Issue Electricity Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY CONNECTED: In This

  12. STC Summit Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY CONNECTED: In ThisSTC

  13. STEM Challenge Winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY CONNECTED:

  14. STEM school | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY|STEM VolunteerSTEM

  15. STFC PowerPoint template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY|STEMthe Tevatron on

  16. STIMULUS SNAPSHOTS Highlights From the Past Two Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATESTAY|STEMthe

  17. STIPmap_30X24poster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG

  18. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  19. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

  20. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J; Fortner, Allison M; Jett, Robert T; Peterson, Mark J; Carriker, Neil; Morris, Jesse G; Gable, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  1. A model with no firewall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samir D. Mathur

    2015-06-14

    We construct a model which illustrates the conjecture of fuzzball complementarity. In the fuzzball paradigm, the black hole microstates have no interior, and radiate unitarily from their surface through quanta of energy $E\\sim T$. But quanta with $E\\gg T$ impinging on the fuzzball create large collective excitations of the fuzzball surface. The dynamics of such excitations must be studied as an evolution in superspace, the space of all fuzzball solution $|F_i\\rangle$. The states in this superspace are arranged in a hierarchy of `complexity'. We argue that evolution towards higher complexity maps, through a duality analogous to AdS/CFT, to infall inside the horizon of the traditional hole. We explain how the large degeneracy of fuzzball states leads to a breakdown of the principle of equivalence at the threshold of horizon formation. We recall that the firewall argument did not invoke the limit $E\\gg T$ when considering a complementary picture; on the contrary it focused on the dynamics of the $E\\sim T$ modes which contribute to Hawking radiation. This loophole allows the dual description conjectured in fuzzball complementarity.

  2. A survey on application of representation theory to molecular vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasa, Yohenry E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id

    2014-03-24

    Representations Theory is used extensively in many of the physical sciences as every physical system has a symmetry group G. Various differential equations determine the vibration of a molecule, and the symmetry group of the molecule acts on the space of solutions of these equations. In this paper we use CH{sub 4} (methane) molecule, which has four hydrogen atoms at the corners of a regular tetrahedron, and a carbon atom at the center of the tetrahedron. The four hydrogen atoms in CH{sub 4} are permuted by the action of the symmetry group and this action fixes the carbon atom. At each of the 5 vertices, we assign three unit vectors, called the standard basis vectors in directions of the three edges which are joined to the vertex. The symmetry group G of the molecules permutes the 15 standard basis vectors, so we may regard Q{sup 15} as a GG By expressing Q{sup 15} as a direct sum of irreducible GG-modules, the problem of finding the normal modes of vibration is reduced to that of computing the eigenvectors of some small matrices.

  3. Projection and Galaxy Clustering Fourier Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. Fry; David Thomas

    1999-09-13

    Second order perturbation theory predicts a specific dependence of the bispectrum, or three-point correlation function in the Fourier transform domain, on the shape of the configuration of its three wave vector arguments, which can be taken as a signature of structure formed by gravitational instability. Comparing this known dependence on configuration shape with the weak shape dependence of the galaxy bispectrum has been suggested as an indication of bias in the galaxy distribution. However, to interpret results obtained from projected catalogs, we must first understand the effects of projection on this shape dependence. We present expressions for the projected power spectrum and bispectrum in both Cartesian and spherical geometries, and we examine the effects of projection on the predicted bispectrum with particular attention to the dependence on configuration shape. Except for an overall numerical factor, for Cartesian projection with characteristic depth $ \\Dstar $ there is little effect on the shape dependence of the bispectrum for wavelengths small compared to $ \\Dstar $ or projected wavenumbers $ q \\Dstar \\gg 1 $. For angular projection, a scaling law is found for spherical harmonic index $ \\ell \\gg 1 $, but there is always a mixing of scales over the range of the selection function. For large $ \\ell $ it is sufficient to examine a small portion of the sky.

  4. Extracting bb Higgs Decay Signals using Multivariate Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W Clarke; /George Washington U. /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    For low-mass Higgs boson production at ATLAS at {radical}s = 7 TeV, the hard subprocess gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} dominates but is in turn drowned out by background. We seek to exploit the intrinsic few-MeV mass width of the Higgs boson to observe it above the background in b{bar b}-dijet mass plots. The mass resolution of existing mass-reconstruction algorithms is insufficient for this purpose due to jet combinatorics, that is, the algorithms cannot identify every jet that results from b{bar b} Higgs decay. We combine these algorithms using the neural net (NN) and boosted regression tree (BDT) multivariate methods in attempt to improve the mass resolution. Events involving gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} are generated using Monte Carlo methods with Pythia and then the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) is used to train and test NNs and BDTs. For a 120 GeV Standard Model Higgs boson, the m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstruction width is reduced from 8.6 to 6.5 GeV. Most importantly, however, the methods used here allow for more advanced m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstructions to be created in the future using multivariate methods.

  5. Calculation of HELAS amplitudes for QCD processes using graphics processing unit (GPU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagiwara; J. Kanzaki; N. Okamura; D. Rainwater; T. Stelzer

    2009-09-29

    We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast calculations of helicity amplitudes of quark and gluon scattering processes in massless QCD. New HEGET ({\\bf H}ELAS {\\bf E}valuation with {\\bf G}PU {\\bf E}nhanced {\\bf T}echnology) codes for gluon self-interactions are introduced, and a C++ program to convert the MadGraph generated FORTRAN codes into HEGET codes in CUDA (a C-platform for general purpose computing on GPU) is created. Because of the proliferation of the number of Feynman diagrams and the number of independent color amplitudes, the maximum number of final state jets we can evaluate on a GPU is limited to 4 for pure gluon processes ($gg\\to 4g$), or 5 for processes with one or more quark lines such as $q\\bar{q}\\to 5g$ and $qq\\to qq+3g$. Compared with the usual CPU-based programs, we obtain 60-100 times better performance on the GPU, except for 5-jet production processes and the $gg\\to 4g$ processes for which the GPU gain over the CPU is about 20.

  6. Comparison between continuous stirred tank reactor extractor and soxhlet extractor for extraction of El-Lajjun oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anabtawi, M.Z. [Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain)

    1996-02-01

    Extraction on El-Lajjun oil shale in a continuous stirred tank reactor extractor (CSTRE) and a Soxhlet extractor was carried out using toluene and chloroform as solvents. Solvents were recovered using two distillation stages, a simple distillation followed by a fractional distillation. Gas chromotography was used to test for the existence of trapped solvent in the yield. It was found that extraction using a CSTRE gave a 12% increase in yield on average compared with the Soxhlet extractor, and an optimum shale size of 1.0mm offered a better yield and solvent recovery for both techniques. It was also found that an optimum ratio of solvent to oil shale of 2:1 gave the best oil yield. The Soxhlet extractor was found to offer an extraction rate of 1 hour to complete extraction compared with 4 hours in a CSTRE. The yield in a CSTRE was found to increase on increase of stirring. When extraction was carried out at the boiling point of the solvents in a CSTRE, the yield was found to increase by 30% on average compared to that of extraction when the solvent was at room temperature. When toluene was used for extraction, the average amount of bitumen extracted was 0.032 g/g of oil shale and 76.4% of the solvent recovered, compared with 0.037 g/g of oil shale and 84.1% of the solvent recovered using a Soxhlet extractor.

  7. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 ?g/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 ?g. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 ?g. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  8. Optimal refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen E. Allahverdyan; Karen Hovhannisyan; Guenter Mahler

    2010-07-25

    We study a refrigerator model which consists of two $n$-level systems interacting via a pulsed external field. Each system couples to its own thermal bath at temperatures $T_h$ and $T_c$, respectively ($\\theta\\equiv T_c/T_hisolated interaction between the systems driven by the external field and isothermal relaxation back to equilibrium. There is a complementarity between the power of heat transfer from the cold bath and the efficiency: the latter nullifies when the former is maximized and {\\it vice versa}. A reasonable compromise is achieved by optimizing the product of the heat-power and efficiency over the Hamiltonian of the two system. The efficiency is then found to be bounded from below by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}=\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{1-\\theta}}-1$ (an analogue of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency), besides being bound from above by the Carnot efficiency $\\zeta_{\\rm C} = \\frac{1}{1-\\theta}-1$. The lower bound is reached in the equilibrium limit $\\theta\\to 1$. The Carnot bound is reached (for a finite power and a finite amount of heat transferred per cycle) for $\\ln n\\gg 1$. If the above maximization is constrained by assuming homogeneous energy spectra for both systems, the efficiency is bounded from above by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}$ and converges to it for $n\\gg 1$.

  9. Measurements of four-lepton production in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-09-25

    The four-lepton ($4\\ell$, $\\ell = e, \\mu$) production cross section is measured in the mass range from 80 to 1000 GeV using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $4\\ell$ events are produced in the decays of resonant $Z$ and Higgs bosons and the non-resonant $ZZ$ continuum originating from $q\\bar q$, $gg$, and $qg$ initial states. A total of 476 signal candidate events are observed with a background expectation of $26.2 \\pm 3.6$ events, enabling the measurement of the integrated cross section and the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass and transverse momentum of the four-lepton system. In the mass range above $180$ GeV, assuming the theoretical constraint on the $q\\bar q$ production cross section calculated with perturbative NNLO QCD and NLO electroweak corrections, the signal strength of the gluon-fusion component relative to its leading-order prediction is determined to be $\\mu_{gg}=2.4 \\pm 1.0 (stat.) \\pm 0.5 (syst.)\\pm 0.8 (theory)$.

  10. Hair mercury concentrations and associated factors in an electronic waste recycling area, Guiyu, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Wenqing [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Chen, Yaowen [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Gairong [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Luo, Jiayi [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Wu, Kusheng, E-mail: kswu@stu.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: Toxic heavy metals are released to the environment constantly from unregulated electronic waste (e-waste) recycling in Guiyu, China, and thus may contribute to the elevation of mercury (Hg) and other heavy metals levels in human hair. We aimed to investigate concentrations of mercury in hair from Guiyu and potential risk factors and compared them with those from a control area where no e-waste processing occurs. Methods: A total of 285 human hair samples were collected from three villages (including Beilin, Xianma, and Huamei) of Guiyu (n=205) and the control area, Jinping district of Shantou city (n=80). All the volunteers were administered a questionnaire regarding socio-demographic characteristics and other possible factors contributed to hair mercury concentration. Hair mercury concentration was analyzed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Results: Our results suggested that hair mercury concentrations in volunteers of Guiyu (median, 0.99; range, 0.18–3.98 ?g/g) were significantly higher than those of Jinping (median, 0.59; range, 0.12–1.63 ?g/g). We also observed a higher over-limit ratio (>1 ?g/g according to USEPA) in Guiyu than in Jinping (48.29% vs. 11.25%, P<0.001). Logistic regression model showed that the variables of living house also served as an e-waste workshop, work related to e-waste, family income, time of residence in Guiyu, the distance between home and waste incineration, and fish intake were associated with hair mercury concentration. After multiple stepwise regression analysis, in the Guiyu samples, hair mercury concentration was found positively associated with the time residence in Guiyu (?=0.299, P<0.001), and frequency of shellfish intake (?=0.184, P=0.016); and negatively associated with the distance between home and waste incineration (?=?0.190, P=0.015) and whether house also served as e-waste workshop (?=?0.278, P=0.001). Conclusions: This study investigated human mercury exposure and suggested elevated hair mercury concentrations in an e-waste recycling area, Guiyu, China. Living in Guiyu for a long time and work related to e-waste may primarily contribute to the high hair mercury concentrations. -- Highlights: • Mercury levels in hair samples from Guiyu and risk factors were assessed. • The recruitments from Guiyu were exposed to high levels of mercury. • Primitive e-waste recycling resulted in high mercury exposure of local people.

  11. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 × 109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.

  12. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  13. OECM MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 final data report, Rev. 0 February 12, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% siliceous concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

  14. OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 final data report, Rev. 1 February 10, 2003.; Report, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure; and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The test investigated the quench behavior of a 15 cm deep, fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete decomposition products. The melt was quenched at nominally atmospheric pressure. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and data reduction to obtain an estimate of the corrected heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool. A section of the report is devoted to calculations of the conduction-limited heat flux that accounts for heat losses to the crucible holding the corium. The remainder of the report describes post test examinations of the crust, which includes permeability and mechanical strength measurements, and chemical analysis.

  15. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  16. Thermalization of gluon matter including ggggg interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El; C. Greiner; Z. Xu

    2006-09-27

    Within a pQCD inspired kinetic parton cascade we simulate the space time evolution of gluons which are produced initially in a heavy ion collision at RHIC energy. The inelastic gluonic interactions $gg \\leftrightarrow ggg$ do play an important role: For various initial conditions it is found that thermalization and the close to ideal fluid dynamical behaviour sets in at very early times. Special emphasis is put on color glass condensate initial conditions and the `bottom up thermalization' scenario. Off-equilibrium $3\\to 2$ processes make up the very beginning of the evolution leading to an initial decrease in gluon number and a temporary avalanche of the gluon momentum distribution to higher transversal momenta.

  17. A study of the Concentration Dependence of the Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time for Aromatic Protons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Benjamin Franklin

    1960-01-01

    IRPSIWSCC Ot SR SFQ4I48'gg@l RRLLX~N VXN lOR JQKNktg4 PROtOCI Ayytove&'as Co a4glo aalu eaateat by& Sn aaQee ed?ho? to eineete4g thank Qr. Melrin Iienor llho dire?ted this ~ fer hie geo?rolls aid ia all p44loe of the ?apsrinssatal serk, aussie ef tho... data, snd yropaz'atha of tho nenneerl)A. Olo esther'e ?Sneer?et Rpjcocl. ation is also extended to Br. af. 0. Fetter snd Sr. 5. P. Neekoe ot the hyeios Deyartnent, and Sr. X. C. Cliyyle end Sr. Qsa Sail of the Neth? natiee Ssyartnent for ac@ k...

  18. Properties of Entire Functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunkler, Richard F

    1960-01-01

    'ollows that (1 - r ) [Max IF'(z)) on(z-z '(= rl(. ~m(r )&1 ~ 1 C ( The circle (z -v(i= p is contained in the circle ( z-z ( = r ~ 0 1' C From Theorem (1-7), it follows that, for Iz i~ (. &i - [~ l~ ( )I . 1 1 1 - rl Next consider the function G(z) = F...(z) - P(g) ~ For I z - Ql ~ ( we have lG(z)l )P(z) - P())( I F (u)du I 'lP(u)()?( z z Moreover, G(v() O and G'(g) F'($) = 2 p O. Hence, by Lemma (g-2), the ls)age yk fz - g)? $ under G(z) covers the 2/- 1-. % region ) 1 7 4 2 I Hence the image...

  19. The influence of curing time on the keeping quality of Bermuda onions in refrigerated storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, Harry John

    1952-01-01

    , far "r~VQS. '~a'-'0SS 00 qQSS '0IG hQW0le Syrou" '. ". h'~j. '=OXS 0 ~ 'i u Gal t'i0x . -'i 0 . ') . . i 0 . ' ~ 'SX'G'. 'Gl ' 0 ' U. '. . ?'', ' GZ SUE SS ~ ~ 0 5: (', . ':. '. J0S". . SX' ' I Qadi J. S I 0 1 ~Sl0 0 . . ' i 1' ' L0'I 0 }'0 00 S...K'-"'K l&LQBRCZ~ QZ CYr". l1. "!C T 'f~~ O' F, 7;;Z FMPXITG KiAZZTZ 9P 9~'. . ~A Q~iXQ?Q D! PWiPIGERATED FL'BEAST A . ! b. s a J. s A/i:VO" 66 SS 0 Sv'V1G . . &'C1 QQt]t'ai'&t ~/ lV~ Gg:V 3 ":. riculI;ural aaJ ', . eol sr lo 1 Voile~a of i...

  20. Spin transitions in time-dependent regular and random magnetic fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokrovsky, Valery L.; Sinitsyn, NA.

    2004-01-01

    -Zener solution a5exp~2pg2!, b52 A2p expS2 pg22 1 ip4 D gG~2ig2! . ~7! When g varies from 0 to ` , the modulus uau changes from 1 to 0 and the argument of the Jacobi polynomial in Eq. ~6! 2 2 2u A !a !b 2 . 6 ua 2 g , g . . . g the Bloch tensors... gz . ~25! Solving equation for g6 , we find g6~ t !5g6~2`!expS7ib? zt22 7iE 2` t hz~ t8!dt8D ~26! 1~ i/A2 !E 2` t expF7ib? z~ t22t82!2 7iE t8 t hz~ t9!dt9Gh6~ t8!gz~ t8!dt8. ~27! Let us first consider the case of complete initial...

  1. Drilling mud filtration and its effect on the electrical resistivity of porous media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flock, Donald Louis

    1957-01-01

    ., Q UJh-<_1=5 UJ co o u j tr oc 3o u j w CO CL O TABozGG FTX RUBBER GASKET POROUS... and Content by: * r r ianChairman of Committee Head of Department r i Page 1? Summary* t * ? * ? . * ? ? ? t ? ? * 1 2* Introduction . . * ? ? ? , , t ? ? t ? ^ t t ? 4 , 3 3* RSVi? ^ of Literature e o e ^ f t v v o o o a a a c r a a a a o o 4...

  2. Effectiveness of continuous hot-fluid stimulation of high viscosity oil wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oetama, Teddy

    1983-01-01

    temperature of 170 and 180 'F the production his- tories follow the same paths. Higher than 180 'F will only speed up the recovery during the cycling period. In general, the net recovery after 15 D III I- //' I tll CL dl I/ O 0 D D C 'O 0 D L... lll CD CD 27 GJ i/I 0 C3 5- +J 0 o~ $o GJ \\ lg 5- QJ (gg) aauegsig ~asig~ap 28 100 80 60 O o Cl V (tl Ul 40 EJ u ) 20 u O CV 20 40 Radia1 Distance (Ft) 60 Fi gore 16. Temperature Di st& i bution at 400 Days for 100...

  3. Determining the Gluonic Content of Isoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Close; Glennys R. Farrar; Zhenping Li

    1996-10-08

    We develop tools to determine the gluonic content of a resonance of known mass, width and $J^{PC}$ from its branching fraction in radiative quarkonium decays and production cross section in $\\gamma \\gamma$ collisions. We test the procedures by applying them to known $q\\bar{q}$ mesons, then analyze four leading glueball candidates. We identify inconsistencies in data for $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_0(1500)$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_J(1710)$ whose resolution can quantify their glueball status.When $\\Gamma(f_0(1500) \\to \\gamma \\gamma )$ and $\\Gamma(f_J(1710) \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ are known, the $n\\bar{n}, s\\bar{s},gg$ mixing angles can be determined. The enigmatic situation in 1400-1500 MeV region of the isosinglet $0^{-+}$ sector is discussed.

  4. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric V. Linder

    2006-04-11

    Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

  5. QCD description of backward vector meson hard electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pire; K. Semenov-Tian-Shansky; L. Szymanowski

    2015-03-10

    We consider backward vector meson exclusive electroproduction off nucleons in the framework of collinear QCD factorization. Nucleon to vector meson transition distribution amplitudes arise as building blocks for the corresponding factorized amplitudes. In the near-backward kinematics, the suggested factorization mechanism results in the dominance of the transverse cross section of vector meson production ($\\sigma_T \\gg \\sigma_L$) and in the characteristic $1/Q^8$-scaling behavior of the cross section. We evaluate nucleon to vector meson TDAs in the cross-channel nucleon exchange model and present estimates of the differential cross section for backward $\\rho^0$, $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ meson production off protons. The resulting cross sections are shown to be measurable in the forthcoming JLab@12 GeV experiments.

  6. Properties of GRB Lightcurves from Magnetic Reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beniamini, Paz

    2015-01-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within Gamma ray bursts' (GRBs) ultra-relativistic outflows that drive the prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission remains uncertain. Two leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the prompt GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its expected temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for magnetic reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with a Lorentz factor of $\\Gamma'\\gtrsim$a few in the mean rest frame of the outflow - the comoving frame. We consider a thin spherical shell (or reconnection layer) expanding at a bulk Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\gg 1$ in which the emitting material moves with $\\Gamma'$ in the comoving frame along this layer in two anti-parallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting field lines). The resulting relativistic beaming of t...

  7. Soliton solutions of the KP equation and application to shallow water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarvarish Chakravarty; Yuji Kodama

    2009-04-17

    The main purpose of this paper is to give a survey of recent development on a classification of soliton solutions of the KP equation. The paper is self-contained, and we give a complete proof for the theorems needed for the classification. The classification is based on the Schubert decomposition of the real Grassmann manifold, Gr$(N,M)$, the set of $N$-dimensional subspaces in $\\mathbb{R}^M$. Each soliton solution defined on Gr$(N,M)$ asymptotically consists of the $N$ number of line-solitons for $y\\gg 0$ and the $M-N$ number of line-solitons for $y\\ll 0$. In particular, we give the detailed description of those soliton solutions associated with Gr$(2,4)$, which play a fundamental role of multi-soliton solutions. We then consider a physical application of some of those solutions related to the Mach reflection discussed by J. Miles in 1977.

  8. Elliptic flow and nearly perfect fluidity in dilute Fermi gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schaefer

    2010-12-16

    In this contribution we summarize recent progress in understanding the shear viscosity of strongly correlated dilute Fermi gases. We discuss predictions from kinetic theory, and show how these predictions can be tested using recent experimental data on elliptic flow. We find agreement between theory and experiments in the high temperature regime $T\\gg T_F$, where $T_F$ is the the temperature where quantum degeneracy effects become important. In the low temperature regime, $T\\sim T_F$, the strongest constraints on the shear viscosity come from experimental studies of the damping of collective modes. These experiments indicate that $\\eta/s\\lsim 0.5\\hbar/k_B$, where $\\eta$ is the shear viscosity and $s$ is the entropy density.

  9. On the Description of Functions of Position which are Differentiable Except on Surfaces of Ordinary Discontinuity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzy, Edwin Lamar

    1960-01-01

    ()~()(wAg)and g(~)=g, (~)UQ(v) U pJ(~) () gQ where u;, ~, VAg are disjoint and J, (w), g (~), y(v)/) g are disjoint. VI and 7/~ will each be x disjoint, simply connected regions bounded by simple closed sur- faces composed of a subset of g(v)& g (~) and J (v...) respec- tively and one face of the extended g . The unit external normal will be sectionally continuous and V ? Pl(g) will exist in w~ and Elc7 ENS/OlV ~f1 z. J I / Fig. l. An arbitrary, simply connected region intersected by Gauss' Theorem for g(Q...

  10. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Kyle; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2014-09-26

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  11. A study of the relationship between recreational user-day visits and the physical and economic characteristics of Texas water impoundment areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ronnie D

    1966-01-01

    'atty ooaeMex'@hie $14 te gov:IxvMX@@Xe Pox' oatdoox' Ot SILE Ici 0 i Out to Acct tbo Quail c y 8 tBXLdax de dOLlaILc30LL by politic'pa11ti? Cut@oox z. eoreation ax'oas nod. act Ivitiss axe ' numerous and var ? "- ed Xn Ord. ei to gain . a better under...-. ::, '. ' . yekee@5. 3y ~ weekend xee~ee44~ete~ Stele I gg'~48 Qlgl@ 8 cldez'@I 96@8llPvogtL 8 ~e' geed, c@gxilpXgtp?', : . ~ et': %he Neiz~ket. had f' ax . Sn4e~@@e ea~eetWa" deee1e~4-, 'me y@eecm4 M, Te~e+, Q'eediid. MXX@~' gmee', " ZAN~ G'5~6lMIG QQd 4'Xv...

  12. Measurement uncertainty of adsorption testing of desiccant materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C E; Pesaran, A A

    1988-12-01

    The technique of measurement uncertainty analysis as described in the current ANSI/ASME standard is applied to the testing of desiccant materials in SERI`s Sorption Test Facility. This paper estimates the elemental precision and systematic errors in these tests and propagates them separately to obtain the resulting uncertainty of the test parameters, including relative humidity ({plus_minus}.03) and sorption capacity ({plus_minus}.002 g/g). Errors generated by instrument calibration, data acquisition, and data reduction are considered. Measurement parameters that would improve the uncertainty of the results are identified. Using the uncertainty in the moisture capacity of a desiccant, the design engineer can estimate the uncertainty in performance of a dehumidifier for desiccant cooling systems with confidence. 6 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Transition from soft- to hard-Pomeron in the structure functions of hadrons at small-$x$ from holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akira Watanabe; Katsuhiko Suzuki

    2012-06-05

    We study the nucleon and pion structure functions at small Bjorken-$x$ region in the framework of holographic QCD with a special emphasis on the roles of AdS space wave functions. Using the BPST kernel for the Pomeron exchange and calculating its coupling to target hadrons in the AdS space, we obtain $F_2$ structure functions at the small-$x$. Results for the proton $F^p_2$ as well as the pion $F^\\pi_2$ are consistent with experimental data of the deep inelastic scattering and the forward electroproduction of a neutron. Observed $Q^2$ dependence of the Pomeron intercept is well reproduced from soft non-perturbatibve $(Q^2 \\sim 0)$ to hard perturbative $(Q^2 \\gg 1 GeV^2)$ region. We find the interplay between soft and hard Pomerons is closely related with behavior of AdS wave functions of hadrons and the virtual photon.

  14. Quantum statistics in time-modulated exciton-photon system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Yu. Kryuchkyan; A. R. Shahinyan; I. A. Shelykh

    2015-09-14

    We consider a system consisting of a large individual quantum dot with excitonic resonance coupled to a single mode photonic cavity in the nonlinear regime when exciton- exciton interaction becomes important. We show that in the presence of time-modulated external coherent pumping the system demonstrates essentially non classical behavior reflected in sub-Poissonian statistics of exciton- and photon-modes and the Wigner functions with negative values in phase-space for time-intervals exceeding the characteristic time of dissipative processes, $t\\gg\\gamma^{-1}$. It is shown that these results are cardinally different from the analogous results in the regime of the monomode continues-wave (cw) excitation.

  15. LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  16. Linear relaxation to planar Travelling Waves in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsaingeon, Léonard

    2012-01-01

    We study linear stability of planar travelling waves for a scalar reaction-diffusion equation with non-linear anisotropic diffusion. The mathematical model is derived from the full thermo-hydrodynamical model describing the process of Inertial Confinement Fusion. We show that solutions of the Cauchy problem with physically relevant initial data become planar exponentially fast with rate $s(\\eps',k)>0$, where $\\eps'=\\frac{T_{min}}{T_{max}}\\ll 1$ is a small temperature ratio and $k\\gg 1$ the transversal wrinkling wavenumber of perturbations. We rigorously recover in some particular limit $(\\eps',k)\\rightarrow (0,+\\infty)$ a dispersion relation $s(\\eps',k)\\sim \\gamma_0 k^{\\alpha}$ previously computed heuristically and numerically in some physical models of Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  17. Scale-free static and dynamical correlations in melts of monodisperse and Flory-distributed homopolymers: A review of recent bond-fluctuation model studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Wittmer; A. Cavallo; H. Xu; J. E. Zabel; P. Poli?ska; N. Schulmann; H. Meyer; J. Farago; A. Johner; S. P. Obukhov; J. Baschnagel

    2011-07-22

    It has been assumed until very recently that all long-range correlations are screened in three-dimensional melts of linear homopolymers on distances beyond the correlation length $\\xi$ characterizing the decay of the density fluctuations. Summarizing simulation results obtained by means of a variant of the bond-fluctuation model with finite monomer excluded volume interactions and topology violating local and global Monte Carlo moves, we show that due to an interplay of the chain connectivity and the incompressibility constraint, both static and dynamical correlations arise on distances $r \\gg \\xi$. These correlations are scale-free and, surprisingly, do not depend explicitly on the compressibility of the solution. Both monodisperse and (essentially) Flory-distributed equilibrium polymers are considered.

  18. Self-intersection local times of random walks: Exponential moments in subcritical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Fix $p>1$, not necessarily integer, with $p(d-2)0$ that are bounded from above, possibly tending to zero. The speed is identified in terms of mixed powers of $t$ and $\\theta_t$, and the precise rate is characterized in terms of a variational formula, which is in close connection to the {\\it Gagliardo-Nirenberg inequality}. As a corollary, we obtain a large-deviation principle for $\\|\\ell_t\\|_p/(t r_t)$ for deviation functions $r_t$ satisfying $t r_t\\gg\\E[\\|\\ell_t\\|_p]$. Informally, it turns out that the random walk homogeneously squeezes in a $t$-dependent box with diameter of order $\\ll t^{1/d}$ to produce the required amount of self-intersections. Our main tool is an upper bound for the joint density of the local times of the walk.

  19. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allison, Kyle; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2014-11-01

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  20. Measurements of the meson-photon transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons at large momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1998-01-01

    . Gollin, R. M. Hans, E. Johnson, I. Karliner, M. A. Marsh, M. Palmer, M. Selen, and J. J. Thaler University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 61801 K. W. Edwards Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6 and the Institute of Particle... is defined in terms of the transition form factors F g*gR(Q2). In the case of pseudoscalar mesons there is only one form factor. At zero momentum transfer this form factor is expressed as uF g*gR~0 !u 2 5 1 ~ 4pa!2 64pG ~ R!gg! MR 3 , ~4! where a is the QED...

  1. An analysis of egg marketing practices of first buyers of Texas eggs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaarder, Raymond Olaf

    1950-01-01

    I?a, Tbe 4s?1~ eso awagel ?e ia Tshle 5. The ~ ~ ?f th? ?sseegs dsahse sa ekase a?L4 te eeasswsas s?toi1 etseee, %8 6 ~ Vggg@S Of SQXSO M8 CI~CCRl Cf ~ + ?gg haah~ ~, X9g local prodaee ~, oeetnal tdoleaalara ead ~ ia eheaa. SA all the 4eaLeaa of each... tbaae dealer? net eayeatiad oagkete W~m aa their opeeatiena ~ of ~ ?Lae he thais type of teaineaa, aa4 handled thais ogive in the aaae faahlea ao tbe ~ ~ of thole type, TdNe V 1iata the enbnwa ead aweek ef egga peeknae4 in 1%0 by' the 48 4salora...

  2. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  3. The structure and evolution of breast cancer genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Scott

    2011-07-12

    ogaoiv girgbivdiredge ssgdhn vg1Bdirtsgarbglasbavxg Ppp9wcg8 Ua“,og7y vdi,rgyrb onirrirtgfo avdgeare ogesavvimieadi,rgivg.A dA ogdA gbimm o rdg vyfdhn vgb,g irb bgaoiv gmo,Ugbimm o rdgvd Uge ssvg ,oge,UUyd bgno,t rid,ovg ,og imgdA g U,s eysaogA d o,t r... ,mgdA g2Pgt r vg. o gno ui,yvshgib rdimi bgavg earbibad geare ogt r vgb veoif bgfhgT,,bg dgascg1Ppp9wcgMA gaydA,ovge,resyb bgfhg6cccg no bied‘irt’gdAadgdA gG hgm adyo vg,mgdAivgsarbvean >agm .gt r gU,yrdairvgird ovn ov bg .idAgUarhgt r gAissv>.issgno,u gd...

  4. Classes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    ?GfiArlY & M ?GffiAi rl Y2 Y34 56l784694 rl 15rY56 r6 04?0r?89Y5r6 56 Y34 ?35Y4 0?Y ? ????i?????G? 1? ?5775?? ?6?40?r6 9rr?40? ?0? ???????i? ?G ??i ???????i ???GGf G? ??i ?A????f????f ??? ?i???????f 9GffiAi G? Yi??? ?? ??????f ??f??ff?i?? G...?? ???? ??????? 112 ?? i??i????f ?G? ??G?????G? G? ?i?f??? G???????A ?? ???? ?? 0???????G? ??? 1?G?? ?? ???? ??? ????i ?? ????? li??fi ???? ?i????i? G? ??????? 13.2 ??G? ?i?G?i ??i ???i G? ?????A ????f ??i i?? G? Ai?????G? ??G???i? ??GAi?? ????? ???i??i? ?i...

  5. Zero modes, gauge fixing, monodromies, $?$-functions and all that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. O. Barvinsky; D. V. Nesterov

    2012-04-15

    We discuss various issues associated with the calculation of the reduced functional determinant of a special second order differential operator $\\boldmath${F}$ =-d^2/d\\tau^2+\\ddot g/g$, $\\ddot g\\equiv d^2g/d\\tau^2$, with a generic function $g(\\tau)$, subject to periodic and Dirichlet boundary conditions. These issues include the gauge-fixed path integral representation of this determinant, the monodromy method of its calculation and the combination of the heat kernel and zeta-function technique for the derivation of its period dependence. Motivations for this particular problem, coming from applications in quantum cosmology, are also briefly discussed. They include the problem of microcanonical initial conditions in cosmology driven by a conformal field theory, cosmological constant and cosmic microwave background problems.

  6. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  7. Former Students: Class of 1904 - 9 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-06-15

    of the requirements . ", or the degree of MASTER QF SCIFNCB January, i9'S Major Subject: Mec&anical ZnSineering AH AHALYSIS OP P~~HIODIC HSAT I'LO'i'& THI'!OHGH A PLMl~ SLAB A Thesis Approved as to styie and content hy Chai "san of Co . it tee 'Head of Depart... of the slice are shown in Figure 2. The corresponding ener~ balance is: kA(t l ? t )6Q kA(t l - t )aR or t I + t (M ? 2) + where 0 h A(t - t )gg kA(tl t g'9 i~N 'i&GY DlA('HAlill 10d HA1F-is&IC'. " Figu o 3 The ener, ~ dia?ram for thc half...

  8. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  9. Gluon polarization measurements with inclusive jets at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pibero Djawotho; for the STAR Collaboration

    2011-06-28

    At RHIC kinematics, polarized jet hadroproduction is dominated by $gg$ and $qg$ scattering, making the jet double longitudinal spin asymmetry, $A_{LL}$, sensitive to gluon polarization in the nucleon. I will present STAR results of $A_{LL}$ from inclusive jet measurements for the RHIC 2006 run at center-of-mass energy 200 GeV. I will also discuss the current status of the analysis of data from the 2009 run, also at center-of-mass energy 200 GeV. The results are compared with theoretical calculations of $A_{LL}$ based on various models of the gluon density in the nucleon. The STAR data place significant constraints on allowed theoretical models.

  10. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  11. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe D'Appollonio; Paolo Di Vecchia; Rodolfo Russo; Gabriele Veneziano

    2015-05-12

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  12. Predicting cutability of lamb carcasses from easily obtainable carcass measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, William McCoy

    1967-01-01

    to style and content by: t, . C, / ~ C, - /4 Cljaiiiaan of Conic tl. ee He a d o Ti e e a r t ii: e n i ( ~~g~g~ cM e lani oar An~~est 196/ 428807 AC KNOWLE D GME tiT S The staff and personnel of the Meats Laboratory of the Animal Science... snail be eternally grateful. W. M. Oliver August, 1967 TABLE OF COXTEJ'JTS Chapter IETRO DUCT I 0 && . II OBJECTl'&9"'. S. RZ I E'v' OF I, ITERATURE . Pea?urea of Carcass Merit Variables Used for Predic ion TV VI Differences in Cutabiiity...

  13. An economic evaluation of fertilizer application to Coastal Bermudagrass under irrigation on Lufkin fine sandy loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochaska, Frank Charles

    1958-01-01

    AZ:-V@~'. W. . ; j)~303;. ~t42@~6 W. 't5e':, X eqv Ny@ee4. . - gW':. Mi': 6e~m. qZ k '. 5g:~~ "'~M~'. 4pggiRCS; , . 'A~t?'. "Xgg8, . ' ?- ~qi ''Sijb] johns' A~S~i@tmeX'%e~~m = ', 1 il l:, . "i 'i":. ", , i:;:, :, . 'ilia. ;:;::. ::." ' Ag ggMSI iC!L V... ''. '. . . =, . '=;;;-"i-"' A&~Mf@$. C@';40 'g5$XS. ; @4i6"-Cli'PS~4. , 6$$ '0 . (@Bi?' ' 'Q~' Qm'MM') 1 (kg', K4'. X. 4AQCi~wWQw ) A~mC'. 3@~8 1 J +; r ! ~BV~~RVS - - SyeeQ4:. -jp~t44vide La;~assai-to. . ~-. 8? -4+-. '-NLlMqth? -: -. kaa~~ie& MM...

  14. Borexino: A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2002-06-25

    Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

  15. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Camore »/ Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  16. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources. Case study of Murmansk

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Evans, M.; Kholod, N.; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2015-07-27

    Black carbon (BC) is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climate change, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularly pronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect on snow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in the Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory of diesel sources including on-road vehicles, off-road transport (mining, locomotives, construction and agriculture), ships and diesel generators. For on-road transport, we conducted several surveys tomore »understand the vehicle fleet and driving patterns, and, for all sources, we also relied on publicly available local data sets and analysis. We calculated that BC emissions in the Murmansk Region were 0.40 Gg in 2012. The mining industry is the largest source of BC emissions in the region, emitting 69 % of all BC emissions because of its large diesel consumption and absence of emissions controls. On-road vehicles are the second largest source, emitting about 13 % of emissions. Old heavy duty trucks are the major source of emissions. Emission controls on new vehicles limit total emissions from on-road transportation. Vehicle traffic and fleet surveys show that many of the older cars on the registry are lightly or never used. We also estimated that total BC emissions from diesel sources in Russia were 50.8 Gg in 2010, and on-road transport contributed 49 % of diesel BC emissions. Agricultural machinery is also a significant source Russia-wide, in part because of the lack of controls on off-road vehicles.« less

  17. X-Ray Cross-Complementing Group 1 and Thymidylate Synthase Polymorphisms Might Predict Response to Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamas, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision is currently the standard treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancer patients. We used known predictive pharmacogenetic biomarkers to identify the responders to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in our series. Methods and Materials: A total of 93 Stage II-III rectal cancer patients were genotyped using peripheral blood samples. The genes analyzed were X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1), ERCC1, MTHFR, EGFR, DPYD, and TYMS. The patients were treated with 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil concomitantly with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) followed by total mesorectal excision. The outcomes were measured by tumor regression grade (TRG) as a major response (TRG 1 and TRG 2) or as a poor response (TRG3, TRG4, and TRG5). Results: The major histopathologic response rate was 47.3%. XRCC1 G/G carriers had a greater probability of response than G/A carriers (odds ratio, 4.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.62-10.74, p = .003) Patients with polymorphisms associated with high expression of thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) showed a greater pathologic response rate compared with carriers of low expression (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.39, p = .02) No significant differences were seen in the response according to EGFR, ERCC1, MTHFR{sub C}677 and MTHFR{sub A}1298 expression. Conclusions: XRCC1 G/G and thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) are independent factors of a major response. Germline thymidylate synthase and XRCC1 polymorphisms might be useful as predictive markers of rectal tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil.

  18. Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-12-01

    Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

  19. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-02-05

    A geologic/geochemical investigation in the vicinity of UPR-200-E-82 was performed using pairs of cone-penetrometer probe holes. A total of 41 direct-push cone-penetrometer borings (19 pairs to investigate different high moisture zones in the same sampling location and 3 individual) were advanced to characterize vadose zone moisture and the distribution of contaminants. A total of twenty sample sets, containing up to two split-spoon liners and one grab sample, were delivered to the laboratory for characterization and analysis. The samples were collected around the documented location of the C-152 pipeline leak, and created an approximately 120-ft diameter circle around the waste site. UPR-200-E-82 was a loss of approximately 2,600 gallons of Cs-137 Recovery Process feed solution containing an estimated 11,300 Ci of cesium-137 and 5 Ci of technetium-99. Several key parameters that are used to identify subsurface contamination were measured, including: water extract pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, technetium-99, sodium, and uranium concentrations and technetium-99 and uranium concentrations in acid extracts. All of the parameters, with the exception of electrical conductivity, were elevated in at least some of the samples analyzed as part of this study. Specifically, soil pH was elevated (from 8.69 to 9.99) in five samples collected northeast and southwest of the C-152 pipeline leak. Similarly, samples collected from these same cone-pentrometer holes contained significantly more water-extractable sodium (more than 50 ?g/g of dry sediment), uranium (as much as 7.66E-01 ?g/g of dry sediment), nitrate (up to 30 ?g/g of dry sediment), and technetium-99 (up to 3.34 pCi/g of dry sediment). Most of the samples containing elevated concentrations of water-extractable sodium also had decreased levels of water extractable calcium and or magnesium, indicating that tank-related fluids that were high in sodium did seep into the vadose zone near these probe holes. Several of the samples containing high concentrations of water-leachable uranium also contained high pore water corrected alkalinity (3.26E+03 mg/L as CaCO3), indicating that the elevated water-leachable uranium could be an artifact of uranyl-carbonate complexation of naturally occurring labile uranium. However, a mass scan of the water extract containing the highest concentration of uranium was performed via inductively coupled mass spectrometry over the range of 230 to 240 atomic mass units, and a discernable peak was observed at mass 236. Although the data is considered qualitative, the presence of uranium-236 in the 1:1 sediment:water extract is a clear indication that the sample contains contaminant uranium [Hanford reprocessed fuel waste]. After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone surrounding the C-152 pipeline leak site has been contaminated by waste generally sent to tanks. The two zones or regions that contained the largest amount of contaminants, either in concentration or by occurrence of several key constituents/contaminants of concern, were located: 1) between the 241-C-151 and 241-C-152 Diversion Boxes (near the location of UPR-200-E-82) and 2) directly across the C-152 waste site near the C-153 Diversion Box (near where a pipeline, which connects the two diversion boxes, is shown on old blue prints . Without the use of more sophisticated analytical techniques, such as isotope signature analysis of ruthenium fission product isotopes, it is impossible to determine if the contamination observed at these two locations are from the same waste source or are a result of different leak events.

  20. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore »desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  1. Final Report for Project DE-FC02-06ER25755 [Pmodels2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar; Sadayappan, P

    2014-03-12

    In this report, we describe the research accomplished by the OSU team under the Pmodels2 project. The team has worked on various angles: designing high performance MPI implementations on modern networking technologies (Mellanox InfiniBand (including the new ConnectX2 architecture and Quad Data Rate), QLogic InfiniPath, the emerging 10GigE/iWARP and RDMA over Converged Enhanced Ethernet (RoCE) and Obsidian IB-WAN), studying MPI scalability issues for multi-thousand node clusters using XRC transport, scalable job start-up, dynamic process management support, efficient one-sided communication, protocol offloading and designing scalable collective communication libraries for emerging multi-core architectures. New designs conforming to the Argonne’s Nemesis interface have also been carried out. All of these above solutions have been integrated into the open-source MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 software. This software is currently being used by more than 2,100 organizations worldwide (in 71 countries). As of January ’14, more than 200,000 downloads have taken place from the OSU Web site. In addition, many InfiniBand vendors, server vendors, system integrators and Linux distributors have been incorporating MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 into their software stacks and distributing it. Several InfiniBand systems using MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 have obtained positions in the TOP500 ranking of supercomputers in the world. The latest November ’13 ranking include the following systems: 7th ranked Stampede system at TACC with 462,462 cores; 11th ranked Tsubame 2.5 system at Tokyo Institute of Technology with 74,358 cores; 16th ranked Pleiades system at NASA with 81,920 cores; Work on PGAS models has proceeded on multiple directions. The Scioto framework, which supports taskparallelism in one-sided and global-view parallel programming, has been extended to allow multi-processor tasks that are executed by processor groups. A quantum Monte Carlo application is being ported onto the extended Scioto framework. A public release of Global Trees (GT) has been made, along with the Global Chunks (GC) framework on which GT is built. The Global Chunks (GC) layer is also being used as the basis for the development of a higher level Global Graphs (GG) layer. The Global Graphs (GG) system will provide a global address space view of distributed graph data structures on distributed memory systems.

  2. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2?microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi ; Chang, Xiuli; Rentschler, Gerda; Tian, Liting; Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao; Jin, Taiyi; Broberg, Karin

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 ?g/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 ?g/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 ?g/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary ?2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (? = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (? = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.018, 95% CI ? 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ? Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ? The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ? A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ? Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ? The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  3. Non-locality and viscous drag effects on the shear localisation in soft-glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Scagliarini; Benjamin Dollet; Mauro Sbragaglia

    2014-10-14

    We study the Couette flow of a quasi-2d soft-glassy material in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The material is chosen to be above the jamming point, where a yield stress $\\sigma_Y$ emerges, below which the material deforms elastically and above which it flows like a complex fluid according to a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. Simultaneously, the effect of the confining plates is modelled as an effective linear friction law, while the walls aside the Hele-Shaw cell are sufficiently close to each other to allow visible cooperativity effects in the velocity profiles (Goyon et al., Nature 454, 84-87 (2008)). The effects of cooperativity are parametrized with a steady-state diffusion-relaxation equation for the fluidity field $f = \\dot{\\gamma}/\\sigma$, defined as the ratio between shear rate $\\dot{\\gamma}$ and shear stress $\\sigma$. For particular rheological flow-curves (Bingham fluids), the problem is tackled analytically: we explore the two regimes $\\sigma \\gg \\sigma_Y$ and $\\sigma \\approx \\sigma_Y$ and quantify the effect of the extra localisation induced by the wall friction. Other rheo-thinning fluids are explored with the help of numerical simulations based on lattice Boltzmann models, revealing a robustness of the analytical findings. Synergies and comparisons with other existing works in the literature (Barry et al., Phil. Mag. Lett. 91, 432-440 (2011)) are also discussed.

  4. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  5. Hyperscaling at the spin density wave quantum critical point in two dimensional metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Aavishkar A; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    The hyperscaling property implies that spatially isotropic critical quantum states in $d$ spatial dimensions have a specific heat which scales with temperature as $T^{d/z}$, and an optical conductivity which scales with frequency as $\\omega^{(d-2)/z}$ for $\\omega \\gg T$, where $z$ is the dynamic critical exponent. We examine the spin-density-wave critical fixed point of metals in $d=2$ found by Sur and Lee (Phys. Rev. B 91, 125136 (2015)) in an expansion in $\\epsilon = 3-d$. We find that the contributions of the "hot spots" on the Fermi surface to the optical conductivity and specific heat obey hyperscaling (up to logarithms), and agree with the results of the large $N$ analysis of the optical conductivity by Hartnoll et al. (Phys. Rev. B 84, 125115 (2011)). With a small bare velocity of the boson associated with the spin density wave order, there is an intermediate energy regime where hyperscaling is violated with $d \\rightarrow d_t$, where $d_t = 1$ is the number of dimensions transverse to the Fermi surfac...

  6. Control of contamination of radon-daughters in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jillings, Chris; Collaboration: DEAP Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    DEAP-3600 is a 3600kg single-phase liquid-argon dark matter detector under construction at SNOLAB with a sensitivity of 10{sup ?46}cm{sup 2} for a 100 GeV WIMP. The argon is held an an acrylic vessel coated with wavelength-shifting 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB). Acrylic was chosen because it is optically transparent at the shifted wavelength of 420 nm; an effective neutron shield; and physically strong. With perfect cleaning of the acrylic surface before data taking the irreducible background is that from bulk {sup 210}Pb activity that is near the surface. To achieve a background rate of 0.01 events in the 1000-kg fiducial volume per year of exposure, the allowed limit of Pb-210 in the bulk acrylic is 31 mBq/tonne (= 1.2 × 10{sup ?20}g/g). We discuss how pure acrylic was procured and manufactured into a complete vessel paying particular attention to exposure to radon during all processes. In particular field work at the acrylic panel manufacturer, RPT Asia, and acrylic monomer supplier, Thai MMA Co. Ltd, in Thailand is described. The increased diffusion of radon during annealing the acrylic at 90C as well as techniques to mitigate against this are described.

  7. Magneto-thermal Disk Wind from Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is governed by disk angular momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a 1D model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on 1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfv\\'en speed $v_{Ap}$, 2) the sound speed $c_s$ near the wind base, and 3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve $R^{-2}$ scaling). When $v_{Ap}\\gg c_s$, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accel...

  8. Willa Cather's European immigrants: the conflict of old and new world values. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursey, Roberta Lee

    1966-01-01

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  9. Folklore in Huckleberry Finn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skaggs, Peggy Dechert

    1965-01-01

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  10. Rearing of boll weevils on artificial diets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raven B., Klaus Gustav

    1959-01-01

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  11. Coyote-prey interactions on an intensively managed south Texas ranch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Gary Scott

    1988-01-01

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  12. Determining the gluonic content of isoscalar mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, F.E. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (England)] [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (England); Farrar, G.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States); Li, Z. [Physics Department, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Physics Department, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, Peoples Republic of (China)

    1997-05-01

    We develop tools to determine the gluonic content of a resonance of known mass, width, and J{sup PC} from its branching fraction in radiative quarkonium decays and production cross section in {gamma}{gamma} collisions. We test the procedures by applying them to known q{bar q} mesons, then analyze four leading glueball candidates. We identify inconsistencies in data for J/{psi}{r_arrow}{gamma}f{sub 0}(1500) and J/{psi}{r_arrow}{gamma}f{sub J}(1710) whose resolution can quantify their glueball status. When {Gamma}(f{sub 0}(1500){r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma}) and {Gamma}(f{sub J}(1710){r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma}) are known, the n{bar n},s{bar s},gg mixing angles can be determined. The enigmatic situation in the 1400-1500 MeV region of the isosinglet 0{sup {minus}+} sector is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  14. A new Bayesian approach to the reconstruction of spectral functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannis Burnier; Alexander Rothkopf

    2013-10-02

    We present a novel approach for the reconstruction of spectra from Euclidean correlator data that makes close contact to modern Bayesian concepts. It is based upon an axiomatically justified dimensionless prior distribution, which in the case of constant prior function $m(\\omega)$ only imprints smoothness on the reconstructed spectrum. In addition we are able to analytically integrate out the only relevant overall hyper-parameter $\\alpha$ in the prior, removing the necessity for Gaussian approximations found e.g. in the Maximum Entropy Method. Using a quasi-Newton minimizer and high-precision arithmetic, we are then able to find the unique global extremum of $P[\\rho|D]$ in the full $N_\\omega\\gg N_\\tau$ dimensional search space. The method actually yields gradually improving reconstruction results if the quality of the supplied input data increases, without introducing artificial peak structures, often encountered in the MEM. To support these statements we present mock data analyses for the case of zero width delta peaks and more realistic scenarios, based on the perturbative Euclidean Wilson Loop as well as the Wilson Line correlator in Coulomb gauge.

  15. Perturbative QCD effects and the search for a H->WW->l nu l nu signal at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charalampos Anastasiou; Guenther Dissertori; Massimiliano Grazzini; Fabian Stoeckli; Bryan R. Webber

    2009-07-21

    The Tevatron experiments have recently excluded a Standard Model Higgs boson in the mass range 160 - 170 GeV at the 95% confidence level. This result is based on sophisticated analyses designed to maximize the ratio of signal and background cross-sections. In this paper we study the production of a Higgs boson of mass 160 GeV in the gg -> H -> WW -> l nu l nu channel. We choose a set of cuts like those adopted in the experimental analysis and compare kinematical distributions of the final state leptons computed in NNLO QCD to lower-order calculations and to those obtained with the event generators PYTHIA, HERWIG and MC@NLO. We also show that the distribution of the output from an Artificial Neural Network obtained with the different tools does not show significant differences. However, the final acceptance computed with PYTHIA is smaller than those obtained at NNLO and with HERWIG and MC@NLO. We also investigate the impact of the underlying event and hadronization on our results.

  16. An intercalation-locked parallel-stranded DNA tetraplex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tripathi, S.; Zhang, D.; Paukstelis, P. J.

    2015-01-27

    DNA has proved to be an excellent material for nanoscale construction because complementary DNA duplexes are programmable and structurally predictable. However, in the absence of Watson–Crick pairings, DNA can be structurally more diverse. Here, we describe the crystal structures of d(ACTCGGATGAT) and the brominated derivative, d(ACBrUCGGABrUGAT). These oligonucleotides form parallel-stranded duplexes with a crystallographically equivalent strand, resulting in the first examples of DNA crystal structures that contains four different symmetric homo base pairs. Two of the parallel-stranded duplexes are coaxially stacked in opposite directions and locked together to form a tetraplex through intercalation of the 5'-most A–A base pairs betweenmore »adjacent G–G pairs in the partner duplex. The intercalation region is a new type of DNA tertiary structural motif with similarities to the i-motif. 1H–1H nuclear magnetic resonance and native gel electrophoresis confirmed the formation of a parallel-stranded duplex in solution. Finally, we modified specific nucleotide positions and added d(GAY) motifs to oligonucleotides and were readily able to obtain similar crystals. This suggests that this parallel-stranded DNA structure may be useful in the rational design of DNA crystals and nanostructures.« less

  17. Computational Design of Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Stable Zirconium Building Units for Storage and Delivery of Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Gutov, OV; Krungleviciute, V; Borah, B; Mondloch, JE; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Snurr, RQ

    2014-10-14

    A metal organic framework (MOF) with high volumetric deliverable capacity for methane was synthesized after being identified by computational screening of 204 hypothetical MOF structures featuring (Zr6O4)(OH)(4)(CO2)(n) inorganic building blocks. The predicted MOF (NU-800) has an fcu topology in which zirconium nodes are connected via ditopic 1,4-benzenedipropynoic acid linkers. Based on our computer simulations, alkyne groups adjacent to the inorganic zirconium nodes provide more efficient methane packing around the nodes at high pressures. The high predicted gas uptake properties of this new MOF were confirmed by high-pressure isotherm measurements over a large temperature and pressure range. The measured methane deliverable capacity of NU-800 between 65 and 5.8 bar is 167 cc(STP)/cc (0.215 g/g), the highest among zirconium-based MOFs. High-pressure uptake values of H-2 and CO2 are also among the highest reported. These high gas uptake characteristics, along with the expected highly stable structure of NU-800, make it a promising material for gas storage applications.

  18. Superization of Homogeneous Spin Manifolds and Geometry of Homogeneous Supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Santi

    2009-05-24

    Let M_0=G_0/H be a (pseudo)-Riemannian homogeneous spin manifold, with reductive decomposition g_0=h+m and let S(M_0) be the spin bundle defined by the spin representation Ad:H->\\GL_R(S) of the stabilizer H. This article studies the superizations of M_0, i.e. its extensions to a homogeneous supermanifold M=G/H whose sheaf of superfunctions is isomorphic to Lambda(S^*(M_0)). Here G is the Lie supergroup associated with a certain extension of the Lie algebra of symmetry g_0 to an algebra of supersymmetry g=g_0+g_1=g_0+S via the Kostant-Koszul construction. Each algebra of supersymmetry naturally determines a flat connection nabla^{S} in the spin bundle S(M_0). Killing vectors together with generalized Killing spinors (i.e. nabla^{S}-parallel spinors) are interpreted as the values of appropriate geometric symmetries of M, namely even and odd Killing fields. An explicit formula for the Killing representation of the algebra of supersymmetry is obtained, generalizing some results of Koszul. The generalized spin connection nabla^{S} defines a superconnection on M, via the super-version of a theorem of Wang.

  19. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Anže E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  20. Searching for the Higgs Bosons of Minimal Supersymmetry with Muon Pairs and Bottom Quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Dawson; Duane Dicus; Chung Kao

    2002-08-07

    The prospects for the discovery of neutral Higgs bosons (phi^0 = H^0, h^0, A^0) produced with bottom quarks via Higgs decays into muon pairs (pp --> b b-bar phi^0 --> b b-bar mu mu-bar +X) at the CERN LHC are investigated in the minimal supersymmetric model. The complete physics background from the production of b b-bar mu mu-bar, b b-bar W^+ W^- (including t t-bar) and jj mu mu-bar, j = g, u, d, s, c in the Standard Model is calculated with realistic acceptance cuts. This discovery mode has a simple production mechanism from gg --> b b-bar phi^0 with its cross section proportional to 1/cos^2(beta) and could provide an opportunity to measure tan(beta) and the b b-bar phi^0 couplings. In addition, we compare the associated discovery mode above with the inclusive discovery channel pp --> phi^0 --> mu mu-bar +X. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar (A^0) and the heavier CP-even scalar (H^0) Higgs bosons for tan(beta) equivalent to v_2/v_1 >~ 14 and m_A,m_H <~ 325 GeV.

  1. Universal anti-baryon density in $e^+e^-$,$?p$, pp, pA and AA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidong Liu; Zhangbu Xu

    2006-10-24

    We compiled the systematical measurements of anti-nucleus production in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions as well as those in $pp$, $p\\bar{p}$, $\\gamma p$ and $e^{+}e^{-}$ at various beam energies. The anti-baryon phase space density inferred from $\\bar{d}/\\bar{p}$ ratio in $A+A$, $p+A$, $pp(\\bar{p})$ and $\\gamma p$ collisions is found to follow a universal distribution as a function of center of mass of beam energy and can be described in a statistical model. We demonstrated that anti-baryon density in all the collisions is the highest when the collisions are dominated by the processes of $g+g$ or $\\bar{q}+g$. In $e^+e^-$ collisions at LEP, the cross section of $q\\bar{q}g$ is suppressed by a factor of strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ relative to $q\\bar{q}$. This can consistently explain the $\\bar{d}$ suppression observed by ALEPH relative to that in $e^+e^-\\to ggg$ by ARGUS. We discuss the implications to the baryon enhancement at high transverse momentum at RHIC when jet is quenched.

  2. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Slosar, Anze; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  3. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  4. Wakefield Acceleration by Radiation Pressure in Relativistic Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Hoshino

    2007-09-12

    A particle acceleration mechanism by radiation pressure of precursor waves in a relativistic shock is studied. For a relativistic, perpendicular shock with the upstream bulk Lorentz factor of $\\gamma_1 \\gg 1$, large amplitude electromagnetic (light) waves are known to be excited in the shock front due to the synchrotron maser instability, and those waves can propagate towards upstream as precursor waves. We find that non-thermal, high energy electrons and ions can be quickly produced by an action of electrostatic wakefields generated by the ponderomotive force of the precursor waves. The particles can be quickly accelerated up to $\\epsilon_{\\rm max}/\\gamma_1 m_e c^2 \\sim \\gamma_1$ in the upstream coherent wakefield region, and they can be further accelerated during the nonlinear stage of the wakefield evolution. The maximum attainable energy is estimated by $\\epsilon_{\\rm max}/\\gamma_1 m_e c^2 \\sim L_{\\rm sys}/(c/\\omega_{pe})$, where $L_{\\rm sys}$ and $c/\\omega_{pe}$ are the size of an astrophysical object and the electron inertial length, respectively.

  5. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  6. Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in pp collisions at ?s = 8 with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Barklow, T.

    2015-07-18

    A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb?¹ of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson (V = W or Z) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain V H production followed by H decaying to invisible particles for themore »Higgs boson mass range 115 H VH × BR(H ? inv.) varies from 1.6 pb at 115 GeV to 0.13 pb at 300 GeV. Assuming Standard Model production and including the gg ? H contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78% at 95% confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons decays to invisible particles at a mass of 125 GeV.« less

  7. Observations on the vitamin B12 binding substance of egg yolk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ener, Huseyin Siret

    1953-01-01

    ~gg~ ?'~ ?@T PtETT P W43@QgSJ, '98-Q9~6fx ". ~vs "(&gal 'e. 'w~?-mPva~~r~, S~ ~~m=~A~&~ *ting ~g' Pttgggbf $0'3/36+6'fg(R@TT~5[ g '+PI/ /gal'Pft??'?Q' ?Q 'Q~? " f, , ggttTQI? *'m't Air Il?II'I I0 I? '0 'II ?I??T ll 0 't 000 t. ' t'?00'0 Wt Ill t?LII TT...A, Thesis "yi""ih eQ Le Qhe *~pe'j ~'j e *ese' 1 A: gicQ1+MQ1'5716';, :!eshs'51Q91, . P911e:, :, 6 'Qf Text's , i~ yeW~ial fM "i11'. e~h. i=" ". '. he ie~ixemenPs 'e= -~he Pi~w'x s. pZ"' ' ACKhG~KEEC~L::ai?iT The anterior w1shes to, express...

  8. Mean first passage time for a small rotating trap inside a reflective disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin C. Tzou; Theodore Kolokolnikov

    2014-11-16

    We compute the mean first passage time (MFPT) for a Brownian particle inside a two-dimensional disk with reflective boundaries and a small interior trap that is rotating at a constant angular velocity. The inherent symmetry of the problem allows for a detailed analytic study of the situation. For a given angular velocity, we determine the optimal radius of rotation that minimizes the average MFPT over the disk. Several distinct regimes are observed, depending on the ratio between the angular velocity $\\omega$ and the trap size $\\varepsilon$, and several intricate transitions are analyzed using the tools of asymptotic analysis and Fourier series. For $\\omega \\sim \\mathcal{O}(1)$, we compute a critical value $\\omega_c>0$ such that the optimal trap location is at the origin whenever $\\omega \\omega_c $. In the regime $1 \\ll \\omega \\ll \\mathcal{O}(\\varepsilon^{-1})$ the optimal trap path approaches the boundary of the disk. However as $\\omega$ is further increased to $\\mathcal{O}(\\varepsilon^{-1})$, the optimal trap path "jumps" closer to the origin. Finally for $\\omega \\gg \\mathcal{O}(\\varepsilon^{-1})$ the optimal trap path subdivides the disk into two regions of equal area. This simple geometry provides a good test case for future studies of MFPT with more complex trap motion.

  9. Performance of standard rate trickling filters at various depths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peralta-Rojas, Andres

    1955-01-01

    , 3-%gy . ")4y XC V444t"-l4 SBS~. "M Sf'&4' ', A O'P& WCU:44 Ch 5 5~iy*. . X'~:g ggLtex 5 fee4 ~4 "Xg, ~oq Xjt VvMt; e e. where~ eolbm;mW&mar se ~: a tv'e1". X". , ". ~~, 14ex' 4 6seh ~ 'iQy 50ly $ VOBIS 10 448 4'~~ N&1'. & W"&M5lTA'MLS e '. wkly... (. 'opsy X5 '~, eel QIF cl P he %pe eh4ile on )o 'o y '"8 M'sl K. x hp @i~i ":=, . 'Llhea 5 1'eeL cbsey? Ply' . ioy l "s, el%';i5A Mtween IFQl@hlle e98p@Ac144 IQXL~ ~~1 ani '8+ae, ~a, xe-e?1 b~g. h?'. o;ll~w, i lkheve $ I't+~ 4 . C~~ ~3 5 x"t4, doe...

  10. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Higgs Boson Production and Decay in Little Higgs Models with T-parity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan-Ren Chen; Kazuhiro Tobe; C. -P. Yuan

    2006-11-01

    We study Higgs boson production and decay in a certain class of Little Higgs models with T-parity in which some T-parity partners of the Standard Model (SM) fermions gain their masses through Yukawa-type couplings. We find that the Higgs boson production cross section of a 120 GeV Higgs boson at the CERN LHC via gg fusion process at one-loop level could be reduced by about 45%, 35% and 20%, as compared to its SM prediction, for a relatively low new particle mass scale f = 600, 700 and 1000 GeV, respectively. On the other hand, the weak boson fusion cross section is close to the SM value. Furthermore, the Higgs boson decay branching ratio into di-photon mode can be enhanced by about 35% in small Higgs mass region in certain case, for the total decay width of Higgs boson in the Little Higgs model is always smaller than that in the SM.

  12. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H?WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the potential of the process gg ? H? WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H? ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H ? WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H ? ZZ.

  13. Nonadiabatic quantum chaos in atom optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of atomic matter waves in a standing-wave laser field is studied. In the dressed-state picture, wave packets of ballistic two-level atoms propagate simultaneously in two optical potentials. The probability to make a transition from one potential to another one is maximal when centroids of wave packets cross the field nodes and is given by a simple formula with the single exponent, the Landau--Zener parameter $\\kappa$. If $\\kappa \\gg 1$, the motion is essentially adiabatic. If $\\kappa \\ll 1$, it is (almost) resonant and periodic. If $\\kappa \\simeq 1$, atom makes nonadiabatic transitions with a splitting of its wave packet at each node and strong complexification of the wave function as compared to the two other cases. This effect is referred as nonadiabatic quantum chaos. Proliferation of wave packets at $\\kappa \\simeq 1$ is shown to be connected closely with chaotic center-of-mass motion in the semiclassical theory of point-like atoms with positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. Th...

  14. Spectroscopy of Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Charge Transfer in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens Rössler; Simon Burkhard; Tobias Krähenmann; Marc Röösli; Peter Märki; Julien Basset; Thomas Ihn; Klaus Ensslin; Christian Reichl; Werner Wegscheider

    2014-08-22

    We investigate equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-transfer processes by performing high-resolution transport spectroscopy. Using electrostatically defined quantum dots for energy-selective emission and detection, we achieved unprecedented spectral resolution and a high degree of tunability of relevant experimental parameters. Most importantly, we observe that the spectral width of elastically transferred electrons can be substantially smaller than the linewidth of a thermally broadened Coulomb peak. This finding indicates that the charge-transfer process is fast compared to the electron--phonon interaction time. By drawing an analogy to double quantum dots, we argue that the spectral width of the elastic resonance is determined by the lifetime broadening $h\\it{\\Gamma}$ of the emitter and detector states. Good agreement with the model is found also in an experiment in which the charge transfer is in the regime $h\\it{\\Gamma}\\gg k_{\\rm{B}}T$. By performing spectroscopy below the Fermi energy, we furthermore observe elastic and inelastic transfer of holes.

  15. Auroral effects on midlatitude semidiurnal tides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States)); Richmond, A.D.; Roble, R.G. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The effect of auroral activity on mid-latitude semidiurnal tides was investigated using simulations from the NCAR Thermosphere/Ionosphere General Circulation Model (TIGCM). Model runs were made for solar cycle minimum equinox conditions for four levels of geomagnetic activity parameterized by the total hemispheric power index and the cross polar cap potential drop. Simulations at 42.5{degree}N (gg) predicted that the upper thermosphere semidiurnal winds and temperatures generally increase with increasing geomagnetic activity, while the lower thermosphere fields were relatively insensitive to the level of auroral forcing in the model. The modeled semidiurnal mid-latitude tidal response was determined by the magnitude and phasing of the waves generated by in situ solar forcing and the auroral momentum and energy sources, in conjunction with those propagating up from the lower atmosphere. The predicted sensitivity of the model tides to the level of geomagnetic activity may contribute to the observed tidal variability at mid latitudes. Successful modeling of observations will require careful specification of the high-latitude energy and momentum sources.

  16. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outsidemore »the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.« less

  17. Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

    2006-07-20

    A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

  18. Passive tracer in a slowly decorrelating random flow with a large mean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Komorowski; Lenya Ryzhik

    2006-07-25

    We consider the movement of a particle advected by a random flow of the form $\\vv+\\delta \\bF(\\vx)$, with $\\vv\\in\\R^d$ a constant drift, $\\bF(\\vx)$ -- the fluctuation -- given by a zero mean, stationary random field and $\\delta\\ll 1$ so that the drift dominates over the fluctuation. The two-point correlation matrix $\\bR(\\vx)$ of the random field decays as $|\\vx|^{2\\alpha-2}$, as $|\\vx|\\to+\\infty$ with $\\alpha<1$. The Kubo formula for the effective diffusion coefficient obtained in \\cite{kp79} for rapidly decorrelating fields diverges when $1/2\\le\\alpha<1$. We show formally that on the time scale $\\delta^{-1/\\alpha}$ the deviation of the trajectory from its mean $\\by(t)=\\vx(t)-\\vv t$ converges to a fractional Brownian motion $B_\\alpha(t)$ in this range of the exponent $\\alpha$. We also prove rigorously upper and lower bounds which show that $\\E[|\\by(t)|^2]$ converges to zero for times $t\\ll\\delta^{-1/\\alpha}$ and to infinity on time scales $t\\gg \\delta^{-1/\\alpha}$ as $\\delta\\to 0$ when $\\alpha\\in(1/2,1)$. On the other hand, when $\\alpha<1/2$ non-trivial behavior is observed on the time-scale $O(\\delta^{-2})$.

  19. Searches for Higgs boson pair production in the $hh\\to bb\\tau\\tau, \\gamma\\gamma WW*, \\gamma\\gamma bb, bbbb$ channels with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Searches for both resonant and non-resonant Higgs boson pair production are performed in the $hh\\to bb\\tau\\tau, \\gamma\\gamma WW^*$ final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of their production is observed and 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross sections are set. These results are then combined with the published results of the $hh\\to \\gamma\\gamma bb, bbbb$ analyses. An upper limit of 0.69 (0.47) pb on the non-resonant Standard Model like $hh$ production is observed (expected), corresponding to 70 (48) times of the SM $gg\\to hh$ cross section. For production via narrow resonances, cross section limits of $hh$ production from a heavy Higgs boson decay are set as a function of the heavy Higgs boson mass. The observed (expected) limits range from 2.1 (1.1) pb at 260 GeV to 0.011 (0.018) pb at 1000 GeV. These results are interpreted in the context of two simplified sce...

  20. Ultralight carbon aerogel from nanocellulose as a highly selective oil absorption material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Yujie; Yang, Timothy M; Peizhi, Liu; Contescu, Cristian I; Biao, Huang; Siqun, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a sponge-like carbon aerogel from microfibril cellulose (MFC), with high porosity (99%), ultra-low density (0.01 g/cm3), hydrophobic properties (149 static contact angle) and reusability is reported in this paper. The physical properties, internal morphology, thermal properties, and chemical properties of carbon aerogels heat-treated at 700 and 900 oC (Samples C-700 and C-900) were examined. Stabilization and carbonization parameters were optimized in terms of residual carbon yield. The BET surface area of Sample C-700 (521 m2 /g) was significantly higher than of Sample C-950 (149 m2 /g). Graphitic-like domains were observed in C-950. The highest normalized sorption capacity (86 g/g) for paraffin oil was observed in sample C-700. The removal of hydrophilic function groups during carbonization causes carbon aerogel to present highly hydrophobic properties. Carbon aerogel s ability to absorb oil is enhanced by its highly porous 3D network structure with interconnected cellulose nanofibrils.

  1. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 1, 5-12 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    |hftflGqs ;/sf/sf nflu lsdfy{ klg ;'xfpg] s'/f xf]Og . ;/sf/n] nfb]sf] o; k|ltjGwsf lj?4 g]kfnL rnlrqsdL{x?n] ;fgf] :j/df / gful/s ;dfhn] 7"n} :j/df lj/f]w u/]sf 5g\\ . cf]:sf/df g]kfnL rnlrq cg'kl:yt ;g\\ !((( df Sof/fefgnfO{ a]e]nL{ lxN;l:yt ;|fOg cl86f... lj/fdnfO{ ;/sf/n] p;sf] sdhf]/Lsf ?kdf lnP/ To;nfO{ ;s/fTds ?kdf glnbf o;kflnsf] bz} klg g/;+xf/ af6 d'Qm xf]nf eGg ;lsg] kl/l:ylt l;h{gf x'g g;s]sf] xf] . ufpF3/df zfxL g]kfnL ;]gf l;len 8«];df k;]/ dfcf]jfbLsf sfo{stf{x?nfO{ kqmfp ug{ yfn...

  2. Electric charge in the field of a magnetic event in three-dimensional spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Bunster; Cristian Martinez

    2012-02-09

    We analyze the motion of an electric charge in the field of a magnetically charged event in three-dimensional spacetime. We start by exhibiting a first integral of the equations of motion in terms of the three conserved components of the spacetime angular momentum, and then proceed numerically. After crossing the light cone of the event, an electric charge initially at rest starts rotating and slowing down. There are two lengths appearing in the problem: (i) the characteristic length $\\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, where $q$ and $m$ are the electric charge and mass of the particle, and $g$ is the magnetic charge of the event; and (ii) the spacetime impact parameter $r_0$. For $r_0 \\gg \\frac{q g}{2 \\pi m}$, after a time of order $r_0$, the particle makes sharply a quarter of a turn and comes to rest at the same spatial position at which the event happened in the past. This jump is the main signature of the presence of the magnetic event as felt by an electric charge. A derivation of the expression for the angular momentum that uses Noether's theorem in the magnetic representation is given in the Appendix.

  3. Optimal Decoherence Control in non-Markovian Open, Dissipative Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

    2009-10-27

    We investigate the optimal control problem for non-Markovian open, dissipative quantum system. Optimal control using Pontryagin maximum principle is specifically derived. The influences of Ohmic reservoir with Lorentz-Drude regularization are numerically studied in a two-level system under the following three conditions: \\omega_0\\ll\\omega_c, \\omega_0\\approx\\omega_c or \\omega_0\\gg\\omega_c, where \\omega_0 is the characteristic frequency of the quantum system of interest, and \\omega_c the cut-off frequency of Ohmic reservoir. The optimal control process shows its remarkable influences on the decoherence dynamics. The temperature is a key factor in the decoherence dynamics. We analyze the optimal decoherence control in high temperature, intermediate temperature, and low temperature reservoirs respectively. It implies that designing some engineered reservoirs with the controlled coupling and state of the environment can slow down the decoherence rate and delay the decoherence time. Moreover, we compare the non-Markovian optimal decoherence control with the Markovian one and find that with non-Markovian the engineered artificial reservoirs are better than with the Markovian approximation in controlling the open, dissipative quantum system's decoherence.

  4. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to aa in the ???? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for the decay to a pair of new particles of either the 125 GeV Higgs boson (h) or a second charge parity (CP)-even Higgs boson (H) is presented. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. The search was done in the context of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the new particles are the lightest neutral pseudoscalar Higgs bosons (a). One of the two a bosons is required to decay to two muons while themore »other is required to decay to two ? leptons. No significant excess is observed above the expected backgrounds in the dimuon invariant mass range from 3.7 to 50 GeV. Upper limits are placed on the production of h ? aa relative to the standard model gg ? h production, assuming no coupling of the a boson to quarks. The most stringent limit is placed at 3.5% for ma = 3.75 GeV. Upper limits are also placed on the production cross section of H ? aa from 2.33 to 0.72 pb, for fixed ma = 5 GeV with mH ranging from 100 to 500 GeV.« less

  5. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore »of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  6. Quantum dynamics of incoherently driven V-type system: Analytic solutions beyond the secular approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodin, Amro; Brumer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present closed-form analytic solutions to non-secular Bloch-Redfield master equations for quantum dynamics of a V-type system driven by weak coupling to a thermal bath. We focus on noise-induced Fano coherences among the excited states induced by incoherent driving of the V-system initially in the ground state. For suddenly turned-on incoherent driving, the time evolution of the coherences is determined by the damping parameter $\\zeta=\\frac{1}{2}(\\gamma_1+\\gamma_2)/\\Delta_p$, where $\\gamma_i$ are the radiative decay rates of the excited levels $i=1,2$, and $\\Delta_p=\\sqrt{\\Delta^2 + (1-p^2)\\gamma_1\\gamma_2}$ depends on the excited-state level splitting $\\Delta>0$ and the angle between the transition dipole moments in the energy basis. The coherences oscillate as a function of time in the underdamped limit ($\\zeta\\gg1$), approach a long-lived quasi-steady state in the overdamped limit ($\\zeta\\ll 1$), and display an intermediate behavior at critical damping ($\\zeta= 1$). The sudden incoherent turn-on generat...

  7. Búsqueda del Bosón de Higgs del Modelo Standard en el canal de desintegración H ? WW? ? 2?2? en el experimento CMS del LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Rodrigo Anoro, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    A prospective analysis for the search of a SM Higgs boson in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC is performed in this thesis, focusing in the gg ? H ? WW? ? ???? process. The search channel has a clear signature characterized by the presence of two high PT muons in the final state and a significant amount of missing ET due to the undetected neutrinos. No hard jet activity is expected. The principal sources of background come from several SM processes that may have similar final states as those of the signal, mainly W + jets, Z + jets, tt and the almost irreducible WW. Other sources of background are WZ, ZZ and tW processes. Final states coming from QCD processes have different signatures but very large cross-sections and they have also been studied. Several analysis techniques have been developed in this work. The main one is based on the application of a sequential selection criteria using a set of physical observables which characterize the main kinematic properties of the sign...

  8. Local Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of Massive Star Envelopes at the Iron Opacity Peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Bildsten, Lars; Quataert, Eliot; Blaes, Omer

    2015-01-01

    We perform three dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the structure and dynamics of radiation dominated envelopes of massive stars at the location of the iron opacity peak. One dimensional hydrostatic calculations predict an unstable density inversion at this location, whereas our simulations reveal a complex interplay of convective and radiative transport whose behavior depends on the ratio of the photon diffusion time to the dynamical time. The latter is set by the ratio of the optical depth per pressure scale height, $\\tau_0$, to $\\tau_c=c/c_g$, where $c_g \\approx$ 50 km/s is the isothermal sound speed in the gas alone. When $\\tau_0 \\gg \\tau_c$, convection reduces the radiation acceleration and removes the density inversion. The turbulent energy transport in the simulations agrees with mixing length theory and provides its first numerical calibration in the radiation dominated regime. When $\\tau_0 \\ll \\tau_c$, convection becomes inefficient and the turbulent energy transport is negligible. The...

  9. Standing Sausage Modes In Nonuniform Magnetic Tubes: An Inversion Scheme For Inferring Flare Loop Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Standing sausage modes in flare loops are important for interpreting quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flare lightcurves. We propose an inversion scheme that consistently uses their periods $P$ and damping times $\\tau$ to diagnose flare loop parameters. We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in pressure-less straight tubes, for which the transverse density inhomogeneity takes place in a layer of arbitrary width $l$ and is of arbitrary form. We find that $P$ and $\\tau$ depend on the combination of $[R/v_{\\rm Ai}, L/R, l/R, \\rho_{\\rm i}/\\rho_{\\rm e}]$, where $R$ is the loop radius, $L$ is the looplength, $v_{\\rm Ai}$ is the internal Alfv\\'en speed, and $\\rho_{\\rm i}/\\rho_{\\rm e}$ is the density contrast. For all the density profiles examined, $P$ and $\\tau$ experience saturation when $L/R \\gg 1$, yielding an inversion curve in the $[R/v_{\\rm Ai}, l/R, \\rho_{\\rm i}/\\rho_{\\rm e}]$ space with a specific density profile when $L/R$ is sufficiently large. When applied to a spat...

  10. $WWZ/?$ production in large extra dimensions model at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Xiao-Zhou; Duan Peng-Fei; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the effect induced by the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production in the framework of the large extra dimensions (LED) model at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The integrated cross sections and various kinematic distributions in the LED model are presented and compared with those in the standard model. The results show that the contributions from KK-graviton exchange remarkably affect the observables of the triple gauge boson ($W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$) production processes at both the ILC and the LHC, particularly either in the high transverse momentum region or in the central rapidity region. We also find that the relative LED discrepancy for the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production at the LHC is generally larger than that at the ILC due to the additional LED contribution via $gg$ fusion subprocess and the KK-graviton exchanging resonant effect induced by the continuous large colliding energy in $pp$ collision. We conclude that the $W^{+}W^{-}\\gamma$ and $W^{+}W^{-}Z$ productions at the LHC could have the distinct advantage over at the ILC from the aspect of effectively exploring the LED signal in measuring $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production.

  11. The influence of certain management practices upon market quality and profit made in broiler production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William J

    1951-01-01

    ~f' ~~~~ mt'~ ~49~ 9ZCV, " (~. i: @FAN XSXL=Xgg?RhGQ ~ 4GT g pgiKpgUp ~ ~~V ~~~ Q WjQ ~~~ U~XZiC~ ~ O~ ~7: f~9 ply BVQQ~~XI8 SQ~ za? ~E~~w~svs~ ~~a& ~ zemmgozp ~~m ~~ 'g ~csgpgog, ", ~ f~~ zat~o yX ~~:, X K Gd'""~ 'g" u +~ ' G. ~ LIp...G%ttq, Gj~ M, 'g hiT'p'i~ ?k7 C gg ~oc. aux saba ~ 4xgwqgq( ~~ go zoese~y +~eel~ p ", tagz~m ~~ egg mg ~~ @o~ q~y '~p, W ~%%WAf1% WV R~ PA ~~ ~~~ sapp~sae yam etege83te epp~ ~~ ~~+ K4~kl~~ @TH 4 ~Ik~D C~W~ Q@& %~~~V Xtpea~ ~~ ga ~ssqaseog ac~ ~ pasg...

  12. Certain aspects of shear stresses in tapered cantilever beams as revealed through photoelasticity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, John Vivian

    1954-01-01

    ~p~ + Yg JpJg)6 +P) + Ah o ~~gg~r~o ~ooy Cm) 8 Smaze FZFwrZnr7 dpcvpnp or ~ ~wSF/C' ~ooy cohFgws peur s g 8A'/sr g QT pp' oA' g+~ p' &g/s o+ &h4 I gP I 6'+o4 DEFdk'AWE' THF pdw7$ ISSPhtd AS/TAWS Jf 7 0/ A Q AAfo c' +Fsp~7/k wc y~ o ' APE/wc& r...-?-~~~) P' s p/vg ~ ( Op -~Pp) r ore mum's ZnW~rz srWArM i 4d& &WC+ g~ %jag p a( ( ) 8$ rNb w 7+F cpn/pg Fr gA' r1 y Eg 4rgTlp A/ = ~ L~ ? e(c ~ -?~~) ~ ?, (g mc?)7 rr 8 w~ ~I 9p 8p L~g 2 p~& p Hl/w~j ~& 3 ('~ ~~)~ 8 (' ~~) / ) 8g + dr PF4Fn...

  13. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Qualitymore »Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr?¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.« less

  14. Two-dimensional PIC simulations of ion-beam instabilities in Supernova-driven plasma flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Dieckmann; A. Meli; P. K. Shukla; L. O. C. Drury; A. Mastichiadis

    2008-04-16

    Supernova remnant (SNR) blast shells can reach the flow speed $v_s = 0.1 c$ and shocks form at its front. Instabilities driven by shock-reflected ion beams heat the plasma in the foreshock, which may inject particles into diffusive acceleration. The ion beams can have the speed $v_b \\approx v_s$. For $v_b \\ll v_s$ the Buneman or upper-hybrid instabilities dominate, while for $v_b \\gg v_s$ the filamentation and mixed modes grow faster. Here the relevant waves for $v_b \\approx v_s$ are examined and how they interact nonlinearly with the particles. The collision of two plasma clouds at the speed $v_s$ is modelled with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which convect with them magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to their flow velocity vector. One simulation models equally dense clouds and the other one uses a density ratio of 2. Both simulations show upper-hybrid waves that are planar over large spatial intervals and that accelerate electrons to $\\sim$ 10 keV. The symmetric collision yields only short oscillatory wave pulses, while the asymmetric collision also produces large-scale electric fields, probably through a magnetic pressure gradient. The large-scale fields destroy the electron phase space holes and they accelerate the ions, which facilitates the formation of a precursor shock.

  15. Quantum Spontaneous Stochasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The quantum wave-function of a massive particle with small initial uncertainties (consistent with the uncertainty relation) is believed to spread very slowly, so that the dynamics is deterministic. This assumes that the classical motions for given initial data are unique. In fluid turbulence non-uniqueness due to "roughness" of the advecting velocity field is known to lead to stochastic motion of classical particles. Vanishingly small random perturbations are magnified by Richardson diffusion in a "nearly rough" velocity field so that motion remains stochastic as the noise disappears, or classical spontaneous stochasticity, . Analogies between stochastic particle motion in turbulence and quantum evolution suggest that there should be quantum spontaneous stochasticity (QSS). We show this for 1D models of a particle in a repulsive potential that is "nearly rough" with $V(x) \\sim C|x|^{1+\\alpha}$ at distances $|x|\\gg \\ell$ , for some UV cut-off $\\ell$, and for initial Gaussian wave-packet centered at 0. We consi...

  16. Photometry and Spectroscopy of the Type IIP SN 1999em from Outburst to Dust Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmhamdi, A; Chugai, N N; Pastorello, A; Turatto, M; Cappellaro, E; Altavilla, G; Benetti, S; Patat, F; Salvo, M E

    2002-01-01

    We present photometry and spectra of the type IIP SN1999em in NGC 1637 from several days after the outburst till day 642. An amount of $\\approx 0.02 M_{\\odot}$ of ejected $^{56}$Ni is inferred using the recovered bolometric light curve . The H$\\alpha$ and He I 10830 \\AA lines at the nebular epoch show that the distribution of the bulk of $^{56}$Ni can be represented approximately by a sphere of $^{56}$Ni with a velocity of 1500 km s$^{-1}$, which is shifted towards the far hemisphere by about 400 km s$^{-1}$. The fine structure of the H$\\alpha$ at the photospheric epoch reminiscent of the "Bochum event" in SN 1987A is analysed . The late time spectra show a dramatic transformation of the [O I] 6300 \\AA line profile between days 465 and 510, which we interpret as an effect of dust condensation during this period. Late time photometry supports the dust formation scenario after day 465. The [O I] line profile suggests that the dust occupies a sphere with velocity $\\approx 800$ km s$^{-1}$ and optical depth $\\gg1...

  17. The occupancy in the Hadronic Calorimeter endcap of the CLIC detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dam, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the optimal physics performance of a detector for a linear electron–positron col- lider it is essential to minimize the effect of the beam-induced background. Incoherent electron–positron pairs shower in the very forward region of the CLIC detector and cause a too high occupancy of approximately 80% in the inner radius of the HCal endcap. The occupancy is studied by performing full detector simulations and reduced by changing the material and thickness of the support tube that serves as shielding. The effect of the tile size in the HCal endcap is also studied. A minimal occupancy of ? 4% in the HCal inner radius can be reached with a thick tungsten support tube. When taking a more realistic engineering point of view into account and including polyethylene, an occupancy of ? 8% is achieved. These results show that it is possible to reduce the occupancy due to incoherent pairs in the HCal endcap to a similar level as that due to gg ! hadrons events.

  18. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  19. Sea Quark Flavor Asymmetry of Hadrons in Statistical Balance Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Yong-Jun Zhang

    2010-10-20

    We derive a Menta Carlo method to simulate kinetic equilibrium ensemble, and get the same sea-quark flavor asymmetry as the linear equations method in statistical model. In the recent paper, we introduce the spilt factors to indicate the quarks' or gluons' spilt $g\\rightarrow q\\bar{q}(gg)$ and $q\\rightarrow qg$ ability. We obtain the almost fixed asymmetry value $0.12-0.16$ which consists with experimental measurements for proton, when the spilt factors vary in a very wide range over four orders of magnitude. So, we proof the sea quark asymmetry can be derived from statistic principle and not sensitively dependents on the dynamics details of quarks and gluons in proton. We also apply the Menta Carlo method of statistical model to predict the sea-quark asymmetry values for $K$ mesons, octet baryons $\\Sigma$,$\\Xi$ and $\\Delta$ baryons, even for exotic pentaquark states. All these asymmetry values just only dependent on the valence quarks numbers in those hadrons.

  20. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  1. Current quark mass and nonzero-ness of chiral condensates in thermal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Bang-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The effect that the current quark mass $M_0$ may result in nonzero-ness of chiral condensates is systematically reexamined and analyzed in a two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model simulating Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at temperature $T$ and finite quark chemical potential $\\mu$ without and with electrical neutrality (EN) condition and at any $T$ and $\\mu$ without EN condition. By means of a quantitative investigation of the order parameter $m$, it is shown that a nonzero $M_0$ is bound to lead to nonzero quark-antiquark condensates throughout chiral phase transitions , no matter whether the order parameter $m$ varies discontinuously or continuously. In fact, a complete disappearance of the quark-antiquark condensates are proven to demand the non-physical and unrealistic conditions $\\mu \\,\\geq$ or $\\gg\\, \\sqrt{\\Lambda^2+M_0^2}$ if $T=0$ and finite, or $T\\to \\infty$ if $\\mu<\\sqrt{\\Lambda^2+M_0^2}$, where $\\Lambda$ is the 3D momentum cut of the loop integrals. Theoretically these results show that when $M_0$ i...

  2. Effect of temperature on the desorption and decomposition of mustard from activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwacki, C.J.; Buchanan, J.H.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Wagner, G.W.

    1999-12-07

    Experimental data are reported for the desorption of bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, (a sulfur mustard or HD) and its decomposition products from activated coconut shell carbon (CSC). The results show that under equilibrium conditions changes in the HD partial pressure are affected primarily by its loading and temperature of the adsorbent. The partial pressure of adsorbed HD is found to increase by about a decade for each 25 C increase in temperature for CSC containing 0.01--0.1 g/g HD. Adsorption equilibria of HD appear to be little affected by coadsorbed water. Although complicated by its decomposition, the distribution of adsorbed HD (of known amount) appears to occupy pores of similar energy whether dry or in the presence of adsorbed water. On dry CSC adsorbed HD appears stable, while in the presence of water its decomposition is marked by hydrolysis at low temperature and thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures. The principal volatile products desorbed are 1,4-thioxane, 2-chloroethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,4-dithiane, with the latter favoring elevated temperatures.

  3. Top Partners and Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien-Yi Chen; S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis

    2014-11-04

    The Higgs boson is produced at the LHC through gluon fusion at roughly the Standard Model rate. New colored fermions, which can contribute to $gg\\rightarrow h$, must have vector-like interactions in order not to be in conflict with the experimentally measured rate. We examine the size of the corrections to single and double Higgs production from heavy vector-like fermions in $SU(2)_L$ singlets and doublets and search for regions of parameter space where double Higgs production is enhanced relative to the Standard Model prediction. We compare production rates and distributions for double Higgs production from gluon fusion using an exact calculation, the low energy theorem (LET), where the top quark and the heavy vector-like fermions are taken to be infinitely massive, and an effective theory (EFT) where top mass effects are included exactly and the effects of the heavy fermions are included to ${\\cal O}(1/M^2_X)$. Unlike the LET, the EFT gives an extremely accurate description of the kinematic distributions for double Higgs production.

  4. Price Differences in a Durable Products Secondary Market: A Hedonic Price Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fumasi, Roland J

    2013-07-22

    Nhofiry ocGTx&ovse tyisorseopusyObtNUocGGl&oqbJrtoxggx&orseoCyF OrsorseoAUbJo xggTRhoovyouSoisLaoFUtibNUoFU utouJmrDFoisoFU omtuJrtaoJrtH FoeioFU aomLraorsao yuNsuSuDrsFotiL ousoe F tJususNo DisiJuDoibFDiJ yhooPsoFU omryFYoFUuyoryybJmFuisouyosiFo ybtmtuyus...NomtiebDFyousoFU oJrtH FmLrD YoFU som tUrmyoFU aoDibLeoDUrtN oromt JubJo mtuD Yo M som tUrmyoDrmFbt oDisybJ toybtmLbyodU t oeuSS t sFurLyousomtuD oeiosiFo s D yyrtuLaoJrFDUoeuSS t sD yousoJrtNusrLoDiyFonfitFyocGG1Rhoo,UuyoDibLeoO oDUrLL sNusNYo ryois odibLeo .m...

  5. Dark Matter with Topological Defects in the Inert Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Russell Kirk; Jose Miguel No; Stephen M. West

    2015-07-29

    We examine the production of dark matter by decaying topological defects in the high mass region $m_{\\mathrm{DM}} \\gg m_W$ of the Inert Doublet Model, extended with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry. The density of dark matter states (the neutral Higgs states of the inert doublet) is determined by the interplay of the freeze-out mechanism and the additional production of dark matter states from the decays of topological defects, in this case cosmic strings. These decays increase the predicted relic abundance compared to the standard freeze-out only case, and as a consequence the viable parameter space of the Inert Doublet Model can be widened substantially. In particular, for a given dark matter annihilation rate lower dark matter masses become viable. We investigate the allowed mass range taking into account constraints on the energy injection rate from the diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, together with constraints on the dark matter properties coming from direct and indirect detection limits. For the Inert Doublet Model high-mass region, an inert Higgs mass as low as $\\sim 200$ GeV is permitted. There is also an upper limit on string mass per unit length, and hence the symmetry breaking scale, from the relic abundance in this scenario. Depending on assumptions made about the string decays, the limits are in the range $10^{12}$ GeV to $10^{13}$ GeV.

  6. Simulating Factorization with a Quantum Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Luis Rosales

    2015-05-12

    Modern cryptography is largely based on complexity assumptions, for example, the ubiquitous RSA is based on the supposed complexity of the prime factorization problem. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to understand how a quantum computer would eventually weaken these algorithms. In this paper, one follows Feynman's prescription for a computer to simulate the physics corresponding to the algorithm of factoring a large number $N$ into primes. Using Dirac-Jordan transformation theory one translates factorization into the language of quantum hermitical operators, acting on the vectors of the Hilbert space. This leads to obtaining the ensemble of factorization of $N$ in terms of the Euler function $\\varphi(N)$, that is quantized. On the other hand, considering $N$ as a parameter of the computer, a Quantum Mechanical Prime Counting Function $\\pi_{QM}(x)$, where $x$ factorizes $N$, is derived. This function converges to $\\pi(x)$ when $N\\gg x$. It has no counterpart in analytic number theory and its derivation relies on semiclassical quantization alone.

  7. Plano de la Habana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Francisco Rojo

    1963-01-01

    , ", '' XOiQ. t ?T-'1:. ". iiX, ', . @X"lc:. :". iC;3X'661871 f'&)p iQQQ~~Q4MW~XCy w~~~' 8"', ~+~~'~6&, . ". "XCXGSp QD&' GCCQUQ0AB4ay A. QO54pi99 KAXCh XVIAi'-" ~CCG~lCJXC '@16 "QDf3 iC t:$Q&~ 0 3X'3iOB8 '". ""GQM PQPYQt 5Q "M~ 8~' Xg5Ai'lG 4~ pL'354"'C...~ QAC'. PG3, $, GVr* '4"'b% CWLPO84XOXl "'A~~Q &"' fhl~u&PX191 BBVG'XikC? c. ' Q+848~% 'iklf, Cgl WQ'gg~ Qg vpgg~ iV'!=8V@1'"g W9. 2. 1 g3. 'O', "MBA fl&~V@V QC X'CGlig@l. y XD p~@QC!X'Q1 i v Q~tX', V@X'~ CgZR~ M1Q VD3. 'QGtiS, GD 0'"' '&'z1VC;1'u...

  8. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  9. Exotic Decays Of A Heavy Neutral Higgs Through HZ/AZ Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baradhwaj Coleppa; Felix Kling; Shufang Su

    2014-09-25

    Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on the Two Higgs Doublet Model with a low energy spectrum containing scalars $H$ and a pseudoscalar $A$. We study the decays $A\\rightarrow HZ$ or $H\\rightarrow AZ$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain model independent exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process: $gg\\rightarrow A/H\\rightarrow HZ/AZ$, looking at final states bbll, \\tau\\tau ll and ZZZ(4l2j) for l =e,\\mu. We further interpret these bounds in the context of the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model, considering three different classes of processes: $A\\rightarrow h^0Z$, $A\\rightarrow H^0Z$, and $H^0 \\rightarrow AZ$, in which $h^0$ and $H^0$ are the light and heavy CP-even Higgses respectively. For 100 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, we find that for parent particle mass around 300-400 GeV, $A\\rightarrow h^0Z$ has the greatest reach when $H^0$ is interpreted as the 126 GeV Higgs: most regions in the tan\\beta-sin(\\beta-\\alpha) parameter space can be covered by exclusion and discovery. For 126 GeV $h^0$, only relatively small tan\\betadiscovery). For $A\\rightarrow H^0Z$, the reach is typically restricted to sin$(\\beta-\\alpha)\\sim\\pm 1$ with tan\\beta discovery reach possibly extending to all values of tan\\beta. A study of exotic decays of extra Higgses would extend the reach at the LHC and provides nice complementarity to conventional Higgs search channels.

  10. A cesium gas strongly confined in one dimension : sideband cooling and collisional properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bouchoule; M. Morinaga; D. S. Petrov; C. Salomon

    2001-06-06

    We study one-dimensional sideband cooling of Cesium atoms strongly confined in a far-detuned optical lattice. The Lamb-Dicke regime is achieved in the lattice direction whereas the transverse confinement is much weaker. The employed sideband cooling method, first studied by Vuletic et al.\\cite{Vule98}, uses Raman transitions between Zeeman levels and produces a spin-polarized sample. We present a detailed study of this cooling method and investigate the role of elastic collisions in the system. We accumulate $83(5)%$ of the atoms in the vibrational ground state of the strongly confined motion, and elastic collisions cool the transverse motion to a temperature of $2.8 \\mu $K=$0.7 \\hbar\\omega_{\\rm osc}/k_{\\rm B}$, where $\\omega_{\\rm osc}$ is the oscillation frequency in the strongly confined direction. The sample then approaches the regime of a quasi-2D cold gas. We analyze the limits of this cooling method and propose a dynamical change of the trapping potential as a mean of cooling the atomic sample to still lower temperatures. Measurements of the rate of thermalization between the weakly and strongly confined degrees of freedom are compatible with the zero energy scattering resonance observed previously in weak 3D traps. For the explored temperature range the measurements agree with recent calculations of quasi-2D collisions\\cite{Petr01}. Transparent analytical models reproduce the expected behavior for $k_{\\rm B}T \\gg \\hbar \\omega_{\\rm osc}$ and also for $k_{\\rm B}T \\ll \\hbar \\omega_{\\rm osc}$ where the 2D features are prominent.

  11. Mitigation options for methane emissions from rice fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantin, R.S.; Buendia, L.V.; Wassmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The contribution of Philippine rice production to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies conducted in the country are presented in this paper. A significant impact in the reduction of GHG emissions from agriculture can be achieved if methane emissions from ricefields can be abated. This study presents the contribution of Philippine rice cultivation to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies in the country which address the issue of mitigation. Using the derived emission factors from local measurements, rice cultivation contributes 566.6 Gg of methane emission in the Philippines. This value is 62% of the total methane emitted from the agriculture sector. The emission factors employed which are 78% of the IPCC value for irrigated rice and 95% for rainfed rice were derived from measurements with an automatic system taken during the growth duration in the respective ecosystems. Plots drained for 2 weeks at midtillering and before harvest gave a significant reduction in methane emission as opposed to continuously flooded plots and plots drained before harvest. The cultivar Magat reduced methane emission by 50% as compared to the check variety IR72. The application of ammonium sulfate instead of urea reduced methane emission by 10% to 34%. Addition of 6 t ha{sup {minus}1} phosphogypsum in combination with urea reduced emission by 74% as opposed to plots applied with urea alone. It is also from the results of such measurements that abatement strategies are based as regards to modifying treatments such as water management, fertilization, and choice of rice variety. It is not easy to identify and recommend mitigation strategies that will fit a particular cropping system. However, the identified mitigation options provide focus for the abatement of methane emission from ricefields.

  12. Association of genetic polymorphisms in GADD45A, MDM2, and p14{sup ARF} with the risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Pin; Zhang Zhongbin; Wan Junxiang; Zhao Naiqing; Jin Xipeng; Xia Zhaolin

    2009-10-01

    Benzene reactive metabolites can lead to DNA damage and trigger the p53-dependent defense responses to maintain genomic stability. We hypothesized that the p53-dependent genes may play a role in the development of chronic benzene poisoning (CBP). In a case-control study of 303 patients with benzene poisoning and 295 workers occupationally exposed to benzene in south China, we investigated associations between the risk of CBP and polymorphisms in three p53-dependent genes. Potential interactions of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors were also explored. We found p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 polymorphism was associated with risk of CBP (P = 0.014). Compared with those carrying the GG genotype, individuals carrying p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a reduced risk of CBP ([adjusted odds ratio (OR{sub adj}) = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.36-0.89]. Further analysis showed p14{sup ARF} TGA/TAG diplotype was associated with an increased risk of CBP (P = 0.0006), whereas p14{sup ARF} TGG/TAA diplotype was associated with a decreased risk of CBP (P = 0.0000001). In addition, we found individuals carrying both MDM2 Del1518 WW genotype and p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a lower risk of CBP (OR{sub adj} = 0.25; 95%CI = 0.10-0.62; P = 0.003). Although these results require confirmation and extension, our findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in p14{sup ARF} may have an impact on the risk of CBP in the study population.

  13. Ethanol Production from Rice-Straw Hydrolysate Using Zymomonas Mobilis in a Continuous Fluidized-Bed Reactor (FBR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    deJesus, D.; Nghiem, N.P.

    2001-01-01

    Rice-straw hydrolysate obtained by the Arkenol's concentrated acid hydrolysis process was fermented to ethanol using a recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain capable of utilizing both glucose and xylose in a continuous fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). The parameters studied included biocatalyst stability with and without antibiotic, feed composition, and retention time. Xylose utilization in the presence of tetracycline remained stable for at least 17 days. This was a significant improvement over the old strain, Z. mobilis CP4 (pZB5), which started to lose xylose utilization capability after seven days. In the absence of tetracycline, the xylose utilization rate started to decrease almost immediately. With tetracycline in the feed for the first six days, stability of xylose utilization was maintained for four days after the antibiotic was removed from the feed. The xylose utilization rate started to decrease on day 11. In the presence of tetracycline using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 48 g/L glucose and 13 g/L xylose at a retention time of 4.5 h, 95% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion occurred. The ethanol concentration was 29 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.48 g/g sugar consumed or 94% of the theoretical yield. Using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 83 g/L glucose and 28 g/L xylose, 92% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion were obtained. The ethanol concentration was 48 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.45 g/ g sugar consumed or 88% of the theoretical yield. Maximum productivity of 25.5 g/L-h was obtained at a retention time of 1.9 h. In this case, 84% xylose conversion was obtained.

  14. Higgs Properties in the Fourth Generation MSSM: Boosted Signals Over the 3G Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotta, R.C.; Hewett, J.L.; Ismail, A.; Le, M.-P.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    The generalization of the MSSM to the case of four chiral fermion generations (4GMSSM) can lead to significant changes in the phenomenology of the otherwise familiar Higgs sector. In most of the 3GMSSM parameter space, the lighter CP-even h is {approx} 115-125 GeV and mostly Standard Model-like while H,A,H{sup {+-}} are all relatively heavy. Furthermore, the ratio of Higgs vevs, tan {beta}, is relatively unconstrained. In contrast to this, in the 4GMSSM, heavy fourth generation fermion loops drive the masses of h,H,H{sup {+-}} to large values while the CP-odd boson, A, can remain relatively light and tan {beta} is restricted to the range 1/2 {approx}< tan {beta} {approx}< 2 due to perturbativity requirements on Yukawa couplings. We explore this scenario in some detail, concentrating on the collider signatures of the light CP-odd Higgs at both the Tevatron and LHC. We find that while gg {yields} A may lead to a potential signal in the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} channel at the LHC, A may first be observed in the {gamma}{gamma} channel due to a highly loop-enhanced cross section that can be more than an order of magnitude greater than that of a SM Higgs for A masses of {approx} 115-120 and tan {beta} < 1. We find that the CP-even states h,H are highly mixed and can have atypical branching fractions. Precision electroweak constraints, particularly for the light A parameter space region, are examined in detail.

  15. Current quark mass and nonzero-ness of chiral condensates in thermal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bang-Rong Zhou

    2015-06-23

    The effect that the current quark mass $M_0$ may result in nonzero-ness of chiral condensates is systematically reexamined and analyzed in a two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model simulating Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at temperature $T$ and finite quark chemical potential $\\mu$ without and with electrical neutrality (EN) condition and at any $T$ and $\\mu$ without EN condition. By means of a quantitative investigation of the order parameter $m$, it is shown that a nonzero $M_0$ is bound to lead to nonzero quark-antiquark condensates throughout chiral phase transitions , no matter whether the order parameter $m$ varies discontinuously or continuously. In fact, a complete disappearance of the quark-antiquark condensates are proven to demand the non-physical and unrealistic conditions $\\mu \\,\\geq$ or $\\gg\\, \\sqrt{\\Lambda^2+M_0^2}$ if $T=0$ and finite, or $T\\to \\infty$ if $\\mu<\\sqrt{\\Lambda^2+M_0^2}$, where $\\Lambda$ is the 3D momentum cut of the loop integrals. Theoretically these results show that when $M_0$ is included, we never have a complete restoration of dynamical (spontaneous) chiral symmetry breaking, including after a first order chiral phase transition at low $T$ and high $\\mu$. In physical reality, it is the nonzero-ness of the quark-antiquark condensates that leads to the appearance of a critical end point in the first order phase transition line and the crossover behavior at high $T$ and/or high $\\mu$ cases, rather than a possible tricritical point and a second order phase transition line. They also provide a basic reason for that one must consider the interplay between the chiral and diquark condensates in the research on color superconductor at zero $T$ and high $\\mu$ case. The research shows that how a source term of the Lagrangian (at present i.e. the current quark mass term) can greatly affect dynamical behavior of a physical system.

  16. Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States); Fatemi, M. [Sperry Univac, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this project is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate the potential application of these novel materials for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGV). The focus of the project is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed the performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons of adsorbent could be consumed in natural gas vehicles by year 2000. If successful, the results obtained in this project could lead to the use of Illinois coal in a sowing and profitable market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. During this reporting period, a series of experiments were made to evaluate the effect of coal pre-oxidation, coal pyrolysis, and char activation on the surface area development and methane adsorption capacity of activated carbons/chars made from IBC-102. The optimum production conditions were determined to be: coal oxidation in air at 225C, oxicoal (oxidized coal); devolatilization in nitrogen at 400C; and char gasification in 50% steam in nitrogen at 850C. Nitrogen BET surface areas of the carbon products ranged from 800--1100 m{sup 2}/g. Methane adsorption capacity of several Illinois coal derived chars and a 883 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon were measured using a pressurized thermogaravimetric analyzer at pressures up to 500 psig. Methane adsorption capacity (g/g) of the chars were comparable to that of the commercial activated carbon manufactured by Calgon Carbon. It was determined that the pre-oxidation is a key processing step for producing activated char/carbon with high surface area and high methane adsorption capacity. The results to date are encouraging and warrant further research and development in tailored activated char from Illinois coal for natural gas storage.

  17. Renormalization Group Evolution of the Standard Model Dimension Six Operators III: Gauge Coupling Dependence and Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso; Elizabeth E. Jenkins; Aneesh V. Manohar; Michael Trott

    2015-07-27

    We calculate the gauge terms of the one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six operators of the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT). Combining these results with our previous results for the $\\lambda$ and Yukawa coupling terms completes the calculation of the one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six operators. There are 1350 $CP$-even and $1149$ $CP$-odd parameters in the dimension-six Lagrangian for 3 generations, and our results give the entire $2499 \\times 2499$ anomalous dimension matrix. We discuss how the renormalization of the dimension-six operators, and the additional renormalization of the dimension $d \\le 4$ terms of the SM Lagrangian due to dimension-six operators, lays the groundwork for future precision studies of the SM EFT aimed at constraining the effects of new physics through precision measurements at the electroweak scale. As some sample applications, we discuss some aspects of the full RGE improved result for essential processes such as $gg \\to h$, $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $h \\to Z \\gamma$, for Higgs couplings to fermions, for the precision electroweak parameters $S$ and $T$, and for the operators that modify important processes in precision electroweak phenomenology, such as the three-body Higgs boson decay $h \\rightarrow Z \\, \\ell^+ \\, \\ell^-$ and triple gauge boson couplings. We discuss how the renormalization group improved results can be used to study the flavor problem in the SM EFT, and to test the minimal flavor violation (MFV) hypothesis. We briefly discuss the renormalization effects on the dipole coefficient $C_{e\\gamma}$ which contributes to $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and to the muon and electron magnetic and electric dipole moments.

  18. Three- and four-body nonadditivities in nucleic acid tetramers: a CCSD(T) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitonak, Michal; Neogrady, Pavel; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-12-18

    Three- and four-body nonadditivities in the uracil tetramer (in DNA-like geometry) and the GC step (in crystal geometry) were investigated at various levels of the wave-function theory: HF, MP2, MP3, L-CCD, CCSD and CCSD(T). All of the calculations were performed using the 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set, whereas the HF, MP2 and the MP3 nonadditivities were, for the sake of comparison, also determined with the much larger aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The HF and MP2 levels do not provide reliable values for many-body terms, making it necessary to go beyond the MP2 level. The benchmark CCSD(T) three- and four-body nonadditivities are reasonably well reproduced at the MP3 level, and almost quantitative agreement is obtained (fortuitously) either on the L-CCD level or as an average of the MP3 and the CCSD results. Reliable values of many-body terms (especially their higher-order correlation contributions) are obtained already when the rather small 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set is used. The four-body term is much smaller when compared to the three-body terms, but it is definitely not negligible, e.g. in the case of the GC step it represents about 16% of all of the three- and four-body terms. While investigating the geometry dependence of many-body terms for the GG step at the MP3/6-31G**(0.25,0.15) level, we found that it is necessary to include at least three-body terms in the determination of optimal geometry parameters.

  19. Phoretic self-propulsion at large Peclet numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehud Yariv; Sebastien Michelin

    2015-03-02

    We analyse the self-diffusiophoresis of a spherical particle animated by a nonuniform chemical reaction at its boundary. We consider two models of solute absorption, one with a specified distribution of interfacial solute flux, and one where this flux is governed by first-order kinetics with a specified distribution of rate constant. We employ a macroscale model where the short-range interaction of the solute with the particle boundary is represented by an effective slip condition. The solute transport is governed by an advection-diffusion equation. We focus upon the singular limit of large P\\'eclet numbers, $Pe\\gg 1$. In the fixed-flux model, the excess-solute concentration is confined to a narrow boundary layer. The scaling pertinent to that limit allows to decouple the problem governing the solute concentration from the flow field. The resulting nonlinear boundary-layer problem is handled using a transformation to stream-function coordinates and a subsequent application of Fourier transforms, and is thereby reduced to a nonlinear integral equation governing the interfacial concentration. Its solution provides the requisite approximation for the particle velocity, which scales as $Pe^{-1/3}$. In the fixed-rate model, large P\\'eclet numbers may be realized in different limit processes. We consider the case of large swimmers or strong reaction, where the Damk\\"ohler number $Da$ is large as well, scaling as $Pe$. In that double limit, where no boundary layer is formed, we obtain a closed-form approximation for the particle velocity, expressed as a nonlinear functional of the rate-constant distribution; this velocity scales as $Pe^{-2}$. Both the fixed-flux and fixed-rate asymptotic predictions agree with the numerical values provided by computational solutions of the nonlinear transport problem.

  20. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (lle105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, G.F.; Du, H.; Chen, J.G.; Lu, H.C.; Guo, W.C.; Meng, H.; Zhang, T.B.; Zhang, X.J.; Lu, D.R.; Golka, K.; Shen, J.H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2006-12-15

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 (5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P < 0.0001). No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P < 0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P < 0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant genotypes (30.6 vs. 52.7%, OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84, P=0.015) as well as of mutant allele G1578 (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88, P=0.017) than their Han neighbours. Conclusions Genetic predisposition influences dermal arsenism toxicity. The GSTP1 A1578G (IIe105Val) status might be a susceptibility factor for arsenic-related skin lesions.