Sample records for ackerman gg mace

  1. Jennifer Ackerman | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | of Energy TheJennifer Ackerman

  2. Ackerman, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00AboutAchille, Oklahoma: EnergyAckerman,

  3. Organizational Memory: Processes, Boundary Objects, and Trajectories Mark S. Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark S.

    Organizational Memory: Processes, Boundary Objects, and Trajectories Mark S. Ackerman Information 7751 krys@watson.ibm.com Abstract The term organizational memory is due for an overhaul. Memory appears and analyzing organizational memory. 1. Introduction After nearly ten years of research, the term organizational

  4. The Authorship Dilemma: Alphabetical or Contribution? Margareta Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Margareta

    to analyze the impact of author ordering schemes, we show that contribution-based ordering leads to a denserThe Authorship Dilemma: Alphabetical or Contribution? Margareta Ackerman UC San Diego maackerman under any contribution scheme, and, furthermore, the worst case occurs when ordering by contri- bution

  5. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  6. Melt coolability modeling and comparison to MACE test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important question in the assessment of severe accidents in light water nuclear reactors is the ability of water to quench a molten corium-concrete interaction and thereby terminate the accident progression. As part of the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program, phenomenological models of the corium quenching process are under development. The modeling approach considers both bulk cooldown and crust-limited heat transfer regimes, as well as criteria for the pool thermal hydraulic conditions which separate the two regimes. The model is then compared with results of the MACE experiments.

  7. Technical Sessions T. Ackerman, B. Albrecht, D. Lamb, N. Seaman, D. Thomson, and T. Warner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Measurements of Delta G/G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Mallot

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Our present information on the gluon polarisation Delta g/g is reviewed. The data from fixed-target lepton-nucleon experiments are in context with the recent data from the RHIC polarised pp collider. The main tools to study Delta g/g in lepton-nucleon scattering are scaling violations of the g_1 structure functions and longitudinal spin asymmetries in hadron production. Results from high-p_T hadron pairs, inclusive hadrons as well as open-charm production are discussed. At RHIC the most precise data presently came from inclusive pi^0 and jet production. All data indicate that the gluon polarisation is small compared to earlier expectations, but still can make a major contribution to the nucleon spin.

  9. Page 1 of 1 GG 301 Mineralogy Fall 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    Page 1 of 1 GG 301 Mineralogy Fall 2009 Course Description and Syllabus Welcome to Mineralogy on mineral composition, the fourth presents optical mineralogy, the fifth introduces us to major rock some of the analytical tools of modern mineralogy. Course Information Credits: 4 Semester: Fall 2009

  10. GG602 Theoretical Petrology Course Description and Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    GG602 ­ Theoretical Petrology Course Description and Organization Instructor: Julia Hammer phone: 6, R., 1978, Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Petrology: New York, Harper and Row, 284 p. Expected and igneous/metamorphic petrology and who are interested in the geologic application of chemical

  11. ackerman | The Ames Laboratory

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  12. ackerman-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. ackerman-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. ackerman_radar.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. mace-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Measurement of Delta G/G from high transverse momentum hadron pairs in COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Stolarski

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The new COMPASS Delta G/G result obtained from high transverse momentum hadron pairs in the Q^2>1 GeV^2 region is presented. Comparing to the previous analysis in this region the statistical error of Delta G/G is reduced by a factor 3 to 0.10. A weighted method of the Delta G/G measurement based on neural network approach is used. In addition, the formula for the Delta G/G extraction used in the analysis has been updated. The contributions coming from the leading order and QCD Compton processes are no longer neglected.

  17. Recent measurement of Delta G/G at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Bernet; for the COMPASS collaboration

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a preliminary measurement of the gluon polarization Delta G/G in the nucleon, based on the spin asymmetry of quasi-real photoproduction events for which a pair of large transverse momentum hadrons is produced. The data were obtained by the COMPASS experiment at CERN using a 160 GeV polarized muon beam scattered on a large polarized 6LiD target. The preliminary helicity asymmetry for the selected events is A_||/D = 0.002 +- 0.019(stat) +- 0.003(syst). From this value, a leading order analysis based on the model of PYTHIA leads to the gluon polarization in the nucleon Delta G/G(x_g=0.095, mu^2=3 GeV^2)=0.024 +- 0.089(stat) +- 0.057(syst). This value is consistent with parameterizations obtained from QCD fits to the g_1 data, with a first moment Delta G lower than 1, at the same scale.

  18. Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauer, Nikolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

  19. Determination of Delta G/G from Open Charm events at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Koblitz

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main goals of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is the determination of the gluon polarisation in the nucleon, Delta G/G. It is determined from spin asymmetries in the scattering of 160 GeV/c polarised muons on a polarised LiD target. The gluon polarisation is accessed by the selection of photon-gluon fusion (PGF) events. A very clean selection of PGF events can be obtained with charmed mesons in the final state. Their detection is based on the reconstruction of D* and D0 mesons in the COMPASS spectrometer. The analysis method for the first measurement of Delta G/G from the open charm channel is described and the result from COMPASS for the 2002-2004 data taking period is presented.

  20. Hiding a Higgs width enhancement from off-shell gg (--> h*) --> ZZ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heather E. Logan

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the off-shell Higgs boson production cross section in gg (--> h*) --> ZZ have recently been used by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations to indirectly constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. I point out that the interpretation of these measurements as a Higgs width constraint can be invalidated if additional neutral Higgs boson(s) are present with masses below about 350 GeV.

  1. Stress and structure of c,,22... and p2gg,,42... Mn/Cu,,001... surface alloys W. Pan,1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Minn-Tsong

    -layer alloy p2gg- 4 2 -phase indicates an amplitude of 0.9 Å for vertical buckling and lateral modulations

  2. Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors -Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Information Major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transition study plans for current G&G students OPTION 1: Majors - Geology, Geophysics and Spatial Approved Level II Remote Sensing III Geology Summer Sch GIS for Environmental Management III Geophysics Semester 1 Tectonics III Igneous & Metamorphic Geology III Geophysics III Exploration Methods III Semester

  3. Measurement of the KS->gg branching ratio using a pure KS beam with the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The KLOE collaboration

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the decay KS->gg in a sample of 2x10^9 phi->KS KL decays collected at DAPHNE with an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb^{-1}. KS are tagged by the KL interaction in the calorimeter. Two prompt photons must also be detected. Kinematic constraints reduce the initial 6x10^5 events to 2740 candidates, from which a signal of 711\\pm 35 events is extracted. By normalizing to the KS->2pi^0 decays counted in the same sample, we measure BR(KS->gg)= (2.26\\pm0.12_{stat}\\pm0.06_{syst})x10^{-6}, in agreement with O(p^4) Chiral Perturbation Theory predictions.

  4. COLLABORATIVE AND SOCIAL Faculty: Mark Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Research The Interactive Systems group investigates Human- Computer Interaction (HCI), Educational Technology, Multimedia to find people; new collaborative interfaces for reusing informal information; user control in pervasive activity, and learning. The applications cover a wide span: user interface design methods, computa- tional

  5. On Grids in Topological Graphs Eyal Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pach, János

    Berlin Takustr. 9, 14195 Berlin, Germany eyal@inf.fu-berlin.de Jacob Fox Department of Mathematics or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation

  6. ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde1mace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. ARM - VAP Product - mergesonde2mace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg --> H --> W[superscript +]W[superscript -] and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg-->H-->W+W- in pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV. With 4.8??fb-1 ...

  9. version 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg H W +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    ,82 D. Brown ,22 E. Brubaker ,83 X.B. Bu ,8 D. Buchholz ,86 J. Budagov ,53 H.S. Budd ,115 S. Budd ,87. Campanelli ,68 M. Campbell ,104 F. Canelli ,82, 83 A. Canepa ,123 B. Carls ,87 D. Carlsmith ,134 R. Carosiversion 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg

  10. Abortion, 60, 79, 117118 Ackerman, Bruce, 10, 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural and Environmental Bio- technology Commission (AEBC), 248­250 Agriculture and Food Research Coun- cil, 253 Alaska, Court of Appeals, 139 Altered Nuclear Transfer (ANT), 62, 95­99, 102 Appropriation Altered Nuclear Transfer and, 96­98 constitutive,

  11. 2012 NCA University of Colorado Boulder Presentations John M. Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    : Author Theorizing Occupation, Profession, and Career Sat, 11/19: 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM Room: Napoleon B3 of Expertise Fri, 11/18: 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM Room: Napoleon B3 - Third Floor Role: Co-Chair & Co-Author David

  12. Studying Neutrinos with the EXO Experiment Nicole Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    .2948, July 2008. NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY Similar to 'normal' double beta decay, except no neutrinos to neutrinoless double beta decay is given by: S0 1/2 a A MT B 1/2 =efficiency, a=isotopic abundance A Tritium Endpoint meNeutrinoless double

  13. Tropical Western Pacific T. Ackerman Pennsylvania Sate University

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  14. Microsoft Word - TP Ackerman Whilte Paper.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised: April 3, 2014 1phase transitions

  15. A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Soil Erosion Risk Map for New Mexico Bulut, G.G.1; Cal, M.P.2; Richardson, C.P.3; Gallegos, J.B.4 Abstract A soil erosion risk map was developed for the State of New Mexico using for New Mexico was developed showing that erosion risk varied between 0.05 and 0.87 on a scale of 0

  16. 3TU. STAN ACKERMANS INSTITUTESchool for Technological Design Automotive Systems Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    enables me to network actively with automotive partners, as I work on industry assignments from various;The automotive industry is rapidly changing into a high-tech sector facing huge challenges in terms. Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) plays an important role in the high-tech automotive industry

  17. WALLACE E. TYNER Professor Tyner is an energy economist and James and Lois Ackerman Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    chapters. His past work in energy economics has encompassed oil, natural gas, coal, oil shale, biomass

  18. CAMPUS BUILDING............................................... Grid ....... Street Address* Ackerman Student Union.................................................... E4............308 Westwood Plaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ming

    ............780 Westwood Plaza Biomedical Sciences Research Bldg (BSRB)................... F5............615 Charles E............580 Portola Plaza Botany Bldg. ............................................................................. F5............618 Charles E. Young Dr. South Boyer Hall

  19. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

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  20. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal GarageD. Westphal, B. Toon, E.O. B.

  2. THE CORRENTROPY MACE FILTER FOR IMAGE RECOGNITION Kyu-Hwa Jeong, Jose C. Principe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    correlation fil- ters are the synthetic discriminant function (SDF) [5] and its This work was supported. In the conventional SDF approach, the filter is mat- ched to a composite image that is a linear combination in the sa- me class. The shortcomings of the conventional SDF are that the SDF does not consider any input

  3. Approaches to defining a planetary boundary for biodiversity Georgina M. Mace a,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extinction rate and species richness are weak metrics for this purpose, and they do not scale well from local current rates of extinction put the Earth system furthest outside the safe operating space. Here we review the evidence to support a boundary based on extinction rates and identify weaknesses with this metric and its

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Mace_Poster_ARM-ATrain_Comparison [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.ppt

  5. The weight of an assassin's mace : vulnerabilities in the US military's satellite communications and China's information warfare threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Benjamin M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Believing that an information Revolution of Military Affairs has occurred, the US military is currently transforming to achieve dominance over the full spectrum of deployment scenarios with a lighter, more mobile, and more ...

  6. Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Katherine Ellison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

  7. In With the Old, Out With the New: Transition Policy in Environmental Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ackerman & William Hassler, Clean Coal / Dirty Air (1981).William T. Hassler. 1981. Clean Coal/Dirty Air. New Haven:Ackerman & William Hassler, Clean Coal / Dirty Air (1981),

  8. Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard A. Frey, Steven A. Ackerman, Yinghui Liu, Kathleen I. Strabala, Hong Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard.frey@ssec.wisc.edu August 2007 #12;ABSTRACT Significant improvements have been made to the MODIS cloud mask (MOD35 and MYD35 to the 3.9-12 m and 11-12 m cloud tests. More non-MODIS ancillary input data has been added. Land and sea

  9. Study of charmonium resonances in the gg -> K0SK pi- and gg -> K K-pi pi-pi0 processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /U. Milan, Dept. Phys.

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports the analysis of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} final state is known to show a clear signal from the {eta}{sub c}(2S) particle. This c{bar c} state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the {eta}{sub c}(2S) properties is obtained in the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}{sub c}(2S) and other charmonium states to the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

  10. 29 September --2nd October 1998 Editors: MP Zalucki, RAI Drew and GG White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    patterns, a Shin-Etsu rope formulation spaced 2 m apart and a widely-spaced (35 m) pattern using a high

  11. Adequate bases of phase space master integrals for $gg \\to h$ at NNLO and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maik Höschele; Jens Hoff; Takahiro Ueda

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study master integrals needed to compute the Higgs boson production cross section via gluon fusion in the infinite top quark mass limit, using a canonical form of differential equations for master integrals, recently identified by Henn, which makes their solution possible in a straightforward algebraic way. We apply the known criteria to derive such a suitable basis for all the phase space master integrals in afore mentioned process at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD and demonstrate that the method is applicable to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order as well by solving a non-planar topology. Furthermore, we discuss in great detail how to find an adequate basis using practical examples. Special emphasis is devoted to master integrals which are coupled by their differential equations.

  12. 22. Kasting, J. F., Pollack, J. B. & Ackerman, T. P. Response of Earth's atmosphere to increases in solar flux and implications for loss of water from Venus. Icarus 57, 335355 (1984).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eizirik, Eduardo

    ............................................................................................................................................................................. The highly endangered solenodons, endemic to Cuba (Solenodon cubanus) and Hispaniola (S. paradoxus), comprise as tectonic forces separated Cuba and Hispaniola3,4 . Efforts to prevent extinction of the two surviving and Hispaniola to elevations of 2,000 m, and shelter in caves, crevices, logs and extensive tunnel networks

  13. Modeling Bystander Effects Using a Microdosimetric ApproachModeling Bystander Effects Using a Microdosimetric Approach R.D. Stewart, E.J. Ackerman, J.K. Shultis*, and X.C. Lei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    of the responses of the weakly and severely damaged cells. References Acknowledgement n D.J. Brenner, J.B. Little

  14. FY 2009 Annual Report of Joule Software Metric SC GG 3.1/2.5.2, Improve Computational Science Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Roche, Kenneth J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Joule Software Metric for Computational Effectiveness is established by Public Authorizations PL 95-91, Department of Energy Organization Act, and PL 103-62, Government Performance and Results Act. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversees the preparation and administration of the President s budget; evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs, policies, and procedures; assesses competing funding demands across agencies; and sets the funding priorities for the federal government. The OMB has the power of audit and exercises this right annually for each federal agency. According to the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), federal agencies are required to develop three planning and performance documents: 1.Strategic Plan: a broad, 3 year outlook; 2.Annual Performance Plan: a focused, 1 year outlook of annual goals and objectives that is reflected in the annual budget request (What results can the agency deliver as part of its public funding?); and 3.Performance and Accountability Report: an annual report that details the previous fiscal year performance (What results did the agency produce in return for its public funding?). OMB uses its Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to perform evaluations. PART has seven worksheets for seven types of agency functions. The function of Research and Development (R&D) programs is included. R&D programs are assessed on the following criteria: Does the R&D program perform a clear role? Has the program set valid long term and annual goals? Is the program well managed? Is the program achieving the results set forth in its GPRA documents? In Fiscal Year (FY) 2003, the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC-1) worked directly with OMB to come to a consensus on an appropriate set of performance measures consistent with PART requirements. The scientific performance expectations of these requirements reach the scope of work conducted at the DOE national laboratories. The Joule system emerged from this interaction. Joule enables the chief financial officer and senior DOE management to track annual performance on a quarterly basis. Joule scores are reported as success, goal met (green light in PART), mixed results, goal partially met (yellow light in PART), and unsatisfactory, goal not met (red light in PART). Joule links the DOE strategic plan to the underlying base program targets.

  15. LL I N KI N K AA GG EE The newsletter of the John Scott Dailey Florida Institute of Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    12 Public Speaking 101 for Code Enforcement Officials April 19 Certificate Program in Public Records January 2012 CODE ENFORCEMENT CERTIFICATION CLASSES AND EXAMINATIONS Through the Florida Association of Code Enforcement (F.A.C.E.) LEGAL ISSUES OF CODE ENFORCEMENT (LEVEL III) January - March Fort

  16. Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yueqing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David J. Diner, Wedad A. Abdou, Thomas P. Ackerman, KathleenDavid J. Diner, Wedad A. Abdou, Howard R. Gordon, Ralph A.

  17. Report on DIMACS Workshop and Working

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Mellon University Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Report Authors: Serge Egelman School

  18. angle imaging lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sensing. I. David J. Diner; Jewel C. Beckert; Terrence H. Reilly; Carol J. Bruegge; James E. Conel; Ralph A. Kahn; John V. Martonchik; Thomas P. Ackerman; Roger Davies;...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GCMs Clouds challenge both the grid resolution and physical parameterizations... (greenhouse effect dominates) - Low clouds cool (shading effect ... Source: Ackerman, Thomas P. -...

  20. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Custom Projects (Cross-)Functional internal team Members: * Management Sponsor: Thompson * Programs: Eskil and Mace * Engineering: Boyer and Callahan * COTRs: Rose and C....

  1. Water-LessInk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE FUTURE LOOKS BRIGHT PRESENTERS Allie Robbins Mace, Commercial Sector Lead, BPA Sarah F. Moore, Residential Sector Lead, BPA Carrie Cobb, project manager, BPA Planning for the...

  2. Coronary computed tomography angiography predicts subsequent cardiac outcome events: results of the Visipaque CCTA registry study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budoff, MJ; Bloom, SA; Chow, BJ; Chandler, AB; Cole, JH

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Event CCTA= Coronary computed tomography angiography; MACE=CONFIRM (COroNary computed tomography angiography evaluationcalcium scoring and computed tomography angiography: current

  3. arsine evolution methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1984; Mace & Pagel, 1994). Sir Francis Galton recognized this problem in his 1889 evaluation of E. B. Tyler's comparative work, and as "Galton's problem Grants BCS- 0132927 and...

  4. BETWEEN RANDALL COUNTY, TEXAS AND 'I'HE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cellular telephones, prstlnal .wftware, On-Star and GI's ( 6 ) Chcmical nispensing Devices designed for pcrsonal protection (pepper spray, mace) (7) Matches or lighters (8)...

  5. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Solar Water Heater Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans...

  6. DIMACS Center Rutgers University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group University Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Workshop: Cryptography: Theory Meets Practice Dates

  7. October 14, 2009 Workshop in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    of Carbon: China, US and EU" Colin Loxley, "Carbon Allowances and the New Jersey BGS Auction" Eric Ackerman) January 15, 2010 Energy Utilities: Impact of Carbon and Recession Paul Kleindorfer, "The Global Problem

  8. Revised May 17, 2011 Advanced Workshop in Regulation and Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Discussants: Alan E. Finder & Tom Frantz Eric Ackerman: Alternative Regulation: What it is, and why:55 Concurrent Sessions POSTAL REFORM West Laurel Room Chair: John G. Callan Discussants: Stephen DeMatteo, J

  9. Page 1 of 1 PSD FY 2014 ESH IMPROVEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Page 1 of 1 PSD FY 2014 ESH IMPROVEMENT PLAN PREPARED BY ANDREW ACKERMAN This document defines the actions planned for FY 2014 for improving the PSD ESH programs beyond the primary goal of controlling

  10. Last Name First Name DeptID Dept EmailPhone Workers Who Are Not Qualified for Access to NSLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    -II ActiveBNL Appointment Status: Ackerman Andrew PSAB ES&H ackerman@bnl.gov344-5431 19551 Active BNL ESH 7/27/2012 PS ESH 1/9/2014 ESH-740 GERT 11/27/2013 Allaire Marc LSUGUEST LSU GUEST allaire@bnl.gov U9012 Active BNL ESH 3/18/2013 PS ESH ESH-740 GERT 3/13/2013 Arai Yuji LSUGUEST LSU GUEST yarai@illinois.edu344

  11. Meeting of the Faculty Senate, Franklin college of Arts & Sciences March 22, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    with considering how to index and format the Policies and Procedures manual. 5. Comments from Provost Mace: Dr new faculty lines, faculty salary compression, an increase in graduate assistantships, upgrades the salary compression issue. Dr. Mace mentioned that there is some discussion of combining the University

  12. BB UU LL GG AA RR II AA NN AA CC AA DD EE MM YY OO FF SS CC II EE NN CC EE SS IINNSSTTIITTUUTTEE OOFF IINNFFOORRMMAATTIIOONN AANNDD CCOOMMMMUUNNIICCAATTIIOONN TTEECCHHNNOOLLOOGGIIEESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    Library (ITIL) ­ essence development, open problems Abstract: This article aims to give an overview over the ITIL framework objective. It is going to explain the rapidly growing IT business needs which had caused the development of this library. We are also going to follow the ITIL evolution history and find the circumstances

  13. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

  14. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

  15. UCSB/ESM238/Clmenon Thursday, October 5, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    and Management ESM238 / Fall Quarter 2010 CLIMATE CHANGE AGREEMENTS AND POLITICS Tuesday & Thursday 12:45 ­ 2, September 23, 2010: Introduction Reading: Dyer, Scenario One, The Geopolitics of Climate Change; Hansen and understanding climate change politics Reading: Cox, Environment and the media, Ackerman, Cost-benefit, where

  16. DIMACS Center Rutgers University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Other Cranor, AT&T Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan Fabian Monrose, Johns Hopkins University Andrew Patrick, NRC Canada Norman Sadeh, Carnegie Mellon University Working Group: Usable Privacy and Security

  17. Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Ard

    Chapter 3 Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen 3.1.1 Some background on dense hydrogen Hydrogen, out of it the Universe evolved, every atom and leaf, marine iguana and apricot­smelling chanterelle. But my, my, what alchemy: nondescript H 2 --Diane Ackerman 1 -- Hydrogen

  18. Continuous Control Primitive Trajectory Generation and Optimal Motion Splines for All-Wheel Steering Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Alonzo

    algorithms based on the Ackermann, differential drive, or omnidirectional steering models. Ackerman with all-wheel steering capability differ from these models in that the velocity vector can be aimed in anyContinuous Control Primitive Trajectory Generation and Optimal Motion Splines for All

  19. Longwave radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols estimated from MODIS, MISR, and CERES observations on Terra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) [Ackerman and Chung, 1992] and the Total's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments onboard the Terra satellite; we present a new technique prevalent in the tropics [Prospero, 1999], dust aerosols are effective in reflecting solar energy back

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplkment au no 7 , Tome 39, Juillet 1978,page C4-221 STRATOSPHERIC POLLUTION RELATED ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -221 STRATOSPHERIC POLLUTION RELATED ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION PHENOMENA M. ACKERMAN Institut d'Abronomie Spatiale de aspects with recent examples. The new data obtained on the solar ultraviolet radiation since seven years are emphasized. 1. Introduction. - Solar ultraviolet radiation plays a fundamental role in the formation

  1. Economics Bulletin, 2013, Vol. 33 No. 4 pp. 2545-2562 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    #12;Economics Bulletin, 2013, Vol. 33 No. 4 pp. 2545-2562 1. Introduction On one level, corruption appears to be at odds with the prospect of economic development (Mauro, 1995; Rose-Ackerman, 1999 corruption reduces economic growth. Academic debate seems to be divided between supporters of the positive

  2. Received 15 Apr 2014 | Accepted 13 Aug 2014 | Published 17 Sep 2014 Thermal mirror buckling in freestanding graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    Training University, Lavizan, Tehran 16788, Iran. 3 Department of Physics, University of Arkansas in freestanding graphene locally controlled by scanning tunnelling microscopy M. Neek-Amal1,2, P. Xu3,4, J.K. Schoelz3, M.L. Ackerman3, S.D. Barber3, P.M. Thibado3, A. Sadeghi5 & F.M. Peeters1 Knowledge

  3. Received 9 Sep 2013 | Accepted 26 Mar 2014 | Published 28 Apr 2014 Unusual ultra-low-frequency fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    -low-frequency fluctuations in freestanding graphene P. Xu1, M. Neek-Amal2,3, S.D. Barber1, J.K. Schoelz1, M.L. Ackerman1, P Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, Antwerpen B-2020, Belgium. 3 Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran 16788, Iran. 4 Departement Physik

  4. Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra-and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra- and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain James D.H. Ackerman,1,2,5 and Jeffrey J. Neil2,6* This report describes the measurement of water preexchange lifetimes and intra/extracellular content in intact, functioning mammalian brain. Intra- and extracellular water

  5. Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries 95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark S.

    Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries Ô95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library Mark S. Ackerman Roy T. Fielding Information and Computer Science Maintenance will be critical to digital libraries, especially those that promote broad access to diverse

  6. *Speaker **Secretary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    , Matthew Balsara, Poras Gelb, Lev Prakash, Ravi Baynham, Karen Holmes, Jennifer Ramakrishna, Viswanath Beron, Kurt Hooshyar, M. Ali Redman, Timothy Brackin, Adam Ishak-Boushaki, Mustapha Rippel, Scott: David Daniel, Hobson Wildenthal, Robert Ackerman, Frank Anderson, Zalman Balanov, Poras Balsara, Karen

  7. Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with the EXO-200 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    , the most sensitive probe for the existence of Majorana particles and the measurement of the neutrino massObservation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with the EXO-200 Detector N. Ackerman,1,* B Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, California, USA 2 Physics Department, Laurentian University, Sudbury

  8. Advanced Workshop in Regulation and Competition Annual Eastern Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    and energy sectors, including: &Strategies under Competition and Regulation %Transmission &Reliability %Risk Alternative Market Designs for Energy and VArs in a Deregulated Electricity Market TELECOM Central Evergreen Discussants: James W. Brown & Catherine T. McDonough Eric Ackerman & Tim McClive: Update on Demand Response

  9. The Astrophysical Journal, 571:L151L154, 2002 June 1 2002. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Burgasser,1,2 Mark S. Marley,3 Andrew S. Ackerman,3 Didier Saumon,4 Katharina Lodders,5 Conard C. Dahn,6 Observatory, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002-1149; dahn@nofs.navy.mil, hch@nofs.navy.mil. 7 Infrared

  10. DESIGN APPROACHES AND MATERIALS PROCESSES FOR ULTRAHIGH EFFICIENCY LATTICE MISMATCHED MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    -JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Melissa J. Griggs 1 , Daniel C. Law 2 , Richard R. King 2 , Arthur C. Ackerman 3 , James M heterostructures grown in a multi-junction solar cell-like structure by MOCVD. Initial solar cell data are also of the minority carrier lifetime. INTRODUCTION High efficiency triple junction solar cells have recently been

  11. Arnold Schwarzenegger REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and natural gas ratepayers in California. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public support. The authors also thank Thomas Ackerman of the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden; BrendanLogics Inc.; Tom Miller of Pacific Gas and Electric; Abraham Ellis of Public Service Company of New Mexico

  12. Arnold Schwarzenegger REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising support. The authors also thank Thomas Ackerman of the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden; BrendanLogics Inc.; Tom Miller of Pacific Gas and Electric; Abraham Ellis of Public Service Company of New Mexico

  13. Sex-dependent effects of chronic restraint stress during early Theiler's virus infection on the subsequent demyelinating disease in CBA mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    ,b , Ralph Storts c , Thomas H. Welsh b,d , C. Jane R. Welsh b,c , Mary W. Meagher a,* a Department 350,000 people in the United States alone (Anderson et al., 1992). Though the etiology of MS remains of the disease (Ackerman et al., 2003; Anderson et al., 1992; Mohr and Cox, 2001; Mohr et al., 2004; Noseworthy

  14. Enhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to amplify the negative radiative forcing by increasing cloud cover and cloud water [Albrecht, 1989]. [3] We in ship tracks [Ackerman et al., 2000]. Evidence for secondary effects is ambiguous. Cloud cover is seenEnhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze A

  15. Ratings of everyday academic and cognitive skills in evaluation of school learning and learning problems: initial scale development and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, Gordon Dale

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ” (Furnham & Chamorro-Premuzic, 2004, p. 944). These tests are commonly used to assess areas such as academic achievement, cognitive ability, and memory. Tests of typical performance attempt to measure what a person is most likely to do (Cronbach, 1949... performance test scores include motivation (Cronbach, 1949; Kirk & Brown, 2003), attention (Frazier, Demaree, & Youngstrom, 2004), sleep (Kanfer & Ackerman), depression (Kaufman & Lichtenberger, 1999; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 2003), rapport with the assessor...

  16. Effects of Trait Behavioral Approach and Inhibition Sensitivity on Behavioral Aggression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravens, Laura Christine

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Eddie Harmon-Jones Committee Members, Brandon Schmeichel Jeff Ackerman Head of Department, Ludy Benjamin May 2011 Major Subject: Psychology iii ABSTRACT... Effects of Trait Behavioral Approach and Inhibition Sensitivity on Behavioral Aggression. (May 2011) Laura Christine Gravens, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Eddie Harmon-Jones Behavioral approach sensitivity (BAS) has...

  17. Preliminary review of the TTAPS nuclear winter scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Kornegay, F.C.; Perry, A.M.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollock and Sagan (TTAPS) on Global Consequences of Nuclear War was reviewed. The possibility of climate upset must be taken seriously but the uncertainties are larger than the postulated effects. The effects if real would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than on the US and would provide incentive for smaller, more accurate weapons, avoiding cities, and earth-penetrating weapons.

  18. Parameter Estimation Using Dual Fractional Power Filters Jason M. Kinser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinser, Jason M.

    discriminant functions (SDF) which are reviewed in ref. 9. Unlike the previous methods, the SDF class of the SDF class. These filters are Fractional Power Filters (FPFs) which will be reviewed in Section 2 is a superset of two standard SDF-class filters: the SDF and the MACE filter. This section will review the SDF

  19. Voting scheme nonlinearity-based binary composite filter Farid Ahmed, Mohammad A. Karimt and Fahmida Rahman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Farid

    discriminant function (SDF) filters, like minimum average correlation energy (MACE), minimum variance SDF (MVSDF) ,and optimal tradeoff SDF (OTSDF) have been proposed recently for the distortion in three different ways. In the synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filter approach,"2 a number

  20. VOLUME 37 MARCH 1998J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 1998 American Meteorological Society 241

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    - tistics were obtained by Mace (1997) based on the 94- GHz radar returns data. During a number of field ex multilayer cirrus cloud systems using AVHRR data. It is based on the physical properties of the AVHRR 0.63- m ground-based lidar and radar im- ages, balloon-borne replicator data, and NCAR­CLASS humidity soundings

  1. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, suppl6ment au n09, Tome 48, septembre 1987

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    aluminium producer, PECHINEY is strongly committed t o the development of AI-Li alloys, with achievements ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINIUM-LITHIUM AT PECHINEY G. LE ROY, R. MACE, D. MARCHIVE* , P. MEYER* * , R. NOSSENT (replacement of existing alloys) and product forms. The main areas of research in progress, achievements

  2. Devising Face Authentication System and Performance Evaluation Based on Statistical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, msavvid@cs.cmu.edu Abstract The modern world has seen a rapid evolution of the technology the Army Research Office (ARO) to CyLab, CMU. #12;system called the Minimum Average Correlation Energy (MACE) filter in terms of perfor- mance on a database of 65 people under extreme illumination conditions

  3. Statistical mechanical analysis of the dynamics of learning in perceptrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    with constant learning rate 2.5. Theory versus simulations 3. On-line learning: complete training setsStatistical mechanical analysis of the dynamics of learning in perceptrons C. W. H. MACE and A. C to analyse the dynamics of various classes of supervised learning rules in perceptrons. The character

  4. Supporting Information Wetzel et al. 10.1073/pnas.1219266110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    in the packed graphite (denoted in Table S2 as dried graphite in run products). Experiments GG-11, GG-14, GG-19 scattered FeO coating on the Fe-foil after the annealing process. Individual experimental samples were. The graphite in the capsule also serves as the source of C and H during the experimental runs. One set

  5. Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

  6. Genetic analysis of the endangered silver rice rat (Oryzomys palustris natator) and Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouse, Amanda Louise

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 1999). These include roadway mortalities (USFWS 1999; Harveson et al. 2004), increased predation by feral cats (Felis domesticus; Forys and Humphrey 1999), competition from black rats (Rattus rattus...; Mace 2004). In a conservation context, this means that management efforts are established on what is perceived, based on taxonomy, as the best way to preserve biological diversity. This is of even greater importance when the taxonomic status...

  7. Research needs to address ASR challenges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 8 For all its benefits, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) does have some potential challenges that warrant further research and planning, according to scientists and others involved in ASR. In 2005, the National Research... systems to map and analyze major aquifers as part of comprehensive, regional planning efforts.? Dr. Robert Mace, Texas Water Development Board?s (TWDB) director of the groundwater resources division, said Texas has the infor- mation to do the 3-D...

  8. The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on Plasmodium berghei infection in A/J mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, James Frazier

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly higher than the untreated, infected controls. Reticu- locyte counts did not vary enough to affect the outcome of the infection. All animals developed patent parasitemias following * 1 *'o 'th F. h~h' ' f t d ytl o y* . Th' teen (7%) recovered... practical and common method found for pro- longing survival in HBO while still maintaining a thera- peutic regimen has been cyclic, intermittent exposure (1, 9, 15, 30, 36, 48, 57, 71). Ackerman and Br inkley (1) found that rats exposed continuously to 3...

  9. Implications of the nuclear winter thesis. Technical report, 1 May 1984-1 June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldbaum, C.B.; Bee, R.J.; Garrett, B.N.; Glasner, B.S.

    1985-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the potential policy implications of new findings concerning the long-term atmospheric, climatic, and biological effects of nuclear war, commonly referred to as nuclear winter. A summary of the prominent study of these effects, The Global Atmospheric Consequences of Nuclear War by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack and Sagan (TTAPS) is provided. Potential policy implications are examined regarding nuclear weapons strategy and deterrence, extended deterrence, targeting, C3I and damage assessment, future RandD and force modernization, strategic defense systems, arms control, civil defense and the strategic implications of U.S. and Soviet perceptions of nuclear winter. Issues and questions for further research are addressed.

  10. Technical Sessions W. F. Dabberdt, C. ~,1artin, H. L. Cole, J. Dudhia, T. Horst,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8,, 20153 To.T. J. KulpP.T. Ackerman,W.

  11. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document effects Slide 5 of 20 V2GG2V Demonstration - Complete field demonstration of smart meter communication with remaining utility partners Battery Software Improvements -...

  12. Constraints on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings from ??bar ?? and qqbar ?? events at CERN LEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Å kesson, P. F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.

    2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D 70, 032005 ~2004!Constraints on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings from nn¯ gg and qq¯gg events at CERN LEP2 G. Abbiendi,2 C. Ainsley,5 P. F. Åkesson,3,v G. Alexander,21 J. Allison,15 P. Amaral,8 G. Anagnostou,1 K. J. Anderson..., the ratio of the observ expectation is R(data/SM)50.9260.0760.04, where tainties respectively. The nn¯gg and qq¯gg data are use couplings. Combining with previous OPAL results fr limits on the anomalous coupling parameters a0 Z , ac Z ,0.023 GeV22, 20.029 Ge...

  13. atomizer air flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    layer, all the conducted heat is consumed by evaporation. gg Pr Helluy, Philippe 89 Overheat Instability in an Ascending Moist Air Flow as a Mechanism of Hurricane Formation...

  14. THE RATIONAL EXPLOITATION OF THE SEA FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0000000900000000 30 gg» Whiting OOOODOOOOOOOOOQI hho Tongschar, Scharretong, Witje ooo 81 X i o nfi OKo o o o o o o

  15. Universittsmedizin Gttingen Publikationen und Hochschulschriften 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    , Gelpi E, Giaccone G, Graeber MB, Ince P, Kamphorst W, King A, Korkolopoulou P, Kovács GG, Larionov S

  16. The Language of the Mozarabic jarchas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Jerry R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florence: Le Monnier. o Sola-Sfflé, J.M. 1966. Review ofGG (Garcia Gomez 1975 SS (Sola-sole 1973) iYa fatin, §XLVI,second specimen I take from Sola-Sole (1973:127; = GG SS §

  17. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  18. Comparison of Biological and Thermal (Pyrolysis) Pathways for Conversion of Lignocellulose to Biofuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imam, Tahmina 1983-

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    production from lignocellulosic feedstocks were compared. For biological conversions of sorghum, ethanol yield was improved using M81-E variety (0.072 g/g juice) over Umbrella (0.065 g/g juice) for first-generation biomass (sorghum juice), and 0.042 g...

  19. The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Lei

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

  20. High performance building blocks for wireless receiver: multi-stage amplifiers and low noise amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Xiaohua

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    due to their potential closed loop stability problems. Different frequency compensation schemes have been proposed in the literatures. ________________ *?[2007] IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from ?Single Miller Capacitor Frequency...L2m oL2o1o mL2m1m mL2m 2m1m2 mL 2m oL2o1o mL2m1m v gg CCs gg )g(gCs1 ggg ggCs1 gg CCs g Cs1 ggg ggg (s)A (2.1a) 2 CC gg4 C g C g Z 2m1m mL2m 2 ml 2 2m 1m 2m 2,1 +?? = (2.1b...

  1. Factors involved in the seasonal and geographical regulation of diapause in the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, W. L

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS INVOLVED IN 'ZHE SEASONAL AND GEOGEAPNICAL EMQULATION OF DIAPAUSE Ill ttlL BOLL itl' 'VIL I~it&I UNOiliUG OtOtBDIB BOtlIIiBB A thesis by Ninfield Linsoln Sterling Submitted to the Qraduate College of Texas AM Universe. tp in Fartial... under tsy water in wxuc-bottom disseotion dishes. Elgtrae and hind wings were removed and disseotions maCe un4ex' a miorosooye at S0s image. Gne ohaxeoter used fox' the determination of 4iayause was Che hyyertroyhS of Che abdominal fat body...

  2. Gluon polarisation from high transverse momentum hadron pairs production (COMPASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Silva; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new preliminary result of a gluon polarisation \\Delta G/G obtained selecting high transverse momentum hadron pairs in DIS events with Q^2>1 (GeV/c)^2 is presented. Data has been collected by COMPASS at CERN during the 2002-2004 years. In the extraction of $\\Delta G/G$ contributions coming from the leading order $\\gamma q$ and QCD processes are taken into account. A new weighting method based on a neural network approach is used. Also a preliminary result of \\Delta G/G for events with Q^2<1 (GeV/c)^2 is presented.

  3. 2007/08/1747

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    V . The group average of an element v ? V is defined as 1. |G| ?g?G g(v). 2 ..... the eigenvalue ?1 is spanned by the remaining eight double-indexed matrices.

  4. Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Avol E, et  al. 1999. Air pollution and bronchitic symptomsH, White M. 2001. Air pollution and exacerbation of asthmaGG. 2006. Ambient air pollution and asthma exacerbations in

  5. ann butler zimrin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    '&8'gA1AD7Gg&h)5)&"dEF('C&D7&Y r BI(7 Butler, Gregory 10 Finding Butler Reference Books Call Number Range Room...

  6. Progress in Solid State Chemistry 30 (2002) 1101 www.elsevier.nl/locate/pssc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolison gg , David J. Singh hh , Brian H. Toby ii , Sarah Tolbert jj , Ulrich B. Wiesner kk , Patrick M. Mrksich); dnorris@research.nj.nec.com (D. Norris); anozik@nrel.nrel.gov (A. Nozik); xpeng@uark.edu (X

  7. DOE-BES Chemical Sciences Highlights of Progress in Separations...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Dodecyl Ethers in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Ethane." Yee, G.G.; Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D., Langmuir 1992, (8):377-384). The method of FTIR for studies of supercritical...

  8. The nature of the contact of the Navarro and Midway groups at four localities in Falls, Milan, Travis, and Bastrop Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Thomas Joseph

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Todd~ 19A2. ~Dn ~in@ ~eo i @ Cushman~ 1944, gi~n~i ERR~, 19AO. ~N'og~ (~en a~n) ~ Reused 18A5 ~ ~&~8AQ ~~aug~ Gumbel, 1868, QQ~g IDIo go ghrZRLlggp+gg ~rcJJR~qgg Cushman and Todd, 19A6. +~~na ~~~ Plumrer, 1926. ~Va ~in l~na ~ Plummer, 1926...~ 1941. @~ho Liig ~r Plunm. er, 1926. Family ~Cites du~ii~gg g~io~m Cushman and Hanna, 1927. ~Pv ~gg ~ H. H. Brady var ~ Plummeri 1926. P~+gg~g ~ (Brady) var. ~ob Burrows and Holland, 1897. ~gu~e+ g~i~eo (jleuss) var. ~s Cushman and Todd, 1943...

  9. 1300 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 7 / Thursday, January 10, 2002 / Rules and Regulations determining sulfur content in fuel for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1300 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 7 / Thursday, January 10, 2002 / Rules and Regulations sampling and analysis for sulfur content under subpart GG for stationary gas turbines that combust pipeline; Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan Regulation

  10. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been detected extensively, representative examples con- sist the world wide web [4], the collaboration distribution and the evolution mechanism of the complex networks. PACS: 89.75.-k, 05.45.Pq, 05.90.Gg Key words

  11. Keywords Matrix Factorizations and Updates, Block Structured ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 11, 2010 ... T i Di ?ggT = Ai ?DT i Di ?ddT = VT i Vi ?ddT. (72) with a vector d = 1 ?n. (DT i v?

  12. alpha beta gamma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the decoupling limit, M2A0 gg M2Z, the heavy CP-even, CP-odd and charged Higgs boson masses are nearly degenerate, sin(beta-alpha) approaches 1, and the...

  13. Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleere, Jason James

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), gain on grass (GG), feedlot average daily gain (FG), and slaughter weight (SW). Analyses of variance were performed using the procedures of SAS (1988) to determine differences between CC, family code nested...

  14. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Typel, M. Aliotta, V. Burjan, M. Gimenez del Santo, G.G. Kiss, V. Kroha and Z. Hons, Few-Body Systems 50, 323 (2011), Improved results on the extraction of 11...

  16. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3&0.OQ t~~~ ~:g~g ~: g8~ g:88~ 8: 8g 8:ggX _. --. ---l-120"-00£+ O~ 2 • 12-04-0G-O~+G8 2.0500000E+Oo -1. 3106622E+1.1,h414t3E+Q8 1.G.. 321'o3E+G8 1.00,+9266E+08 1.07691,+3E+

  17. Identifying Critical Success Factors for Efficient Consumer Response based on the Australian Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnia, Sherah

    . The mailing list of these organisations was obtained from the Grocery Industry Marketing Guide 1998, ignoring costs 0.00 m -0.39 m -0.77 gg Marketing (promotion) costs 0.25 -0.07 -0.77 g Administrative costs 0 impact on the adoption of ECR. Factors Gamma Education 0.65 g Size 0.82 gg Professionalism 0

  18. Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Molino; Pierre Rognon; Cyprien Gay

    2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular materials, a phenomenon called dilatancy. We have aready described a geometrical interpretation of elastic dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we complement this work in the regime of less dry 2D GG foams. In particular, we highlight the relatively strong dilatancy effects expected in the regime where we have predicted rapid Plateau border variations.

  19. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  20. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

  1. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  2. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  3. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  4. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

  5. Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Deborah J; Howson, Joanna M M; Payne, Felicity; Maier, Lisa M; Bailey, Rebecca; Holland, Kieran; Lowe, Christopher E; Cooper, Jason D; Hulme, John S; Vella, Adrian; Dalhman, Ingrid; Lam, Alex C; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Twells, Rebecca C J; Todd, John A

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    .00 [ref] A/G 1.02 [0.87–1.18] G/G 0.99 [0.82–1.20] CFH A>G rs1061170 0.38 823 (541/517) 0.46 0.96 [0.85–1.08] A/A 1.00 [ref] A/G 1.00 [0.85– 1.17] G/G 0.88 [0.68–1.14] 0.38 3149/ 3485 0.87 0.99 [0.92–1.07] A/A 1.00 [ref] A/G 1.07 [0.96–1.19] G/G 0.94 [0...

  6. The rate of germination and growth of certain range grasses under experimental conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxnam, Herbert Richard

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;"ficienqp co stra~i~~ cry'; rr11 of vP!M dao ~ ~~+9~& for . ". t! acor arrdcm&rrrL!irr, o oc'~tv ic rosa% n. mf ~ ~rrctS. rrn 8xrrm. ". " . "-x' ~'. "~":rx r r 390'3b& "orror'I oro. 'Q sr ud&c !xg . 'oorro. " (1". 1' XXO'!, os~ (13%) srr3 ";~r, ' Vl an '- ~m...$il 'Aqgg5$5 g q gg Q 'Q Q Q 'Q Q Q '4@ 8'44ZC QQQ QSSQQ gang QQSQS 8%$8 %RA~ i 4'4/8 QRR R~gg WH C CC g 0 lac ~ ~ IIC 0 %SASH 8888 gQ gQ Cll W IA g ~gg ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ C4 0Ig QQ'QQ88 QQSQQ ~f Q 'RNCQ a" OO N i4%O ch ~ De...

  7. Origin of color centers in the flux-grown europium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrovsky, A. S.; Arkhipkin, V. G.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.; Krylov, A. S. [L. V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036, Russia and Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk 660079 (Russian Federation); Vagizov, F. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77840 (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium gallium garnet (EuGG) single crystals were grown from fluxes with various contents. Optical absorption spectra of EuGG grown from a flux containing calcium show an additional band in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectra as compared to the case of a calcium-free flux. Moessbauer spectra of the samples grown from the fluxes with different additives show no signs of other valence states of the europium ions except for 3+. However, they indicate changes in the crystal field due to the entrance of additive ions. The nature of the additional absorption must be the same as that for calcium-doped gadolinium gallium garnet, i.e., anion vacancies. Moessbauer isotope shifts and quadrupole splitting for EuGG are determined.

  8. Shape Studies of Quark Jets versus Gluon Jets at sqrt(s) = 10 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Kansas 66045 'University ofMinnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (Received 1 June 1992) Using date from e e annihilation into hadrons taken on the Y(1S) and continuum, we are able to compare event properties of three-gluon (ggg) and quark-antiquark (qq...(1S). Contrary to the notion that two-gluon (gg) events are globally very similar to qq jets, we infer from a study of the yb (J=0 or 2) states that gg event shapes more closely resemble ggg decays of the Y(1S),whereas qqg decays of the yb (J= 1...

  9. The external morphology of the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Monawar

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~Sy SIAQ 4%i AMIsR e ~ y a ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ gg Pl& Vo FLglN@ 2$+ZPy T4ow %be Mi5go ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ PlaW VX. Figures C-gk, Abdal and OeniiaUa ~. . . ~ 44 THE EKTERHAL HORPHOLOOX OP THR HWEETPOTATO MRPGL, CXLAH mmCARXOH E{maHTHLOS (RCHHERH) XHTRQNCTXON AHD..., . (1954). Roinhsrd (192$) ~ aarisod the tansnsnie states of tho sooetpetato vsovil. Fabrieins (179~} first described tho ?seetpetate veovil aa ~ gg~~~, later (LES) as gf+ggtR ggygg~g, and again (1798) referred to it bp tho orlginaX emhlnatton. OXXvter...

  10. The feasibility of a helicopter passenger service in the Dallas-Fort Worth area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Nelson Lane

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I Psx'sf, el Kw~X& l;Snab af '@e rejeigmedte %aj. 'phd Be+em 'og 5 By. EMsrm Xapa Kathy Approved hs 00 @~ale ~ qmCeha. by& M-5R $8gQR~B&) ' r Hl59g , ' ' G:-G 'K 5 5:. 'N 'g S ':" 5 :''''I-. . 1. 05t$8ctf vog... - -- - ? ' ? - - 1, S XXX SVAMNXGS AMS SEEN' GP Sg~ ??- - . ' ' 19 QQXI XGS ~ ??? ~ ? R?? 79 Xg S 55??' ?' ?? ~ ~' . ? ? ' ' ? 3R S Qfto1 XG7 V S~gg l XV RKXSSIUG'~ 'AMG FG'g5555XQ GF TIE QN8d@ VGA 'BGSXH ~ Qx' ?sg S-'M?' ea...

  11. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)·B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10?² for A? masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  12. Photon and neutral pion production in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Ganti, MS; Gutierrez, TD; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mangotra, LK; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, LJ; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Singaraju, RN; Simon, F.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trivedi, MD; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasiliev, AN; Vasiliev, M.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, W.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, HY; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, J.; Zubarev, AN.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Boucham,34 A. Brandin,21 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,33 H. Caines,43 M. Calder?n de la Barca S?nchez,2 J. Carroll,18 J. Castillo,18 M. Castro,41 D. Cebra,5 P. Chaloupka,9 S. Chattopadhyay,38 H. F. Chen,32 Y. Chen,6 S. P. Chernenko,10 M. Cherney... was limited to uyu,2. This rapidity window produces more than 99% of the photons with uyu,0.5 from p0?gg decays. These distributions were passed through a Monte Carlo decay simulator used to calculate the p0?gg decay kinematics and boost between the center...

  13. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

  14. SPARTICUS: Small Particles in Cirrus Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Mace, E Jensen, G McFarquhar, J Comstock, T Ackerman, D Mitchell, X Liu, T Garrett

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From a mass-weighted perspective, cirrus clouds exert an enormous influence on the radiative energy budget of the earth’s climate system. Owing to their location in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus can significantly reduce the outgoing longwave radiation while, at the same time, remaining relatively transmissive to solar energy. Thus, cirrus clouds are the only cloud genre that can exert a direct radiative warming influence on the climate system (Ackerman et al. 1988). It is not surprising, therefore, that general circulation models (GCMs) are especially sensitive to the presence of cirrus in the model atmosphere. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995), for instance, show that the climate sensitivity can vary by as much as 40% due to the properties of cirrus varying between transparent and opaque limits. Lohmann and Roeckner (1995) also identify a key feedback by cirrus that is often overlooked; on longer time scales cloud heating in the upper troposphere can act to maintain and modulate the general circulation of the atmosphere through accelerating the subtropical and polar jet streams. Understanding these mechanisms and representing them in models is complicated by the fact that cirrus properties vary over an enormous dynamic range compared to most other clouds.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 1996 155 histograms needed to arithmetic encode the quantizer indexes. Such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeevi, Yehoshua Y. "Josh"

    .6 s. This does not include the time needed to fit GG models. The second pass that performs actualIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 1996 155 histograms needed by arithmetic coding in our simulations. The possible advantage of an adaptive arithmetic code needs

  16. The Astrophysical Journal, 521:L63--L66, 1999 August 10 # 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

    from circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars, using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared for the warm gas seen in H 2 are discussed in terms of photon and wind­shock heating mechanisms --- infrared: ISM: lines and bands --- ISM: molecules --- molecular processes --- stars: individual (GG Tauri

  17. ICCAT BIGEYE TUNA RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE RE-EXPORT SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix DOCUMENT NUMBER ICCAT BIGEYE TUNA RE-EXPORT CERTIFICATE RE-EXPORT SECTION: 1. RE-EXPORTING COUNTRY / ENTITY / FISHING ENTITY 2. POINT OF RE-EXPORT 3. DESCRIPTION OF IMPORTED FISH Product Type(*) F OF FISH FOR RE-EXPORT Product Type(*) F/FR RD/GG/DR/FL/OT Net Weight (Kg) * F=FRESH, FR=Frozen, RD

  18. Compass Results on Gluon Polarisation from High pT hadron pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Silva; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the COMPASS experiment is the determination of the gluon polarisation \\Delta G/G, for a deep understanding of the spin structure of the nucleon. In DIS the gluon polarisation can be measured via the Photon-Gluon-Fusion (PGF) process, identified by open charm production or by selecting high p_T hadron pairs in the final state. The data used for this work were collected by the COMPASS experiment during the years 2002-2004, using a 160 GeV naturally polarised positive muon beam scattering on a polarised nucleon target. A new preliminary result of the gluon polarisation \\Delta G/G from high p_T hadron pairs in events with Q^2>1 (GeV/c)^2 is presented. In order to extract \\Delta G/G, this analysis takes into account the leading process \\gamma q contribution together with the PGF and QCD Compton processes. A new weighted method based on a neural network approach is used. A preliminary \\Delta G/G result for events from quasi-real photoproduction (Q^2<1 (GeV/c)^2) is also presented.

  19. A global inventory of ecosystem sources of methyl bromide, an ozone destroying gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenney, Gareth

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and anthropogenically produced. Biomass burning, salt marsh and agriculture are reported as the largest natural sources. However, there exists a need for a global inventory as current budget estimates are uncertain, based on limited data and show a 45Gg yr-1 discrepancy...

  20. Preprint 0 (2001) ?--? 1 Development of a new experimental method for studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammel, Peter

    to investigate the MWPCs with #­ and #­ sources. The chambers were tested in a vessel filled with clean hydrogen. Schmidt c , G.G. Semenchuk a , M. Soroka a , A.A. Vorobyov a , N.I. Voropaev a a Petersburg Nuclear These studies were conducted by our collaboration since 1997 [2]. A special test setup was constructed at PNPI

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Diatom-inferred late Pleistocene and Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK M. Gierga Á S. M. Bernasconi Mountains. Keywords Diatoms Á Stable carbon isotopes Á Ioannina Á Lake-level change Á Late Pleistocene Á Holocene Introduction The eastern Mediterranean is a key region for palaeoclimatological research

  2. 7, 605639, 2007 Mass, chemistry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , and V. Gianelle 7 1 Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, T.P. 290, Ispra (VA) 21020, Italy 2 British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK particles", which accounts for >80% of fine par- ticles). Organic matter (OM) and black-carbon (BC

  3. COMPACT DOMINATION FOR GROUPS DEFINABLE IN LINEAR O-MINIMAL STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriou, Pantelis E.

    that the canonical homomorphism : G G/G00 is a kind of intrinsic `standard part map'. Recall the following of an ordered field, standard part maps have already appeared in the following two situations, among others. In [BO2, Definition 4.1], a standard part map is defined from the `finite part' Fin(Mn ) of Mn onto Rn

  4. One-loop Single Real Emission Contributions to Inclusive Higgs Production at NNNLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William B. Kilgore

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the contributions of the one-loop single-real-emission amplitudes, $gg\\to H g$, $qg\\to H q$, etc. to inclusive Higgs boson production through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order in the strong coupling.

  5. December 2006 409NEW BIOLOGICAL BOOKS serves as an engrossing guide to both what is and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Environments GG2012 TO BE DETERMINED Arts Tropical Savannas: Ecology Management EN1106 TO BE DETERMINED Arts Learning and Memory PSY1021 PSY3103 Science Conservation Biology BS3060 BIO3115 Science Behavioural Ecology Social Sciences Sensation and Perception PS1061 PSY3108 Sciences sociales Social Sciences The Politics

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C8, supplement au Journal de Physique HI, Volume 4, septembre 1994 C8-183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the parameters in Table 1. As in [1], all data for initial density p0, bulk sound speed CQ, and shear modulus GgHugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of 12 GPa. These data are compared in Fig. 1 with hydrocode simulations using

  7. April 27, 2010 Well Logging I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    wells and may be drilled to tap into water or oil/natural gas. Core samples are usually not taken4/26/2010 1 GG450 April 27, 2010 Well Logging I Today's material comes from p. 501-541 in the text book. Please read and understand all of this material! Drilling ­ Exploration and Scientific Holes

  8. Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elagin, Andrey

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to tau tau using 7.8 fb^-1 of pp collisions at 1.96 TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one...

  9. Introduc)on of lab ac)vi)es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    ·Overview of lab ac)vi)es #12;·En-Jui (En-Ray) Lee · h@p://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8 of Water · The characteris)cs of tsunamis & the early warning systems. #12 · Hydraulic gradient and its calcula)on · How to determina)on of groundwater flow

  10. Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elagin, Andrey

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to tau tau using 7.8 fb^-1 of pp collisions at 1.96 TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one...

  11. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A[superscript 0], A[superscript 0]?gg or ss? , where A[superscript 0] is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of ...

  12. UNI-CAT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the APS G.G. Long, A.J. Allen, J. Ilavsky, P.R. Jemian, and P. Zschack USAXS studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate gel in cement A.J. Allen, J.J. Thomas, and H.M. Jennings 34-ID...

  13. eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanaugh, Kyle

    Peer Reviewed Title: Synchrony in dynamics of giant kelp forests is driven by both local recruitment://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7vw6c5gg Keywords: giant kelp, Landsat, Macrocystis pyrifera, Moran effect, population dynamics kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) canopy biomass to examine population synchrony in southern California kelp

  14. Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education, OISE, UT Order of Canada Award

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education, OISE, UT Order of Canada of Canada at a ceremony in Ottawa on November 15, 2013. Alison received the award in recognition of her-deserved recognition, Alison! See ceremony at: http://photos.gg.ca/Media/22112013-MEDIA-Order-of-Canada. Please credit

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13, PAGES 2637-2640, JULY 1, 2001 Ocean release of fossil fuel CO2: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    a 220 MW gas power plant, it is found that the volume of the near-source water with a pH-reduction 0 are 200, 400 and 800 Gg-CO2, corresponding to CO2 emissions from conventional 55-220 MW gas power plants], a local 3-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) code (

  16. Phoenix-UrbanNon-Sacramentorural.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    the ecosystem has yet to be fully constructed. Goals 1. To understand the drivers of carbon dynamics in urban. Vegetation (Trees and Shrubs) Storage and NPP Tree and Shrub Total NPP: 172 Gg C / Year Tree and Shrub Total on a per area basis, but there is more storage in trees and less in shrubs · NPP in urban mesic plots

  17. A GIS and object oriented classification application to the problem of scaling ecological patterns and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lira-Noriega, André s

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and NIR at gg 1 m ground pixel resolution) – NDVI and SAVI in ERDAS Imagine 9.2 – Object oriented classification (eCognition 3) to extract exact location of host trees – Model the probability of presence using a metapopulation fkframework Road Trip...

  18. 541.ps.gz - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ( + tR 2)Z+ = tZD E tEG: (138). Now suppose that Z; G; D are smooth and di erentiable for t ! 0 ([25, Thm. 6.1,p.120]), then. (139) Z = Z0 + tZ 1 + O(t2); G=G0 + tG 1 ...

  19. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    4/21/2010 1 GG450 April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI Data Interpretation II Today's material section Chrono- stratigraphic section Relations of strata to boundaries of a depositional sequence Seismic stratigraphic reflection terminations within an idealized seismic sequence Reflection configurations #12

  20. Gell-Mann - Low Function for QCD in the strong-coupling limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Suslov

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gell-Mann - Low function \\beta(g) in QCD (g=g0^2/16\\pi^2 where g0 is the coupling constant in the Lagrangian) is shown to behave in the strong-coupling region as \\beta_\\infty g^\\alpha with \\alpha\\approx -13, \\beta_\\infty\\sim 10^5.

  1. Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Ko, Che Ming; Zhang, B. W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quark and gluon jets traversing through a quark-gluon plasma not only lose their energies but also can undergo flavor conversions. The conversion rates via the elastic q((q) over bar )g -> gq((q) over bar )and the inelastic q (q) over bar gg...

  2. Potential for storage of carbon dioxide in the rocks beneath the East Irish Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    strategy towards renewable and new energy technologies. The East Irish Sea Basin, which lies between Research and British Geological Survey Keyworth Nottingham NG12 5GG Email: klsh@bgs.ac.uk Tyndall Centre carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the East Irish Sea Basin, UK was assessed as part of the Tyndall Centre

  3. Topology 39 (2000) 525}530 Robinson}Whitehouse complex and stable homotopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, Birgit

    ( n, 1). For any arrow g : nPm and i3m one denotes by gG : nGP1 the component of g at i. Here n : nPm has a unique extension as a pointed map [n]P[m]. By abuse of notation we still denote this map

  4. Intercalation of Trioxatriangulenium Ion in DNA: Binding, Electron Transfer, X-ray Crystallography, and Electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    treatment) primarily at GG steps. The X-ray crystal structure of TOTA+ intercalated in the hexameric duplex DNA is driven by recognition that the precise function of numerous synthetic and natural products by intercalators. Additional interest in investigation of intercalation and stacking was stimulated by the report

  5. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  6. Can CP-violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the -term GG locally violating CP- invariance (D. Kharzeev et al., PRL 81, 512 (1998)). To search investigated experimentally (STAR Collaboration, PRL 103, 251601 (2009)). In the case when particles a and b., PRL 81, 512 (1998); Zhitnitsky, Buckley et al., PRL 84, 4814 (2000); Millo and Shuryak, ar

  7. Neslihan Dogan Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    Supervisors: Prof. Geoff Brooks Dr. M. Akbar Rhamdhani Dr. Jamal Naser Droplet Generation in Oxygen. Droplet Generation 4. Future Work #12;© Swinburne University of Technology Basic Oxygen Steelmaking stirring) - OT (oxygen flow) - SD (scrap dissolution) - GG (gas generation) - DCB(decarburization in bath

  8. Rsultat de l'appel propositions 2010 Jeunes quipes associes l'IRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    convention dans les semaines qui viennent. Les financements, qui dans certains cas correspondent à des Correspondant IRD : Jean Louis RAJOT Nom de l'équipe : Analyse littorales, océaniques et climatiques au Nord du Golfe de Guinée (ALOC-GG) Responsable : Yves Kouassi KOUADIO Pays : Côte d'Ivoire, Bénin Unité

  9. Sequence Specificity of DNA Alkylation by the Antitumor Natural Product Leinamycin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Sequence Specificity of DNA Alkylation by the Antitumor Natural Product Leinamycin Hong Zang. The sequence specificity for DNA alkylation by this structurally novel compound has not previously been at the 5-G in 5-GG and 5-GT sequences. The sequence preferences for activated leinamycin are significantly

  10. Lars Junghans, PhD Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    with a special focus on sustainable architecture, building technology and building physics. #12;Lars Junghans, PhD Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning University of Michigan:30pm - 4:00pm 2355 GG Brown Sustainable Building Optimization The introduced approach proposes a cross

  11. Physical Mapping of Chromosomes: A Combinatorial Problem in Molecular Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alizadeh, Farid

    of nucleotides from the set fA; T ; C;Gg. The nucleotides A and T are complementary to each other, as are the nucleotides C and G. Each nucleotide on one strand is bound to a complementary nucleotide on the other strand will cleave a DNA molecule at every site where a certain short sequence of nucleotides occurs. A separation

  12. Integrating 40 Ar, U-Pb, and astronomical clocks in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    956 Integrating 40 Ar/39 Ar, U-Pb, and astronomical clocks in the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation, British Geological Survey, Keyworth NG12 5GG, UK 6 U.S. Geological Survey, MS 980, Denver, Colorado 80225 radioiso- topic data with the floating astrochronology for the Niobrara Formation. The ages are determined

  13. Supplementary Text S1. KD was calculated for binding of HMGB1a to CP-and OX-DNA in the TGGA, AGGC and CGGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    in relaxation MD and 2 ps in production MD; constant temperature, using weak-coupling algorithm, at 300 K, heat of the atoms. Besides the atomic partial charges, other force field parameters of the Pt-GG adducts were referenced from AMBER parm99 force field parameters or from previous work by Yao et al(2). and Scheeff et al

  14. Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glassglass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass­glass liquid foams Fran�cois Molino: October 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

  15. Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Fran¸cois Molino 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

  16. Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes subjected to permanent ground displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Using electrical, magnetic and acoustic sensors to detect damage in segmental concrete pipes and Environmental Engineering, 2340 G.G. Brown Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States c Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kingston, RI 02881

  17. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  18. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  19. NEGLECTED CLOUDS IN T AND Y DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Visscher, Channon [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Leggett, S. K., E-mail: cmorley@ucolick.org [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As brown dwarfs cool, a variety of species condense in their atmospheres, forming clouds. Iron and silicate clouds shape the emergent spectra of L dwarfs, but these clouds dissipate at the L/T transition. A variety of other condensates are expected to form in cooler T dwarf atmospheres. These include Cr, MnS, Na{sub 2}S, ZnS, and KCl, but the opacity of these optically thinner clouds has not been included in previous atmosphere models. Here, we examine their effect on model T and Y dwarf atmospheres. The cloud structures and opacities are calculated using the Ackerman and Marley cloud model, which is coupled to an atmosphere model to produce atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles in radiative-convective equilibrium. We generate a suite of models between T{sub eff} = 400 and 1300 K, log g = 4.0 and 5.5, and condensate sedimentation efficiencies from f{sub sed} = 2 to 5. Model spectra are compared to two red T dwarfs, Ross 458C and UGPS 0722-05; models that include clouds are found to match observed spectra significantly better than cloudless models. The emergence of sulfide clouds in cool atmospheres, particularly Na{sub 2}S, may be a more natural explanation for the 'cloudy' spectra of these objects, rather than the reemergence of silicate clouds that wane at the L-to-T transition. We find that sulfide clouds provide a mechanism to match the near- and mid-infrared colors of observed T dwarfs. Our results indicate that including the opacity of condensates in T dwarf atmospheres is necessary to accurately determine the physical characteristics of many of the observed objects.

  20. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  1. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  2. Inclusive J/{psi} Production in {Upsilon} Decay Via Color-Singlet Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Zhiguo [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China); Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal, 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Wang Jianxiong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the recent works about the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay. Our results show that until now the color-singlet (CS) contribution which includes leading order ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}){Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-barg process and {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg(4g) process as well as {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2{alpha}2} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg processes can not explain the experimental data yet. A preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc} (B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21}, which is much larger than color-octet (CO) prediction, is also given as a good quantity to discriminate the CS and color-octet mechanism.

  3. The Jet Energy Profile: A BSM Analysis Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivukula, R Sekhar; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new heavy di-jet resonance could be discovered at the 14 TeV LHC. In this talk we present a strategy to reveal the nature of such a particle; in particular to discern whether it is a quark-antiquark (q qbar), quark-gluon (qg), or gluon-gluon (gg) resonance. The strategy is based on the study of the energy profiles of the two leading jets in the di-jet channel. Including statistical uncertainties in the signal and the QCD backgrounds, we show that one can distinguish between gg, qg, and q bar resonances; an evaluation of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the jet energy profile will require a detailed detector study once sufficient 14 TeV di-jet data is in hand.

  4. The Jet Energy Profile: A BSM Analysis Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sekhar Chivukula; Elizabeth H. Simmons; Natascia Vignaroli

    2015-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new heavy di-jet resonance could be discovered at the 14 TeV LHC. In this talk we present a strategy to reveal the nature of such a particle; in particular to discern whether it is a quark-antiquark (q qbar), quark-gluon (qg), or gluon-gluon (gg) resonance. The strategy is based on the study of the energy profiles of the two leading jets in the di-jet channel. Including statistical uncertainties in the signal and the QCD backgrounds, we show that one can distinguish between gg, qg, and q bar resonances; an evaluation of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the jet energy profile will require a detailed detector study once sufficient 14 TeV di-jet data is in hand.

  5. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 11, 8 March 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    FOR DETAILS AND IMMEDIATE WORK OPPORTUNITIES: 136- 89 ROOSEVELT AVE. #303, FLUSHING, NY 11354 PHONE: 718- 762- 4001 7Nepali Aawaz | Falgun 25.2062 Politics 6f9f /x]sfn] cfGbf]ngn] lng' kg]{ htL ultL lng g;s]sf] o'jf g]tf uug yfkf atfp5g . k|:t't 5, nf]s tfl... Gg] sfdgf ug'{ Aoy{ x'G5 . pgLx?sf] s'/f ;'Gg' k5{ / xfd|f] s'/f a'‰fpg'k5{ . clxn] eO{/x]sf] cfGbf]ng klg o'jfx?n] g} l6sfO{ /x]sf5g, c‰ of] lgl:qmo ;d'xnfO{ ;lqmo kfg]{ xf] eg] s:tf] utL lnG5 lnG5 . clxn] klg cf...

  6. Inclusive radiative {psi}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Ecklund, K. M. [Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct photon spectrum in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}gg. We determine the ratio of the inclusive direct photon decay rate to that of the dominant three-gluon decay rate {psi}(2S){yields}ggg (R{sub {gamma}}{identical_to}{gamma}({gamma}gg)/{gamma}(ggg)) to be R{sub {gamma}}(z{sub {gamma}}>0.4)=0.070{+-}0.002{+-}0.019{+-}0.011, with z{sub {gamma}} defined as the scaled photon energy relative to the beam energy. The errors shown are statistical, systematic, and that due to the uncertainty in the input branching fractions used to extract the ratio, respectively.

  7. A cytogenetic study of the Gossypium arboreum L. Gossypium hirsutum L. ring-of-six chromosomes and some plant characters isolated from a three-species hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiranti, Ivan Nicolas

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IIIooot of tbe regaimwesio Sow ibo SoSgeo af +4~4 ~ . 4@i~ l$~. pg 'i l h } 'c 4 'o- t l CTI'QQQSfXC IflST CF SR ggQgg JQg@gg L, {ggggg g gpss L. KR lf - SQ CSIQCNCIOS Ivaa Xieekas TiragA1 ee te ~ eaateat +s i, r 'I 4 I i ' \\ ff P ( 1 8VCGP8...' C. i se. "?'P' '~ '(9::~. IVY rkk' . ~lb A' t. 1 1'' ' I The besLawreu of tLN P1 te glabrous eegregatei iato bairp es4 glabsoas elaeew ?s ?syeoied bF tho bppotbuie state4 slxeeL bowler, the ratiu derialsd sigaifieeatLF Aoa 1&1 (Table 5), Tbe...

  8. On the prediction of far field computational aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the following expressions: 10 4. P, (?, t) = ? J' . drd. cI f p a V? at Jt=o It sin vR g=g (4) 4 P, '(, , t) = ? J, dl'd + J, dpd (5) f lR f a lR ot Jt=o RsinvR Jt=o fir sin vR O=O g=g where r is the source time, t, is the observer time and vR is the angle.... : r)P e ? = ? 7' P. cits p (28) This equation describes the propagation of small amplitude pressure waves. By comparing Equation (28) to the wave equation in terms of 4, it is noted that the equations are analogous if a = e/p. This will be true...

  9. Introduction to direct neutrino mass measurements and KATRIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Thümmler; for the KATRIN Collaboration

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of neutrinos and especially their rest mass play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. On the other hand experiments such as MARE, KATRIN and the recently proposed Project 8 will investigate the spectral shape of beta-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Here, because of neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. It combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type. It will investigate the neutrino rest mass with 0.2 eV/c (90% C.L.) sensitivity and allow beta spectroscopy close to the tritium endpoint at 18.6 keV with unprecedented precision.

  10. Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Amit Aravind

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

  11. Experimental solution thermodynamics of a ternary solvent/polymer/solvent system by inverse gas chromatography / by Dominic Wai Wah Ching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ching, Dominic Wai Wah

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the composition and of the orientation parameter y, The negative values of gG (Table V) obtained from this ex- pression indicate that the polymer dissolves in the solvents at this temperature. Third, the orientation parameter y that was determined did not vary... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subjects Chemical Engineering EXPERIMENTAL SOLUTION THERMODYNAMICS OF A TERNARY SOLVENT/POLYMER/SOLVENT SYSTEM BY INVERSE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY A Thesis DOMINIC WAI WAH CHING Approved...

  12. Ontology-based cross-species integration and analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkoutos, Georgios V; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    phenotype class. For example, S000000649 is annotated with Ionic stress resistance: decreased and the additional class Sodium chloride (CHEBI:26710). The intended meaning of this phenotype description is that the resistance of the yeast cell to respond... -7 October 2011 * Correspondence: gg295@cam.ac. uk 1Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK Abstract Ontologies are widely used in the biomedical community for annotation and integration of databases...

  13. Development of Low-Voltage and Large-Current DC Power Supply with High-Frequency Transformer Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    Development of Low-Voltage and Large-Current DC Power Supply with High-Frequency Transformer-voltage and large-current DC power supply with a high-frequency transformer coupling. The power supply is simply·,Zü"gg"X·C~R,êC"_N^"X Keywords: DC power supply, low-voltage and large-current, high-frequency transformer, leakage inductance 1

  14. PUBLISHED VERSION The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium's, a proposed second high power (up to 40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address: Nuclear Fusion, Tritium, Confinement, Scaling Law, Alpha Particle, PACS: 52.55.Fa, 89.30.Gg, 52.55.-s, 52

  15. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  16. Replay behaviors in cyclic debugging of concurrent software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhutkar, Arjun Vijay

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLAY BEHAVIORS IN CYCLIC DEBUGGING OF CONCURRENT SOFTWARE A Thesis by ARJUN VIJAY BHUTKAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1991 Major Subject: Computer Science REPLAY BEHAVIORS IN CYCLIC DEBUGGING OF CONCURRENT SOFTWARE A Thesis by ARJUN VIJAY BHUTKAR Approved as to style and content by: t ) 1)) Riche. rd A. Volz (Chair of Committee) /~ ggPM Fabrizio...

  17. Variable structure control of a flexible manipulator / by Kevin Barry Shelburne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelburne, Kevin Barry

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR A Thesis by KEVIN BARRY SHELBURNE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 19gg Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering VARIABLE STRIrCTURE CONTROL OF A FLEXIBLE MANIPULATOR A Thesis by KEVIN BARRY SHELBURNE Approved as to style snd content by: Louis Ev~er (Chairman of Committee) Carl Gerhold (Member) Amitabh...

  18. Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Zirconium up to 2.5 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    up to 2.5 keV G. Leinweber,* J. Burke, C. R. Lubitz, H. D. Knox, and N. J. Drindak Lockheed Martin resonances up to 2.5 keV. The zirconium reso- nance parameters Gg and Gn, determined in the present- rameter extraction. Recent work at RPI using the up- graded equipment is given by Danon et al.5 for rare

  19. The Effects of Insecticidal Treatments on Beneficial Insect and Spider Population Cotton Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Eston Odell

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ggggggf Gloverz appeezed after calcim arsenate was applied to cotton. ldditionsl applications of ths insecticide did not reduce the infestations to any great extent, hicotine dusts applied with the calcine arssnats 4id not give satisfactory oontrol.... Fletcher (1929) reported that cotton plants dusted with celciuRL arsenats becane infested with cotton aphids which cov- ered tbe leaves with honeydew. Me believed that an uneven 4is- tribution of @gg$~ ggg (peddle) on cotton ma dus to the at- traction...

  20. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 56175638, 2014 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/acp-14-5617-2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    .2 Industry Combustion Coal/Boiler, Kilns Liu et al. (2008), 1185 1185 1701.2 Coke Oven Blast Furnace Gas in the original INTEX-B NMVOC Emissions /Gg Power Coal 1178 1178 1130.7 Biofuel Tsai et al. (2003), Liu et al, 4421, 5561 (Andreae and Merlet, 2001) Tsai et al.(2003) 16.8 Industry Non-combustion Coke 11, 217 11

  1. Updated Higgs cross section at approximate N$^3$LO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bonvini; Richard D. Ball; Stefano Forte; Simone Marzani; Giovanni Ridolfi

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We update our estimate of the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^3$LO) in $\\alpha_s$ in view of the recent full computation of the result in the soft limit for infinite top mass, which determines a previously unknown constant. We briefly discuss the phenomenological implications. Results are available through the updated version of the ggHiggs code.

  2. The serum transaminase activities of Equus caballus: a study of the transaminase levels under normal and disease conditions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Mark Francis

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SERUM TRANSAtujINASE ACTIVITIES OP ggJg CABALLUS: A STUDY OF THE TRANSAMINASE LEVELS UNDER NORMAL AND DISEASE CONDITIONS A Thesis By MARK FRANCIS YOUNG Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... FRANCIS YOUNG Accepted as to style and content by: airman of Committee (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) January 1964 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to express his sincere gratitude to the following people: Dr, J. C. Ramge, chairman...

  3. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Taylor, F. Martinez, R. Hey, K. Maeda, and K. Ohno, Synchronous reorientation of the Woodlark Basin. Blewett, D.T., Lucey P.G., and Hawke B.R., Ling G.G., and Robinson M.S. (1997) A comparison of mercurian, and B.R. Hawke, 1997, Clementine images of the lunar sample-return stations: Refinement of FeO and Ti

  4. Patronage as a gauge of membership relations of four Texas Cooperative Gin Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seawright, Alvin Floyd

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fmeas as~ ". ~artsd ay~ pwcKisste1y ~-". e5 90@os. 'it of-. thQ cx&gX@Qd Lv. 1~49'. llesLbepg'li9 RMjt 'Rfolllgle Gg ~ ZQXatei to &eh'~tbi Q Eat~iage abye aeeosdinij: to l~tb. of patronage'. ia eh@'wn M, tabxe l4i kn. Miyeetioh, of. this, table...

  5. Mean field approximation for noisy delay coupled excitable neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikola Buric; Dragana Rankovic; Kristina Todorovic; Nebojsa Vasovic

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean field approximation of a large collection of FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable neurons with noise and all-to-all coupling with explicit time-delays, modelled by $N\\gg 1$ stochastic delay-differential equations is derived. The resulting approximation contains only two deterministic delay-differential equations but provides excellent predictions concerning the stability and bifurcations of the averaged global variables of the exact large system.

  6. Postpartum endocrinology and sexual behavior relative to lactation in collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchek, Kathleen Mary

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and content by: ane M. Packard (Chair of Committee) axS. ' ss, Jr (Member) William E. Grant (Member) Davi . Schmidly (Head of Department) December 1989 Postpartum Endocrinology and Sexual Behavior Relative to Lactation in Collared Peccaries ~ g...@g (December 1989) Kathleen Mary Franchek, BS?Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jane lvL Packard To study the effect of lactation on the interbirth interval, seven female collared peccaries were used. Endocrine and behavioral mechanisms...

  7. EXERCISE 4 IN INTRODUCTION TO REPRESENTATION THEORY DMITRY GOUREVITCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Plancherel formula ||F(u)||2 = n||u||2 . (2) (P) Using the Plancherel formula prove the following Theorem(Gauss Fq and consider the Gauss sum = (g)(g), where the sum is taken over g F× . Then || = q1-set. Show that the category ShG(X) is canonically equiva- lent to the category Sh(G\\X). If you have done

  8. Calculation of rotordynamic forces on labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensel, Steve John

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis STEVE JOHN HENSEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering CALCULATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC FORCES ON LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by STEVE JOHN HENSEL Approved as to style snd content by: David Rhode (Chairman of Committee) Erian Baskharone Leel and Garison (Member) +, gg, W. D...

  9. Supplement 1. PFC emissions from UNFCCC data1086 Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emission are reported to UNFCCC by 34 Annex I countries as part of their obligations as signatories to the1087

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    (UNFCCC, 2009). Emissions are reported for CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 in Gg) 6500 (CF4), 9200 (C2F6), 7000 (C3F8), 8700 (c-1089 C4F8), 7000 (C4F10), 7500 (C5F12), and 7400 (C6F14

  10. Willa Cather's European immigrants: the conflict of old and new world values.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursey, Roberta Lee

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Q QX'6 i". Glypt 'iik"-PXJQkt6'd~ Dg GQ~~~ G gVZVQiRGB piZ'g~ a&~. X MQU~& '83%9 19' ~e 01~ & Px'ofeaaax ~avis E', liw~az" am6 I~L~~s C. Eave gQ~ ggiQ'3 p Qg~gg~~jgp '3Q gg 'j"ta g 'c jgg JgM@~(q $ QQg Q G7'~O Dp' FZ'2C'~'GUiQQ GG Kp' W"Qa3c~"'8y... ~d ~&' y~ ~a. eu~~~9. z qv-'~ j, h9ag ef fc-~m"- acc'4. : iD2j-'R~fiX~B, e & ~ i%88 CQ'u'c38i''~8 XQvcFBB~ 9zl EUFQ"-? Qz. " L~~~~'~P'1. 8 PQ ~~CGX'5. R1 f97. ' i3. c@-cvJ &~~GQ 3~$ 4&3~1BEiGQQ 55~ KGz' QQ ~QQQ gCQPQ '& 5 2 M~NQX"1 g @BE q 3. gM K...

  11. The treatment of love in four George Eliot novels: Adam Bede, The mill on the Floss, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Gary Neal

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Q~le w s e@ P~Cg85g@g' giQI~~QS ~%IV p@i54g Qp &9 C~~~~S g@M&8~ k'eehCe~ge eS ~ t~~hC, e~~ Pip m4 R~~ 5y 6~~'@My 4Q'B&. QWXNg C3@8 4~6~~- W@~4j) tA'54 N~Q Gg ~4+ CggCjp @AC %14X~~6, 4m ~~~5 t&~~~g @ ~fz ' ~~~: fp~ gggj~ e'~@ XV (g~ Xee~z Xgf)k)~ ps...~%&e yeB, M. ~ ~~'e pxmgeem0i@n eg gee'h9, e~ elmwetgai~ Pe gm@ex 4&eg QL~QQMQg9 CA~8 G@~~$@g 9Z 'Q'k6 XQVG C~& 89+vQg SQ~X, SCC' Acct&ux Dem@9, ekeme e. " Ae a', ~Oy eZ eM~ 3. eve aZ l'~pe 'V&iV ZGX' Gt'QFMCA ~84? TQ f~ fRIC4+ 89gg8l @Nt9 KQQ&i9 QQ...

  12. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  13. Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Dong

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isotopes with the AMS techniques.

  14. Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menard, Katrina Louise

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1 AP PENDIX A Ha p l e t t e r L oc al i t y E S C S p e c i e s 20 0- 30 0k m > 90 0k m H o s t S u bs pe c i e s S ubge ne r a S e c t i o n AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a e JV P . po nd er o s a s c o p u... l o r u m P i n us P o n d e r os ae AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a e JV P . po nd er o s a s c o p u l o r u m P i n us P o n d e r os ae AD U t ah : D a gg et C o . A s h l e y N F 1 H C . po nd er o s a...

  15. Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, K J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isoto...

  16. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  17. A SEARCH FOR L/T TRANSITION DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 AND WISE: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEARBY OBJECTS INCLUDING TWO CANDIDATE SPECTROSCOPIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deacon, Niall R. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dupuy, Trent J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Redstone, Joshua [Facebook, 335 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10017-4677 (United States); Price, P. A., E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present initial results from a wide-field (30,000 deg{sup 2}) search for L/T transition brown dwarfs within 25 pc using the Pan-STARRS1 and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) surveys. Previous large-area searches have been incomplete for L/T transition dwarfs, because these objects are faint in optical bands and have near-infrared (near-IR) colors that are difficult to distinguish from background stars. To overcome these obstacles, we have cross-matched the Pan-STARRS1 (optical) and WISE (mid-IR) catalogs to produce a unique multi-wavelength database for finding ultracool dwarfs. As part of our initial discoveries, we have identified seven brown dwarfs in the L/T transition within 9-15 pc of the Sun. The L9.5 dwarf PSO J140.2308+45.6487 and the T1.5 dwarf PSO J307.6784+07.8263 (both independently discovered by Mace et al.) show possible spectroscopic variability at the Y and J bands. Two more objects in our sample show evidence of photometric J-band variability, and two others are candidate unresolved binaries based on their spectra. We expect our full search to yield a well-defined, volume-limited sample of L/T transition dwarfs that will include many new targets for study of this complex regime. PSO J307.6784+07.8263 in particular may be an excellent candidate for in-depth study of variability, given its brightness (J = 14.2 mag) and proximity (11 pc)

  18. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

  19. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Qingsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wei, Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Yuan, Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain)] [Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Wang, Li-E. [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ?2 or ?3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ?3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ?3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  20. Mercury Methylation at Mercury Mines In The Humboldt River Basin, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, John E. (U.S. Geological Survey); Crock, James G. (U.S. Geological Survey); Lasorsa, Brenda K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Hg and methylmercury concentrations were measured in mine-waste calcines (retorted ore), sediment, and water samples collected in and around abandoned mercury mines in western Nevada to evaluate Hg methylation at the mines and in the Humboldt River basin. Mine-waste calcines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 14 000?g/g. Stream-sediment samples collected within 1 km of the mercury mines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 170?g/g, whereas stream sediments collected>5 km from the mines, and those collected from the Humboldt River and regional baseline sites, contain total Hg concentrations<0.5?g/g. Similarly, methylmercury concentrations in mine-waste calcines are locally as high as 96 ng/g, but methylmercury contents in stream-sediments collected downstream from the mines and from the Humboldt River are lower, ranging from<0.05 to 0.95 ng/g. Stream-water samples collected below two mines studied contain total Hg concentrations ranging from 6 to 2000 ng/L, whereas total Hg in Humboldt River water was generally lower ranging from 2.1 to 9.0 ng/L. Methylmercury concentrations in the Humboldt River water were the lowest in this study (<0.02-0.27 ng/L). Although total Hg and methylmercury concentrations are locally high in mine-waste calcines, there is significant dilution of Hg and lower Hg methylation down gradient from the mines, especially in the sediments and water collected from the Humboldt River, which is> 8 km from any mercury mines. Our data indicate little transference of Hg and methylmercury from the sediment to the water column due to the lack of mine runoff in this desert climate.

  1. 4657575758575757958575757575757@ (true, ) ( ,true)( , ) ( , )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godefroid, Patrice

    I 9 I # " '1 G !#" $&% # ! 7 ! '! % 9! e( g % 8 F S )f# & 63@ 6 # "' # 30 ' 6 ' 1 " ( " e10 2g3 $ gG A ' 8 %C BHI P E G8 %ACG " I '1 1 % & %A4 6 1@ 1 ( I " I # " %54 BHI P E G@ %A4 # ! 7 %AC 0 %A4 G A ' 8 %54 BCDE G@ %A4 G " I '1 1 % & %AC 6 18 1 ( I " I # " %C BCDE G8 %AC# ! 7 %AC 0 %A4S e

  2. A study of the deep water benthos of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Gilbert T

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mollusks Nine species oi' scaphopods were found from 100 to 1500 fathoms. Henderson's monograph (1920) of the east American scaphopods proved to be invaluable in working with these specimens. All the shells collected fall into the genus ~De ~l H, and..., for convenience in this study, they have been grouped into the subgenera presented by Henderson. Neither Parker (1860) nor springer and Bullis (1956) mention scaphopods in their deep eater bottoa saaples froa the Gulf of Mexico. / ~D+~gg H~QIN Dell, 1878~ ~d...

  3. Single-top hadroproduction in association with a W boson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Motylinski, Patrick; Webber, Bryan R; White, C D

    as the perturbative order increases. At the leading order (LO) in the SM, O(g2W?S), such a set is empty, and the underlying partonic process is bg ?? tW . (2.2) When next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections in ?S are considered, contributions (e.g. gg ? tW b... - order result in gW. Thus, the inclusion of higher-order QCD corrections forces one to include electroweak corrections to all orders so as to avoid divergences, and this potentially spoils the power counting in gW, according to which eq. (2.2) is the LO...

  4. Dilepton as a Possible Signature for the Baryon-Rich Quark-Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, L. H.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, C. T.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dileptons at small invariant masses. This effect becomes more pro- nounced as the density of the hadronic matter increases. On the other hand, if a baryon-rich quark-gluon plasma is initially formed, then dileptons will be produced from the qq... reasonable approximation as the process qq~gg is fast. As in the consideration of the phase dia- gram, we shall also neglect strange quark production in the fireball. This will not change our results appreciably as it has been shown in Ref. 11...

  5. Comparison of vegetation found on equal age spoil mounds in Robertson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, Thorpe Ambrose

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Dominant species by soil texture groups by mounds SOIL TEXTURE CLASS MOUND 1 MOUND 2 MOUND 3 MOUND 4 70-76 Percent Sand AM~gg MARRDttt A~*Aft ~tiff lt ~1 ~tt h ~ph la incise A~ ~th R G 1 tfl Oxalis dillenii Teucrium canadense Proelichia floridana... t ~ph la incise ll ~ht td ~Mdt M 1 ~PL ~Mt Portulaca Parvula SS+ Percent Sand Baccharis salicina ~PL t ~tt t D N 'll Side ~sinosa N Littd 0* lt ~df 1 tt ~dh t h skirrhobasis ~thdt, Baccharis salicina D P ttl M~dt M t Oenothera laciniata...

  6. The relative resistance of commercial cantaloupe varieties to aphid infestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa, Rumaldo Trevino

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~~5, i Glc:era he longs to the order Hcsoptera an, ' tc the fsnily iphididae, Xt was first reporte& in Texas in QW~ The nolan aphid is a sm33. soAAxdied 1nsect a, ' ost Xf?5 of an inch leaf Xt'a color varies free a psla yellowish-&reen to slsost... of four ecasasroial cantaloupe veriatiesa Aaith~e Farfeota Texas Hesistant Pla Haloes Sert Ho, 36? Sda Sweet and ~orris 47 which is a btseding line f nm Geo~a hprioultural:trisect Station+ The @sion Aphid According tc Paddock(11~ ths nolan aphid ~k gg...

  7. Geographic variation in the yellow mud turtle, Kinosternon flavescens, from the central and southwestern United States, and northwestern Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houseal, Timothy William

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specimens used in the statistical analyses, arranged into samples (OTU's), with the sample sizes indicated. . . . . 6 Results of the Student's T-Test to test for sexual ~ 'yhf 'yl fyfK. f. u ff* Big Sand Mound (Muscatine-Louisa Counties, Iowa...-Test was performed on a series of 96 specimens fK. f. u*'f hp'gg*d'1 dppl ' fd'-1 counties, Iowa) for which voucher specimens are available. All of these analyses are conservative tests requiring little or no a-~riori assumptions regarding the data. MANOVA...

  8. Exchange effects in magnetized quantum plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics including the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We consider a number of wave phenomenon under influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves we focus our attention to the Langmuir waves, Trivelpiece-Gould waves, ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves and low-frequencies electromagnetic waves at $T_{e}\\gg T_{i}$ . We obtained the numerical simulation of the dispersion properties of different types of waves.

  9. Measurement of the total cross section for e(+)e(-)?hadrons at s?=10.52 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -of-flight system is the electromagnetic calorimeter, consisting of 7800 thallium- doped cesium iodide crystals. The central ‘‘barrel’’ region of the calorimeter covers about 75% of the solid angle and has an energy resolution of about 4% at 100 MeV and 1.2% at 5 Ge... the possible residual contamination from two-photon colli- sions remaining in the gg-poor distribution after imposition of all our hadronic event selection requirements. Two-photon collisions are thus determined to comprise ~0.860.4!% of our total hadronic...

  10. The Knight of the Burning Pestle: analysis of production in a public theater and a private theater in seventeenth century London.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenck, Robert William

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was produced in 1635 in the Phoenix Theater in Drury Lane by Queen Henr1etta's Men, and it is quite possible that the show was seen again 1n a 1662 production in the Red Bull Theater in Clerkenwell by the King~s Men. These two playhouses-?the Phoenix... in Drury Lane i Con+ctural Reconstruction CHA PTER THE PLiT Before an analysis of the production of Q~~gg as i. t wae probably performed before the audiences of seventeenth century london, seas co+cents abaut the play itself seem to be in order...

  11. np-elastic analyzing power A(N0) at 485 and 788 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNaughton, M. W.; McNaughton, K. H.; Glass, G.; Riley, P. J.; Auer, KH; Davis, CA; Gulmez, E.; Hiebert, John C.; Jeppersen, R. H.; Ransome, R. D.; Spinka, H.; Sum, V.; Supek, I.; Tripard, G. E.; Woolverton, H.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    44, 2267 ~1991!. @21# C. Lechanoine-Leluc and F. Lehar, Rev. Mod. Phys. 65, 47 ~1993!. @22# M.W. McNaughton, Polarization Phenomena in Nuclear Phys- ics, edited by G.G. Ohlson, R.E. Brown, N. Jarmie, M.W. Mc- Naughton, and G.M. Hale, AIP Conf..., and previous data; enlargement of part of Fig. 1. @15# W.R. Ditzler et al . , Phys. Rev. D 46, 2792 ~1992!. @16# S. Nath et al . , Phys. Rev. D 39, 3520 ~1989!. and A.J. Salthouse, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 42 ~AIP, New York, 1978!, p. 142. 53 1097np...

  12. Energy band structure and intrinsic coherent properties in two weakly linked Bose Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Dong Li; Yunbo Zhang; J. -Q. Liang

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy band structure and energy splitting due to quantum tunneling in two weakly linked Bose-Einstein condensates were calculated by using the instanton method. The intrinsic coherent properties of Bose Josephson junction were investigated in terms of energy splitting. For $E_{C}/E_{J}\\ll 1$, the energy splitting is small and the system is globally phase coherent. In the opposite limit, $E_{C}/E_{J}\\gg 1$, the energy splitting is large and the system becomes a phase dissipation. Our reslults suggest that one should investigate the coherence phenomna of BJJ in proper condition such as $E_{C}/E_{J}\\sim 1$.

  13. Log of a young author's thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitiere, Autry James

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . t 1974 Major Subject: English LOG OF A YOUNG AUTHOR'S THINKING: GEORGE W CABLE'S "DROP SHOT" A Thesis by AUTRY JAMES SINITIERE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committe Hea of Department M er ember) August 1974 & s ~~. )$, gg... APSTRACT Log of a Young Author's Thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot" (August 1974) Autry James Sinitiere, B. A. , College of Santa Fe Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr Richard H. Ballinger In February 1870 George W. Cable began writing a * p p...

  14. Two-loop helicity amplitudes for the production of two off-shell electroweak bosons in gluon fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caola, Fabrizio; Melnikov, Kirill; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the part of the two-loop virtual amplitude for the process $gg \\to V_1 V_2 \\to (l_1 \\bar l'_{1}) (l_2 \\bar l'_2)$, where $V_{1,2}$ are arbitrary electroweak gauge bosons, that receives contributions from loops of massless quarks. Invariant masses of electroweak bosons are allowed to be different from each other. Our result provides an important ingredient for improving the description of gluon fusion contribution to the production of four-lepton final states at the LHC.

  15. General Single Field Inflation with Large Positive Non-Gaussianity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao Li; Tower Wang; Yi Wang

    2008-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analysis of the WMAP three year data suggests $f_{NL}^{local}\\simeq86.8$ in the WMAP convention. It is necessary to make sure whether general single field inflation can produce a large positive $f_{NL}$ before turning to other scenarios. We give some examples to generate a large positive $f_{NL}^{equil}$ in general single field inflation. Our models are different from ghost inflation. Due to the appearance of non-conventional kinetic terms, $f_{NL}^{equil}\\gg1$ can be realized in single field inflation.

  16. The determination of area source emission factors using whole air sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Harriet Patricia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Tedlar bags have been shown to be transparent to ground level radiation . They are also 18 difficult to clean and are subject to sample loss through permeation . Studies have shown that toluene and xylenes 14 show an appreciable loss if exposed... rates from a land treatment facility. The observed solvent concentrations ranged from 3. 2, to 0. 1 gg/m for benzene, 5. 0 to 1. 1 ug/m for toluene, and 9. 2 3 3 to 0. 7 pg/m for xylene. Monitoring results were compared 3 to concentrations predicted...

  17. Remote generation of entanglement for individual atoms via optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Q. Guo; H. Y. Zhong; Y. H. Zhang; H. S. Song

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of atomic entanglement is discussed in a system that atoms are trapped in separate cavities which are connected via optical fibers. Two distant atoms can be projected to Bell-state by synchronized turning off the local laser fields and then performing a single quantum measurement by a distant controller. The distinct advantage of this scheme is that it works in a regime that $\\Delta\\approx\\kappa\\gg g$, which makes the scheme insensitive to cavity strong leakage. Moreover, the fidelity is not affected by atomic spontaneous emission.

  18. Behavior of introduced red drum and habitat-use overlap with largemouth bass in a power-plant cooling reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert Clayton

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in an oligotrophic lake in Minnesota was followed by ty-f ld I I y 8 Pb hP 8 gg tf 8 th t f~ competition was a limiting factor. Johnson and Hale (1977) reported that walleye d ll thb h~ht d I I I ft girth hbltt, possibly leading to competitive interactions... with largemouth bass were ascertained in Lake Fairfleld, Texas, using ultrasonic telemetry. Habitat-use overlap between the species was evaluated seasonally to determine if the potential for interspecific competition existed after the initial effects...

  19. Next-to-next-to-leading order soft gluon corrections in top quark hadroproduction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Vogt, Ramona

    . Likewise, the subleading terms stop and reverse the downward trend of the PIM scaling functions. The 1PI gg contribution will still be positive while the PIM will still be negative but the difference may not be as large as before. Using the alternate... cross section is not as large as previously, due to the subleading terms. The average of the two kinematics is just above the NLO cross sections for both energies. Going to higher scales increases all the NNLO corrections so that both kinematics choices...

  20. Higgs boson production in association with a jet using jettiness subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boughezal, Radja; Giele, Walter; Liu, Xiaohui; Petriello, Frank

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the recently proposed jettiness-subtraction scheme to provide the complete calculation of Higgs boson production in association with a jet in hadronic collisions through next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. This method exploits the observation that the $N$-jettiness event-shape variable completely describes the singularity structure of QCD when final-state colored particles are present. Our results are in agreement with a recent computation of the $gg$ and $qg$ partonic initial states based on sector-improved residue subtraction. We present phenomenological results for both fiducial cross sections and distributions at the LHC.

  1. Bounds on the Lyapunov exponent via crude estimates on the density of states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mira Shamis; Thomas Spencer

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Chirikov (standard) map at large coupling $\\lambda \\gg 1$, and prove that the Lyapounov exponent of the associated Schroedinger operator is of order $\\log \\lambda$ except for a set of energies of measure $\\exp(-c \\lambda^\\beta)$ for some $1 < \\beta < 2$. We also prove a similar (sharp) lower bound on the Lyapunov exponent (outside a small exceptional set of energies) for a large family of ergodic Schroedinger operators, the prime example being the $d$-dimensional skew shift.

  2. Conformations, Transverse Fluctuations and Crossover Dynamics of a Semi-Flexible Chain in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiqun Huang; Aniket Bhattacharya; Kurt Binder

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unified scaling description for the dynamics of monomers of a semiflexible chain under good solvent condition in the free draining limit. We consider both the cases where the contour length $L$ is comparable to the persistence length $\\ell_p$ and the case $L\\gg \\ell_p$. Our theory captures the early time monomer dynamics of a stiff chain characterized by $t^{3/4}$ dependence for the mean square displacement(MSD) of the monomers, but predicts a first crossover to the Rouse regime of $t^{2\

  3. A New Action for Heavy Lattice Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a unified formalism for lattice fermions, in which the relativistic action of Wilson and the nonrelativistic and static actions appear as special cases. It is valid at all values of $m_q a$, including $m_q a \\approx 1$. In the limit $m_q a \\ll 1 $, the formulation reduces to the light quark action of Wilson. In the limit $m_q a \\gg 1 $, the formulation reduces to the nonrelativistic action of Thacker and Lepage, and to the static action of Eichten.

  4. Dechlorination of PCE by mixtures of green rust and zero-valent iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchal, Fabienne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H for the reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE in 0. 007g/g GRso4 suspension. Error bars for k represent 95% confidence intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Initial reductive capacity of GRso4 for PCE as a function of pH. Error... bars for the reductive capacities represent 95% confidence intervals. . . . . . . . . 21 Reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE by non-treated ZVI at pH 8, 9, and 10. Some errors bars are smaller than the symbols...

  5. A study of the durability of lime as a stabilizing agent of clay soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Harvey Earl

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOIL CONSTANTS OF NATURAL SOIL UNIFIEn SXSTEN SF N. C. LoL PaI Palm CLASSIFICATION SPe QRAVa 7 ~the 5 Fears 4 Fears KLig $45 Slog 70og 18~5 55. 9 ELIAS lge 4 58, 4 R, 67 1S, S CH R, gg RR 8 CH R, 68 Rl+5 4 Frs. 7 m, 49. 1 18 R 50, 8 tR 5...+an e Consdttee esd of Depart n Angu*, 1958 Acknowledgnent is due to Rr, Spencer Ji Buchanan, Professor of Civg. Engineering for his guidance, sorel support and assistance in obtaining needed-materialsI to lh'. Charles J. Ifeese, Associate Professor...

  6. An analysis of Ezra Pound's attitudes in the Pisan Cantos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Samuel Jack

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United SCates coaman4 post, at Javsgna and thence co genoa for interrogation, lS after being held under house arrest at Genoa for several weeks, he was transferred to Che kary Disciplinary Training Center at Pisa, Italy, where he was held from Ney... Cent in the medical compound, where he recovered. It was here at the Pisa GTC that Che first draft of the ~L C~gg@g was written. The ~@~CQgQg are a record of Pound~a life and mind during the time Chat he wae imprisoned at Pisai 17?~era pound ac...

  7. A study of the effect of feeding Albino rats with cottonseed meal to which various chemicals have been added during the cooking process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staffel, Eugene Otto

    1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Ao4 ta4ahe eo4 Cteeth oooo etoeljee4, ~ gg )haffaaaaa, )aobjoeeaa, oo4 Naaoa, Rffeeg ef Xpe Ooletow oo4 Rjh aaagooetm Sieae ta Neaotej~ ga@~ of Noexjljca, g, yy? 4t~ (logo) ~ ggghotltog, Raoee~ eaag Oeoag, S~eo ea Oeletfjeaajaaa, 0'equi Itot...? ao e aetio ehjoh ~ loe 11 oeleteaa es4 high tia yhoeykaoyoge eeealbe4 tm a ~ ta ya~aeaae ta bely eejgha aog heol104~ sh@lltag, Ryooaaa& eo4 ogeaaa eheeeg aheo mgaeetoa ?olae ho4 a eyeejtte tohjbjacerg co%tea ?yeaa aha 4eyoejejaa of %he heaae...

  8. The determination of vapor composition curves by means of the photo-electric cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Preston Earl

    1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Calibratiea Cares for CHCllg - CC14 Usiag Riyal& Phase kbsosptiea at gg * ~ a ~ ~ ~ t ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ FIGURES I, Wltfng JNageua of the Asylifier . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 XX* Ayyasebas Use4 ha Abets bg Vayex Abssxytiaa IXX. Ayyaeabas Use4 ka Asslike by XAqs14..., sable to the ~eoIsriaetrie& ~ nalpeis ef alxtares ef vayers Or 1iqaLSs obese absorytioa saaRe is yartiallg er eaapiotolJ oataL4e tho visible rosieay as is the ease sith aasy erSani? aixtaros obtaiaablo by 4istillatioai (1) A4aae, "Tbe See of tho Phet...

  9. A Viso do Paraguai no Brasil ^=s==

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Visão do Paraguai no Brasil 131 ^=sáë©ç=�ç= m~ê~�ì~á=åç= _ê~ëáäG= póäî~áå=pçì��~ì�GG= fåíêç�ì´©ç= ls estrangeiros que viajam pelo Brasil podem se surpreender com o lugar que o Paraguai ocupa mesmo tempo do Brasil e do Paraguai, são percebidos na sua atualida- de e quase integralidade de seu

  10. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  11. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  12. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  13. Nuclear Power - Deployment, Operation and Sustainability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Plutonium Denaturing as an Effective Method for Nuclear Fuel Proliferation Protection in Open and Closed Fuel Cycles 331 Kryuchkov E.F., Tsvetkov P.V., Shmelev A.N., Apse V.A., Kulikov G.G., Masterov S.V., Kulikov E.G. and Glebov V.B Part 5 Thorium 363... Talbot Laboratory, Urbana, Illinois USA 1. Introduction T h e largest experien c e in operatin g nuclear power plants has been in nuclear naval propulsi o n , particul a r l y aircraft carriers and subma r i n e s . This accumul a t e d exper i e n c...

  14. Bioassay of toxaphene, parathion and DDT residues on alfalfa by use of mosquito larvae, Aedes aegypti (L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheves, Rondal Lee

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LI BRA R& A A M COLLEar. Or 7f J(oo BIOASSAY OF TOXAPHKNK~ PAIIATHION AND DDT IIKSIDUES ON ALFALFA BY USK OF MOSQUITO LARVAK, jIm, QQQJQ, (L ~ ) By IIONDAL LKK CHKVKS A Theolo Subsltted to the graduate School, of the Agrloultural aad... Moehaaleal College of Texao la partial fulfllseat of the requlroseato for the degree of MASTKR OF SCIKNCK M y I9$8 Major Sub joot c Kntoso I ogy Ll&gg, gr & Aa c011 EGE Df TEZ~ BIOASSAY OF TOXAPHKNK, PARATHION AND DDT RKSIDUKS ON ALFALFA SY USK...

  15. Remote atom entanglement in a fiber-connected three-atom system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo Yan-Qing; Chen Jing; Song He-Shan

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ising-type atom-atom interaction is obtained in a fiber-connected three-atom system. The interaction is effective when $\\Delta\\approx \\gamma _{0}\\gg g$. The preparations of remote two-atom and three-atom entanglement governed by this interaction are discussed in specific parameters region. The overall two-atom entanglement is very small because of the existence of the third atom. However, the three-atom entanglement can reach a maximum very close to 1.

  16. Graphs associated with semigroups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baber, Stephen Asa

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the graph of this system as well. We first consider the question of when G(g ) is a com- 3 19 piete graph. The more general question of connectedness will be considered later' In order to state the next few results we need a definitions A minimal right... tM2. In [2], Clifford and Preston show that any two idempotent elements in an inverse semigroup commute. Thus, complete graph. ele2=e2el e MI()M2. As above, G(4 ) is a In order to show that the four conditions in corollary 4. 3...

  17. New strategies for the synthesis of azepine-containing alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallant, Matthew David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dimethyltritylsilyl ether 35. . . . . . . . . . Diels-Alder cyclization of 18 with dimethyl fumarate. . . . . Intramolecular Heck cyclization of enamide 32. . . . . . . , . . . . . Page 23 24 26 27 28 28 30 30 32 33 34 43 xn1 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1.... 11: Diels-Alder cyclization of 27 with dimethyl fumarate and X-ray structure of dimethyltritylsilyl ether 35. Iicc Or Me Me or C LiBHe, Beo, PhH, gg 'C, 24h ~ "CO Me H 27 87% CO, Me 61% 32 OH Ph, CSiMe2Br DMF, rl, 24 h AgNO3, Iree Ofr...

  18. Synthesis and thermal chemistry of selected N-vinylisoquinuclidenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beamer, Ralph Lewis

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Phenylethen-1-yl)-2-azabicyclo- [2. 2. 2]oct-7-en-3-one-5, 6-di carboxylate gg) from Amino Ether 62 . Dimethyl 2-(trans-2-Phenyl ethen-1-yl )-2-azabi cyclo- [2. Z. 2]oct-7-en-3-one-5, 6-di carboxyl ate (39) from Di aci d 61 2-(trans-2-Aenyl ethen-1-yl )-5... or oxidative fragmentation. As a result, they were not isolable under conditions used for their preparation, but rather they were transformed to the parent azabicyclo[2. 2. 2]octenone. 2-(5, 5-Dimethyl- cyclohex-2-en-l-on-3-yl)-5, 6-benzo-2-azabicyclo[2. 2...

  19. An econometric analysis of prices for Texas grapefruit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Villarreal, Jorge

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " Price F. o. b. Price. Prcccssed Grapefruit Price Fouat'on. I". ethod of Statisticei Analysis. Data. . 76 I m f L jo / '-'2 Zquatior G. "-, fruit Texas. "rash Grape ru m J. exes ~ !I Qy F. o. I" orida. "Gn F. o. ~r ce it Pci. ce Ejlu... + . 00370y (. 191) (. 00083) Xf = 6. 441 Means: Xz Where: Xz. q y . 437q + . 00000y 11 3067 X? 9 2067 Xf ? 2 1000 q 9 o333 y 1666 GG G. S. azu:ual average retail pr'ce for orapefruit (cents per pound) U. S. annual averag fam-retail price spread...

  20. Schistosoma mansoni: evidence for a complement receptor on adult male parasites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Timothy Brian

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Figure l. Classical Pathwa Alternative Pathwa Ag-Ab complexes (IgC, Igg) Initiating Factor (IF) Polysaccharides, Lipopolysaccharides, Ab aggregates C3 ilail ' 2' t 25 ? +GGG + 25 C6& C7? CBG C9 GG, 7, 2, 9 ~Lt 2 Figure 1. The Classical... help in the preparation of slides; to Ms. Pam Brown for technics. l assistance; and last, but not least, to my typist whose untiring efforts through the many tedious rewrites of this work are greatly appreciated, you know who you are. The author...

  1. A comparative study of certain biological phenomena of a resistant and a susceptible strain of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, John G

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laid slightly more eggs and were larger than susosptible females. There vere no noted differenoes in siss or feoundity of ths F3 generation of resistant and susceptible individuals. Genetic studies by King (1954) point out that seleotion itself is a...A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CERTAIN BIOLOGICAL'PHENOMENA CF A RESISTANT AND A SUSCEPTIBLE STRAIN OF THE BOLL @EVIL, ~@ggQ~ ~S BOHEMAN A Thesis by JOHN GORDON THOMAS Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultu"al and Mechanioal College...

  2. Variation in the human Cannabinoid Receptor (CNR1) gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ) population is shown (using the publicly available HapMap version 3, release R2, database available at http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/. Chakrabarti and Baron-Cohen Molecular Autism 2011, 2:10 http://www.molecularautism.com/content/2/1/10 Page 3 of 7 [46... -Cohen Molecular Autism 2011, 2:10 http://www.molecularautism.com/content/2/1/10 Page 4 of 7 response is also associated with the longest gaze dura- tion for happy faces. For rs806380, the allelic group associated with the highest striatal response (GG) is also...

  3. G. McNeilus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, New Jersey:TransitYorkshireFutureGG.

  4. G.M. Allen & Sons Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, New Jersey:TransitYorkshireFutureGG.M.

  5. The Dartmouth Seminar: analysis of proceedings and a bibliography.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenck, Aileen Alana Hendricks

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in trans- lation, and some attention to other media of expression, such as moving pictures, radio nd tele- vision--altogether a quite ambitious program" (p. 7')) . However, Muller does not stop here; he goes on to report in depth the Seminar.... -, ~", -, 6 e a o epartmen em r em r August l974 y% gg&~g9 ABSTRACT The Dartmouth Seminar: Analysis of Proceedings and a Bibliography. (August 1$'74) Aileen Alana Hendricks Venckt B. A. , Texas XVI University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr...

  6. Parity assignments in 172,174Yb using polarized photons and the K quantum number in rare earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Savran; S. Müller; A. Zilges; M. Babilon; M. W. Ahmed; J. H. Kelley; A. Tonchev; W. Tornow; H. R. Weller; N. Pietralla; J. Li; I. V. Pinayev; Y. K. Wu

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100 % polarized photon beam at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgS) at Duke University has been used to determine the parity of six dipole excitations between 2.9 and 3.6 MeV in the deformed nuclei 172,174 Yb in photon scattering (g,g') experiments. The measured parities are compared with previous assignments based on the K quantum number that had been assigned in Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) experiments by using the Alaga rules. A systematic survey of the relation between gamma-decay branching ratios and parity quantum numbers is given for the rare earth nuclei.

  7. G

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Management andGG Subject:

  8. G

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Management andGG Subject:Subject:

  9. G

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Management andGG

  10. G24 Innovations Ltd G24i | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreightFulongFuturo Latino AmericanoGG24

  11. GAIA Akkumulatorenwerke GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreightFulongFuturo Latino AmericanoGG24GAIA

  12. $\\Deltag/g$ results from the Open Charm production at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celso Franco

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main goals of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is the determination of the gluon contribution to the nucleon spin. To achieve this goal COMPASS uses a naturally polarised muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV and a fixed polarised target. Two types of materials are used for the latter: $^{6}$LiD (polarised deuterons) during the years of 2002-2006 and NH$_{3}$ (polarised protons) in 2007. The gluons in the nucleon can be accessed directly via the Photon Gluon Fusion (PGF) process. Among the channels studied by COMPASS, the production of charmed mesons is the one that tags a PGF interaction in the most clean and efficient way. This talk presents a result for the gluon polarisation, $\\Delta g/g$, which is based on a measurement of the spin asymmetry resulting from the production of D$^{0}$ mesons. These mesons are reconstructed through the invariant mass of their decay products. The statistical significance of the $D^{0}$ mass spectra has been improved significantly using a new method based on Neural Networks. The $\\Delta g/g$ result is also presented using a next-to-leading order (NLO-QCD) analysis of the $\\mu N \\rightarrow q\\bar{q}$ reaction. Such correction is relevant and was for the first time applied to an experimental measurement of the gluon polarisation.

  13. Folklore in Huckleberry Finn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skaggs, Peggy Dechert

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &ugh iz phd& exeqllev&ee ef' i'"eK" q~~rg ~m Bee bee@ e-e5ilerl ~ @&Man he gm]C ~'e ~~i4 / . ~. gA'8. 4M, 44%04? . " 5'4 ili0, '@@8@@ "%W X". Xg44'~'~8 Pae4eiqje~"i, . ~eeej. @ QvxN@gg, beg ~4', ~ 8~Xv yf ~tN~Z, ' &~X+ ~P'. " Q'8Q, 1'iaTX. 5'48MVOSC...;Qe?Bye ji . qhenee, , . "7aeeizae: ig yv~j. 4~iq'5 O'Lt&94 54% gQIACFJc~lf g5G Qt&N' A~i)SQ g XE14 QQ"H:. 460$' 'uh&t 4oei, anQ. a goo6 d~=:P. ann'h eeet fax, ". v@. . "-"~ Iv a Gg'Qll~X' 'VCR& %~111%":WgiCXJlP~' f Og. 'tkt~ B@GF~'5 fX'OU )XQ j'$1; if...

  14. Engineering peptides to promote stabilizing interactions in the solid state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Sandipan; Thompson, S.; Camarda, K.; Topp, E.

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 0.0 07 0.6 6 ? 0.0 05 Ac VY GN GA Ac VY GN GA + PV P Ac VY GG GN GA Ac VY GG GN GA + PV P So lid (h rs) So lut ion (h rs) Pe pti de s De am ida tio n h alf -liv es 0.43 0.37 0.62 3.53 0.64 6.0 8 38. 5 62. 1 010203040506070 H a l f - l i f e...En gin ee rin g p ep tid es to pr om ot e s tab iliz ing int er ac tio ns in th e s oli d s tat e Sa nd ipa n S inh a1, Sa ra h T ho mp so n2 , K yle C am ar da 2, El iza be th To pp 1 De pa rtm en t o f P ha rm ac eu tic al Ch em ist ry...

  15. Multielement ultratrace analysis of molybdenum with high performance secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virag, A.; Friedbacher, G.; Grasserbauer, M.; Ortner, H.M.; Wilhartitz, P.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam melting has been used to obtain ultrapure refractory metals that are gaining importance in metal oxide semiconductor--very large scale integration (MOS--VLSI) processing technology, fusion reactor technology, or as superconducting materials. Although the technology of electron beam melting is well established in the field of production of very clean refractory metals, little is known about the limitations of the method because the impurity level of the final products is frequently below the detection power of common methods for trace analysis. Characterization of these materials can be accomplished primarily by in situ methods like neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometric methods (glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)). A suitable method for quantitative multielement ultratrace bulk analysis of molybdenum with SIMS has been developed. Detection limits of the analyzed elements from 10/sup -7/ g/g down to 10/sup -12/ g/g have been found. Additional information about the distribution of the trace elements has been accumulated.

  16. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 ?g/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 ?g. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 ?g. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  17. The influence of certain management practices upon market quality and profit made in broiler production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William J

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~~ ~ gpwrgg e yeg ~ %aeter ~ ~ gharry ~ m ~ ~~ ~ emm ~ ~ ~ m M~~ ~ M ~~~ x~~ ~ ~~ Qcsx) ~ ~ ~m ~ 'sm ~~'C gG 4~+XKIE . G~~. LY, ' '3r. , C $(; 'ClGT~~OVJ'&' M Hp, , GXlCi' jT ~ ZQQ 629 jQ ~ Qf ~ (5L Q pkYXSfQQQ pRG' Sg~gK~ RXQVpCQ jQ @AGl, v Wj. kX 44jw... ~ ~ xys ~ yeysaC ~ ?s~ Seyayyee ~ ethsynaaya +8++ ~ & ~ ~ aeg Aep aaK sea ~ ~ 0 K g~ V~~+% + % X~+@~4 %+8 ~ %~%K P++ ~ %%~~~~ P~@~% @4 m m ~~m4@va ~ ~~ ~ ~m g%z) m m '~ ~pSSSCkZQC$ ~? ~~~ ~ pKS ~~ Sg. ~ gD' zgG "M:fwG-BZgf- ~~ P ~+ -$ gg & ~i~~ ~y &'L...

  18. Supernova constraints on a superlight gravitino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicus, D.A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mohapatra, R.N. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics; Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In supergravity models with low supersymmetry breaking scale the gravitinos can be superlight, with mass in the 10{sup -6} eV to few keV range. In such a case, gravitino emission provides a new cooling mechanism for protoneutron stars and therefore can provide constraints on the mass of a superlight gravitino. This happens because the coupling to matter of superlight gravitinos is dominated by its goldstino component, whose coupling to matter of superlight gravitinos is dominated by its goldstino component, whose coupling to matter is inversely proportional to the scale of supersymmetry breaking and increases as the gravitino mass decreases. Present observations therefore provide lower limits on the gravitino mass. Using the recently revised goldstino couplings, we find that the two dominant processes in supernova cooling are e{sup +} e{sup -} {yields} GG and {gamma}+e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} GG. They lead to a lower limit on the supersymmetry breaking scale {Lambda}{sub s} from 160 to 500 GeV for core temperatures 30 to 60 MeV and electron chemical potentials 200 to 300 MeV. The corresponding lower limits on the gravitino mass are .6 - 6 x 10{sup -6} eV.

  19. Optimal refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen E. Allahverdyan; Karen Hovhannisyan; Guenter Mahler

    2010-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a refrigerator model which consists of two $n$-level systems interacting via a pulsed external field. Each system couples to its own thermal bath at temperatures $T_h$ and $T_c$, respectively ($\\theta\\equiv T_c/T_hrefrigerator functions in two steps: thermally isolated interaction between the systems driven by the external field and isothermal relaxation back to equilibrium. There is a complementarity between the power of heat transfer from the cold bath and the efficiency: the latter nullifies when the former is maximized and {\\it vice versa}. A reasonable compromise is achieved by optimizing the product of the heat-power and efficiency over the Hamiltonian of the two system. The efficiency is then found to be bounded from below by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}=\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{1-\\theta}}-1$ (an analogue of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency), besides being bound from above by the Carnot efficiency $\\zeta_{\\rm C} = \\frac{1}{1-\\theta}-1$. The lower bound is reached in the equilibrium limit $\\theta\\to 1$. The Carnot bound is reached (for a finite power and a finite amount of heat transferred per cycle) for $\\ln n\\gg 1$. If the above maximization is constrained by assuming homogeneous energy spectra for both systems, the efficiency is bounded from above by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}$ and converges to it for $n\\gg 1$.

  20. Calculation of HELAS amplitudes for QCD processes using graphics processing unit (GPU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagiwara; J. Kanzaki; N. Okamura; D. Rainwater; T. Stelzer

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast calculations of helicity amplitudes of quark and gluon scattering processes in massless QCD. New HEGET ({\\bf H}ELAS {\\bf E}valuation with {\\bf G}PU {\\bf E}nhanced {\\bf T}echnology) codes for gluon self-interactions are introduced, and a C++ program to convert the MadGraph generated FORTRAN codes into HEGET codes in CUDA (a C-platform for general purpose computing on GPU) is created. Because of the proliferation of the number of Feynman diagrams and the number of independent color amplitudes, the maximum number of final state jets we can evaluate on a GPU is limited to 4 for pure gluon processes ($gg\\to 4g$), or 5 for processes with one or more quark lines such as $q\\bar{q}\\to 5g$ and $qq\\to qq+3g$. Compared with the usual CPU-based programs, we obtain 60-100 times better performance on the GPU, except for 5-jet production processes and the $gg\\to 4g$ processes for which the GPU gain over the CPU is about 20.

  1. Phenylxylylethane (PXE): a high-density, high-flashpoint organic liquid scintillator for applications in low-energy particle and astrophysics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borexino Collaboration

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the study of a new liquid scintillator target for neutrino interactions in the framework of the research and development program of the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment. The scintillator consists of 1,2-dimethyl-4-(1-phenylethyl)-benzene (phenyl-o-xylylethane, PXE) as solvent and 1,4-diphenylbenzene (para-Terphenyl, p-Tp) as primary and 1,4-bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as secondary solute. The density close to that of water and the high flash point makes it an attractive option for large scintillation detectors in general. The study focused on optical properties, radioactive trace impurities and novel purification techniques of the scintillator. Attenuation lengths of the scintillator mixture of 12 m at 430 nm were achieved after purification with an alumina column. A radio carbon isotopic ratio of C-14/C-12 = 9.1 * 10^{-18}$ has been measured in the scintillator. Initial trace impurities, e.g. U-238 at 3.2 * 10^{-14} g/g could be purified to levels below 10^{-17} g/g by silica gel solid column purification.

  2. Light Quarkonium - Glueball Mixing from a Holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixing structure of isospin-singlet scalars, the light quarkonium $(\\bar{q}q)$ and glueball $(gg)$ in two-flavor QCD, based on a holographic model of bottom-up hard-wall type. In the model the pure quarkonium and glueball states are unambiguously defined in terms of the different $U(1)_A$ charges in the restoration limit of the chiral $U(2)_L \\times U(2)_R$ symmetry, in which the quarkonium gets massless as the chiral partner of the pion. Hence the $\\bar{q}q$-$gg$ mixing arises in the presence of the nonzero chiral condensate or pion decay constant. At the realistic point where the pion decay constant and other hadron masses reach the observed amount, we predict the tiny mixing between the lightest quarkonia and glueball: The smallness of the mixing is understood by the slightly small ratio of the chiral and gluon condensate scales. The low-lying two scalar masses are calculated to be $\\simeq 1.25$ GeV and $\\simeq 1.77$ GeV, which are compared with masses of $f_0(1370)$ and $f_0(1710)$. Our resul...

  3. Projection and Galaxy Clustering Fourier Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. Fry; David Thomas

    1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Second order perturbation theory predicts a specific dependence of the bispectrum, or three-point correlation function in the Fourier transform domain, on the shape of the configuration of its three wave vector arguments, which can be taken as a signature of structure formed by gravitational instability. Comparing this known dependence on configuration shape with the weak shape dependence of the galaxy bispectrum has been suggested as an indication of bias in the galaxy distribution. However, to interpret results obtained from projected catalogs, we must first understand the effects of projection on this shape dependence. We present expressions for the projected power spectrum and bispectrum in both Cartesian and spherical geometries, and we examine the effects of projection on the predicted bispectrum with particular attention to the dependence on configuration shape. Except for an overall numerical factor, for Cartesian projection with characteristic depth $ \\Dstar $ there is little effect on the shape dependence of the bispectrum for wavelengths small compared to $ \\Dstar $ or projected wavenumbers $ q \\Dstar \\gg 1 $. For angular projection, a scaling law is found for spherical harmonic index $ \\ell \\gg 1 $, but there is always a mixing of scales over the range of the selection function. For large $ \\ell $ it is sufficient to examine a small portion of the sky.

  4. Biochemistry of ethylene in plants and other problems related to leaf abscission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrero, Fay Alberto

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L IBRARY * & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS *&MCOLE&GFTX MA LFOXSLwL &w eSrwFG rwa MFOLT eTM*SLEG TLSrFLa FM SLrA r*GC&GG&Mw co ArX rS*LTFM OLTTLTM r adiing,t,dmh Gscld,,nv ,m ,?n ?gtvst,n G??mm? m? ,?n r?gd?s?,sgt? thv En??thd?t? Cm??n?n m? Fn?ti dh... ?tg,dt? ?s??d??lnh, m? ,?n gn?sdgnlnh,i ?mg ,?n vn?gnn m? aMCFMT MA eO&SMGMeOX ?thstgo ???? Et?mg Gsc?n?,? e?th, e?oidm?m?o *&MCOLE&GFTX MA LFOXSLwL &w eSrwFG rwa MFOLT eTM*SLEG TLSrFLa FM SLrA r*GC&GG&Mw r adiing,t,dmh co ArX rS*LTFM OLTTLTM...

  5. Extracting bb Higgs Decay Signals using Multivariate Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W Clarke; /George Washington U. /SLAC

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For low-mass Higgs boson production at ATLAS at {radical}s = 7 TeV, the hard subprocess gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} dominates but is in turn drowned out by background. We seek to exploit the intrinsic few-MeV mass width of the Higgs boson to observe it above the background in b{bar b}-dijet mass plots. The mass resolution of existing mass-reconstruction algorithms is insufficient for this purpose due to jet combinatorics, that is, the algorithms cannot identify every jet that results from b{bar b} Higgs decay. We combine these algorithms using the neural net (NN) and boosted regression tree (BDT) multivariate methods in attempt to improve the mass resolution. Events involving gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} are generated using Monte Carlo methods with Pythia and then the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) is used to train and test NNs and BDTs. For a 120 GeV Standard Model Higgs boson, the m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstruction width is reduced from 8.6 to 6.5 GeV. Most importantly, however, the methods used here allow for more advanced m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstructions to be created in the future using multivariate methods.

  6. Comparison between continuous stirred tank reactor extractor and soxhlet extractor for extraction of El-Lajjun oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anabtawi, M.Z. [Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction on El-Lajjun oil shale in a continuous stirred tank reactor extractor (CSTRE) and a Soxhlet extractor was carried out using toluene and chloroform as solvents. Solvents were recovered using two distillation stages, a simple distillation followed by a fractional distillation. Gas chromotography was used to test for the existence of trapped solvent in the yield. It was found that extraction using a CSTRE gave a 12% increase in yield on average compared with the Soxhlet extractor, and an optimum shale size of 1.0mm offered a better yield and solvent recovery for both techniques. It was also found that an optimum ratio of solvent to oil shale of 2:1 gave the best oil yield. The Soxhlet extractor was found to offer an extraction rate of 1 hour to complete extraction compared with 4 hours in a CSTRE. The yield in a CSTRE was found to increase on increase of stirring. When extraction was carried out at the boiling point of the solvents in a CSTRE, the yield was found to increase by 30% on average compared to that of extraction when the solvent was at room temperature. When toluene was used for extraction, the average amount of bitumen extracted was 0.032 g/g of oil shale and 76.4% of the solvent recovered, compared with 0.037 g/g of oil shale and 84.1% of the solvent recovered using a Soxhlet extractor.

  7. Autonomous Pseudomonoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Franco, Ignacio

    2009-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    // A A2 ?X p??1?1qqqq 88qqqq #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; ???= A2 1?f // c ?= A2 p =={{{{{{{{ ?= (2.3) A?X ?= c f // j?1?1 KKK K %%KK KK A j?1 HHH H $$HH HH 1 ?= A?X 1 00 ?= p??1 // A2 ?X j??1?1ssss 99ssss #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A2 ?X 1?f // A2 p... -cells denote the obvious counits). X j?1 #15;#15; 1 ''#31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A?X j?1?1 KKK K %%KK KK j??1 // X f // j?1 KKK K %%KK KK?= A j?1 GGG G ##GG GG 1 #31;#31; ?=?= A?X p??1 // 1 00 ?= A2 ?X j??1?1ssss 99ssss #31;#31; #31;#31; #11;#19; A2 ?X1...

  8. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  9. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their relative importance in the crust fracture mechanism at plant scale. The second half of this report describes the apparatus for measuring crust strength. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength).

  10. OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

  11. OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

  12. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  13. Hair mercury concentrations and associated factors in an electronic waste recycling area, Guiyu, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Wenqing [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Chen, Yaowen [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Gairong [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Luo, Jiayi [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Wu, Kusheng, E-mail: kswu@stu.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: Toxic heavy metals are released to the environment constantly from unregulated electronic waste (e-waste) recycling in Guiyu, China, and thus may contribute to the elevation of mercury (Hg) and other heavy metals levels in human hair. We aimed to investigate concentrations of mercury in hair from Guiyu and potential risk factors and compared them with those from a control area where no e-waste processing occurs. Methods: A total of 285 human hair samples were collected from three villages (including Beilin, Xianma, and Huamei) of Guiyu (n=205) and the control area, Jinping district of Shantou city (n=80). All the volunteers were administered a questionnaire regarding socio-demographic characteristics and other possible factors contributed to hair mercury concentration. Hair mercury concentration was analyzed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Results: Our results suggested that hair mercury concentrations in volunteers of Guiyu (median, 0.99; range, 0.18–3.98 ?g/g) were significantly higher than those of Jinping (median, 0.59; range, 0.12–1.63 ?g/g). We also observed a higher over-limit ratio (>1 ?g/g according to USEPA) in Guiyu than in Jinping (48.29% vs. 11.25%, P<0.001). Logistic regression model showed that the variables of living house also served as an e-waste workshop, work related to e-waste, family income, time of residence in Guiyu, the distance between home and waste incineration, and fish intake were associated with hair mercury concentration. After multiple stepwise regression analysis, in the Guiyu samples, hair mercury concentration was found positively associated with the time residence in Guiyu (?=0.299, P<0.001), and frequency of shellfish intake (?=0.184, P=0.016); and negatively associated with the distance between home and waste incineration (?=?0.190, P=0.015) and whether house also served as e-waste workshop (?=?0.278, P=0.001). Conclusions: This study investigated human mercury exposure and suggested elevated hair mercury concentrations in an e-waste recycling area, Guiyu, China. Living in Guiyu for a long time and work related to e-waste may primarily contribute to the high hair mercury concentrations. -- Highlights: • Mercury levels in hair samples from Guiyu and risk factors were assessed. • The recruitments from Guiyu were exposed to high levels of mercury. • Primitive e-waste recycling resulted in high mercury exposure of local people.

  14. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  15. A Test of the Relative Values of Cotton Seed Meal and Silage, and Cotton Seed Meal and Cotton Seed Hulls for Fattening Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, John C.; Metcalfe, T. P.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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  16. A nucleon in a tiny box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedaque, P F; Rupak, G; Bedaque, Paulo F; Griesshammer, Harald W; Rupak, Gautam

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Chiral Perturbation Theory techniques to compute the nucleon mass-shift due to finite volume and temperature effects. Our results are valid up to next-to-leading order in the "$\\eps$-r{\\'e}gime" ($mL\\sim m\\beta\\ll 1$) as well as in the "$p$-r{\\'e}gime" ($mL\\sim m\\beta\\gg 1$). Based on the two leading orders, we discuss the convergence of the expansion as a function of the lattice size and quark masses and find that only for particular $\\beta/L$ ratios does the expansion seem to converge. This result can be used to extrapolate lattice results obtained from lattice sizes smaller than the pion cloud, avoiding the numerical simulation of physics under theoretical control.

  17. Infrared Singularities and Soft Gluon Resummation with Massive Partons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ferroglia; M. Neubert; B. D. Pecjak; L. L. Yang

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared divergences of QCD scattering amplitudes can be derived from an anomalous dimension matrix, which is also an essential ingredient for the resummation of large logarithms due to soft gluon emissions. We report a recent analytical calculation of the anomalous dimension matrix with both massless and massive partons at two-loop level, which describes the two-loop infrared singularities of any scattering amplitudes with an arbitrary number of massless and massive partons, and also enables soft gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic order. As an application, we calculate the infrared poles in the q qbar -> t tbar and gg -> t tbar scattering amplitudes at two-loop order.

  18. The discrete time detection of time varying deterministic signals in m-dependent noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleker, Julius Perkins

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and c') lim g(x)f"(x-e s. )dx = g(x)f"(x)dx , for each i and E ([T (Y) - E (T?(Y))] ) d) lim 1 Ep(LT (Y)]') The following two properities shall also be assumed n I f n n J o(x)f(x-esi)dxl e-p = j ? n g(x) f(x-es, . ) ) e &dx acn-- e-0 -J aen... standard calculus of variations techniques, we form a new funct1on J(~) H(~+ a g), where c 1s a real variable and the function 8g is a variation of g. Then a necessary condition (17j for H(gg) to be an extreme value is 15 -2x [g(x) + cag(x)] f(x)dx 2...

  19. Geology of the Pontotoc North-Northwest area San Saba County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauvin, Aaron Lawrence

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X6ogaag aqvag~g gofeg Zest ~sW RQ5tRXW 'gC! 8gageM $o saWap sr& ~g skusms~nbsz a~ go guouq;yygyny ~y~d anzac, go aGaygay ysayuaqasg pun gegx~ynoyg&y . a~ go g~g Sqsnyal~ s~ oq ps'q, qygqng uyAnaqg, ~g note'g sgsa~ 8VRKTi XiTigOQD 'Qgf 8 f?8... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ sgeggeg $8Ieuec) il SE MIH DX80%RI 69 ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ 8+ngngg Te~ )9 5 ~ ~ SI'IV, Gngg [SUGTee'g y9 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 1 ~ ~ 0, ~ ~ IE ~ l t ~ 't ~ QPJQQQ QggQQQ Q C9 ~ ~ Il9$8Eg EISUIUQBllQ P9 ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~, ~ euogeegg/g 8$P J ogP@ 09...

  20. Charged-Higgs-boson production at the LHC: Next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Kraemer, Michael; Spira, Michael; Walser, Manuel [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominant production process for heavy charged-Higgs bosons at the LHC is the associated production with heavy quarks. We have calculated the next-to-leading-order supersymmetric QCD corrections to charged-Higgs production through the parton processes qq,gg{yields}tbH{sup {+-}} and present results for total cross sections and differential distributions. The QCD corrections reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence and thus stabilize the theoretical predictions. We present a comparison of the next-to-leading-order results for the inclusive cross section with a calculation based on bottom-gluon fusion gb{yields}tH{sup {+-}} and discuss the impact of the next-to-leading-order corrections on charged-Higgs searches at the LHC.

  1. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle Allison; Christopher T. Hill; Graham G. Ross

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  2. On the process-dependence of coherent medium-induced gluon radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Peigné; Rodion Kolevatov

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering forward dijet production in the $q\\to qg$ partonic process, we derive the spectrum of accompanying soft gluon radiation induced by rescatterings in a nuclear target. The spectrum is obtained to logarithmic accuracy for an arbitrary energy sharing between the final quark and gluon, and for final transverse momenta as well as momentum imbalance being large as compared to transverse momentum nuclear broadening. In the case of equal energy sharing and for approximately back-to-back quark and gluon transverse momenta, we reproduce a previous result of Liou and Mueller. Interpreting our result, we conjecture a simple formula for the medium-induced radiation spectrum associated to hard forward $1 \\to n$ processes, which we explicitly check in the case of the $g \\to gg$ process.

  3. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  4. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  5. The isolation of an unidentified factor from yeast extract for the formate-pyruvate exchange reaction in streptococcus faecalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chi-sin

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % t ~ ~ ~ I ~ ' ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Qggg(gg -emmyao ccIsea g xssag paa p~?@ eggygeqtatI ~ sEwggasxg eh'$$os ga seyptgs +~qsqg Zj osogao oIs04 Q'dI~~ ~'pI4eqctp et@ tackle ccsolao oIsex QVl !g &'A&eqsp e% ++V oagko~ qq'1 aqua ccrc 4~08$ et...X; xoq, oag eqq go uoggaog~xn8 aqua cog smsqo, ~ ' . ' ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a~sex eousqoxs uog qqgn soqoag eqq go exnpeooz8 usga, soT~xnd ps~T ~ ~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ sxq goy o, uuqo~ qqTn sogosg eqg go exnpsoaxd uoTqmg~xm~. ~ puooog ~ I...

  6. Geology of the Pontotoc North-Northwest area San Saba County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauvin, Aaron Lawrence

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UTequneg uo qg . Iecgg9g QUGQseQlfg u'gBQUnog de@ i q8 'I' I r' 8 ~ ~ e . w ~ o e ~, s ~ i . ~ e ~~ggggg yp 1 ~, ~ ~ 0, 'I . ~ ~ 0 0 I 4 \\ 1 lk, , ~ 0 S ~ ~ 1 OggggQggQQ- gg ~ ~ ~ 5 fl 4 ~ ~ '. ' . ~ '. ; irajueegXsguag-greg ~ ~ 4, ~ ~ 4... -xoa gsam~nos a~ ~ ggyydn oueyg aqua yo query wsamqgxou a~ uo paqeaoy sy eaxe ps' qgxog-~xoH aogoguod aqua, DVHZ Sgg 5 r Apngs yo asm ~ ay yaaaas ~ spry duo e~ sg~ gym' eyuopa~ ~ Sao~' appose Imp yy~g$08 QQB SS~lgl 5$PClg QQ'f0+ Q~ '~ gpgOg g...

  7. Application of organolithium compounds for the preparation of some aliphatic and alicyclic phosphines, phosphine oxides and phosphine sulfides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Screttas, Constantinos G

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @? ~?? Qg) 23h2? 19? Oelkie? N?? pygmy? Qgg? ~i? @ 636)71h(1486)? 2o. te?L~. 4. w. , Net, a. m Isg?14. a. I. , g. ~. ~. , gg. g9. RL ~ heal& 0? Lh?? @g? Q~Q Qgg? ~ g? 326(1932) TL?Q? $? g? 966(1933) ~ 22? 9?fs??a? ??, y? ~. ~? @g, ?, g, 1684(1921) ~ 23...? Oaf fs?ay D? D? ??4 Watt?1 ~ C? 4 ~ ~ QQ?? Q? 3696(1999) ~ 2$? LLL?h?elis, ??, ~?? ~? 63(1901) ~ l5eh?elis, k? a?4 Oleishs?sa? L? ~ ~?? g? 801?1961(lw)2) ~ 26? ICeh?olio/ I? ??4 Ileeee? ?? ~ Q@?? gy 1610(1842)? 27 ~ Herr?LL ~ D? I?? g? AS...

  8. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe D'Appollonio; Paolo Di Vecchia; Rodolfo Russo; Gabriele Veneziano

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  9. Biology, economic importance and chemical control of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. (J. E. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Phil MacArthur

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 40 ZHTgoDUCTXON Tho fall arcigcwsrn, 8gg~g ging~g (J ~ E. ChrLth), is f?ccnd in tbo tcscp?rate and tr?pi?el ~ of the &~?st?rn hcwcL~. This hueA pest ?as first de~ by lcd, th in ~ fron a specdncsc tahsn in GoorgLa (Beagisoni 1%9). Tho fa... ooonesie ~ te the Ratter oooo % dotoenino th? foa~~tr of ayylging Lnsoetioidos, the ooet of tsaatnent wast bo hei Jenmtedt and Seafood (19/8) found that the aswosgo east for aylA, "pbbs insootLsidos to yenaawnA ~ bp tho nso ef ~ aaehbiesy" +as g. . yes...

  10. Quantum Control of Qubits and Atomic Motion Using Ultrafast Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mizrahi; B. Neyenhuis; K. Johnson; W. C. Campbell; C. Senko; D. Hayes; C. Monroe

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed lasers offer significant advantages over CW lasers in the coherent control of qubits. Here we review the theoretical and experimental aspects of controlling the internal and external states of individual trapped atoms with pulse trains. Two distinct regimes of laser intensity are identified. When the pulses are sufficiently weak that the Rabi frequency $\\Omega$ is much smaller than the trap frequency $\\otrap$, sideband transitions can be addressed and atom-atom entanglement can be accomplished in much the same way as with CW lasers. By contrast, if the pulses are very strong ($\\Omega \\gg \\otrap$), impulsive spin-dependent kicks can be combined to create entangling gates which are much faster than a trap period. These fast entangling gates should work outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime and be insensitive to thermal atomic motion.

  11. Our Family's Food: How We Plan to Get It.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances L.; Mason, Louise; Harris, Jimmie Nell; Cox, Maeona

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Select ox of the plans and find the groups which ccr. respond to the age, sex and activity of all yoor family members. Transfer these amounts tr g 1- w, bb, bet? t?,t?t-PSW ,t?I?cD W % g 1 ow a(ow aww ss ***hvlw... -3'dcdc-l' 0 5 a$ a" c m k gm 5 e-5 2~2 CQZM +:+8,3 g'&'g; ' E U Ej yyy qO?q I., "1"19 ,.I *c?Y*c?* om.. c?Yc9" ,,...I ,1)1 0 : ; . . . . , . ,OIII 00-4 ..I ,I, I.. ..I ,,I ,.#.I* ,.*I ,,..I. .,se .I ,. I...

  12. Transition from soft- to hard-Pomeron in the structure functions of hadrons at small-$x$ from holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akira Watanabe; Katsuhiko Suzuki

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nucleon and pion structure functions at small Bjorken-$x$ region in the framework of holographic QCD with a special emphasis on the roles of AdS space wave functions. Using the BPST kernel for the Pomeron exchange and calculating its coupling to target hadrons in the AdS space, we obtain $F_2$ structure functions at the small-$x$. Results for the proton $F^p_2$ as well as the pion $F^\\pi_2$ are consistent with experimental data of the deep inelastic scattering and the forward electroproduction of a neutron. Observed $Q^2$ dependence of the Pomeron intercept is well reproduced from soft non-perturbatibve $(Q^2 \\sim 0)$ to hard perturbative $(Q^2 \\gg 1 GeV^2)$ region. We find the interplay between soft and hard Pomerons is closely related with behavior of AdS wave functions of hadrons and the virtual photon.

  13. Control authority of unconventional control surface deflections on a fighter aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Lloyd Joe

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    60 80 0. 8 0. 6 4- 4- Cl o 04 0. 2 -IO Q Q 0 00ggG IO 20 Angle of Attack (deg) 30 Figure 12. Reynolds Number Effects 34 C3 g=e 0 /=80 q =80 . 012 . Oll . 010 . 009 g . 008 4- . 007 0 m . 006 8 . 005 . 004 . 003 . 002... . 001 0. 000 5 15 0 Io 20 Angle of Attack (deg) 25 Figure 13. Asymmetries in Lateral-Directional Data with No Sideslip 0 0 =4o q =SO d $ ~ 80 . 006 . 002 0 S 0. 000 o 002 ~006 -5 5 IS 25 SS 0 IO 20 30 Angle of Attack (deg) Figure 13...

  14. Borexino: A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

  15. Self-intersection local times of random walks: Exponential moments in subcritical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Mathias

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fix $p>1$, not necessarily integer, with $p(d-2)0$ that are bounded from above, possibly tending to zero. The speed is identified in terms of mixed powers of $t$ and $\\theta_t$, and the precise rate is characterized in terms of a variational formula, which is in close connection to the {\\it Gagliardo-Nirenberg inequality}. As a corollary, we obtain a large-deviation principle for $\\|\\ell_t\\|_p/(t r_t)$ for deviation functions $r_t$ satisfying $t r_t\\gg\\E[\\|\\ell_t\\|_p]$. Informally, it turns out that the random walk homogeneously squeezes in a $t$-dependent box with diameter of order $\\ll t^{1/d}$ to produce the required amount of self-intersections. Our main tool is an upper bound for the joint density of the local times of the walk.

  16. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 5, 23 November - 6 December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    . bIf hgzlQm pTkfbg ug]{ xf] eg] xªsªdf t'?Gt} Ps nfv g]kfnL dlxnfn] sfd kfpg ;Sg] l:ylt /x]sf] cf]e/l;h g]lKnh ODKnf]Od]G6 P;f]l;P;g xªsªsf cWoIf uf]ljGb ;'Aaf atfpg'x'G5 . pxfF eGg'x'G5, æg]kfnL dlxnf sfdbf/sf] dfu xªsªdf 7"nf] 5, t/ ;fdfGo ;Lk... . The under- standing was reached in “haste" without consulting other 130 political parties and the government. The King would have no problem to go for Constituent Assembly election if “all political parties" demanded so. The government may take legal...

  17. The relationship of air temperature and air volume to the rate of drying rice in sacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, William Lloyd

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operation to a stoiiture content, ef 19 to, 14 per eemt. "She eaoJee w~e ~~;. ;ogpu;Ih dtiring. the '&yield, epeMMen for each test, At the end of the drying peribd, s composite simple 5 r n'ne, 'tegen fron. each ~i4r:, for;~ii~, . determ4nsMem ~8 later... ~ 0 XQO. I 1'15. h +1, 8 1%4. 5 1/0, 5 1~9&JI 1OV~ XMQ gp, ss N. , '7G gg, 65 g). , 4Q Q6. 48 QO;51 $6, 41 19. 75 (VS sLin ) 19. VT ('l. 5 'min. ) 14 62 (Ts min. ) XQ 44 , X5? x1AS a '. gutsy. Isagles fojt'~i'etige detereinstiona...

  18. Measurement uncertainty of adsorption testing of desiccant materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C E; Pesaran, A A

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of measurement uncertainty analysis as described in the current ANSI/ASME standard is applied to the testing of desiccant materials in SERI`s Sorption Test Facility. This paper estimates the elemental precision and systematic errors in these tests and propagates them separately to obtain the resulting uncertainty of the test parameters, including relative humidity ({plus_minus}.03) and sorption capacity ({plus_minus}.002 g/g). Errors generated by instrument calibration, data acquisition, and data reduction are considered. Measurement parameters that would improve the uncertainty of the results are identified. Using the uncertainty in the moisture capacity of a desiccant, the design engineer can estimate the uncertainty in performance of a dehumidifier for desiccant cooling systems with confidence. 6 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Two-Photon Correlations in Atomic Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and m is the magnetic quantum number in the F repre- sentation. The two photons are represented as plane waves whose directions of travel are k, and k, , respectively, and whose helicities, +1, are denoted by a, and o, , respectively, Detector 1... effects, is S &X dO, dQ, 2 &o," l~(1)lo, &&c2 l~(2)lorn&l IQg ~ Qy 02 02 Pf ~ 7tl~~ y gf y Nlf gg SIQ 75I (-1) '"P(F, , m, )(2F +1)' && C(F1F, ; m, m, -m)C(FlF, ; m', m, ?m')C(F1F&, m, mz ?m) && C (FlF&, m ', m& ?m') W (J& JF& F; 1 I ) W (J&JF&F; 1I...

  20. Lokaratna, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,segpeigpur ei g thmgfpseg fpu-mtb0gThmvg8mlrecg trg thmg8pesvpgapytmgapllmig ? ?na?t 0gThmvgpumgpg8 ysemyygarff estv0gThmvgpumgmecpcmigsegpcusa lt umg8 tgfrytlvg arffmuasplskmigpcusa lt um0gThmvgrLegusamgfslly0ggThmvgpumgy aamyyO lg8 ysemyyfmegpeig hp... Thmg Upeihp g y ddrymilv g thmg ruscsepl g sehp8stpety g rOg thmymg ’sllpcmy g simetsOv g thmfyml’my g pyg 4gBolangir District Gazetteer,1968 zpis’pysq0 g Thm g umlscsre g rO g thm g Upeihp g um’rl’my g pur ei g mputh g Kriimyy g pei g rthmug umdumymetptsreyg...

  1. Partial characterization of [alpha]-D-mannosidase deficient mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Linda Louise

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aqaLdwoo qsowLe uy '?stsoptdtLopnasd?paoeLdau azogauaqq uotq. eubtsap stqq '. stsoptsouuew aseastp uewn4 aqua paLqwasau nLaso(o uotg tpuoo aqua spueL6 qdwEL aqua go sLLao LetLaqgopuao(notgau pue suounau go saLonoett aqua. ut Letuaqew abeuoqs aqua...Leguoo -asouuew e po a6euogs aqua ul anblun gnq 'amoupuEs s, uaLunH 6ullqwas -au aseaslp a6e~ops pazL[ewaua6 e paqcuosap aH (gg6L) uewuaqop Eq ~apaosip oLg uoads e se pasoubeLp q. s~ 0 see sLsopisouuem uewnH 'goagap oLZemEzua aqq ~op sno6 -Ezoaagaq s(emcue ui...

  2. The structure of countable primary abelian groups and primary abelian groups without elements of infinite height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heatherly, Henry Edward

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'and thezefeze $(xz~3i~s) Q' g(n-lx s). Bn'4' xz - y. g ie, ef, : ;ehQez' y and". he@ac h3 hypothesize h(zap 8)wh'(xz )x e)& @ sentf a4iq@gen. ' Thsz'hfe'zs, @ 5 g(g) 4 lj(z) m' a, 'ez' Q(xz) ds Qx)". e a-. Chas the thsezsm is txns' fm' h e n+3... be Aehateli by C~ 1/2p 1/4, &/4p 3/6, eh@? aniby ande& gnlhiplianiian, . 18l. ', ltoelolel, oe::l. oe p 1 1 lo 1 b hooee bp e bio ll' lp, ' ob ecol lfol ill pebble, ehebb e leo o gxoof8 Xt 6 ie hare%an-freaq then She theorem . Teoisarph:e Ca Rp She. hll...

  3. A study of a small supersonic wind tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Pu-Kwang

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . '1111&E&(reo 0or;-, lde. a ooir: 1 O:Ek( fIOE: 1 '. tll f Eeoc& sl!'oC&rr i!a(d! Ei, (E'b(r N, Eloo(o '1 i Kl c' pJ &i&(1 1& or \\ &e f j 1&"1& 1! . : 1( ". . I Gx; '?o (r&e"'. kdf'&lE'e 6) 1')! -' VOI(ro;. , y of 1" 1 o;. o( E*oa";1 b; f oE&o 8 el o k...A "&T'. !07 0~'' l; '!&7? . "t:i~''". "~':"iTC hlIhl) TU. -'Ji!'7, I ':", "at% ' 1 ~. "' 4". 0 w'. "~. "31'. ';, . ', ' . :~ P ", '. C'. i A iiTU!gg i)" %;, i'. ') t. S. lpga 'l"!pi:. [C' & y!':) TU. '!":! " . 3 O . ;-'. ii1? ". !& ('i's, t...

  4. The EUV Spectrum of the Quasi-Coherent Oscillations of the Dwarf Nova SS Cygni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Data obtained by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite are used to determine the EUV spectrum of the quasi-coherent oscillations of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. It is found that the spectrum of the oscillations is neither blue nor red nor grey relative to the net (oscillation-phase integrated) spectrum, and hence that the oscillations cannot be explained by variations in the effective temperature, absorbing column density, or effective area, respectively. Instead, it is found that the amplitude of the oscillations is high at the relative maxima of the net spectrum, and low to zero at the relative minima of the net spectrum. This behavior can be explained by either variations in the emission line flux atop a constant underlying continuum, or variations in the optical depth of a haze of overlapping absorption lines, in which case the optical depths must be $\\tau<1$ at the relative maxima of the net spectrum, and $\\tau\\gg 1$ at the relative minima.

  5. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric V. Linder

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

  6. R-parity violating effects in top quark flavor-changing neutral-current production at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Junjie [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, K1S 5B6 (Canada); Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu Lei [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the minimal supersymmetric model the R-parity violating top quark interactions, which are so far weakly constrained, can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) productions for the top quark at the large hadron collider (LHC). In this work we assume the presence of the B-violating couplings and examine their contributions to the FCNC productions proceeding through the parton processes cg{yields}t, gg{yields}tc, cg{yields}t{gamma}, cg{yields}tZ and cg{yields}th. We find that all these processes can be greatly enhanced relative to the R-parity preserving predictions. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, all the production channels except cg{yields}th can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity, in contrast to the R-parity preserving case in which only cg{yields}t can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity.

  7. Challenges for Large-Field Inflation and Moduli Stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfried Buchmuller; Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Alexander Westphal; Clemens Wieck; Martin Wolfgang Winkler

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the interplay between K\\"ahler moduli stabilization and chaotic inflation in supergravity. While heavy moduli decouple from inflation in the supersymmetric limit, supersymmetry breaking generically introduces non-decoupling effects. These lead to inflation driven by a soft mass term, $m_\\varphi^2 \\sim m m_{3/2}$, where $m$ is a supersymmetric mass parameter. This scenario needs no stabilizer field, but the stability of moduli during inflation imposes a large supersymmetry breaking scale, $m_{3/2} \\gg H$, and a careful choice of initial conditions. This is illustrated in three prominent examples of moduli stabilization: KKLT stabilization, K\\"ahler Uplifting, and the Large Volume Scenario. Remarkably, all models have a universal effective inflaton potential which is flattened compared to quadratic inflation. Hence, they share universal predictions for the CMB observables, in particular a lower bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r \\gtrsim 0.05$.

  8. A morphological comparison of the eyes of some falconiform and passeriform birds with special reference to: Passer domesticus, Mimus polyglottos, Sturnella magna, Falco sparverius, Cathartes aura, and Buteo jamaicensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lord, Rexford D

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the annular pad of the lens of birds' eyes. rane (1~) cade 0 furthsr Study of the bootes snd Oonolu- ded that tho pooteu ic not derived from the choroid (as had been pre viously believed) and that it ie an intraocular sense organ and is concerned... of fsloonifora birds, X ef' s boriaont;. 2 meet%, . 'r~, 5ees&;l~ gg m?, 4m~ pox'~i~&p ef; the aye ~ 4amQea ieh~4aa eaNa eue ~ xamMe 2Qhc. M~aLu ~4 qgo ++ X eye gf g4t 4~~~ 8y6 'Nip"~s 6~ 4 4+8 Vy'P "Qpp'. ' y Cps ~ pad cv Rect C X - Keie X4fo...

  9. Thermalization of gluon matter including ggggg interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El; C. Greiner; Z. Xu

    2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Within a pQCD inspired kinetic parton cascade we simulate the space time evolution of gluons which are produced initially in a heavy ion collision at RHIC energy. The inelastic gluonic interactions $gg \\leftrightarrow ggg$ do play an important role: For various initial conditions it is found that thermalization and the close to ideal fluid dynamical behaviour sets in at very early times. Special emphasis is put on color glass condensate initial conditions and the `bottom up thermalization' scenario. Off-equilibrium $3\\to 2$ processes make up the very beginning of the evolution leading to an initial decrease in gluon number and a temporary avalanche of the gluon momentum distribution to higher transversal momenta.

  10. Elliptic flow and nearly perfect fluidity in dilute Fermi gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schaefer

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution we summarize recent progress in understanding the shear viscosity of strongly correlated dilute Fermi gases. We discuss predictions from kinetic theory, and show how these predictions can be tested using recent experimental data on elliptic flow. We find agreement between theory and experiments in the high temperature regime $T\\gg T_F$, where $T_F$ is the the temperature where quantum degeneracy effects become important. In the low temperature regime, $T\\sim T_F$, the strongest constraints on the shear viscosity come from experimental studies of the damping of collective modes. These experiments indicate that $\\eta/s\\lsim 0.5\\hbar/k_B$, where $\\eta$ is the shear viscosity and $s$ is the entropy density.

  11. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  12. LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  13. Di-Higgs phenomenology: The forgotten channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Englert; Frank Krauss; Michael Spannowsky; Jennifer Thompson

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for multi-Higgs final states allow to constrain parameters of the SM (or extensions thereof) that directly relate to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Multi-Higgs production cross sections, however, are small and the phenomenologically accessible final states are challenging to isolate in the busy multi-jet hadron collider environment of the LHC run 2. This makes the necessity to extend the list of potentially observable production mechanisms obvious. Most of the phenomenological analyses in the past have focused on $gg\\to hh+jets$; in this paper we study $pp\\to t\\bar t hh$ at LHC run 2 and find that this channel for $h\\to b\\bar b$ and semi-leptonic and hadronic top decays has the potential to provide an additional handle to constrain the Higgs trilinear coupling in a global fit at the end of run 2.

  14. New environmental regulation for the aerospace industry: The aerospace NESHAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, J.P.; Gampper, B.P. [Brusn and McDonnell Waste Consultants, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baker, J.M. [Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    40 CFR Part 63, Subpart GG, the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities, commonly referred to as the Aerospace NESHAP, was issued on September 1, 1995 and requires compliance by September 1, 1998. The regulation affects any facility that manufactures or reworks commercial, civil, or military aircraft vehicles or components and is a major source of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs). The regulation targets reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) and Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) emissions to the atmosphere. Processes affected by the new regulation include aircraft painting, paint stripping, chemical milling masking, solvent cleaning, and spray gun cleaning. Regulatory requirements affecting these processes are summarized, and different compliance options compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and industry acceptance. Strategies to reduce compliance costs and minimize recordkeeping burdens are also presented.

  15. Modeling the effects of spatial agronomic inputs on crop yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCauley, James Darrell

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entry in the marginal probability matrix obtained by summing the rows of p(i, j). Ng pg(j) = Zp(i, j) Ng Ng pz+g(k) = i=))=)p(i, j'), k q [2, 3, . . . , 2Ng] )+g=a Ng Ng p, s(k) = g=gg=g p(i, i), k E [0, 1, . . . , jVg ? 1) h ? gl=& Ng Ng p*= 2... answered all of my e ? mail inquiries regarding the port and spent long hours on the phone during debugging, Sam Turner at the GOSSYM ? COMAX Information Unit in Starkville, Mississippi, was also very helpful during the early stages of this worln Rajesh...

  16. Environmental factors in relation to seedling necroses of cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Gopinath

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COE LI O 1A ro q ?n LI H _st B AG LI Ov i CO ?*> CM CM e ? ? ? ?CJ Ia oFTRLI B XGLI OOCM L I BR AL Y &M &** -StLI GAAG LI vQO \\ NO NO t A B YSR B CM LI LH LI CM OK n CM o ? oo I -Ot n1 oo ^ &H eOOtr\\ ?ncM 0\\ LI _ a... nA sG B F?R _E B CO Y t A I A O LI LI ?+?? oStLI I 3 O COo o LI LI GG LI G LI LI P-'i LI B f t 1A* CO _=T l>- B B CM B B Os B F * LI B LI B? ? L I LI B sS> L I IL Y Y CO -vA LI EG YB LI LI B AG LG LI LI IA...

  17. Renormalization and asymptotic expansion of Dirac's polarized vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Gravejat; Mathieu Lewin; Eric Séré

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform rigorously the charge renormalization of the so-called reduced Bogoliubov-Dirac-Fock (rBDF) model. This nonlinear theory, based on the Dirac operator, describes atoms and molecules while taking into account vacuum polarization effects. We consider the total physical density including both the external density of a nucleus and the self-consistent polarization of the Dirac sea, but no `real' electron. We show that it admits an asymptotic expansion to any order in powers of the physical coupling constant $\\alphaph$, provided that the ultraviolet cut-off behaves as $\\Lambda\\sim e^{3\\pi(1-Z_3)/2\\alphaph}\\gg1$. The renormalization parameter $0

  18. Rethinking the QCD collisional energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Peshier

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that to leading order the collisional energy loss of an energetic parton in the hot quark gluon plasma reads $dE/dx \\sim \\alpha(m_D^2)T^2$, where the scale of the coupling is determined by the (parametrically soft) Debye screening mass. Compared to previous expressions derived by Bjorken and other authors, $dE^B/dx \\sim \\alpha^2 T^2 \\ln(ET/m_D^2)$, the rectified result takes into account the running of the coupling, as dictated by quantum corrections beyond tree level. As one significant consequence, due to asymptotic freedom, the QCD collisional energy loss becomes independent of the jet energy in the limit $E \\gg T$. It is advocated that this resummation improved perturbative result might be useful to (re-)estimate the collisional energy loss for temperatures relevant in heavy ion phenomenology.

  19. The distribution and relative abundance of Nematopsis spp., as found in Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) in the Galveston Bay area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger Dean

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first porosporid in America, ~Nt ' t, h'hh f d' tl, g'll d 1 t' fth ll yt . g 1 ~ii'd th d gt t't 'fth ' b, ~ph b. t' d~E ~d* . H p*tt*d' f t' f yt g gf M*bj k Bay, Virginia, to Lake Barre, Louisiana. After a variety of field and lb t*N P ' t, h gg... Further Stud of Nemato sis th gh ' p ' f~Nt ' k, th 1'f y 1 f* a number of species remains to be described. Two of the most recent species to be identified reveal only known decapod hosts. Ball (1951)d 'b dN. ~o-'* th*b ' fg gr' ' f tt ~p* 'd t 1' d P...

  20. Tracing CP violation in the production of top quark pairs by multiple TeV proton-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bernreuther; A. Brandenburg

    1993-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibilities of searching for non-standard CP violation in $pp\\to t\\bar{t}X$ at multiple TeV collision energies. A general kinematic analysis of the underlying partonic production processes $gg\\to t\\bar{t}$ and $q\\bar{q}\\to t\\bar{t}$ in terms of their density matrices is given. We evaluate the CP-violating parts of these matrices in two-Higgs doublet extensions of the standard model (SM) and give results for CP asymmetries at the parton level. We show that these asymmetries can be traced by measuring suitable observables constructed from energies and momenta of the decay products of $t$ and $\\bar{t} $. We find CP-violating effects to be of the order of $10^{-3}$ and show that possible contaminations induced by SM interactions are savely below the expected signals.

  1. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Kyle [University of Oxford; Hill, Christopher T. [FNAL; Ross, Graham G. [University of Oxford

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field $\\sigma$ which has a very large VEV $f \\gg m_\\text{Higgs}$. This requires a sector of "ultra-weak" couplings $\\zeta_i$, where $\\zeta_i \\lesssim m_\\text{Higgs}^2 / f^2$. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of $\\sigma$ in the $\\zeta_i \\rightarrow 0$ limit. The singlet field $\\sigma$ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman-Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  2. A beta-type fully implicit reservoir simulator with variable bubble point and dew point 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boe, Jarle

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the nomenclature, The continuity equation for each phase is: -Q =-B ?, ', (SB, ) (4) +- ? 'uR ? Q-QR=-Pl ? (SB+SBR)(5) ax gx ax ox so g oso 3t gg ooso u -Q = 8 ?. (SB) a ax wx w at w w (6) Combining equations (1) - (6), the diffusivity equation for each... phase can be expressed as fo11ows: Oi1 equation: Ck k B r aP 8 xroo o y)+Q=B(SB) ax u;x ox o at o o 0 The gas equation: +Q +QR =B? a g o so at (SB +SBR ) g g 0 0 so Water equation: Ck k B & aP a xrww/ w 1 a ( ? -v )+Q =B ? (SB) ax u 43x wx...

  3. Grazing practices as a major factor in fire occurrence in the longleaf pine region of southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David Adair

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . &o 9. n l3)II) bio ilrl' o. ' 0 lrregz PC3JZ Col nu3 Gccolinsi~'. fon CBG BG C PQ'pu3 'is Ic' n do I. B z 3 i I on 'I' 118 PGK dG orrdB BB ns sus dn tiG z -3vsal 'ci'IlQC Chs SBBGCGGC popu3 "Cion Csin i. GG 1m~de in lmndin Gnd I'olI& Conan. iss...;ii I ZOIIllc'GS SZQ BCCQSSX919 iield WQJ. l Ored ce j bi. e . ieve ouen ~pox'te?i i'c 'xxiprove 183. 3' pzccBQtiono a'ie IilIB3. 8?. 1 Iced. GBX'i &~ A. l 4118 prcc3. 61il BXQB xs Fiobo ioo83. 3 pOOX o derSQ j BXIO rehIXBB BX bile OXQI GIXin'lbing b...

  4. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a shear flow in an initially unmagnetized plasma, unlike in the (magneto)hydrodynamics case. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroom-like electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. Macroscopic ($\\gg c/\\omega_{pe}$) fields are shown to be generated by these microscopic shear instabilities, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission and to seed MHD processes at long time-scales.

  5. An analysis of periodic heat flow through a plane slab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Daniel Morgan

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the slice are shown in Figure 2. The corresponding ener~ balance is: kA(t l ? t )6Q kA(t l - t )aR or t I + t (M ? 2) + where 0 h A(t - t )gg kA(tl t g'9 i~N 'i&GY DlA('HAlill 10d HA1F-is&IC'. " Figu o 3 The ener, ~ dia?ram for thc half... + nc~. g 2 + 't2 (LYJ 2)+t g2g, 6 ~ cl. , ')61, 1 ~9 L. , to + tz(V, ? 2) ? , - t 1. + ~61. 1 2. - . ". ' + . '2O. O = ~6. g 61. 1 + 20. 0 2. - 2 + 262. 2Nbtb + ti(M - 2Nb ' ) + 2t4 i 2 . 2 0 +262. " 2. -2 . 2 -2 +2 20. 0 ~26. 0 Net heat...

  6. Specimen Catalog, Numbers 6092-9501 (1961-1975)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    . 3~ ?l - Zg.___ /0 .O ? r - 1- l g %*? ? - q - H /g,g>? - 2 - -? -/ ? TrfJi ? - 7 - 17 *7.3' > - * ) - / % ?h jz J j j j l r_z3 _sJA 7 .2 " - - 9 - / 8 M l z3. - IS__ ? 3 ,f| .

  7. Procedures employed in the verification of postings, footings, and ledger balances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Carl

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    app??oint ion 989 &414& 55 115&54f &5? $5&lid& ae 15 & fs'F. BO 108 & $15& 04 1& $08& 48 $&944, 15 ?5&4$4, 05 e&?95&000&00 I&140&gg, oo? f 05 & 000& 00 I, 180 & 000& 00 4 8&9$5&455&95 4 sde&ff1&vo 4 sgesa&aod. ds l&odf &8$9&59 114&fde&04... Sd&i'd, oa 4{1) 159&40? 59, 4dl. ee 4&155&000&00 8&8?5&000, 00 (5) 958&dls&50 l&odf &889&58 je) 58, 44f, dd 114&fde&04 (F) 58&9?0. 00 $5 &905& BI s9. 411. 55 &e) sd, eef. s9? 4&154&000&00 I & 885 & 000& 00 10&954& 00 948&515& 50 1 & 155...

  8. Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varun Sahni; Yuri Shtanov

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about 25% fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

  9. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  10. Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

  11. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Sui Lu; Rudolf Podgornik

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. The steric constraint is implemented via a representation of the Heaviside function, which enables one to transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero mode fluctuations of the membranes, and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area $S$, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the inter-membrane separation $d$ as $d^{-2}$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but crosses over to $d^{-4}$ scaling for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$, whereas the zero mode part of the steric potential always scales as $d^{-2}$. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain exact nonlinear expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude $\\sigma$, which becomes small at low temperatures $T$ and/or large bending stiffnesses $\\kappa$. Moreover, $\\sigma$ scales as $d$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but saturates at $\\sqrt{k_{{\\rm B}} T S/\\kappa}$ for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study inter-membrane interactions subject to three different types of potential: (i)~the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii)~an attractive square well, (iii)~the Morse potential, and (iv)~a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  12. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A geologic/geochemical investigation in the vicinity of UPR-200-E-82 was performed using pairs of cone-penetrometer probe holes. A total of 41 direct-push cone-penetrometer borings (19 pairs to investigate different high moisture zones in the same sampling location and 3 individual) were advanced to characterize vadose zone moisture and the distribution of contaminants. A total of twenty sample sets, containing up to two split-spoon liners and one grab sample, were delivered to the laboratory for characterization and analysis. The samples were collected around the documented location of the C-152 pipeline leak, and created an approximately 120-ft diameter circle around the waste site. UPR-200-E-82 was a loss of approximately 2,600 gallons of Cs-137 Recovery Process feed solution containing an estimated 11,300 Ci of cesium-137 and 5 Ci of technetium-99. Several key parameters that are used to identify subsurface contamination were measured, including: water extract pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, technetium-99, sodium, and uranium concentrations and technetium-99 and uranium concentrations in acid extracts. All of the parameters, with the exception of electrical conductivity, were elevated in at least some of the samples analyzed as part of this study. Specifically, soil pH was elevated (from 8.69 to 9.99) in five samples collected northeast and southwest of the C-152 pipeline leak. Similarly, samples collected from these same cone-pentrometer holes contained significantly more water-extractable sodium (more than 50 ?g/g of dry sediment), uranium (as much as 7.66E-01 ?g/g of dry sediment), nitrate (up to 30 ?g/g of dry sediment), and technetium-99 (up to 3.34 pCi/g of dry sediment). Most of the samples containing elevated concentrations of water-extractable sodium also had decreased levels of water extractable calcium and or magnesium, indicating that tank-related fluids that were high in sodium did seep into the vadose zone near these probe holes. Several of the samples containing high concentrations of water-leachable uranium also contained high pore water corrected alkalinity (3.26E+03 mg/L as CaCO3), indicating that the elevated water-leachable uranium could be an artifact of uranyl-carbonate complexation of naturally occurring labile uranium. However, a mass scan of the water extract containing the highest concentration of uranium was performed via inductively coupled mass spectrometry over the range of 230 to 240 atomic mass units, and a discernable peak was observed at mass 236. Although the data is considered qualitative, the presence of uranium-236 in the 1:1 sediment:water extract is a clear indication that the sample contains contaminant uranium [Hanford reprocessed fuel waste]. After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone surrounding the C-152 pipeline leak site has been contaminated by waste generally sent to tanks. The two zones or regions that contained the largest amount of contaminants, either in concentration or by occurrence of several key constituents/contaminants of concern, were located: 1) between the 241-C-151 and 241-C-152 Diversion Boxes (near the location of UPR-200-E-82) and 2) directly across the C-152 waste site near the C-153 Diversion Box (near where a pipeline, which connects the two diversion boxes, is shown on old blue prints . Without the use of more sophisticated analytical techniques, such as isotope signature analysis of ruthenium fission product isotopes, it is impossible to determine if the contamination observed at these two locations are from the same waste source or are a result of different leak events.

  13. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2?microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi (China); Chang, Xiuli [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Rentschler, Gerda [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden); Tian, Liting [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jin, Taiyi, E-mail: tyjinster@gmail.com [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Broberg, Karin, E-mail: karin.broberg_palmgren@med.lu.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 ?g/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 ?g/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 ?g/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary ?2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (? = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (? = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.018, 95% CI ? 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ? Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ? The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ? A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ? Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ? The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  14. Final Report for Project DE-FC02-06ER25755 [Pmodels2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar; Sadayappan, P

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we describe the research accomplished by the OSU team under the Pmodels2 project. The team has worked on various angles: designing high performance MPI implementations on modern networking technologies (Mellanox InfiniBand (including the new ConnectX2 architecture and Quad Data Rate), QLogic InfiniPath, the emerging 10GigE/iWARP and RDMA over Converged Enhanced Ethernet (RoCE) and Obsidian IB-WAN), studying MPI scalability issues for multi-thousand node clusters using XRC transport, scalable job start-up, dynamic process management support, efficient one-sided communication, protocol offloading and designing scalable collective communication libraries for emerging multi-core architectures. New designs conforming to the Argonne’s Nemesis interface have also been carried out. All of these above solutions have been integrated into the open-source MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 software. This software is currently being used by more than 2,100 organizations worldwide (in 71 countries). As of January ’14, more than 200,000 downloads have taken place from the OSU Web site. In addition, many InfiniBand vendors, server vendors, system integrators and Linux distributors have been incorporating MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 into their software stacks and distributing it. Several InfiniBand systems using MVAPICH/MVAPICH2 have obtained positions in the TOP500 ranking of supercomputers in the world. The latest November ’13 ranking include the following systems: 7th ranked Stampede system at TACC with 462,462 cores; 11th ranked Tsubame 2.5 system at Tokyo Institute of Technology with 74,358 cores; 16th ranked Pleiades system at NASA with 81,920 cores; Work on PGAS models has proceeded on multiple directions. The Scioto framework, which supports taskparallelism in one-sided and global-view parallel programming, has been extended to allow multi-processor tasks that are executed by processor groups. A quantum Monte Carlo application is being ported onto the extended Scioto framework. A public release of Global Trees (GT) has been made, along with the Global Chunks (GC) framework on which GT is built. The Global Chunks (GC) layer is also being used as the basis for the development of a higher level Global Graphs (GG) layer. The Global Graphs (GG) system will provide a global address space view of distributed graph data structures on distributed memory systems.

  15. A New Unified Dark Fluid Model and Its Cosmic Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lixin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose a new unified dark fluid (UDF) model with equation of state (EoS) $w(a)=-\\alpha/(\\beta a^{-n}+1)$, which includes the generalized Chaplygin gas model (gGg) as its special case, where $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $n$ are three positive numbers. It is clear that this model reduces to the gCg model with EoS $w(a)=-B_s/(B_s+(1-B_s)a^{-3(1+\\alpha)})$, when $\\alpha=1$, $\\beta=(1-B_s)/B_s$ and $n=3(1+\\alpha)$. By combination the cold dark matter and the cosmological constant, one can coin a EoS of unified dark fluid in the form of $w(a)=-1/(1+(1-\\Omega_{\\Lambda})a^{-3}/\\Omega_{\\Lambda})$. With this observations, our proposed EoS provides a possible deviation from $\\Lambda$CDM model when the model parameters $\\alpha$ and $n$ deviate from 1 and 3 respectively. By using the currently available cosmic observations from type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) Union2.1, baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), we test the viability of this model and detect the possible devot...

  16. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  17. Color-singlet J/{psi} production at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 6}) in {Upsilon} decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Zhiguo [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China); Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona Diagonal, 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Wang Jianxiong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing, 100049 (China) and Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, (CAS) Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To clarify the conflict between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay, we consider the {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order color-singlet (CS) contributions of processes {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gggg. Both the branching ratio and the J/{psi} momentum spectrum are calculated, and the branching ratio (4.7x10{sup -4}) is larger than the leading-order contribution ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}, {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+ccg). Together with the QCD and QED leading-order contributions considered in our previous work, the CS prediction of the branching ratio for the direct J/{psi} production is Br({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}{sub direct}+X)=0.90{sub -0.31}{sup +0.49}x10{sup -4}, which is still about 3.8 times less than the CLEO measurement. We also obtain a preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc}=(B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) and find that the value 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} is much larger than the color-octet prediction, and suggest to measure this quality in future experimental analysis.

  18. First Search for Multijet Resonances in sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; et al

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV p{anti p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excessmore »outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.« less

  19. Photometry and Spectroscopy of the Type IIP SN 1999em from Outburst to Dust Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmhamdi, A; Chugai, N N; Pastorello, A; Turatto, M; Cappellaro, E; Altavilla, G; Benetti, S; Patat, F; Salvo, M E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present photometry and spectra of the type IIP SN1999em in NGC 1637 from several days after the outburst till day 642. An amount of $\\approx 0.02 M_{\\odot}$ of ejected $^{56}$Ni is inferred using the recovered bolometric light curve . The H$\\alpha$ and He I 10830 \\AA lines at the nebular epoch show that the distribution of the bulk of $^{56}$Ni can be represented approximately by a sphere of $^{56}$Ni with a velocity of 1500 km s$^{-1}$, which is shifted towards the far hemisphere by about 400 km s$^{-1}$. The fine structure of the H$\\alpha$ at the photospheric epoch reminiscent of the "Bochum event" in SN 1987A is analysed . The late time spectra show a dramatic transformation of the [O I] 6300 \\AA line profile between days 465 and 510, which we interpret as an effect of dust condensation during this period. Late time photometry supports the dust formation scenario after day 465. The [O I] line profile suggests that the dust occupies a sphere with velocity $\\approx 800$ km s$^{-1}$ and optical depth $\\gg1...

  20. Teacher-Student Relationships: Exploring the Perceptions of Students Who Exhibit Challenging Behaviors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satter, Allyson Leigh

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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

  1. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sehgal, Neelima [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  2. Superization of Homogeneous Spin Manifolds and Geometry of Homogeneous Supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Santi

    2009-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Let M_0=G_0/H be a (pseudo)-Riemannian homogeneous spin manifold, with reductive decomposition g_0=h+m and let S(M_0) be the spin bundle defined by the spin representation Ad:H->\\GL_R(S) of the stabilizer H. This article studies the superizations of M_0, i.e. its extensions to a homogeneous supermanifold M=G/H whose sheaf of superfunctions is isomorphic to Lambda(S^*(M_0)). Here G is the Lie supergroup associated with a certain extension of the Lie algebra of symmetry g_0 to an algebra of supersymmetry g=g_0+g_1=g_0+S via the Kostant-Koszul construction. Each algebra of supersymmetry naturally determines a flat connection nabla^{S} in the spin bundle S(M_0). Killing vectors together with generalized Killing spinors (i.e. nabla^{S}-parallel spinors) are interpreted as the values of appropriate geometric symmetries of M, namely even and odd Killing fields. An explicit formula for the Killing representation of the algebra of supersymmetry is obtained, generalizing some results of Koszul. The generalized spin connection nabla^{S} defines a superconnection on M, via the super-version of a theorem of Wang.

  3. Search for a CP-odd Higgs boson decaying to $Zh$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a heavy, CP-odd Higgs boson, $A$, decaying into a $Z$ boson and a 125 GeV Higgs boson, $h$, with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The search uses proton--proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. Decays of CP-even $h$ bosons to $\\tau\\tau$ or $bb$ pairs with the $Z$ boson decaying to electron or muon pairs are considered, as well as $h \\rightarrow bb$ decays with the $Z$ boson decaying to neutrinos. No evidence for the production of an $A$ boson in these channels is found and the 95% confidence level upper limits derived for $\\sigma (gg\\rightarrow A) \\times \\mbox{BR}(A\\rightarrow Zh) \\times \\mbox{BR}(h\\rightarrow f\\bar{f})$ are 0.098--0.013 pb for $f=\\tau$ and 0.57--0.014 pb for $f=b$ in a range of $m_A =$ 220--1000 GeV. The results are combined and interpreted in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models.

  4. Radiation from polarized electrons in oriented crystals at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Baier; V. M. Katkov

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation from high energy electrons in an oriented crystal can be considered in a frame of the quasiclassical operator method which appears to be a most satisfactory approach to the problem. Under some quite generic assumptions the general expression is derived for the probability of circularly polarized photon emission from the longitudinally polarized electron in oriented crystal. The particular mechanism of radiation depends on interrelation between the angle of incidence $\\vartheta_0$ (angle between the momentum of initial electron and axis (plane) of crystal) and angle $\\vartheta_v \\equiv V_0/m$ ($V_0$ is the scale of a potential of axis or a plane relative to which the angle $\\vartheta_0$ is defined). When $\\vartheta_0 \\ll \\vartheta_v$ one has magnetic bremsstrahlung type of radiation (with corrections $\\propto \\vartheta_0^2$ which are due to inhomogeneous character of field in crystal). When $\\vartheta_0 \\gg \\vartheta_v$ one obtains the theory of coherent bremsstrahlung, while for $\\vartheta_0 \\geq \\vartheta_v$ one arrives to the modified theory of coherent bremsstrahlung. At high energy radiation in oriented crystals is strongly enhanced comparing with standard bremsstrahlung.

  5. Circumbinary Molecular Rings Around Young Stars in Orion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Zapata; Paul T. P. Ho; Luis F. Rodriguez; Peter Schilke; Stan Kurtz

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm continuum, methyl cyanide molecular line, and 7 mm continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array, toward the most highly obscured and southern part of the massive star forming region OMC1S located behind the Orion Nebula. We find two flattened and rotating molecular structures with sizes of a few hundred astronomical units suggestive of circumbinary molecular rings produced by the presence of two stars with very compact circumstellar disks with sizes and separations of about 50 AU, associated with the young stellar objects 139-409 and 134-411. Furthermore, these two circumbinary rotating rings are related to two compact and bright {\\it hot molecular cores}. The dynamic mass of the binary systems obtained from our data are $\\geq$ 4 M$_\\odot$ for 139-409 and $\\geq$ 0.5 M$_\\odot$ for 134-411. This result supports the idea that intermediate-mass stars will form through {\\it circumstellar disks} and jets/outflows, as the low mass stars do. Furthermore, when intermediate-mass stars are in multiple systems they seem to form a circumbinary ring similar to those seen in young, multiple low-mass systems (e.g., GG Tau and UY Aur).

  6. Search for invisible decays of the Higgs boson produced in association with a hadronically decaying vector boson in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles is performed using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The process considered is Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson ($V$ = $W$ or $Z$) that decays hadronically, resulting in events with two or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No excess of candidates is observed in the data over the background expectation. The results are used to constrain $VH$ production followed by $H$ decaying to invisible particles for the Higgs mass range $115gg\\rightarrow H$ contribution as signal, the results also lead to an observed upper limit of 78% at 95% confidence level on the branching ratio of Higgs bosons dec...

  7. Limitations and Opportunities of Off-Shell Coupling Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Englert; Michael Spannowsky

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect constraints on the total Higgs width $\\Gamma_h$ from correlating Higgs signal strengths with cross section measurements in the off-shell region for $p(g)p(g)\\to 4\\ell$ production have received considerable attention recently, and the CMS collaboration have published a first measurement. We revisit this analysis from a new physics and unitarity constraints perspective and conclude that limits on $\\Gamma_h$ obtained in this fashion are not reliable unless we make model-specific assumptions, which cannot be justified at the current stage of the LHC programme. Relaxing the $\\Gamma_h$ interpretation, we discuss the merits of high invariant mass cross section measurements in the context of Higgs CP analyses, higher dimensional operator testing, and resolved new physics in the light of electroweak precision constraints beyond effective theory limitations. Furthermore, we show that a rather model-independent LHC constraint can be obtained from adapting the $gg\\to 4\\ell$ analysis to the weak boson fusion channels at lower statistical yield.

  8. Optimal Decoherence Control in non-Markovian Open, Dissipative Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the optimal control problem for non-Markovian open, dissipative quantum system. Optimal control using Pontryagin maximum principle is specifically derived. The influences of Ohmic reservoir with Lorentz-Drude regularization are numerically studied in a two-level system under the following three conditions: \\omega_0\\ll\\omega_c, \\omega_0\\approx\\omega_c or \\omega_0\\gg\\omega_c, where \\omega_0 is the characteristic frequency of the quantum system of interest, and \\omega_c the cut-off frequency of Ohmic reservoir. The optimal control process shows its remarkable influences on the decoherence dynamics. The temperature is a key factor in the decoherence dynamics. We analyze the optimal decoherence control in high temperature, intermediate temperature, and low temperature reservoirs respectively. It implies that designing some engineered reservoirs with the controlled coupling and state of the environment can slow down the decoherence rate and delay the decoherence time. Moreover, we compare the non-Markovian optimal decoherence control with the Markovian one and find that with non-Markovian the engineered artificial reservoirs are better than with the Markovian approximation in controlling the open, dissipative quantum system's decoherence.

  9. Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  10. Non-locality and viscous drag effects on the shear localisation in soft-glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Scagliarini; Benjamin Dollet; Mauro Sbragaglia

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Couette flow of a quasi-2d soft-glassy material in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The material is chosen to be above the jamming point, where a yield stress $\\sigma_Y$ emerges, below which the material deforms elastically and above which it flows like a complex fluid according to a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) rheology. Simultaneously, the effect of the confining plates is modelled as an effective linear friction law, while the walls aside the Hele-Shaw cell are sufficiently close to each other to allow visible cooperativity effects in the velocity profiles (Goyon et al., Nature 454, 84-87 (2008)). The effects of cooperativity are parametrized with a steady-state diffusion-relaxation equation for the fluidity field $f = \\dot{\\gamma}/\\sigma$, defined as the ratio between shear rate $\\dot{\\gamma}$ and shear stress $\\sigma$. For particular rheological flow-curves (Bingham fluids), the problem is tackled analytically: we explore the two regimes $\\sigma \\gg \\sigma_Y$ and $\\sigma \\approx \\sigma_Y$ and quantify the effect of the extra localisation induced by the wall friction. Other rheo-thinning fluids are explored with the help of numerical simulations based on lattice Boltzmann models, revealing a robustness of the analytical findings. Synergies and comparisons with other existing works in the literature (Barry et al., Phil. Mag. Lett. 91, 432-440 (2011)) are also discussed.

  11. Bootstrap Dynamical Symmetry Breaking with New Heavy Chiral Quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukihiro Mimura; Wei-Shu Hou; Hiroaki Kohyama

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A Higgs-like new boson with mass around 126 GeV is now established, but its true nature probably cannot be settled with 2011--2012 LHC data. We assume it is a dilaton with couplings weaker than the Higgs boson (except to $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $gg$), and explore dynamical symmetry breaking (DSB) by strong Yukawa coupling of a yet unseen heavy chiral quark doublet $Q$. Assuming the actual Higgs boson to be heavy, the Goldstone boson $G$ of electroweak symmetry breaking still couples to $Q$ with Yukawa coupling $\\lambda_Q$. A ``bootstrap" gap equation without a Higgs particle is constructed. Electroweak symmetry breaking via strong $\\lambda_Q$ generates both heavy mass for $Q$, while self-consistently justifying $G$ as a massless Goldstone particle in the loop. The spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in principle \\emph{allows} for a dilaton. We numerically solve such a gap equation and find the mass of the heavy quark to be a couple of TeV. We offer a short critique on the results of the scale-invariant model of Hung and Xiong, where a similar gap equation is built with a massless scalar doublet. Through this we show that a light SM Higgs at 126 GeV cannot be viable within our approach to DSB, while a dilaton with weaker couplings is consistent with our main result.

  12. Detecting a Higgs Pseudoscalar with a Z Boson Produced in Bottom Quark Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung Kao; Shankar Sachithanandam

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the prospects of detecting a Higgs pseudoscalar ($A^0$) in association with a $Z$ gauge boson produced from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A general two Higgs doublet model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model are adopted to study the discovery potential of $pp \\to ZA^0 \\to \\ell \\bar{\\ell} b\\bar{b} +X (\\ell = e, \\mu)$, via $b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$ with physics backgrounds and realistic cuts. Promising results are found for $m_A \\alt 400$ GeV in a general two Higgs doublet model when the heavier Higgs scalar ($H^0$) can decay into a $Z$ boson and a Higgs pseudoscalar ($H^0 \\to ZA^0$). We compare the production rates from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) and gluon fusion ($gg \\to ZA^0$) and find that they are complementary processes to produce $ZA^0$ in hadron collisions. While gluon fusion is the major source for producing a Higgs pseudoscalar associated with a $Z$ boson at the LHC for $\\tan\\beta \\alt 10$, bottom quark fusion can make dominant contributions for $\\tan\\beta \\agt 10$.

  13. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  14. The investigation of the electrodeposition of iron from fluoborate solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosier, Benjamin

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4' NSQ~s~~s~~oeeseewe~eam~ &5 SWSNLj~e ~~y~~~e w~eoe+'we+4~ QQ8@+ S~~~e+w~yi4yy44Wgsas~y4+eW4, 45 ~~ 4~ gl gg() 568 l 18 Nw@INNW~& A~ W ". W'O~':MiA %4 ~ AWNING NN W ek4eNw ~1~04 ~4 ~ NSSN@R NN'~ + NNN4 N ~ eeemmmmeeeam~~ ~K PXQQQKNL... Stoat saa mam W) inlaw? so the cLleetrylepoLttcLea of fecces eever smQ ~ QX~s Dos ~. aehd8eaa ?SelCCLCdag lSCSSe4Ca ~tee Theee ~ SeTSCStask thecal sceeideratka NffLedg taLs sssosst4r'e8 cps to the fcemst'oa ef euyvke aasL feria fccnocygsiee ccsl ~c8...

  15. Note on Anomalous Higgs-Boson Couplings in Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchalla, G; Celis, A; Krause, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale $v$. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order $10\\%$ from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, $v$, the scale of new Higgs dynamics $f$, and the cut-off $\\Lambda=4\\pi f$, admit expansions in $\\xi=v^2/f^2$ and $f^2/\\Lambda^2$. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as $\\xi\\gg 1/16\\pi^2$ the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral ...

  16. Parallel electric field generation by Alfven wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, N H; Brown, J C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    {This work aims to investigate the spectral structure of the parallel electric field generated by strong anisotropic and balanced Alfvenic turbulence in relation with the problem of electron acceleration from the thermal population in solar flare plasma conditions.} {We consider anisotropic Alfvenic fluctuations in the presence of a strong background magnetic field. Exploiting this anisotropy, a set of reduced equations governing non-linear, two-fluid plasma dynamics is derived. The low-$\\beta$ limit of this model is used to follow the turbulent cascade of the energy resulting from the non-linear interaction between kinetic Alfven waves, from the large magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s}\\ll 1$ down to the small "kinetic" scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s} \\gg 1$, $\\rho_{s}$ being the ion sound gyroradius.} {Scaling relations are obtained for the magnitude of the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, as a function of $k_{\\perp}$ and $k_{\\parallel}$, showing that the electric field develops ...

  17. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

  18. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  19. Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liu; C. M. Ko; B. W. Zhang

    2007-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Quark and gluon jets traversing through a quark-gluon plasma not only lose their energies but also can undergo flavor conversions. The conversion rates via the elastic $q(\\bar q)g\\to gq(\\bar q)$ and the inelastic $q\\bar q\\leftrightarrow gg$ scatterings are evaluated in the lowest order in QCD. Including both jet energy loss and conversions in the expanding quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, we have found a net conversion of quark to gluon jets. This reduces the difference between the nuclear modification factors for quark and gluon jets in central heavy ion collisions and thus enhances the $p/\\pi^+$ and ${\\bar p}/\\pi^-$ ratios at high transverse momentum. However, a much larger net quark to gluon jet conversion rate than the one given by the lowest-order QCD is needed to account for the observed similar ratios in central Au+Au and p+p collisions at same energy. Implications of our results are discussed.

  20. Running coupling effects in the evolution of jet quenching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Iancu; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the consequences of including the running of the QCD coupling in the equation describing the evolution of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q$ in the double logarithmic approximation. To start with, we revisit the case of a fixed coupling, for which we obtain exact solutions valid for generic values of the transverse momentum (above the medium saturation scale) and corresponding to various initial conditions. In the case of a running coupling, we construct approximate solutions in the form of truncated series obtained via successive iterations, whose convergence is well under control. We thus deduce the dominant asymptotic behavior of the renormalized $\\hat q$ in the limit of a large evolution time $Y\\equiv\\ln(L/\\lambda)$, with $L$ the size of the medium and $\\lambda$ the typical wavelength of a medium constituent. We show that the asymptotic expansion is universal with respect to the choice of the initial condition at $Y=0$ and, moreover, it is remarkably similar to the corresponding expansion for the saturation momentum of a shockwave (a large nucleus). As expected, the running of the coupling significantly slows down the increase of $\\hat q$ with $Y$ in the asymptotic regime at $Y\\gg 1$. For the phenomenologically interesting value $Y\\simeq 3$, we find an enhancement factor close to 3, independently of the initial condition and for both fixed and running coupling.

  1. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Dynamics during Magnetic Reconnection in the Magnetically-dominated Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron-positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet ($\\sigma \\equiv B^2/(4\\pi n_e m_e c^2) \\gg 1$). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature drift of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra $f \\propto (\\gamma-1)^{-p}$ and approaches $p = 1$ for sufficiently large $\\sigma$ and system size. Eventually most of the available magne...

  2. First Search for Multijet Resonances in sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV p{anti p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. A Rediatively Light Stop Saves the Best Global Fit for Higgs Boson Mass and Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaofeng Kang; Tianjun Li; Jinmian Li; Yandong Liu

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC discovered the Standard Model (SM) like Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV. However, there exist hints of deviations from Higgs decays. Including the Tevatron data, the deviations can be explained by the extremely mixed stop sector in the sense of best global fit (BGF). We analyze the relations among the competing reduced coupling hGG, Higgs boson mass,and LHC stop mass m_{\\wt t_1} lower bound at the tree- and one-loop level. In particular, we point out that we use the light stop running mass in the Higgs boson mass calculation while the light stop pole mass in the Higgs decays. So the gluino radiative correction on the light stop mass plays the crucial role. Its large negative correction saves the GBF in the Minimal Supersymmetric SM (MSSM) and the next to the MSSM (NMSSM) constrained by the perturbativity. Moreover, a light stop is predicted: in the MSSM if we set the gluino mass M_3\\lesssim4 TeV, we have m_{\\wt t_1}

  4. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  5. Synchrotron radiation from massless charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical radiation power from an accelerated massive charge diverges in the zero-mass limit, while some general arguments suggest that strictly massless charge does not not radiate at all. On the other hand, the regularized classical radiation reaction force, though looking odd, is non-zero and finite. To clarify this controversy, we consider radiation problem in massless scalar quantum electrodynamics in the external magnetic field. In this framework, synchrotron radiation is found to be non-zero, finite, and essentially quantum. Its spectral distribution is calculated using Schwinger's proper time technique for {\\em ab initio} massless particle of zero spin. Provided $E^2\\gg eH$, the maximum in the spectrum is shown to be at $\\hbar \\omega=E/3$, and the average photon energy is $4E/9$. The normalized spectrum is universal, depending neither on $E$ nor on $H$. Quantum nature of radiation makes classical radiation reaction equation meaningless for massless charge. Our results are consistent with the view (sup...

  6. String theories as the adiabatic limit of Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Alexander D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Yang-Mills theory with a matrix gauge group $G$ on a direct product manifold $M=\\Sigma_2\\times H^2$, where $\\Sigma_2$ is a two-dimensional Lorentzian manifold and $H^2$ is a two-dimensional open disc with the boundary $S^1=\\partial H^2$. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the metric on $\\Sigma_2$ yield constraint equations for the Yang-Mills energy-momentum tensor. We show that in the adiabatic limit, when the metric on $H^2$ is scaled down, the Yang-Mills equations plus constraints on the energy-momentum tensor become the equations describing strings with a worldsheet $\\Sigma_2$ moving in the based loop group $\\Omega G=C^\\infty (S^1, G)/G$, where $S^1$ is the boundary $S^1=\\partial H^2$ of $H^2$. By choosing $G= R^{d-1, 1}$ and putting to zero all parameters in $\\Omega R^{d-1, 1}$ besides $R^{d-1, 1}$, we get a string moving in $R^{d-1, 1}$. If one takes $\\Sigma_2= R\\times [0,1]$ or $R\\times S^1$, one obtains equations for open or closed strings. Similarly one can get equations of string moving in ...

  7. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Slosar, Anze; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore »of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  8. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  9. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Hongsuk; Thirumalai, D; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yea...

  10. Constraining cosmic deceleration-acceleration transition with type Ia supernova, BAO/CMB and H(z) data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Marcelo Vargas dos; Waga, Ioav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the kink-like parametrization of the deceleration parameter ($q(z)$) \\cite{ishida08}, which considers a transition, at redshift $z_t$, from cosmic deceleration to acceleration. In this parametrization the initial ($z \\gg z_t$) value of the q-parameter is $q_i$, its final ($z=-1$) value is $q_f$ and the duration of the transition is parametrized by $\\tau$. We obtain constraints on the free parameters of the model using recent data from type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the Hubble parameter (H(z)). The use of H(z) data introduces an explicit dependence of the combined likelihood on the present value of the Hubble parameter ($H_0$), allowing us to explore the influence of different priors when marginalizing over this parameter. We also study the importance of the CMB information in the results by considering data from WMAP7, WMAP9 (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe - 7 and 9 years) and the Planck satellite. Assuming a flat space ge...

  11. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H?WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential of the process gg ? H? WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H? ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H ? WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H ? ZZ.

  12. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. A Combined Neutron and Gamma-Ray Multiplicity Counter Based on Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Jennifer Dolan; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray (g) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times needed when using more measurables. We present measurement results of n, g, nn, ng, gg, nnn, nng, ngg, and ggg multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples is discussed. Successful measurements of multiples rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

  14. Jet Vetoes Interfering with H->WW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Moult; Iain W. Stewart

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Far off-shell Higgs production in $H \\rightarrow WW,ZZ$, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements require an understanding of the cross section in the far off-shell region in the presence of realistic experimental cuts. We analytically study the effect of a $p_T$ jet veto on far off-shell cross sections, including signal-background interference, by utilizing hard functions in the soft collinear effective theory that are differential in the decay products of the $W/Z$. Summing large logarithms of $\\sqrt{\\hat s}/p_T^{veto}$, we find that the jet veto induces a strong dependence on the partonic centre of mass energy, $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$, and modifies distributions in $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$ or $M_T$. The example of $gg\\rightarrow H \\rightarrow WW$ is used to demonstrate these effects at next to leading log order. We also discuss the importance of jet vetoes and jet binning for the recent program to extract Higgs couplings and widths from far off-shell cross sections.

  15. Technicolor corrections on $B_{s,d} \\to ??$ decays in QCD factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenjun Xiao; Cai-Dian Lü; Wujun Huo

    2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of the Top-color-assisted Technicolor (TC2) model, we calculate the new physics contributions to the branching ratios $\\calb(B_{s,d} \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ and CP violating asymmetries $\\rcpm(B_{s,d} \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ in the QCD factorization based on the heavy-quark limit $m_b \\gg \\Lambda_{QCD}$. Using the considered parameter space, we find that (a) for both $B_s\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $B_d \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decays, the new physics contribution can provide a factor of two to six enhancement to their branching ratios, (b) for the $B_s \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decay, its direct CP violation is very small in both the SM and TC2 model, and (c) the CP violating asymmetry $\\rcpm(B_d \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ is around the ten percent level in both the SM and TC2 model, but the sign of CP asymmetry in the TC2 model is different from that in the SM.

  16. Certain plant and animal (beef cattle) responses to management practices on phosphorus deficient ranges of the King Ranch in South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruby, Ellis Scott

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?fG0 ?WJ? s?rlFtc yoFcl Fce FctpFo nh??x sFllo?m r?OygcO?O lg pFcFu?p?cl yrFslts?O sc y,gOy,gr9O e?xtst?cl rFcu?O gx l,? xtcu rFcs, tc Og9l, l?3FO h1 ?''iK OSRAA r?I1 E8 U F eiKKG.AaAiRf O?I)iAAG? AR ALG u.a??aAG OSLRR' R( ALG F5.iS?'A?.a' af? p...GSLafiSa' sR''G5G R( lG2aK if ya.Aia' (?'(i'')GfA R( ALG rGd?i.G)GfAK (R. ALG eG5.GG R( egslgr gx y,togOgy,z pa?R. K?I?GSA> raf5G pafa5G)GfA ?Wb? Fs4cg7o?eup?cl lLG a?ALR. DiKLGK AR G2*.GKK LiK a**.GSiaAiRf AR ALG )af1 )G)IG.K R( lG2aK F5.iS?'A?.a' af...

  17. Ultralight carbon aerogel from nanocellulose as a highly selective oil absorption material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Yujie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Yang, Timothy M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Peizhi, Liu [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Biao, Huang [University of Tennessee and Fujian Agricultural and Forestry University; Siqun, Wang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of a sponge-like carbon aerogel from microfibril cellulose (MFC), with high porosity (99%), ultra-low density (0.01 g/cm3), hydrophobic properties (149 static contact angle) and reusability is reported in this paper. The physical properties, internal morphology, thermal properties, and chemical properties of carbon aerogels heat-treated at 700 and 900 oC (Samples C-700 and C-900) were examined. Stabilization and carbonization parameters were optimized in terms of residual carbon yield. The BET surface area of Sample C-700 (521 m2 /g) was significantly higher than of Sample C-950 (149 m2 /g). Graphitic-like domains were observed in C-950. The highest normalized sorption capacity (86 g/g) for paraffin oil was observed in sample C-700. The removal of hydrophilic function groups during carbonization causes carbon aerogel to present highly hydrophobic properties. Carbon aerogel s ability to absorb oil is enhanced by its highly porous 3D network structure with interconnected cellulose nanofibrils.

  18. Does the Newton's gravitational constant vary sinusoidally with time? An independent test with planetary orbital motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sinusoidally time-varying pattern for the values of the Newton's constant of gravitation $G$ measured in Earth-based laboratories over the latest decades has been recently reported in the literature. Its amplitude and period amount to $A_G=1.619\\times 10^{-14} \\textrm{kg}^{-1} \\textrm{m}^3 \\textrm{s}^{-2}, P_G=5.899 \\textrm{yr}$, respectively. Given the fundamental role played by $G$ in the currently accepted theory of gravitation and the attempts to merge it with quantum mechanics, it is important to put to the test the hypothesis that the aforementioned harmonic variation may pertain $G$ itself in a direct and independent way. The bounds on $\\dot G/G$ existing in the literature may not be extended straightforwardly to the present case since they were inferred by considering just secular variations. Thus, we numerically integrated the ad-hoc modified equations of motion of the major bodies of the Solar System by finding that the orbits of the planets would be altered by an unacceptably larger amount in vie...

  19. String theories as the adiabatic limit of Yang-Mills theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander D. Popov

    2015-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Yang-Mills theory with a matrix gauge group $G$ on a direct product manifold $M=\\Sigma_2\\times H^2$, where $\\Sigma_2$ is a two-dimensional Lorentzian manifold and $H^2$ is a two-dimensional open disc with the boundary $S^1=\\partial H^2$. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the metric on $\\Sigma_2$ yield constraint equations for the Yang-Mills energy-momentum tensor. We show that in the adiabatic limit, when the metric on $H^2$ is scaled down, the Yang-Mills equations plus constraints on the energy-momentum tensor become the equations describing strings with a worldsheet $\\Sigma_2$ moving in the based loop group $\\Omega G=C^\\infty (S^1, G)/G$, where $S^1$ is the boundary of $H^2$. By choosing $G=R^{d-1, 1}$ and putting to zero all parameters in $\\Omega R^{d-1, 1}$ besides $R^{d-1, 1}$, we get a string moving in $R^{d-1, 1}$. In arXiv:1506.02175 it was described how one can obtain the Green-Schwarz superstring action from Yang-Mills theory on $\\Sigma_2\\times H^2$ while $H^2$ shrinks to a point. Here we also consider Yang-Mills theory on a three-dimensional manifold $\\Sigma_2\\times S^1$ and show that in the limit when the radius of $S^1$ tends to zero, the Yang-Mills action functional supplemented by a Wess-Zumino-type term becomes the Green-Schwarz superstring action.

  20. Stationary components of HeI in strong magnetic fields - a tool to identify magnetic DB white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jordan; P. Schmelcher; W. Becken

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In only three of the 61 known magnetic white dwarfs helium has been identified unambiguously while about 20% of all non-magnetic stars of this class are known to contain HeI or HeII. Until recently, data for HeI data were available only for magnetic fields below 20MG. This changed with the publication of extensive data by the group in Heidelberg. The corresponding calculations have now been completed for the energetically lowest five states of singlet and triplet symmetry for the subspaces with |m| <= 3; selected calculations have been performed for even higher excitations. In strongly magnetized white dwarfs only line components are visible whose wavelengths vary slowly with respect to the magnetic field, particularly stationary components which have a wavelength minimum or maximum in the range of the magnetic fields strengths on the stellar surface. In view of the many ongoing surveys finding white dwarfs we want to provide the astronomical community with a tool to identify helium in white dwarfs for fields up to 5.3GG. To this end we present all calculated helium line components whose wavelengths in the UV, optical, and near IR vary slowly enough with respect to the field strength to produce visible absorption features. We also list all stationary line components in this spectral range. Finally, we find series of minima and maxima which occur as a result of series of extremal transitions to increasingly higher excitations. We estimated the limits for 8 series which can possibly give rise to additional absorption in white dwarf spectra; one strong absorption feature in GD229 which is yet unexplained by stationary components is very close to two estimated series limits.

  1. The future of gas turbine compliance monitoring: The integration of PEMS and CEMS for regulatory compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Stationary Gas Turbines were first promulgated in 1979 (40 CFR 60, Subpart GG), continuous compliance monitoring for gas turbines was simply a parametric monitoring approach where a unit was tested at four load conditions. For those units where water or steam injection was used for NO{sub x} control, testing consisted of establishing a water (or steam injection) versus fuel flow curve to achieve permitted NO{sub x} emission levels across the load range. Since 1979, the growth in gas turbine popularity has encouraged the development of Predictive Emissions Monitoring Systems (PEMS) where gas turbine operating parameters and ambient conditions are fed into a prediction algorithm to predict, rather than monitor, emissions. However, permitting requirements and technological advances now have gas turbines emitting NO{sub x} in the single digits while the overall combined-cycle thermal efficiency has improved dramatically. The combination of supplemental duct-firing in heat recovery steam generators, pollution prevention technology, post-combustion emission controls, and EPA Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) regulations for the power industry, resulted in a shift towards CEMS due to the complexity of the overall process. Yet, CEMS are often considered to be a maintenance nightmare with significant amounts of downtime. CEMS and PEMS have their own advantages and disadvantages. Thus evolved the need to find the optimum balance between CEMS and PEMS for gas turbine projects. To justify the cost of both PEMS and CEMS in the same installation, there must be an economic incentive to do so. This paper presents the application of a PEMS/CEMS monitoring system that integrates both PEMS and CEMS in order to meet, and exceed, all emissions monitoring requirements.

  2. A Generalized Linear Transport Model for Spatially-Correlated Stochastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony B. Davis; Feng Xu

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a new model for transport in stochastic media with long-range spatial correlations where exponential attenuation (controlling the propagation part of the transport) becomes power law. Direct transmission over optical distance $\\tau(s)$, for fixed physical distance $s$, thus becomes $(1+\\tau(s)/a)^{-a}$, with standard exponential decay recovered when $a\\to\\infty$. Atmospheric turbulence phenomenology for fluctuating optical properties rationalizes this switch. Foundational equations for this generalized transport model are stated in integral form for $d=1,2,3$ spatial dimensions. A deterministic numerical solution is developed in $d=1$ using Markov Chain formalism, verified with Monte Carlo, and used to investigate internal radiation fields. Standard two-stream theory, where diffusion is exact, is recovered when $a=\\infty$. Differential diffusion equations are not presently known when $a<\\infty$, nor is the integro-differential form of the generalized transport equation. Monte Carlo simulations are performed in $d=2$, as a model for transport on random surfaces, to explore scaling behavior of transmittance $T$ when transport optical thickness $\\tau_\\text{t} \\gg 1$. Random walk theory correctly predicts $T \\propto \\tau_\\text{t}^{-\\min\\{1,a/2\\}}$ in the absence of absorption. Finally, single scattering theory in $d=3$ highlights the model's violation of angular reciprocity when $a<\\infty$, a desirable property at least in atmospheric applications. This violation is traced back to a key trait of generalized transport theory, namely, that we must distinguish more carefully between two kinds of propagation: one that ends in a virtual or actual detection, the other in a transition from one position to another in the medium.

  3. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 5.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The number of observed Higgs boson decays to diphotons divided by the corresponding Standard Model prediction, called the signal strength, is found to be $\\mu = 1.17 \\pm 0.27$ at the value of the Higgs boson mass measured by ATLAS, $m_{H}$ = 125.4 GeV. The analysis is optimized to measure the signal strengths for individual Higgs boson production processes at this value of $m_{H}$. They are found to be $\\mu_{\\mathrm{ggF}} = 1.32 \\pm 0.38$, $\\mu_{\\mathrm{VBF}} = 0.8 \\pm 0.7$, $\\mu_{{WH}} = 1.0 \\pm 1.6 $, $\\mu_{{ZH}} = 0.1 ^{+3.7}_{-0.1} $, $\\mu_{{t\\bar{t}H}} = 1.6 ^{+2.7}_{-1.8} $, for Higgs boson production through gluon fusion, vector-boson fusion, and in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson or a top-quark pair, respectively. Compared with the previously published ATLAS analysis, the results reported here also benefit from a new energy calibration procedure for photons and the subsequent reduction of the systematic uncertainty on the diphoton mass resolution. No significant deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model are found.

  4. Density Power Spectrum of Compressible Hydrodynamic Turbulent Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jongsoo Kim; Dongsu Ryu

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments, and understanding density structures and their statistics in turbulent media is of great importance in astrophysics. In this paper, we study the density power spectra, $P_{\\rho}$, of transonic and supersonic turbulent flows through one and three-dimensional simulations of driven, isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence with root-mean-square Mach number in the range of $1 \\la M_{\\rm rms} \\la 10$. From one-dimensional experiments we find that the slope of the density power spectra becomes gradually shallower as the rms Mach number increases. It is because the density distribution transforms from the profile with {\\it discontinuities} having $P_{\\rho} \\propto k^{-2}$ for $M_{\\rm rms} \\sim 1$ to the profile with {\\it peaks} having $P_{\\rho} \\propto k^0$ for $M_{\\rm rms} \\gg 1$. We also find that the same trend is carried to three-dimension; that is, the density power spectrum flattens as the Mach number increases. But the density power spectrum of the flow with $M_{\\rm rms} \\sim 1$ has the Kolmogorov slope. The flattening is the consequence of the dominant density structures of {\\it filaments} and {\\it sheets}. Observations have claimed different slopes of density power spectra for electron density and cold H I gas in the interstellar medium. We argue that while the Kolmogorov spectrum for electron density reflects the {\\it transonic} turbulence of $M_{\\rm rms} \\sim 1$ in the warm ionized medium, the shallower spectrum of cold H I gas reflects the {\\it supersonic} turbulence of $M_{\\rm rms} \\sim$ a few in the cold neutral medium.

  5. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  6. Note on Anomalous Higgs-Boson Couplings in Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Buchalla; O. Cata; A. Celis; C. Krause

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale $v$. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order $10\\%$ from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, $v$, the scale of new Higgs dynamics $f$, and the cut-off $\\Lambda=4\\pi f$, admit expansions in $\\xi=v^2/f^2$ and $f^2/\\Lambda^2$. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as $\\xi\\gg 1/16\\pi^2$ the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six) couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  7. Bioeconomy Initiative at MBI International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleff, Susanne, Ph.D.

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Di-carboxylic acids have the potential to replace petrochemicals used in the polymer industry (Werpy and Petersen, 2004). MBI developed a process for the production of succinic acid using a proprietary organism. During this work MBI assessed the feasibility to produce other carboxylic acids either using A. succinogenes or other organisms. The development of recombinant A. succinogenes strain derivatives for a mono-carboxylic acid through over-expression of enzymatic activities was successful. Fermentations achieved titers of 58 g/L for this organic acid. Recombinant strains that produced the same acid, but a different stereoisomer, reached titers of 10 g/L. Attempts to increase the titers for this isomer as well as other organic acids were unsuccessful. MBI is looking for commercial partners to pursue the development of recombinant A. succinogenes strains for the production of other organic acids. Attempts to develop recombinant strains of A. succinogenes for fumaric acid production through introduction of various antisense RNA constructs were unsuccessful. Alternative suitable organisms were evaluated and Rhizopus oryzae, a natural fumaric acid producer with potential for process improvements, was selected. A novel fermentation and one-step recovery process was developed that allowed capture of IP, produced titers of >80 g/L with a productivity of 1.8 g/L-h and 57% (g/g glucose) yield. The process was scaled to 2000 L pilot scale. The economic analysis projected a production cost of 72 c/lb. Recycling and re-use of the base was demonstrated and incorporated into the process. The ability of the organism to produce fumaric acid from other carbon sources and biomass hydrolysate was demonstrated. The production of other organic acids was evaluated and techno-economic de-risking roadmap documents were prepared.

  8. Connecting the Physical Properties of Galaxies with the Overdensity and Tidal Shear of the Large-Scale Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jounghun Lee; Cheng Li

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the correlations between the large-scale environment of galaxies and their physical properties, using a sample of 28,354 nearby galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the large-scale tidal field reconstructed in real space from the 2Mass Redshift Survey and smoothed over a radius of $\\sim 6 h^{-1}$Mpc. The large-scale environment is expressed in terms of the overdensity, the ellipticity of the shear and the type of the large-scale structure. The physical properties analyzed include $r$-band absolute magnitude $M_{^{0.1}r}$, stellar mass $M_\\ast$, $g-r$ colour, concentration parameter $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and surface stellar mass density $\\mu_\\ast$. Both luminosity and stellar mass are found to be statistically linked to the large-scale environment, regardless of how the environment is quantified. More luminous (massive) galaxies reside preferentially in the regions with higher densities, lower ellipticities and halo-like structures. At fixed luminosity, the large-scale overdensity depends strongly on parameters related to the recent star formation history, that is colour and D(4000), but is almost independent of the structural parameters $R_{90}/R_{50}$ and $\\mu_\\ast$. All the physical properties are statistically linked to the shear of the large-scale environment even when the large-scale density is constrained to a narrow range. This statistical link has been found to be most significant in the quasi-linear regions where the large-scale density approximates to an order of unity, but no longer significant in highly nonlinear regimes with $\\delta_{\\rm LS}\\gg 1$.

  9. Bosons in Disc-Shaped Traps: From 3D to 2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schnee; J. Yngvason

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mathematically rigorous analysis of the ground state of a dilute, interacting Bose gas in a three-dimensional trap that is strongly confining in one direction so that the system becomes effectively two-dimensional. The parameters involved are the particle number, $N\\gg 1$, the two-dimensional extension, $\\bar L$, of the gas cloud in the trap, the thickness, $h\\ll \\bar L$ of the trap, and the scattering length $a$ of the interaction potential. Our analysis starts from the full many-body Hamiltonian with an interaction potential that is assumed to be repulsive, radially symmetric and of short range, but otherwise arbitrary. In particular, hard cores are allowed. Under the premisses that the confining energy, $\\sim 1/h^2$, is much larger than the internal energy per particle, and $a/h\\to 0$, we prove that the system can be treated as a gas of two-dimensional bosons with scattering length $a_{\\rm 2D}= h\\exp(-(\\hbox{\\rm const.)}h/a)$. In the parameter region where $a/h\\ll |\\ln(\\bar\\rho h^2)|^{-1}$, with $\\bar\\rho\\sim N/\\bar L^2$ the mean density, the system is described by a two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii density functional with coupling parameter $\\sim Na/h$. If $|\\ln(\\bar\\rho h^2)|^{-1}\\lesssim a/h$ the coupling parameter is $\\sim N |\\ln(\\bar\\rho h^2)|^{-1}$ and thus independent of $a$. In both cases Bose-Einstein condensation in the ground state holds, provided the coupling parameter stays bounded.

  10. Accretion and plasma outflow from dissipationless discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Bogovalov; Stanislav Kelner

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an extreme case of disc accretion onto a gravitating centre when the viscosity in the disc is negligible. The angular momentum and the rotational energy of the accreted matter is carried out by a magnetized wind outflowing from the disc. The outflow of matter from the disc occurs due to the Blandford & Payne(1982) centrifugal mechanism. The disc is assumed to be cold. Accretion and outflow are connected by the conservation of the energy, mass and the angular momentum. The basic properties of the outflow, angular momentum flux and energy flux per particle in the wind, do not depend on the details of the structure of the accretion disc. In the case of selfsimilar accretion/outflow, the dependence of the rate of accretion $\\dot M$ in the disc depends on the disc radius $r$ on the law $\\dot M \\sim r^{{1\\over2(\\alpha^2-1)}}$, where $\\alpha$ is a dimensionless Alfvenic radius. In the case of $\\alpha \\gg 1$, the accretion in the disc is provided by very weak matter outflow from the disc and the outflow predominantly occurs from the very central part of the disc. The solution obtained in the work provides mechanism which transforms the gravitational energy of the accreted matter into the energy of the outflowing wind with efficiency close to 100%. The final velocity can essentially exceed Kepler velocity at the site of the wind launch. This mechanism allows us to understand the nature of the astrophysical objects with low luminosity discs and energetic jet-like outflows.

  11. Three- and four-body nonadditivities in nucleic acid tetramers: a CCSD(T) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitonak, Michal; Neogrady, Pavel; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Three- and four-body nonadditivities in the uracil tetramer (in DNA-like geometry) and the GC step (in crystal geometry) were investigated at various levels of the wave-function theory: HF, MP2, MP3, L-CCD, CCSD and CCSD(T). All of the calculations were performed using the 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set, whereas the HF, MP2 and the MP3 nonadditivities were, for the sake of comparison, also determined with the much larger aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The HF and MP2 levels do not provide reliable values for many-body terms, making it necessary to go beyond the MP2 level. The benchmark CCSD(T) three- and four-body nonadditivities are reasonably well reproduced at the MP3 level, and almost quantitative agreement is obtained (fortuitously) either on the L-CCD level or as an average of the MP3 and the CCSD results. Reliable values of many-body terms (especially their higher-order correlation contributions) are obtained already when the rather small 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set is used. The four-body term is much smaller when compared to the three-body terms, but it is definitely not negligible, e.g. in the case of the GC step it represents about 16% of all of the three- and four-body terms. While investigating the geometry dependence of many-body terms for the GG step at the MP3/6-31G**(0.25,0.15) level, we found that it is necessary to include at least three-body terms in the determination of optimal geometry parameters.

  12. Measurement of the front back asymmetry in top-antitop quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Thomas A.; /Michigan U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quarks, along with leptons and force carrying particles, are predicted by the Standard Model to be the fundamental constituents of nature. In distinction from the leptons, the quarks interact strongly through the chromodynamic force and are bound together within the hadrons. The familiar proton and neutron are bound states of the light ''up'' and ''down'' quarks. The most massive quark by far, the ''top'' quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments in March, 1995. The new quark was observed in p{bar p} collisions at 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass of the top quark was measured to be 176 {+-} 13 GeV/c{sup 2} and the cross section 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup +3.6} pb. It is the Q = 2/3, T{sub 3} = +1/2 member of the third generation weak-isospin doublet along with the bottom quark. The top quark is the final Standard Model quark to be discovered. Along with whatever is responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, top quark physics is considered one of the least understood sectors of the Standard Model and represents a front line of our understanding of particle physics. Currently, the only direct measurements of top quark properties come from the CDF and D0 experiments observing p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron. Top quark production at the Tevatron is almost exclusively by quark-antiquark annihilation, q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} (85%), and gluon fusion, gg {yields} t{bar t} (15%), mediated by the strong force. The theoretical cross-section for this process is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb for m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. Top quarks can also be produced at the Tevatron via q{bar b}{prime} {yields} tb and qg {yields} q{prime}tb through the weak interaction. The cross section for these processes is lower (3pb) and the signal is much more difficult to isolate as backgrounds are much higher. The top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W-boson and a bottom quark (t {yields} Wb). The total decay width t {yields} Wb is {Lambda} = 1.50 GeV. This corresponds to an incredibly short lifetime of 0.5 x 10{sup -24} seconds. This happens so quickly that hadronization and bound states do not take place, which leads to the interesting consequence that the top quark spin information is passed to the decay products.

  13. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Cindy Zhang, Xiao Y; Dickman, Christopher TD; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa C; Millen, Kathleen J; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Ramos, Oscar HP; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda SC; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma DC; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam WZ; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter J; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    f8nK 2f8nH 2f8nF 2f8nB 2f8nD 1p3iG 1p3aC 1p3aF 1p3aD 1p3oB 1p3bG 1p3pG 1p3fD 1p34B 1p3oF 1p3iD 1p3gD 1p3oD 1p3bH 1p3iC 1p3lH 1p34C 1p3bD 1p3kB 1p3pF 1p3mH 1p3lB 1p34H 1p3mC 1p3gG 1p3mD 1p34D 1p3kD 1p3oG 1p3lF 1p3bC 1p3kH 1p3pH 1p3iH 1p3pB 1p3gH 1p3kC... 02N 2o61A 2o61B 2as5N 2as5M 1gjiA 1gjiB 1nfkA 1nfkB 1s9kC 1owrP 1owrQ 1owrM 1owrN 1svcP 1le5A 1leiB 1le5E 1le9E 1le5B 1le9F 1le5F 1le9B 1le9A 1leiA DNA_pol_lambd_f 3c5fB 3c5gB 3c5fA 3c5gA 1huoB 1huoA 1huzA 1huzB 2i9gA 1tv9A 1tvaA 2fmsA 2fmpA 2fmqA 1...

  14. Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

  15. Top-Quark Initiated Processes at High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Han; Joshua Sayre; Susanne Westhoff

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In hadronic collisions at high energies, the top-quark may be treated as a parton inside a hadron. Top-quark initiated processes become increasingly important since the top-quark luminosity can reach a few percent of the bottom-quark luminosity. In the production of a heavy particle $H$ with mass $m_H > m_t$, treating the top-quark as a parton allows us to resum large logarithms $\\log(m_{H}^{2}/m_{t}^{2}$) arising from collinear splitting in the initial state. We quantify the effect of collinear resummation at the 14-TeV LHC and a future 100-TeV hadron collider, focusing on the top-quark open-flavor process $gg\\to t\\bar t H$ in comparison with $t\\bar t \\to H$ and $tg\\rightarrow tH$ at the leading order (LO) in QCD. We employ top-quark parton distribution functions with appropriate collinear subtraction and power counting. We find that (1) Collinear resummation enhances the inclusive production of a heavy particle with $m_H\\approx$ 5 TeV (0.5 TeV) by more than a factor of two compared to the open-flavor process at a 100-TeV (14-TeV) collider; (2) Top-quark mass effects are important for scales $m_H$ near the top-quark threshold, where the cross section is largest. We advocate a modification of the ACOT factorization scheme, dubbed m-ACOT, to consistently treat heavy-quark masses in hadronic collisions; (3) The scale uncertainty of the total cross section in m-ACOT is of about 20 percent at the LO. While a higher-order calculation is indispensable for a precise prediction, the LO cross section is well described by the process $t\\bar t\\to H$ using an effective factorization scale significantly lower than $m_H$. We illustrate our results by the example of a heavy spin-0 particle. Our main results also apply to the production of particles with spin-1 and 2.

  16. LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington produced plutonium for several decades and in the process generated billions of gallons of radioactive waste. Included in this complex mixture of waste was 50 Ci of iodine-129 ({sup 129}I). Iodine-129’s high abundance, due to its high fission yield, and extreme toxicity result in iodine-129 becoming a key risk driver at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The mobility of radioiodine in arid environments, such as the Hanford Site, depends largely on its chemical speciation and is also greatly affected by many other environmental factors, especially natural sediment organic matter (SOM). Groundwater radioiodine speciation has not been measured in arid regions with major plumes or large disposed {sup 129}I inventories, including the Hanford Site, Idaho National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. In this study, stable iodine-127 and radioiodine-129 speciation, pH, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of groundwater samples collected from seven wells located in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were investigated. The most striking finding was that iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) was the most abundant species. Unexpectedly, iodide (I{sup -}), which was likely the form of iodine in the source materials and the expected dominant groundwater species based on thermodynamic considerations, only accounted for 1-2% of the total iodine concentration. It is likely that the relatively high pH and the low abundance of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) that is present at the site slowed down or even inhibited the reduction of iodate, as SOM abiotically reduce iodate into iodide. Moreover, a study on the kinetics of iodide and iodate uptake and aqueous speciation transformation by three representative subsurface Hanford sediments was performed over a period of about one month. This study was carried out by using iodide-125 or iodate-125 at the ambient iodine-127concentration found at the site. Iodate K{sub d} values were on average 89% greater than iodide K{sub d} values, and the K{sub d} values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied {sup 129}I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe{sup 2+}. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O{sub 2}/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 ± 8 ?g/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO{sub 2} as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ {sup 129}I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural attenuation, or long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal sites.

  17. Recent Developments in SHERPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibald, Jennifer; /Durham U., IPPP; Gleisberg, Tanju; /SLAC; Hoeche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.; Schumann, Steffen; /Edinburgh U.; Siegert, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Winter, Jan; /Fermilab

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent QCD-related developments in the SHERPA event generator are presented. In the past decades, event generators such as PYTHIA [1, 2] and HERWIG [3, 4] have been central for nearly all physics analyses at particle physics experiments at the high-energy frontier. This will also hold true at the LHC, where a large number of interesting signals for new particles or new phenomena (the Higgs boson or any other manifestation of the mechanism behind electro-weak symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, extra dimensions etc.) is hampered by a plethora of severe, sometimes overwhelming backgrounds. Nearly all of them are largely influenced by QCD. Therefore it seems fair to say that the success of the LHC in finding new physics may very well depend on a deep and detailed understanding of old physics, like QCD. Examples for this include, among others, the central-jet veto for the vector boson fusion channel for Higgs production or topologies, where gauge bosons emerge in association with many jets, a background for many search channels. In a reflection on increased needs by the experimental community, aiming at higher precision, incorporation of new physics models and so on, the work horses of old have undergone serious renovation efforts, resulting in new, improved versions of the respective codes, namely PYTHIA8 [5] and HERWIG++ [6]. In addition a completely new code, SHERPA [7], has been constructed and is in the process of maturing. The status of this code is the topic of this contribution. SHERPA's hallmark property is the inclusion of higher-order tree-level QCD contributions, leading to an improved modelling of jet production. They are introduced through a full-fledged matrix element generator, AMEGIC++ [8], which is capable of generating matrix elements and corresponding phase space mappings for processes with multi-particle final states in various models, including the Standard Model, anomalous gauge triple and quadruple couplings according to [9, 10], the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Feynman rules from [11], the ADD-model of extra dimensions [12, 13], and a model with an extra U(1) singlet coupling to the Higgs boson only [14]. The code has been thoroughly tested and validated [15]. This code, however, is limited, especially in the treatment of many ({ge} 6) external QCD particles. Therefore, in the near future, SHERPA will incorporate another, new matrix element generator, COMIX, which is based on Berends-Giele recursion relations [16] and color-dressing [17] rather than color-ordering. In Tabs. 1 and 2 some example cross sections for gg {yields} ng at fixed energies and pp {yields} b{bar b} + n jets obtained with this program are exhibited and compared to those from other programs. In addition, concerning the calculation of higher-order matrix elements and cross sections, there have been first steps towards an automation of such calculations at truly next-to leading order accuracy. They manifest themselves in the implementation of a procedure [19] to fully automatically construct and evaluate Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction terms [20] for the real part of such NLO calculations. The results from the matrix element calculations are merged with the subsequent parton shower through the formalism of [21, 22]. The results of its implementation in SHERPA [23] has recently been compared with other algorithms [24]. Although there remains some dispute about the theoretical equivalence of the different approaches, the overall results show satisfying agreement with each other, such that they can be used with confidence for data analysis.

  18. Application of the Principle of Maximum Conformality to Top-Pair Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /SLAC /Chongqing U.

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A major contribution to the uncertainty of finite-order perturbative QCD predictions is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}. For example, by using the conventional way of setting {mu}{sub r} {element_of} [m{sub t}/2, 2m{sub t}], one obtains the total t{bar t} production cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with the uncertainty {Delta}{sigma}{sub t{bar t}}/{sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {approx} (+3%/-4%) at the Tevatron and LHC even for the present NNLO level. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the renormalization scale ambiguity in precision tests of Abelian QED and non-Abelian QCD theories. By using the PMC, all nonconformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling constant, and the resulting scale-fixed predictions are independent of the renormalization scheme. The correct scale-displacement between the arguments of different renormalization schemes is automatically set, and the number of active flavors n{sub f} in the {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-function is correctly determined. The PMC is consistent with the renormalization group property that a physical result is independent of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}{sup init}. The PMC scale {mu}{sub r}{sup PMC} is unambiguous at finite order. Any residual dependence on {mu}{sub r}{sup init} for a finite-order calculation will be highly suppressed since the unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms will be absorbed into the PMC scales higher-order perturbative terms. We find that such renormalization group invariance can be satisfied to high accuracy for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the NNLO level. In this paper we apply PMC scale-setting to predict the t{bar t} cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. It is found that {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} remains almost unchanged by varying {mu}{sub r}{sup init} within the region of [m{sub t}/4, 4m{sub t}]. The convergence of the expansion series is greatly improved. For the (q{bar q})-channel, which is dominant at the Tevatron, its NLO PMC scale is much smaller than the top-quark mass in the small x-region, and thus its NLO cross-section is increased by about a factor of two. In the case of the (gg)-channel, which is dominant at the LHC, its NLO PMC scale slightly increases with the subprocess collision energy {radical}s, but it is still smaller than m{sub t} for {radical} {approx}< 1 TeV, and the resulting NLO cross-section is increased by {approx}20%. As a result, a larger {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is obtained in comparison to the conventional scale-setting method, which agrees well with the present Tevatron and LHC data. More explicitly, by setting m{sub t} = 172.9 {+-} 1.1 GeV, we predict {sigma}{sub Tevatron, 1.96 TeV} = 7.626{sub -0.257}{sup +0.265} pb, {sigma}{sub LHC, 7 TeV} = 171.8{sub -5.6}{sup +5.8} pb and {sigma}{sub LHC, 14 TeV} = 941.3{sub -26.5}{sup +28.4} pb.

  19. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005 and added to in 2007. This list includes cross sections which are experimentally important, and which are theoretically feasible (if difficult) to calculate. Basically all 2-3 cross sections of interest have been calculated, with the frontier now extending to 2 {yields} 4 calculations. Often these calculations exist only as private codes. Since 2007, two additional calculations have been completed: t{bar t}b{bar b} and W+3 jets, reflecting the advance of the NLO technology to 2 {yields} 4 processes. In addition, the cross section for b{bar b}b{bar b} has been calculated for the q{bar q} initial state with the gg initial state calculation in progress. Final states of such complexity usually lead to multi-scale problems, and the correct choice of scales to use can be problematic not only at LO, but also at NLO. The size of the higher order corrections and of the residual scale dependence at NLOcan depend strongly on whether the considered cross section is inclusive, or whether a jet veto cut has been applied. Depending on the process, dramatically different behavior can be observed upon the application of a jet veto. There is a trade-off between suppressing the NLO cross section and increasing the perturbative uncertainty, with application of a jet veto sometimes destroying the cancellation between infra-red logs of real and virtual origin, and sometimes just suppressing large (and very scale-sensitive) tree-level contributions. So far, there is no general rule predicting the type of behavior to be expected, but this is an important matter for further investigation. From the experimental side, an addition to the above wish-list that will be crucial is the determination of the accuracy to which each of the calculations needs to be known. This is clearly related to the experimental accuracy at which the cross sections can be measured at the LHC, and can determine, for example, for what processes it may be necessary to calculate electo-weak corrections, in addition to the higher order QCD corrections. On the theoretical side, it would also be interesting to categorize

  20. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.