Sample records for achieving fusion conditions

  1. Divertor conditions relevant for fusion reactors achieved with linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Lof, A.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Rooij, G. J. van; Scholten, J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kleyn, A. W. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Van't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94157, 1090 GD Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense magnetized hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been produced with electron densities up to 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures up to 3.7 eV with a linear plasma generator. Exposure of a W target has led to average heat and particle flux densities well in excess of 4 MW m{sup -2} and 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. We have shown that the plasma surface interactions are dominated by the incoming ions. The achieved conditions correspond very well to the projected conditions at the divertor strike zones of fusion reactors such as ITER. In addition, the machine has an unprecedented high gas efficiency.

  2. Fusion Plasma Performance Required for Fusion Power The performance achieved on MFE and IFE fusion experiments using DT fuel is compared with the fusion performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Plasma Performance Required for Fusion Power The performance achieved on MFE and IFE fusion experiments using DT fuel is compared with the fusion performance required for a Fusion Power Plant. Const. Cost $B Date

  3. Fusion Rules and Conditional Statistics in Turbulent Advection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion rules in turbulence address the asymptotic properties of many-point correlation functions when some of the coordinates are very close to each other. Here we put to experimental test some non-trivial consequences of the fusion rules for scalar correlations in turbulence. To this aim we examine passive turbulent advection as well as convective turbulence. Adding one assumption to the fusion rules one obtains a prediction for universal conditional statistics of gradient fields. We examine the conditional average of the scalar dissipation field $\\left$ for $R$ in the inertial range, and find that it is linear in $T(\\B.r+\\B.R)-T(\\B.r)$ with a fully determined proportionality constant. The implications of these findings for the general scaling theory of scalar turbulence are discussed.

  4. Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has as fusion energy produced divided the external energy incident on the fusion reaction chamber. Typical fusion power plant design concepts require a fusion gain of 30 for MFE and 70 for IFE. Fusion energy

  5. Matrix factorisations for rational boundary conditions by defect fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Behr; Stefan Fredenhagen

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A large class of two-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(2,2)$ superconformal field theories can be understood as IR fixed-points of Landau-Ginzburg models. In particular, there are rational conformal field theories that also have a Landau-Ginzburg description. To understand better the relation between the structures in the rational conformal field theory and in the Landau-Ginzburg theory, we investigate how rational B-type boundary conditions are realised as matrix factorisations in the $SU(3)/U(2)$ Grassmannian Kazama-Suzuki model. As a tool to generate the matrix factorisations we make use of a particular interface between the Kazama-Suzuki model and products of minimal models, whose fusion can be realised as a simple functor on ring modules. This allows us to formulate a proposal for all matrix factorisations corresponding to rational boundary conditions in the $SU(3)/U(2)$ model.

  6. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

  7. Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor R. V. Budny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor R. V. Budny Princeton Plasma; published online 9 September 2011) Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge technique for introducing Li is via pellet injection. This was pioneered in ALCATOR- CMOD where it was first

  8. Thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear fusion is a way to achieve nuclear fusion by using extremely high temperatures. There are two forms of thermonuclear fusion: uncontrolled, in which the resulting energy is released in an uncontrolled manner, as it is in thermonuclear weapon...

  9. Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge electron density which allows increased neutral beam penetration, central heating, and fueling. Consequently, the temperature profiles became more peaked with higher central T{sub i}, T{sub e}, toroidal rotation, and neutron emission rates.

  10. Integrable Boundaries, Conformal Boundary Conditions and A-D-E Fusion Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger E. Behrend; Paul A. Pearce; Jean-Bernard Zuber

    1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The $sl(2)$ minimal theories are labelled by a Lie algebra pair $(A,G)$ where $G$ is of $A$-$D$-$E$ type. For these theories on a cylinder we conjecture a complete set of conformal boundary conditions labelled by the nodes of the tensor product graph $A\\otimes G$. The cylinder partition functions are given by fusion rules arising from the graph fusion algebra of $A\\otimes G$. We further conjecture that, for each conformal boundary condition, an integrable boundary condition exists as a solution of the boundary Yang-Baxter equation for the associated lattice model. The theory is illustrated using the $(A_4,D_4)$ or 3-state Potts model.

  11. Hydrogen Hydrogen FusionFusionFusionFusionFusionFusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiz, Ulrich

    100.000 years LNGS Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso Borexino THE THERMONUCLEAR FUSION REACTIONHydrogen Hydrogen Fusion Deuterium FusionFusionFusionFusionFusionFusion THE SUN AS BOREXINO SEES

  12. Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 11311144 Physics and technology conditions for attaining tritium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tritium self-sufficiency for the DT fuel cycle M.E. Sawana,, M.A. Abdoub a Fusion Technology Institute online 27 December 2005 Abstract There is no practical external source of tritium for fusion energy development beyond ITER and all subsequent fusion systems have to breed their own tritium. To ensure tritium

  13. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Roger J. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B{sub pol} diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and B{sub ||} along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n{sub e}B{sub ||} product and higher n{sub e} and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  14. Neutronic and thermal calculation of blanket for high power operating condition of fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagawa, H.; Shimakawa, S.; Kuroda, T. [Oarai Research Establishement of JAERI, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal (breeding region) structures of ceramic breeder blanket to accommodate high power operating conditions such as a DEMO reactor have been investigated. The conditions considered here are the maximum neutron wall load of 2.8 MW/m{sup 2} at outboard midplane corresponding to a fusion power of 3.0 GW and the coolant temperature of 200{degrees}C. Structure of a blanket is based on the layered pebble bed concept, which has been proposed by Japan since the ITER CDA. Lithium oxide with 50% enriched {sup 6}Li is used in a shape of small spherical pebbles which are filled in a 316SS can avoid its compatibility issue with Be. Beryllium around the breeder can is filled also in a shape of spherical pebbles which works not only as a neutron multiplier but also as a thermal resistant layer to maintain breeder temperature for effective in-situ tritium recovery. Diameters and packing fractions of both pebbles are {<=} 1 mm and 65%, respectively. A layer of block Be between cooling panels is introduced as a neutron multiplier (not as the thermal resistant layer) to enhance tritium breeding performance. Inlet temperature of water coolant is 200{degrees}C to meet the high temperature conditioning requirement to the first wall which is one of walls of the blanket vessel. Neutronics calculations have been carried out by one-dimensional transport code, and thermal calculations have also been carried out by one-dimensional slab code.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Muon-catalyzed dt Fusion in Wide Ranges of D/T Mixture Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van [Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Demin, A.M.; Golubkov, A.N.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Klevtsov, V.G.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Musyaev, R.K.; Perevozchikov, V.V.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Zlatoustovskii, S.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov, Nizhni Novgorod oblast, 607200 (Russian Federation); Demin, D.L.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Grafov, N.N.; Gritsaj, K.I.; Konin, A.D.; Medved', S.V.; Rudenko, A.I.; Yukhimchuk, S.A. [Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow oblast, 141980 (Russian Federation)] [and others

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vast program of the experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed dt fusion was performed on the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research phasotron. Parameters of the dt cycle were obtained in a wide range of the D/T mixture conditions: temperatures of 20-800 K, densities of 0.2-1.2 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD), and tritium concentrations of 15-86%. In this paper, the results obtained are summarized.

  16. Assisted fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German Kälbermann

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of nuclear fusion consisting of a wave packet impinging into a well located between square one dimensional barriers is treated analytically. The wave function inside the well is calculated exactly for the assisted tunneling induced by a perturbation mimicking a constant electric field with arbitrary time dependence. Conditions are found for the enhancement of fusion.

  17. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  18. The Role of Lithium Conditioning in Achieving High Performance, Long Pulse H-mode Discharges in the NSTX and EAST Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, Rajesh [PPPL; Mansfield, D. K. [PPPL; Gong, X. Z. [IPPCAS; Sun, Z. [IPPCAS; Bell, M. G. [PPPL

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the role of lithium wall conditioning on the achievement of high performance, long pulse discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is documented. Common observations include recycling reduction and elimination of ELMs. In NSTX, lithium conditioning typically resulted in ELM-free operation with impurity accumulation, which was ameliorated e.g. with pulsed 3D fields to trigger controlled ELMs. Active lithium conditioning in EAST discharges has overcome this problem, producing an ELM-free Hmode with controlled density and impurities.

  19. Electron Screening Effect on Stellar Thermonuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -h. Spatschek; M. Bonitz; T. Klinger; U. Ebert; C. Franck; A. V. Keudell; D. Naujoks; M. Dewitz; A. Y. Potekhin; G. Chabrier

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermonuclear fusions and show that these scenarios do not apply to stellar conditions. c ? 2013 WILEY

  20. 55Fe effect on enhancing ferritic steel He/dpa ratio in fission reactor irradiations to simulate fusion conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haibo; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How to increase the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio in a fission reactor neutron spectrum is an important question for fusion reactor material testing. An early experiment showed that the accelerated He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 2.3 was achieved for 96% enriched 54Fe in iron with 458.2 effective full power days (EFPD) irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL. Greenwood suggested that the transmutation produced 55Fe has a thermal neutron helium production cross section which may have an effect on this result. In the current work, the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio is studied in the neutron spectrum of HFIR with 55Fe thermal neutron helium production taken into account. The available ENDF-b format 55Fe incident neutron cross section file from TENDL, Netherlands, is first input into the calculation model. A benchmark calculation for the same sample as used in the aforementioned experiment was used to adjust and evaluate the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section values. The analysis shows a decrease of a factor of 6700 for the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section in the intermediate and low energy regions is required in order to fit the experimental results. The best fit to the cross section value at thermal neutron energy is about 27 mb. With the adjusted 55Fe (n, a) cross sections, calculation show that the 54Fe and 55Fe isotopes can be enriched by the isotopic tailoring technique in a ferritic steel sample irradiated in HFIR to significantly enhance the helium production rate. The results show that a 70% enriched 54Fe and 30% enriched 55Fe ferritic steel sample would produce a He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 13 initially in the HFIR peripheral target position (PTP). After one year irradiation, the ratio decreases to about 10. This new calculation can be used to guide future isotopic tailoring experiments designed to increase the He(appm)/dpa ratio in fission reactors. A benchmark experiment is suggested to be performed to evaluate the 55Fe (n, a) cross section at thermal energy.

  1. After many years of fusion research, the conditions needed for a DT fusion reactor have been approached on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). For the first time the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    , is observed to increase in D­T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the n i (0) T i (0) t E product by 55 supershot and limiter­H­mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time. Demonstrating the production of »10 MW of fusion power. In this paper, a brief description will be given

  2. PLASMA-PHYSICS-21 Heavy ion driven reactor-size double shell inertial fusion targets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Serna Moreno; N. A. Tahir; J. J. López Cela; A. R. Piriz; D. H. H. Hoffmann

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is considered as an alternative to Magnetic Confinement Fusion to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion. The main goal is to exploit the energy released from thermonuclear fusion reactions

  3. Lower Hybrid antennas for nuclear fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillairet, Julien; Bae, Young-Soon; Bai, X; Balorin, C; Baranov, Y; Basiuk, V; Bécoulet, A; Belo, J; Berger-By, G; Brémond, S; Castaldo, C; Ceccuzzi, S; Cesario, R; Corbel, E; Courtois, X; Decker, J; Delmas, E; Delpech, L; Ding, X; Douai, D; Ekedahl, A; Goletto, C; Goniche, M; Guilhem, D; Hertout, P; Imbeaux, F; Litaudon, X; Magne, R; Mailloux, J; Mazon, D; Mirizzi, F; Mollard, P; Moreau, P; Oosako, T; Petrzilka, V; Peysson, Y; Poli, S; Preynas, M; Prou, M; Saint-Laurent, F; Samaille, F; Saoutic, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear fusion research goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power for peaceful purposes. In order to achieve the conditions similar to those expected in an electricity-generating fusion power plant, plasmas with a temperature of several hundreds of millions of degrees must be generated and sustained for long periods. For this purpose, RF antennas delivering multi-megawatts of power to magnetized confined plasma are commonly used in experimental tokamaks. In the gigahertz range of frequencies, high power phased arrays known as "Lower Hybrid" (LH) antennas are used to extend the plasma duration. This paper reviews some of the technological aspects of the LH antennas used in the Tore Supra tokamak and presents the current design of a proposed 20 MW LH system for the international experiment ITER.

  4. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Raymond [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Royal Military Academy, Association EURATOM - Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type -- the tokamak -- is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' project ITER.

  5. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  6. Multinational achievement: PPPL collaborates on record fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the edge of the gas near the interior walls of the tokamak. Controlling these fast-growing instabilities, called "edge localized modes" (ELMs), produced a record life...

  7. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the FIRE pre-conceptual design study is to define a low-cost (~$1B) burning plasma experiment to attain to the burning plasma step because of the progress made in fusion science and fusion technology. Progress toward design and fabrication of FIRE, and that there is confidence that FIRE will achieve burning plasma

  8. Fusion Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Intriligator

    1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss when and how the Verlinde dimensions of a rational conformal field theory can be expressed as correlation functions in a topological LG theory. It is seen that a necessary condition is that the RCFT fusion rules must exhibit an extra symmetry. We consider two particular perturbations of the Grassmannian superpotentials. The topological LG residues in one perturbation, introduced by Gepner, are shown to be a twisted version of the $SU(N)_k$ Verlinde dimensions. The residues in the other perturbation are the twisted Verlinde dimensions of another RCFT; these topological LG correlation functions are conjectured to be the correlation functions of the corresponding Grassmannian topological sigma model with a coupling in the action to instanton number.

  9. Fusion power production in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 9.3 MW of fusion power has been produced from deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The total fusion yield from a single plasma pulse has reached 6.5 MJ. The experiments in TFTR with deuterium-tritium plasmas fueled and heated by neutral beam injection span wide ranges in plasma and operating conditions. Through the use of lithium pellet conditioning to control the edge recycling, the plasma confinement in TFTR has been improved to the point where the stability of the plasma to pressure driven modes is limiting the fusion power for plasma currents up to 2.5 MA. The central energy and fusion power densities in these plasmas are comparable to those expected in a thermalized DT reactor, such as ITER.

  10. Compatibility of Physics and Engineering in Magnetic Fusion White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compatibility of Physics and Engineering in Magnetic Fusion White Paper on Magnetic Fusion.edu (Dated: July 14, 2012) The compatibility of the requirements of physics and engineering is the fundamental issue in the achievement of useful magnetic fusion energy. Issues that must be addressed include

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Slough

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking described in this report was to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The FRC must also survive during the time it takes for the metal liner to compress the FRC target. The initial work at the UW was focused on developing adequate preionization and flux trapping that were found to be essential in past experiments for obtaining the density, flux and most critically, FRC lifetime required for MTF. The timescale for testing and development of such a source can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T{sub ion} ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than 1 meter, and the time from the initiation of formation to the establishment of the final equilibrium was less than 10 microseconds. With some modification, each accelerator can be made capable of producing FRCs suitable for the production of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment. Based on the initial FRC merging/compression results, the design and methodology for an experimental realization of the target plasma for the MTF liner experiment can now be defined. The construction and testing of the key components for the formation of the target plasma at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) will be performed on the IPA experiment, now at MSNW. A high density FRC plasmoid will be formed and accelerated out of each IPA into a merging/compression chamber similar to the imploding liner at AFRL. The properties of the resultant FRC plasma (size, temperature, density, flux, lifetime) will be obtained. The process will be optimized, and a final design for implementation at AFRL will be carried out. When implemented at AFRL it is anticipated that the colliding/merging FRCs will then be compressed by the liner. In this manner it is hoped that ultimately a plasma with ion temperatures reaching the 10 keV range and fusion gain near unity can be obtained.

  12. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  13. Fixed conditions for achieving the real-valued partition function of one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled with time-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prayitno, T. B., E-mail: trunk-002@unj.ac.id [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda Rawamangun no. 10, Jakarta, 13220 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have imposed the conditions in order to preserve the real-valued partition function in the case of onedimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled by time-dependent potential. In this case we have solved the Gross-Pitaevskii equation by means of the time-dependent perturbation theory by extending the previous work of Kivshar et al. [Phys. Lett A 278, 225–230 (2001)]. To use the method, we have treated the equation as the macroscopic quantum oscillator and found that the expression of the partition function explicitly has complex values. In fact, we have to choose not only the appropriate functions but also the suitable several values of the potential to keep the real-valued partition function.

  14. Fusion energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

  15. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Larry Baylor explains how the US ITER team is working to prevent solar flare-like events at a fusion energy reactor that will be like a small sun on earth

  16. US ITER - Why Fusion?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Fusion Hydrogen Fusion - Mark Uhran Safe, Clean and Virtually Unlimited Energy Hydrogen fusion, the process that powers our sun and the stars, is the most fundamental...

  17. Dynamic Instruction Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

  18. Information integration for data fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, O.H.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data fusion has been identified by the Department of Defense as a critical technology for the U.S. defense industry. Data fusion requires combining expertise in two areas - sensors and information integration. Although data fusion is a rapidly growing area, there is little synergy and use of common, reusable, and/or tailorable objects and models, especially across different disciplines. The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project had two purposes: to see if a natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used for data fusion problems, and if so, to determine whether this methodology would help identify commonalities across areas and achieve greater synergy. The project confirmed both of the initial hypotheses: that the natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used effectively in data fusion areas and that commonalities could be found that would allow synergy across various data fusion areas. The project found five common objects that are the basis for all of the data fusion areas examined: targets, behaviors, environments, signatures, and sensors. Many of the objects and the specific facts related to these objects were common across several areas and could easily be reused. In some cases, even the terminology remained the same. In other cases, different areas had their own terminology, but the concepts were the same. This commonality is important with the growing use of multisensor data fusion. Data fusion is much more difficult if each type of sensor uses its own objects and models rather than building on a common set. This report introduces data fusion, discusses how the synergy generated by this LDRD would have benefited an earlier successful project and contains a summary information model from that project, describes a preliminary management information model, and explains how information integration can facilitate cross-treaty synergy for various arms control treaties.

  19. Fusion Power Associates Fusion Energy Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Power Associates Fusion Energy Sciences Program www.ofes.fusion.doe.gov U.S. Department for ITER Decision Making (IAEA, November 8-9, 2004) Delegations from China, European Union, Japan

  20. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

  1. Fusion Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion

  2. Inertial fusion: strategy and economic potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial fusion must demonstrate that the high target gains required for practical fusion energy can be achieved with driver energies not larger than a few megajoules. Before a multi-megajoule scale driver is constructed, inertial fusion must provide convincing experimental evidence that the required high target gains are feasible. This will be the principal objective of the NOVA laser experiments. Implosions will be conducted with scaled targets which are nearly hydrodynamically equivalent to the high gain target implosions. Experiments which demonstrate high target gains will be conducted in the early nineties when multi-megajoule drivers become available. Efficient drivers will also be demonstrated by this time period. Magnetic fusion may demonstrate high Q at about the same time as inertial fusion demonstrates high gain. Beyond demonstration of high performance fusion, economic considerations will predominate. Fusion energy will achieve full commercial success when it becomes cheaper than fission and coal. Analysis of the ultimate economic potential of inertial fusion suggests its costs may be reduced to half those of fission and coal. Relative cost escalation would increase this advantage. Fusions potential economic advantage derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy (which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity).

  3. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, 7011 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boris, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, South West, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Piefer, G. R. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs, 2555 Industrial Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53713 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  4. Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

  5. Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Minimal Fusion Systems Ellen Henke University of Birmingham Ellen Henke Minimal Fusion Systems #12;Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Contents 1 Introduction 2 Minimal Fusion Systems 3 Maximal Parabolics 4 Results Ellen

  6. Socio-economic Aspects of Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Schmidt

    2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion power systems, if developed and deployed, would have many attractive features including power production not dependant on weather or solar conditions, flexible siting, and minimal carbon dioxide production. In this paper, we quantify the benefit of these features. In addition, fusion deployment scenarios are developed for the last half of this century and these scenarios are analyzed for resource requirements and waste production.

  7. Designing Fusion Machines for High Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Fusion Machines for High Availability Tom Brown, Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics is proportional to (Availability)-1 Rapid removal/replacement of limited-life in-vessel components is a necessary condition for high availability. DEMO will need to show that a fusion plant can operate with high

  8. Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form? A. M. Bradshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form? A. M. Bradshaw Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics million years. The fuels for nuclear fusion ­ lithium and deuterium ­ satisfy this condition because multipliers foreseen for fusion power plants, in particular beryllium, represent a major supply problem

  9. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  10. Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.

    2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion can play an important role in sustainable global energy because it has an available and unlimited fuel supply and location not restricted by climate or geography. Further, it emits no greenhouse gases. It has no potential for large energy releases in an accident, and no need for more than about 100 years retention for radioactive waste disposal. Substantial progress in the realization of fusion energy has been made during the past 20 years of research. It is now possible to produce significant amounts of energy from controlled deuterium and tritium (DT) reactions in the laboratory. This has led to a growing confidence in our ability to produce burning plasmas with significant energy gain in the next generation of fusion experiments. As success in fusion facilities has underpinned the scientific feasibility of fusion, the high cost of next-step fusion facilities has led to a shift in the focus of international fusion research towards a lower cost development path and an attractive end product. The increasing data base from fusion research allows conceptual fusion power plant studies, of both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches to fusion, to translate commercial requirements into the design features that must be met if fusion is to play a role in the world's energy mix; and identify key R and D items; and benchmark progress in fusion energy development. This paper addresses the question, ''Is mankind closer or farther away from controlled fusion than a few decades ago?'' We review the tremendous scientific progress during the last 10 years. We use the detailed engineering design activities of burning plasma experiments as well as conceptual fusion power plant studies to describe our visions of attractive fusion power plants. We use these studies to compare technical requirements of an attractive fusion system with present achievements and to identify remaining technical challenges for fusion. We discuss scenarios for fusion energy deployment in the energy market.

  11. Production and measurement of engineered surfaces for inertial confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Douglas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial Confinement Fusion uses the optical energy from a very high power laser to implode spherical capsules that contain a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium. The capsules are made of either Beryllium, plastic, or glass and range from 0.1 mm to 2 mm in diameter. As a capsule implodes, thereby compressing the fuel to reach nuclear fusion conditions, it achieves temperatures of millions of degrees Centigrade and very high pressures. In this state, the capsule materials act like fluids and often a low density fluidic material will push on a higher density material which can be a very unstable condition depending upon the smoothness of the interface between the two materials. This unstable condition is called a hydrodynamic instabillity which results in the mixing of the two materials. If the mixing occurs between the fuel and a non-fuel material, it can stop the fusion reaction just like adding significant amounts of water to gasoline can stop the operation of an automobile. Another region in the capsule where surface roughness can cause capsule performance degradation is at a joint. For instance, many capsules are made of hemispheres that are joined together. If the joint surfaces are too rough, then there will an effective reduction in density at the joint. This density reduction can cause a non-uniform implosion which will reduce the fusion energy coming out of the capsule.

  12. Fusion Algebras of Logarithmic Minimal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present explicit conjectures for the chiral fusion algebras of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The generators of fusion are countably infinite in number but the ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure but require so-called Kac representations which are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fundamental fusion algebra is in general a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the results of Gaberdiel and Kausch for p=1 and with Eberle and Flohr for (p,p')=(2,5) corresponding to the logarithmic Yang-Lee model. In the latter case, we confirm the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. We also find that closure of a fundamental fusion algebra is achieved without the introduction of indecomposable representations of rank higher than 3. The conjectured fusion rules are supported, within our lattice approach, by extensive numerical studies of the associated integrable lattice models. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere. The agreement of our fusion rules with the previous fusion rules lends considerable support for the identification of the logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p') with the augmented c_{p,p'} (minimal) models defined algebraically.

  13. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueckner, Keith A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  14. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter deals with the analysis and engineering scaling of solid breeded blankets. The limits under which full component behavior can be achieved under changed test conditions are explored. The characterization of these test requirements for integrated testing contributes to the overall test matrix and test plan for the understanding and development of fusion nuclear technology. The second chapter covers the analysis and engineering scaling of liquid metal blankets. The testing goals for a complete blanket program are described. (MOW)

  15. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

  16. Multinational achievement: PPPL collaborates on record fusion plasma in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS DeptMultilateralMultimediaScience

  17. COLLOQUIUM: Achieving 10MW Fusion Power in TFTR: a Retrospective |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience,Institute for Advanced StudyPrinceton

  18. Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slough, John

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus on an experimental demonstration of the macron launcher at full power, and the demonstration of megagauss magnetic field compression by a small array of full scale macrons. In addition the physics of the compression of an FRC to fusion conditions will be undertaken with a smaller scale MFL. The timescale for testing will be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of other facilities at MSNW where the target FRC will be created and translated inside the MFL just prior to implosion of the MFL. Experimental success would establish the concept at the �proof of principle� level and the following phase III effort would focus on the full development of the concept into a fusion gain device. Successful operation would lead to several benefits in various fields. It would have application to high energy density physics, as well as nuclear waste transmutation and alternate fission fuel cycles. The smaller scale device could find immediate application as an intense source of neutrons for diagnostic imaging and non-invasive object interrogation.

  19. Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehne, R W

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

  20. Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Kuehne

    2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

  1. FESAC FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP) PANEL REPORT William Tang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power plant (DEMO), further science and technology is needed to achieve the 2500 MW of continuous power1 FESAC FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP) PANEL REPORT William Tang1 , Riccardo Betti2 , Jeffrey) to FESAC, Dr. Raymond Orbach clearly identifies the overarching objective of the proposed Fusion Simulation

  2. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  3. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  4. Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2012 Annual Meeting 2 General Fusion Making affordable fusion power a reality. · Founded in 2002, based to demonstrate the first fusion system capable of "net gain" 3 years after proof · Validated by leading experts

  5. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duval, B. P. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

  6. Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Energy Sciences Program Mission The Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) program leads the national for an economically and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. The National Energy Policy states that fusion-heated) plasma, and the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) has concluded that the fusion program

  7. Image Fusion: Principles, Methods, and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sroubek, Filip

    different sensors (visible and infrared, CT and NMR, or panchromatic and multispectral satellite images fusion is used to achieve high spatial and spectral resolutions by combining images from two sensors, one applications have appeared in medical imaging like simultaneous evaluation of CT, MRI, and/or PET images

  8. Hindrance of ^{16}O+^{208}Pb fusion at extreme sub-barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henning Esbensen; Serban Misicu

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the fusion data for $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb using coupled-channels calculations. We include couplings to the low-lying surface excitations of the projectile and target and study the effect of the ($^{16}$O,$^{17}$O) one-neutron pickup. The hindrance of the fusion data that is observed at energies far below the Coulomb barrier cannot be explained by a conventional ion-ion potential and defining the fusion in terms of ingoing-wave boundary conditions (IWBC). We show that the hindrance can be explained fairly well by applying the M3Y double-folding potential which has been corrected with a calibrated, repulsive term that simulates the effect of nuclear incompressibility. We show that the coupling to one-neutron transfer channels plays a crucial role in improving the fit to the data. The best fit is achieved by increasing the transfer strength by 25% relative to the strength that is required to reproduce the one-neutron transfer data. The larger strength is not unrealistic because the calculated inelastic plus transfer cross section is in good agreement with the measured quasielastic cross section. We finally discuss the problem of reproducing the fusion data at energies far above the Coulomb barrier. Here we do not account for the data when we apply the IWBC but the discrepancy is essentially eliminated by applying the M3Y+repulsion potential and a weak, short-ranged imaginary potential.

  9. Anomaly Detection for Resilient Control Systems Using Fuzzy-Neural Data Fusion Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resilient control systems in critical infrastructures require increased cyber-security and state-awareness. One of the necessary conditions for achieving the desired high level of resiliency is timely reporting and understanding of the status and behavioral trends of the control system. This paper describes the design and development of a neural-network based data-fusion system for increased state-awareness of resilient control systems. The proposed system consists of a dedicated data-fusion engine for each component of the control system. Each data-fusion engine implements three-layered alarm system consisting of: (1) conventional threshold-based alarms, (2) anomalous behavior detector using self-organizing maps, and (3) prediction error based alarms using neural network based signal forecasting. The proposed system was integrated with a model of the Idaho National Laboratory Hytest facility, which is a testing facility for hybrid energy systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the implemented data fusion system provides timely plant performance monitoring and cyber-state reporting.

  10. Microscopic study of Ca$+$Ca fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Keser; A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the fusion barriers for reactions involving Ca isotopes $\\mathrm{^{40}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{40}Ca}$, $\\mathrm{^{40}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}$, and $\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}$ using the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory coupled with a density constraint. In this formalism the fusion barriers are directly obtained from TDHF dynamics. We also study the excitation of the pre-equilibrium GDR for the $\\mathrm{^{40}Ca}+\\mathrm{^{48}Ca}$ system and the associated $\\gamma$-ray emission spectrum. Fusion cross-sections are calculated using the incoming-wave boundary condition approach. We examine the dependence of fusion barriers on collision energy as well as on the different parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction.

  11. Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 Plasma Injector 10 people $3M 1 year #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 8 Density people $3.5M 14 months #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 11 Plasma Compression ExperimentsFusion Power Associates, 2011 Annual Meeting 1 General Fusion #12;Fusion Power Associates, 2011

  12. 50 Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , .... · Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential ­ Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion demonstrated in 19521 50 Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ SOFE 2009 June 1, 2009 San Diego, CA 92101 #12;2 #12;2 #12;3 Fusion Prior to Geneva 1958 · A period of rapid

  13. Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future* Robert Conn Fusion Energy, "Opportunities and Directions in Fusion Energy Science for the Next Decade", held July 11-23, 1999 in Snowmass, Colorado. #12;2 Abstract History shows that all the major opportunities to advance fusion research were

  14. MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Fusion Technology & Engineering Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Technology & Engineering Division 1. Costing of 4 "Reference" Options 2. Equalization of TF;MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Fusion Technology & Engineering Division Total Cost (M$) vs. A; MMIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Fusion Technology & Engineering Division J.H. Schultz M

  15. Investigation into Fusion Feasibility of a Magnetized Target Fusion Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetton, Brian

    Investigation into Fusion Feasibility of a Magnetized Target Fusion Reactor Michael Lindstrom fusion en- ergy known as a magnetized target fusion reactor, in which an intense pressure wave the fusion reactor design we have chosen to model. In section 2, we present a simplified model and set

  16. Power measurements in fusion reactors Author: Aljaz Cufar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Â?umer, Slobodan

    Seminar: Power measurements in fusion reactors Author: Aljaz Cufar Mentor: doc. dr. Andrej Trkov are presented and power balance condition for magnetic confinement plasma is estimated. The most important methods and detectors used for power measurements in today's largest magnetic confinement fusion reactors

  17. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  18. Frontier of Fusion Research: Path to the Steady State Fusion Reactor by Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which will be built in Cadarache in France, has finally started this year, 2006. Since the thermal energy produced by fusion reactions divided by the external heating power, i.e., the Q value, will be larger than 10, this is a big step of the fusion research for half a century trying to tame the nuclear fusion for the 6.5 Billion people on the Earth. The source of the Sun's power is lasting steadily and safely for 8 Billion years. As a potentially safe environmentally friendly and economically competitive energy source, fusion should provide a sustainable future energy supply for all mankind for ten thousands of years. At the frontier of fusion research important milestones are recently marked on a long road toward a true prototype fusion reactor. In its own merits, research into harnessing turbulent burning plasmas and thereby controlling fusion reaction, is one of the grand challenges of complex systems science.After a brief overview of a status of world fusion projects, a focus is given on fusion research at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, which is playing a role of the Inter University Institute, the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research and by the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility. The current status of LHD project is presented focusing on the experimental program and the recent achievements in basic parameters and in steady state operations. Since, its start in a year 1998, a remarkable progress has presently resulted in the temperature of 140 Million degree, the highest density of 500 Thousand Billion/cc with the internal density barrier (IDB) and the highest steady average beta of 4.5% in helical plasma devices and the largest total input energy of 1.6 GJ, in all magnetic confinement fusion devices. Finally, a perspective is given of the ITER Broad Approach program as an integrated part of ITER and Development of Fusion Energy project Agreement. Moreover, the relationship with the NIFS' new parent organization the National Institutes of Natural Sciences and with foreign research institutions is briefly explained.

  19. The European Fusion Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antidormi, R.; Bartlett, D.; Bruhns, H. [European Commission (Belgium)

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term objective of the European fusion programme is the harnessing of the power of fusion to help meet mankind's future energy needs.This paper describes the current research programme, the unique organisational character of the fusion programme, and European and world-wide co-operation. The future evolution of the programme as part of the European Research Area and the developments currently taking place in preparation for the possible construction of ITER, the next major step towards the realisation of fusion power, are discussed.

  20. Indecomposable Fusion Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias R. Gaberdiel; Horst G. Kausch

    1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the fusion products of certain representations of the Virasoro algebra for c=-2 and c=-7 which are not completely reducible. We introduce a new algorithm which allows us to study the fusion product level by level, and we use this algorithm to analyse the indecomposable components of these fusion products. They form novel representations of the Virasoro algebra which we describe in detail. We also show that a suitably extended set of representations closes under fusion, and indicate how our results generalise to all (1,q) models.

  1. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

  2. DENSE MATTER IN LASER DRIVEN FUSION ! LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS R.L. Mc Crory and J. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    irradiation to heat and compress a target containing thermonuclear fuel to fusion conditions. This is stillDENSE MATTER IN LASER DRIVEN FUSION ! LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS R.L. Mc Crory and J. Wilson Laboratory. The high power lasers in quaestion were constructed with laser fusion studies as the goal, i

  3. On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    On Lithium Wall and Performance of Magnetic Fusion Device S. I. Krasheninnikov1 , L. E. Zakharov2 It is shown that lithium walls resulting in zero recycling conditions at the edge of magnetic fusion device strong impact of fully absorbing lithium walls on the performance of magnetic fusion devices have been

  4. Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    . Abdou Fusion Power Program October 1982 Invited paper presented at the International Conference by Mohamed A. Abdou ABSTRACT Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets

  5. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T; Simon, A J; Powers, S; Meier, W R

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production avoidance. Sensitivity of benefits-gained to timing of market-entry is presented. These results show the importance of achieving market entry in the 2030 time frame. Economic modeling results show that fusion energy can be competitive with other low-carbon energy sources. The paper concludes with a description of the LIFE commercialization path. It proposes constructing a demonstration facility capable of continuous fusion operations within 10 to 15 years. This facility will qualify the processes and materials needed for a commercial fusion power plant.

  6. Fusion Chamber Technology Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1. Abdou, M.A., The APEX Team, Ying, A., Morley, N., Gulec, K., Smolentsev, S., Kotschenreuther, M-248, 2001. 2. Mohamed Abdou and the APEX Team, Exploring novel high power density concepts for attractive fusion systems, Fusion Engineering and Design, vol. 45, pp. 145-167, 1999. 3. Abdou, M. A., Ying, A., Lu

  7. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  8. HEDP and new directions for fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quest for fusion energy has a long history and the demonstration of thermonuclear energy release in 1951 represented a record achievement for high energy density. While this first demonstration was in response to the extreme fears of mankind, it also marked the beginning of a great hope that it would usher in an era of boundless cheap energy. In fact, fusion still promises to be an enabling technology that can be compared to the prehistoric utilization of fire. Why has the quest for fusion energy been so long on promises and so short in fulfillment? This paper briefly reviews past approaches to fusion energy and suggests new directions. By putting aside the old thinking and vigorously applying our experimental, computational and theoretical tools developed over the past decades we should be able to make rapid progress toward satisfying an urgent need. Fusion not only holds the key to abundant green energy, but also promises to enable deep space missions and the creation of rare elements and isotopes for wide-ranging industrial applications and medical diagnostics.

  9. The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E I

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

  10. strategic directions achievement"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    jacaranda tree that graces the University of Sydney Quadrangle was planted in the 1920s. It has become inspired by achievement.......... 2 University structure and organisation.... 3 Research and innovation of existing practice - constructive but confronting. We seek sustainable economic development, and this means

  11. POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY JUSTICE IN SOCIETY: BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY) Project Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware First Publication in July 2010 Updated December 2010 #12;Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

  12. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability at MnDOT Cindy Carlsson MnDOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation 22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference May 24, 2011 #12;Sustainable practices respect Sustainability #12;Environmental Sustainability Sustainable practices · Are compatible with and may enhance

  13. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson Mn/DOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation April 21, 2011 #12;Sustainability Is Not New Mn/DOT has long been a leader in CSS and environmental excellence. . . . . . so we're well along on the path to sustainability! #12;Today Sustainability is More

  14. Fusion excitation function revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph. Eudes; Z. Basrak; F. Sébille; V. de la Mota; G. Royer; M. Zori?

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a comprehensive systematics of fusion-evaporation and/or fusion-fission cross sections for a very large variety of systems over an energy range 4-155 A.MeV. Scaled by the reaction cross sections, fusion cross sections do not show a universal behavior valid for all systems although a high degree of correlation is present when data are ordered by the system mass asymmetry.For the rather light and close to mass-symmetric systems the main characteristics of the complete and incomplete fusion excitation functions can be precisely determined. Despite an evident lack of data above 15A.MeV for all heavy systems the available data suggests that geometrical effects could explain the persistence of incomplete fusion at incident energies as high as 155A.MeV.

  15. Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Annual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    82 kV #12;7 Outline · Refurbished Z · Pulsed power fusion · Advances in pulsed power technology · Z-pinch;10 Outline · Refurbished Z · Pulsed power fusion · Advances in pulsed power technology · Z-pinch IFE Linear1 Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium December 4

  16. "50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classified US Program on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Project Sherwood) carried out until 1958 when"50" Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ Fi P th SFusion Fire Powers the Sun "W d t if k f i k ""We need to see if we can make fusion work

  17. Fusion for Neutrons as a Necessary Step to Commercial Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reactors are limited Fast reactors as the basis for future large-scale nuclear industry with acceptable1 Fusion for Neutrons as a Necessary Step to Commercial Fusion B. Kuteev Head of Fusion Reactor MWe #12; Fast track to Fusion for Energy is defined: ITER ~2020 DEMO ~2035 FPP ~2050 New products

  18. Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

  19. Requirements and Design Envelope for Volumetric Neutron Source Fusion Facilities for Fusion Nuclear Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M [University of California, Los Angeles] [University of California, Los Angeles; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL] [ORNL

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper shows that timely development of fusion nuclear technology (FNT) components, e.g. blanket, for DEMO requires the construction and operation of a fusion facility parallel to ITER. This facility, called VNS, will be dedicated to testing, developing and qualifying FNT components and material combinations. Without VNS, i.e. with ITER alone, the confidence level in achieving DEMO operating goals has been quantified and is unacceptably low (< 1 %). An attractive design envelope for VNS exists. Tokamak VNS designs with driven plasma (Q ~ 1-3), steady state plasma operation and normal copper toroidal field coils lead to small sized devices with moderate cost.

  20. Fusion Energy Program Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Plasma Technologies Fusion Technologies Advanced MaterialsFusion Energy Program Presentation to Field Work Proposals Washington, D.C. N. Anne Davies Associate Director for Fusion energy Office of Energy Research March23, 1994 #12;FUSION ENERGY PROGRAM FYI

  1. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  2. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  3. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  5. Z, ZX, and X-1: A Realistic Path to High Fusion Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOK, DONALD L.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Z-pinches now constitute the most energetic and powerful sources of x-rays available by a large margin. The Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories has produced 1.8 MJ of x-ray energy, 280 TW of power, and hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV. These advances are being applied to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on Z. The requirements for high fusion yield are exemplified in the target to be driven by the X-1 accelerator. X-1 will drive two z-pinches, each producing 7 MJ of x-ray energy and about 1000 TW of x-ray power. Together, these radiation sources will heat a hohlraum containing the 4-mm diameter ICF capsule to a temperature exceeding 225 eV for about 10 ns, with the pulse shape required to drive the capsule to high fusion yield, in the range of 200--1000 MJ. Since X-1 consists of two identical accelerators, it is possible to mitigate the technical risk of high yield by constructing one accelerator. This accelerator, ZX, will bridge the gap from Z to X-1 by driving an integrated target experiment with a very efficient energy source, ZX will also provide experimental condition that the full specifications of the X-1 accelerator for high yield are achievable, and that a realistic path to high fission yield exists.

  6. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility.

  7. Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

  8. How Fusion Energy Works

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fusion energy is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. As part of How Energy Works, we'll cover everything from fuel sources to plasma physics and beyond.

  9. Fusion-breeder program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding /sup 239/Pu and /sup 233/U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed. (MOW)

  10. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsyganov, E. N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  11. Generalized Fusion Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Aharony

    1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, DiFrancesco and Zuber have characterized the RCFTs which have a description in terms of a fusion potential in one variable, and proposed a generalized potential to describe other theories. In this note we give a simple criterion to determine when such a generalized description is possible. We also determine which RCFTs can be described by a fusion potential in more than one variable, finding that in fact all RCFTs can be described in such a way, as conjectured by Gepner.

  12. LBNL perspective on inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangerter, Roger O.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL Perspective on Inertial Fusion Energy Roger Bangerter1990) and the last Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (1993)year 2005, the Inertial Fusion Energy Program must grow to

  13. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ITER (in Latin ?the way?) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen ? deuterium and tritium ? fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project ? China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States ? represent more than half the world?s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  14. How much laser power can propagate through fusion plasma?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel M. Lushnikov; Harvey A. Rose

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of intense laser beams is crucial for inertial confinement fusion, which requires precise beam control to achieve the compression and heating necessary to ignite the fusion reaction. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), where fusion will be attempted, is now under construction. Control of intense beam propagation may be ruined by laser beam self-focusing. We have identified the maximum laser beam power that can propagate through fusion plasma without significant self-focusing and have found excellent agreement with recent experimental data, and suggest a way to increase that maximum by appropriate choice of plasma composition with implication for NIF designs. Our theory also leads to the prediction of anti-correlation between beam spray and backscatter and suggests the indirect control of backscatter through manipulation of plasma ionization state or acoustic damping.

  15. Fusion Rules in Navier-Stokes Turbulence: First Experimental Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrienne L. Fairhall; Brindesh Dhruva; Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia; Katepalli R. Sreenivasan

    1997-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first experimental tests of the recently derived fusion rules for Navier-Stokes (N-S) turbulence. The fusion rules address the asymptotic properties of many-point correlation functions as some of the coordinates coalesce, and form an important ingredient of the nonperturbative statistical theory of turbulence. Here we test the fusion rules when the spatial separations lie within the inertial range, and find good agreement between experiment and theory. An unexpected result is a simple linear law for the Laplacian of the velocity fluctuation conditioned on velocity increments across large separations.

  16. Stau-catalyzed d-t Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koichi Hamaguchi; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Masayasu Kamimura; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitino of mass 10-100 GeV is a well motivated scenario in supergravity. If the stau is the next lightest supersymmetry particle, its life-time becomes order of $10^{6-8}$ sec. If it is the case the stau makes a big impact on the nuclear fusion, since it is a charged particle. In this paper we perform a detailed calculation of a stau-catalyzed d-t fusion. We find that if certain technical conditions are satisfied, it is not hopeless to use the nuclear fusion as a source of energy.

  17. anisotropic d-d fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the fuel and high temperature in the hot spot to trigger ignition and maximize the thermonuclear energy gain. To achieve high 11 LLNL-PRES-463228 FUSION PERSPECTIVES* Plasma...

  18. Fusion Scientists See Promise Where Obama Shows No By John Lippert -May 3, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    companies to build an electricity-producing fusion power plant eight to 12 years after the NIF achieves and $44 less than photovoltaic solar cells. Moses, 63, wants to raise $1.5 billion, partially from

  19. Realization of Fusion Energy: An alternative fusion roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Realization of Fusion Energy: An alternative fusion roadmap Farrokh Najmabadi Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering Director, Center for Energy Research UC San Diego International Fusion Road of emerging nations, energy use is expected to grow ~ 4 fold in this century (average 1.6% annual growth rate

  20. FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF): UPDATE · It was well recognized there were also critical materials and technology issues that needed to be addressed in order to apply the knowledge we gained about burning plasma state #12;FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM

  1. Applications and Progress of Dust Injection to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Mansfield, Dennis K.; Roquemore, Lane A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Ticos, Catalin M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Three regimes of dust injection are proposed for different applications to fusion energy. In the 'low-speed' regime (<5 km/s), basic dust transport study, edge plasma diagnostics, edge-localized-mode (ELM) pacing in magnetic fusion devices can be realized by injecting dust of known properties into today's fusion experiments. ELM pacing, as an alternative to mini-pellet injection, is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion devices. Different schemes are available to inject dust. In the 'intermediate-speed' regime (10-200 km/s), possible applications of dust injection include fueling of the next-step fusion devices, core-diagnostics of the next-step fusion devices, and compression of plasma and solid targets to aid fusion energy production. Promising laboratory results of dust moving at 10-50 km/s do exist. Significant advance in this regime may be expected in the near term to achieve higher dust speeds. In the 'high-speed' regime (>500 km/s), dust injection can potentially be used to directly produce fusion energy through impact. Ideas on how to achieve these extremely high speeds are mostly on paper. No plan exists today to realize them in laboratory. Some experimental results, including electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration, are summarized and compared. Some features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. A necessary component of all dust injectors is the dust dropper (also known as dust dispenser). A computer-controlled piezoelectric crystals has been developed to dropped dust in a systematic and reproducible manner. Particle fluxes ranges from a few tens of particles per second up to thousands of particles per second by this simple device.

  2. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  3. data fusion 15 June 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    real world data fusion Fred Daum 15 June 2012 data fusion Copyright © 2012 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Customer Success Is Our Mission is a trademark of Raytheon Company. 1 #12;PATRIOT

  4. Fusion reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, D.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma kinetic temperature and density changes, each per an injected fuel density rate increment, control the energy supplied by a thermonuclear fusion reactor in a power production cycle. This could include simultaneously coupled control objectives for plasma current, horizontal and vertical position, shape and burn control. The minimum number of measurements required, use of indirect (not plasma parameters) system measurements, and distributed control procedures for burn control are to be verifiable in a time dependent systems code. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has the need to feedback control both the fusion output power and the driven plasma current, while avoiding damage to diverter plates. The system engineering of fusion reactors must be performed to assure their development expeditiously and effectively by considering reliability, availability, maintainability, environmental impact, health and safety, and cost.

  5. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chris Holland

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  6. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  7. Fusion welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  8. Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion Energy

  9. Fusion Science to Prepare

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links FusionDIII-D

  10. LASER FUSION CHAMBER DESIGN James P. Blanchard1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    the energy emitted by the target in such a way that the plant can achieve a commercially viable power approaches required for commercially viable laser fusion power plants, the issues driving those designs define the chamber size by providing flux limits for the various threats. In cases where a dry

  11. Vector Boson Fusion Higgs Production at the LHC - Mass Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Green

    2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist substantial backgrounds to the vector boson fusion production of Higgs at the LHC. Mass variables are studied which may alleviate the need to assume a spin zero WW resonance in order to achieve a sufficient signal to noise ratio in the two jet plus two lepton and missing energy final state.

  12. Advanced fusion diagnostics. Final technical report, July 15, 1991--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, K.G.

    1993-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Key among various issues of ignited plasmas is understanding the physics of energy transfer between thermal plasma particles and magnetically confined, highly energetic charged ions in a tokamak device. The superthermal particles are products of fusion reactions. The efficiency of energy transfer by collisions, from charged fusion products (e.g., {alpha}-particles) to plasma ions, grossly determines whether or not plasma conditions are self-sustaining without recourse to auxiliary heating. Furthermore, should energy transfer (efficiency be poor, and substantial auxiliary heating power is required to maintain reacting conditions within the plasma, economics may preclude commercial viability of fusion reactors. The required charged fusion product information is contained in the energy distribution function of these particles. Knowledge of temporal variations of the superthermal particle energy distribution function could be used by a fusion reactor control system to balance plasma conditions between thermal runaway and a modicum of fusion product energy transfer. Therefore, diagnostics providing data on the dynamical transfer of alpha-particle and other charged fusion product energy to the plasma ions are essential elements for a fusion reactor control system to insure that proper plasma conditions are maintained. The objective of this work is to assess if spectral analysis of rf radiation emitted by charged fusion products confined in a magnetized plasma, called ion cyclotron emission (ICE), can reveal the vital data of the distribution function of the superthermal particles.

  13. 2015 Call for HPC Achievement Award Nominations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear...

  14. Fusion potentials I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Di Francesco; J. -B. Zuber

    1992-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the conjecture by Gepner that the fusion ring of a rational conformal field theory is isomorphic to a ring of polynomials in $n$ variables quotiented by an ideal of constraints that derive from a potential. We show that in a variety of cases, this is indeed true with {\\it one-variable} polynomials.

  15. About sponsorship Fusion power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using the energy released when two light atomic nuclei are brought together to make a heavier one are needed. Unlike existing nuclear reactors, which produce nasty long-lived radioactive waste, the radioactive processes involved with fusion are relatively short- lived and the waste products benign. Unlike

  16. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive targets for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction Adensity matter and fusion energy. Previously, experiments inHeavy ion fusion science research for high energy density

  17. New mechanism of membrane fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mueller; K. Katsov; M. Schick

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out Monte Carlo simulation of the fusion of bilayers of single chain amphiphiles which show phase behavior similar to that of biological lipids. The fusion mechanism we observe is very different from the ``stalk'' hypothesis. Stalks do form on the first stage of fusion, but they do not grow radially to form a hemifused state. Instead, stalk formation destabilizes the membranes and results in hole formation in the vicinity of the stalks. When holes in each bilayer nucleate spontaneously next to the same stalk, an incomplete fusion pore is formed. The fusion process is completed by propagation of the initial connection, the stalk, along the edges of the aligned holes.

  18. Fusion Probability in Dinuclear System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juhee Hong

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion can be described by the time evolution of a dinuclear system with two degrees of freedom, the relative motion and transfer of nucleons. In the presence of the coupling between two collective modes, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation in a locally harmonic approximation. The potential of a dinuclear system has the quasifission barrier and the inner fusion barrier, and the escape rates can be calculated by the Kramers' model. To estimate the fusion probability, we calculate the quasifission rate and the fusion rate. We investigate the coupling effects on the fusion probability and the cross section of evaporation residue.

  19. Stau-catalyzed Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hamaguchi; T. Hatsuda; T. T. Yanagida

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that the stau may play a role of a catalyst for nuclear fusions if the stau is a long-lived particle as in the scenario of gravitino dark matter. In this letter, we consider d d fusion under the influence of stau where the fusion is enhanced because of a short distance between the two deuterons. We find that one chain of the d d fusion may release an energy of O(10) GeV per stau. We discuss problems of making the stau-catalyzed nuclear fusion of practical use with the present technology of producing stau.

  20. anterior cervical fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  1. alkaline phosphatase fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  2. antibody fusion proteins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  3. abl fusion gene: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  4. acyltransferase gfp fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  5. albumin fusion proteins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  6. anatomical information fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  7. antigen fusion proteins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  8. affects myoblast fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  9. anterior spinal fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  10. anterior vertebral fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  11. anterior interbody fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  12. acquired motor fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  13. angiography fusion images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  14. alloy fusion safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  15. altered fusion transcript: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  16. artificial gene fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  17. activate membrane fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  18. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  19. INSPECTION OF FUSION JOINTS IN PLASTIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Savitski; Connie Reichert; John Coffey

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost effective method of assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field exists. Visual examination and pressure testing are current non-destructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project will develop, demonstrate, and validate an in-situ non-destructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system will include a laser based image-recognition system that will automatically generate and interpret digital images of pipe joints and assign them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. A Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) is being developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation and reveal the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and non-standard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and tensile testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and tensile testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than tensile testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  20. Inspection of Fusion Joints in Plastic Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connie Reichert

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard method of joining plastic pipe in the field is the butt fusion process. As in any pipeline application, joint quality greatly affects overall operational safety of the system. Currently no simple, reliable, cost-effective method exists for assessing the quality of fusion joints in the field. Visual examination and pressure testing are current nondestructive approaches, which do not provide any assurance about the long-term pipeline performance. This project developed, demonstrated, and validated an in-situ nondestructive inspection method for butt fusion joints in gas distribution plastic pipelines. The inspection system includes a laser-based image-recognition system that automatically generates and interprets digital images of pipe joints and assigns them a pass/fail rating, which eliminates operator bias in evaluating joint quality. An EWI-patented process, the Weld Zone Inspection Method (WZIM) was developed in which local heat is applied to the joint region to relax the residual stresses formed by the original joining operation, which reveals the surface condition of the joint. In cases where the joint is not formed under optimal conditions, and the intermolecular forces between contacting surfaces are not strong enough, the relaxation of macromolecules in the surface layer causes the material to pull back, revealing a fusion line. If the joint is sound, the bond line image does not develop. To establish initial feasibility of the approach, welds were performed under standard and nonstandard conditions. These welds were subjected to the WZIM and two destructive forms of testing: short-term tensile testing and long-term creep rupture testing. There appears to be a direct correlation between the WZIM and the destructive testing results. Although WZIM appears to be more sensitive than destructive testing can verify, the approach appears valid.

  1. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  2. Fusion burn dynamics in dense Z-pinches (DZP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Werley, K.A.; Hagenson, R.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion burn dynamics and energy yield of the dense Z-pinch (DZP) are examined using a profile-averaged, zero-dimensional time-dependent model. A range of conditions (fuel, line density, voltage, fusion-product heating, enthalpy endless, density and temperature profiles, current rise rate, electrode impurities) are examined. Magneto-hydrodynamic stability is assumed, and initial conditions are based on those ideally existing after the melting and ionization of a solid fiber of fusion fuel. Plasma-conditions required of neutron sources for materials testing ({dot S}{sub n} {ge} 10{sup 19} n/s) and for possible commercial power production are examined. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (SSP) through three strategic objectives: · Achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory experiments to include access to thermonuclear burn conditions in the laboratory, a unique and unprecedented to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. The NIF is a 192-bea

  4. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  5. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Still Flying Fusion Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    please either join the Yahoo Group (http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/stillflying) or email the editor (stillflying@bitwiser.com - subject heading "Contribution"). Disclaimer This publication is not affiliated with Joss Whedon ; Mutant Enemy, Inc.... This abridged edition is available only at Fusion, Issue Two will be available soon, complete with an Adam Baldwin interview! If you wish to subscribe (for free) please email stillflying@bitwiser.com with the subject heading "Subscribe" and you...

  7. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) FINAL REPORT September 1990 Report of the Technical Panel on Magnetic Fusion of the Energy Research Advisory Board Washington, D .C. 20585 #12;#12;Fusion Policy of your Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. It presents a fusion policy that the Committee believes

  8. Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 7 Materials and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and hydrogen generating ­ fusion plant are the key advantage. 7MaterialsandTechnology #12;Annual Report of materials suitable for attractive power plants, the conceptual design of demonstration power plants on modelling (and its validation) of the behaviour of materials in fusion power plant conditions, the European

  9. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  10. Achieve maximum application availability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Highlights Achieve maximum application availability and data protection using SQL Server AlwaysOn and other high availability features Reduce planned downtime significantly with SQL Server on Windows and management of high availability and disaster recovery using integrated tools Achieve maximum application

  11. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  12. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

  13. Edmund J. Synakowski Fusion Power Associates Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund J. Synakowski Fusion Power Associates Meeting September 27 - 28, 2006 The LLNL Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Program: leadership roles in both MFE and IFE, buoyed by ITER, NIF science, and LLNL

  14. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms leading to fusion, nuclear structure is affectingknoi,. A [he "nuclear structure" in fusion will consist ofCI i CO I0 + Be fusion I0 ' -cm Nuclear reaction S-factors

  15. Wafer Fusion for Integration of Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Allerman, A.A.; Kravitz, S.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Hindi, J.J.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a wafer fusion technology to achieve integration of semiconductor materials and heterostructures with widely disparate lattice parameters, electronic properties, and/or optical properties for novel devices not now possible on any one substrate. Using our simple fusion process which uses low temperature (400-600 C) anneals in inert N{sub 2} gas, we have extended the scope of this technology to examine hybrid integration of dissimilar device technologies. As a specific example, we demonstrate wafer bonding vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to transparent AlGaAs and GaP substrates to fabricate bottom-emitting short wavelength VCSELs. As a baseline fabrication technology applicable to many semiconductor systems, wafer fusion will revolutionize the way we think about possible semiconductor devices, and enable novel device configurations not possible by epitaxial growth.

  16. Physics Regimes in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Meade; S.C.Jardin; C.E. Kessel; M.A. Ulrickson; J.H. Schultz; P.H. Rutherford; J.A. Schmidt; J.C. Wesley; K.M. Young; N.A.Uckan; R.J. Thome; P. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; and C.C.Baker

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Burning plasma science is recognized widely as the next frontier in fusion research. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is a design study of a next-step burning plasma experiment with the goal of developing a concept for an experimental facility to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) self-heating, stability, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. This will require plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q greater than or equal to 5) that are sustained for a duration comparable to characteristic plasma timescales (greater than or equal to 10) tau(subscript ''E''), approximately 4 tau(subscript ''He''), approximately 2 tau(subscript ''skin''). The work reported here has been undertaken with the objective of finding the minimum size (cost) device to achieve these physics goals.

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C1, supplkment au no2, Tome 40,fkvr~er1979, page C1-73 ATOMIC, IONIC AND MOLECULAR DATA IN THERMO-NUCLEAR FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AND MOLECULAR DATA IN THERMO-NUCLEAR FUSION RESEARCH H.W. Drawin Association EURATOM-CEA DQpartement de Physique section deals with molecular data which are of interest in thermo-nuclear fusion research. 1. INTRODUCTION In order to achieve controlled thermo- nuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium one needs both high

  18. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldsof Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

  19. Study of internal magnetic field via polarimetry in fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivation Controlled thermonuclear fusion is a promising2007]. Controlled thermonuclear fusion is based on the

  20. Fusion Electricity A roadmap to the realisation of fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Electricity A roadmap to the realisation of fusion energy #12;28 European countries signed association EURaToM ­ University of latvia LATVIA lithuanian Energy Institute LITHUANIA Ministry of Education and Research ROMANIA Ministry of Education, science, culture and sport SLOVENIA centro de Investigaciones

  1. Systematics of fusion probability in "hot" fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Junlong Tian; Werner Scheid

    2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion probability in "hot" fusion reactions leading to the synthesis of super-heavy nuclei is investigated systematically. The quasi-fission barrier influences the formation of the super-heavy nucleus around the "island of stability" in addition to the shell correction. Based on the quasi-fission barrier height obtained with the Skyrme energy-density functional, we propose an analytical expression for the description of the fusion probability, with which the measured evaporation residual cross sections can be reproduced acceptably well. Simultaneously, some special fusion reactions for synthesizing new elements 119 and 120 are studied. The predicted evaporation residual cross sections for 50Ti+249Bk are about 10-150fb at energies around the entrance-channel Coulomb barrier. For the fusion reactions synthesizing element 120 with projectiles 54Cr and 58Fe, the cross sections fall to a few femtobarns which seems beyond the limit of the available facilities.

  2. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  3. Fusion and Ignition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide and Methane |science Fusion

  4. US ITER - Why Fusion?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may bedieselsummer gasoline price0US Fusion Research

  5. Fusion Power Associates Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbell is theOpportunities HighFusion Power

  6. Fusion Communication Summit cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity from NOAA'sFusion

  7. Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

  8. Course: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Universit degli Studi di Padova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesare, Bernardo

    the subject of controlled thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. Both fusion science of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, b) Engineering of a Magnetically Confined Fusion Reactor, c) ExperimentalCourse: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Università degli Studi di Padova in agreement

  9. Recent Accomplishments and Future Directions in US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Petti; Brad J. Merrill; Phillip Sharpe; L. C. Cadwallader; L. El-Guebaly; S. Reyes

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US fusion program has long recognized that the safety and environmental (S&E) potential of fusion can be attained by prudent materials selection, judicious design choices, and integration of safety requirements into the design of the facility. To achieve this goal, S&E research is focused on understanding the behavior of the largest sources of radioactive and hazardous materials in a fusion facility, understanding how energy sources in a fusion facility could mobilize those materials, developing integrated state of the art S&E computer codes and risk tools for safety assessment, and evaluating S&E issues associated with current fusion designs. In this paper, recent accomplishments are reviewed and future directions outlined.

  10. Magnetic Fusion Pilot Plant Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FNSF = Fusion Nuclear Science Facility CTF = Component Test Facility · Powerplantlike maintenance. · Targeted ultimate capabilities: ­ Fusion nuclear S&T development, component testing · Steady applicable to power plant · Demonstrate methods for fast replacement of in-vessel components ­ Net

  11. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) ­ Motivation, Role, Required Capabilities YK Martin Peng;1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Example: fusion nuclear-nonnuclear coupling effects-composites; Nano-structure alloy; PFC designs, etc. · Nuclear-nonnuclear coupling in PFC: - Plasma ion flux induces

  12. The Fusion Machine (extended abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Philippa

    directly. In the fusion machine, only channels exist at runtime. Channels may be remote, or co to rendezvous at the chan- nel. Execution amounts to the heating of a term (a directed implementation, rendezvous can result in explicit fusions, namely equational concurrent constraints on names. Upon heating

  13. Quasi-rational fusion products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Nahm

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion is defined for arbitrary lowest weight representations of $W$-algebras, without assuming rationality. Explicit algorithms are given. A category of quasirational representations is defined and shown to be stable under fusion. Conjecturally, it may coincide with the category of representations of finite quantum dimensions.

  14. su(3)k fusion coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Begin; P. Mathieu; M. A. Walton

    1992-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed and explicit formula for all $\\su{(3)}_k$ fusion coefficients is presented which, in the limit $k \\rightarrow \\infty$, turns into a simple and compact expression for the $su(3)$ tensor product coefficients. The derivation is based on a new diagrammatic method which gives directly both tensor product and fusion coefficients.

  15. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Fusion algebra of critical percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

  18. Fusion Energy 101 Jeff Freidberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Huge resources ­ a renewable · No CO2 emissions · No pollution · Inherently safe · No proliferation be in the future? 2 #12;Consumption of Energy by Sector Transportation Electricity Heating EIA ­ DOE 2010 3 #12;Where does fusion fit in? · Goal of fusion: make electricity · Lots of it! · Base load electricity ­ 24

  19. Frontiers of Fusion Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    migration Radiation damage accumulation kinetics · 1 D vs. 3D diffusion processes · ionization Insulators · Optical Materials *asterisk denotes Fusion Materials Task Group #12;Fusion Materials Sciences R Displacement cascades Quantification of displacement damage source term · Is the concept of a liquid valid

  20. Information Technology Systems for Fusion Industry and ITER Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putvinskaya, N.; Bulasheva, N.; Cole, G.; Dillon, T.; Frieman, E.; Sabado, M.; Schissel, D. (and others)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial developments in the fusion industry will have to overcome numerous technical challenges and will have a strong need for modern information technology (IT) systems.The fusion industry has manifested itself with an unprecedented international collaboration, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Data accumulated in ITER will be the major output of the project and will create the knowledge base for a future fusion power plant. A modern and effective information infrastructure will be critical to the success of the ITER project.To accumulate and maintain the knowledge base at all stages of the project, we propose to build an integrated information system for ITER: ITER Information Plant (IIP). IIP will minimize lost experiment time and accelerate the understanding, interpretation, and planning of fusion experiments. IIP will allow to reap maximum benefits from the project's scientific and technological achievements, make the ITER results accessible to hundreds of researchers worldwide. This will facilitate collaboration, dramatically increasing the pace of scientific and technological discovery and the rate at which practical use is made of these discoveries.As the first of its kind, the ITER Information Plant could be used in the future as a prototype IT system for national and international fusion projects, in which multicountry collaboration, distributed work sites and operations are catalysts for success.

  1. PPPL-3183 -Preprint: May 1996, UC-420, 424, 426 Fusion Reactivity, Confinement, and Stability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration [8], and Supershots enhanced by Li pellet conditioning [9, 10

  2. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  3. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  4. Electron screening effect on stellar thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potekhin, A Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the impact of plasma correlation effects on nonresonant thermonuclear reactions for various stellar objects, namely in the liquid envelopes of neutron stars, and the interiors of white dwarfs, low-mass stars, and substellar objects. We examine in particular the effect of electron screening on the enhancement of thermonuclear reactions in dense plasmas within and beyond the linear mixing rule approximation as well as the corrections due to quantum effects at high density. In addition, we examine some recent unconventional (Yukawa-potential and "quantum-tail") theoretical results on stellar thermonuclear fusions and show that these scenarios do not apply to stellar conditions.

  5. Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made.

  6. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k{sub eff} of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's.

  7. Clean steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels.

  8. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  9. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  10. Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

  11. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Bernard [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-0445 (United States)]. E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  12. Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory -- Intermediate between MFE and IFE · Presently only fundedMagnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan G. A. Wurden Fusion Energy Program Office Los Alamos National Laboratory Jan. 14, 2003 #12;Magnetized Target Fusion: Input

  13. Fusion EnergyFusion Energy Powering the XXI centuryPowering the XXI century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion EnergyFusion Energy Powering the XXI centuryPowering the XXI century Carlos Matos Ferreira, Fusion Energy Conference, Vilamoura, Portugal #12;OutlineOutline ·· World Energy ConsumptionWorld Energy Consumption ·· Global WarmingGlobal Warming ·· Advantages of Fusion energyAdvantages of Fusion energy

  14. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2006 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community. Benefits Fusion is the energy source that powers the sun and stars. In the fusion process, formsScience/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2006 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2005 Comparable Appropriation FY 2006 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science

  15. Magnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Matterhorn initiated at Princeton 1950s Classified US Project Sherwood on controlled thermonuclear fusionMagnetic Confinement Fusion at the Crossroads Michael Bell Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;MGB / UT / 070307 2 The Beginnings of Fusion Energy Research 1928 Concept of fusion reactions

  16. Fusion rules in conformal field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fuchs

    1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of fusion rings and fusion rule algebras, and of their manifestations in twodimensional (conformal) field theory, are described: diagonalization and the connection with modular invariance; the presentation in terms of quotients of polynomial rings; fusion graphs; various strategies that allow for a partial classification; and the role of the fusion rules in the conformal bootstrap programme.

  17. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  18. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  20. Muon catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breunlich, W.H.; Cargnelli, M.; Marton, J.; Naegele, N.; Pawlek, P.; Scrinzi, A.; Werner, J.; Zmeskal, J.; Bistirlich, J.; Crowe, K.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the program and results of our experiment performed by a European-American collatoration at the Swiss Institute of Nuclear Research. Systematic investigations of the low temperature region (23K to 300K) reveal a surprisingly rich physics of mesoatomic and mesomolecular processes, unparalleled in other systems of isotopic hydrogen mixtures. A dramatic density dependence of the reaction rates is found. The rich structure in the time spectra of the fusion neutrons observed at low gas density yields first evidence for new effects, most likely strong contributions from reactions of hot muonic atoms. The important question of muon losses due to He sticking is investigated by different methods and over a wide range of tritium concentrations.

  1. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  2. Fusion pumped light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  3. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  4. Class II virus membrane fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kielian, Margaret [Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave., Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)]. E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Enveloped animal viruses fuse their membrane with a host cell membrane, thus delivering the virus genetic material into the cytoplasm and initiating infection. This critical membrane fusion reaction is mediated by a virus transmembrane protein known as the fusion protein, which inserts its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the cell membrane and refolds to drive the fusion reaction. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Inhibition of the fusion protein refolding reaction confirms its importance in fusion and suggests new antiviral strategies for these medically important viruses.

  5. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  6. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuccillo, Angelo A.; Ceccuzzi, Silvio [Unità Tecnica Fusione ENEA, C. R. Frascati, 00044 RM (Italy); Phillips, Cynthia K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion “burn” may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to “demo” and “fusion power plant.” A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of power to the plasma while minimizing the interaction between the plasma and launching structures. These potentially harmful interactions between the plasma and the vessel and launching structures are challenging: (i) significant and variable loss of power in the edge regions of confined plasmas and surrounding vessel structures adversely affect the core plasma performance and lifetime of a device; (ii) the launcher design is partly “trial and error,” with the consequence that launchers may have to be reconfigured after initial tests in a given device, at an additional cost. Over the broader frequency range, another serious gap is a quantitative lack of understanding of the combined effects of nonlinear wave-plasma processes, energetic particle interactions and non-axisymmetric equilibrium effects on determining the overall efficiency of plasma equilibrium and stability profile control techniques using RF waves. This is complicated by a corresponding lack of predictive understanding of the time evolution of transport and stability processes in fusion plasmas.

  7. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  8. Fusion Rules for Extended Current Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest Baver; Doron Gepner

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial classification of fusion rules have shown that rational conformal field theory is very limited. In this paper we study the fusion rules of extend ed current algebras. Explicit formulas are given for the S matrix and the fusion rules, based on the full splitting of the fixed point fields. We find that in s ome cases sensible fusion rules are obtained, while in others this procedure lea ds to fractional fusion constants.

  9. EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Public Understanding and Education Outreach 7 - Training 7 JET Operations 8 JET Studies 11 MAST 14 - MAST to capture heat from the fusion core to generate electricity in a power station. In this Executive Summary

  10. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  11. Virasoro Representations on Fusion Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kellendonk; A. Recknagel

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For any non-unitary model with central charge c(2,q) the path spaces associated to a certain fusion graph are isomorphic to the irreducible Virasoro highest weight modules.

  12. Cell fusion in Neurospora crassa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichius, Alexander

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research aims of this thesis were the identification of novel cell fusion mutants of Neurospora crassa and the subsequent functional characterization of selected candidate proteins during conidial anastomosis ...

  13. The reality of cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, L.C. (Eltron, Inc., Winchester, MA (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the unreproducibility, doubt, and controversy involved in the question of the cold fusion of deuterium, enough good data have been published to clearly indicate the reality of some sort of nuclear fusion. Yamaguchi and Niushioka reported a thrice-repeated event in which large amounts of heat and definite bursts of neutrons evolved simultaneously with considerable out-gassing of absorbed deuterium. These results are consistent with nuclear fusion and not with a chemical reaction. In this paper a detailed mechanism is proposed that is consistent with these events and that also generally explains many of the scattered indications of cold fusion that have been reported. There must be an adventitiously large enough presence of tritium to initiate the nuclear reaction. The results of previously successful experiments cannot now be reproduced because currently available D{sub 2}O (and D{sub 2}) is so low in adventitious tritium as to preclude initiation of the nuclear reaction.

  14. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V. [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  15. Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxxxxx Overview of fusion nuclear technology in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Overview of fusion nuclear technology in the US N.B. Morley et al. / Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxx­xxx · firstwall

  16. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1665. [38] B G Logan, 1993 Fusion Engineering and Design 22,J Perkins, (June 2007), to be submitted to Nuclear Fusion. [36] M Tabak 1996 Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2. [37] S Atzeni, and

  17. Japanese magnetic confinement fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R.C.; Abdou, M.A.; Berry, L.A.; Horton, C.W.; Lyon, J.F.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six U.S. scientists surveyed and assessed Japanese research and development in magnetic fusion. The technical accomplishments from the early 1980s through June 1989 are reviewed, and the Japanese capabilities and outlook for future contributions are assessed. Detailed evaluations are provided in the areas of basic and applied plasma physics, tokamak confinement, alternate confinement approaches, plasma technology, and fusion nuclear technology and materials.

  18. ash fusion temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Fusion Performance Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: Inst. for Plasma Research 3 Univ. of Texas Inst for Fusion Studies (October 6, 1999) The physics in a...

  19. alternate magnetic fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory -- Intermediate between MFE and IFE Presently...

  20. Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Simulations Run at NERSC Support Fusion Experiments at MIT, General Atomics...

  1. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

  2. Fusion systems and biset functors via ghost algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hare, Shawn Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2 Fusion Preserving1 Background 1.1 Fusion System Basics . . . . . . 1.2A. Craven. The theory of fusion systems. Vol. 131. Cambridge

  3. Prospects for improved fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally, a new energy source must be capable of displacing old energy sources while providing both economic opportunities and enhanced environmental benefits. The attraction of an essentially unlimited fuel supply has generated a strong impetus to develop advanced fission breeders and, even more strongly, the exploitation of nuclear fusion. Both fission and fusion systems trade a reduced fuel charge for a more capital-intensive plant needed to utilize a cheaper and more abundant fuel. Results from early conceptual designs of fusion power plants, however, indicated a capital intensiveness that could override cost savings promised by an inexpensive fuel cycle. Early warnings of these problems appeared, and generalized routes to more economically attractive systems have been suggested; specific examples have also recently been given. Although a direct reduction in the cost (and mass) of the fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils, and primary structure) most directly reduces the overall cost of fusion power, with the mass power density (MPD, ratio of net electric power to FPC mass, kWe/tonne) being suggested as a figure-of-merit in this respect, other technical, safety/environmental, and institutional issues also enter into the definition of and direction for improved fusion concepts. These latter issues and related tradeoffs are discussed.

  4. TRITIUM ACCOUNTANCY IN FUSION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J. E.; Farmer, D. A.; Moore, M. L.; Tovo, L. L.; Poore, A. S.; Clark, E. A.; Harvel, C. D.

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MC&A requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBAs) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material subaccounts (MSAs) are established along with key measurement points (KMPs) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSAs. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breading, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of “net” tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines.

  5. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3DepthDetecting bioterrorism:

  6. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Con- trolled Nuclear Fusion, CONF-760975-P3, pages 1061–more effective solution, nuclear fusion. Fission Energy Thethe development of nuclear fusion weapons, humankind has

  7. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  8. Conformal nets III: fusion of defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Bartels; Christopher L. Douglas; André Henriques

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Conformal nets provides a mathematical model for conformal field theory. We define a notion of defect between conformal nets, formalizing the idea of an interaction between two conformal field theories. We introduce an operation of fusion of defects, and prove that the fusion of two defects is again a defect, provided the fusion occurs over a conformal net of finite index. There is a notion of sector (or bimodule) between two defects, and operations of horizontal and vertical fusion of such sectors. Our most difficult technical result is that the horizontal fusion of the vacuum sectors of two defects is isomorphic to the vacuum sector of the fused defect. Equipped with this isomorphism, we construct the basic interchange isomorphism between the horizontal fusion of two vertical fusions and the vertical fusion of two horizontal fusions of sectors.

  9. Rep-Rated Target Injection for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, D.T.; Goodin, D.T.; Stemke, R.W.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Drake, T.J.; Egli, W.; Vermillion, B.A.; Klasen, R.; Cleary, M.M

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) with laser drivers is a pulsed power generation system that relies on repetitive, high-speed injection of targets into a fusion reactor. To produce an economically viable IFE power plant the targets must be injected into the reactor at a rate between 5 and 10 Hz.To survive the injection process, direct drive (laser fusion) targets (spherical capsules) are placed into protective sabots. The sabots separate from the target and are stripped off before entering the reactor chamber. Indirect drive (heavy ion fusion) utilizes a hohlraum surrounding the spherical capsule and enters the chamber as one piece.In our target injection demonstration system, the sabots or hohlraums are injected into a vacuum system with a light gas gun using helium as a propellant. To achieve pulsed operation a rep-rated injection system has been developed. For a viable power plant we must be able to fire continuously at 6 Hz. This demonstration system is currently set up to allow bursts of up to 12 targets at 6 Hz. Using the current system, tests have been successfully run with direct drive targets to show sabot separation under vacuum and at barrel exit velocities of {approx}400 m/s.The existing revolver system along with operational data will be presented.

  10. An Assessment of the Economics of Future Electric Power Generation Options and the Implications for Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delene, J.G.; Hadley, S.; Reid, R.L.; Sheffield, J.; Williams, K.A.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the potential range of electric power costs for some major alternatives to fusion electric power generation when it is ultimately deployed in the middle of the 21st century and, thus, offers a perspective on the cost levels that fusion must achieve to be competitive. The alternative technologies include coal burning, coal gasification, natural gas, nuclear fission, and renewable energy. The cost of electricity (COE) from the alternatives to fusion should remain in the 30-50 mils/kWh (1999 dollars) range of today in carbon sequestration is not needed, 30-60 mils/kWh if sequestration is required, or as high as 75 mils/kWh for the worst-case scenario for cost uncertainty. The reference COE range for fusion was estimated at 70-100 nmils/kWh for 1- to 1.3-GW(e) scale power plants. Fusion costs will have to be reduced and/or alternative concepts derived before fusion will be competitive with the alternatives for the future production of electricity. Fortunately, there are routes to achieve this goal.

  11. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facility (NIF) will extend HEDP experiments to include access to thermonuclear burn conditions's Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) through three strategic objectives: Achieve thermonuclear ignition thermonuclear ignition to the national nuclear weapons program was one of the earliest motivations of the ICF

  12. FIRE, A Next Step Option for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meade, D.M.

    2002-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The next major frontier in magnetic fusion physics is to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, MHD stability, self-heating, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) Design Study has been undertaken to define the lowest cost facility to attain, explore, understand, and optimize magnetically confined fusion-dominated plasmas. The FIRE is envisioned as an extension of the existing Advanced Tokamak Program that could lead to an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The FIRE activities have focused on the physics and engineering assessment of a compact, high-field tokamak with the capability of achieving Q approximately equal to 10 in the ELMy H-mode for a duration of about 1.5 plasma current redistribution times (skin times) during an initial burning-plasma science phase, and the flexibility to add Advanced Tokamak hardware (e.g., lower-hybrid current drive) later. The configuration chosen for FIRE is similar to that of ARIES-RS, the U.S. Fusion Power Plant study utilizing an Advanced Tokamak reactor. The key ''Advanced Tokamak'' features are: strong plasma shaping, double-null pumping divertors, low toroidal field ripple (<0.3%), internal control coils, and space for wall stabilization capabilities. The reference design point is R subscript ''o'' = 2.14 m, a = 0.595 m, B subscript ''t''(R subscript ''o'') = 10 T, I subscript ''p'' = 7.7 MA with a flattop time of 20 s for 150 MW of fusion power. The baseline magnetic fields and pulse lengths can be provided by wedged BeCu/OFHC toroidal-field (TF) coils and OFHC poloidal-field (PF) coils that are pre-cooled to 80 K prior to the pulse and allowed to warm up to 373 K at the end of the pulse. A longer-term goal of FIRE is to explore Advanced Tokamak regimes sustained by noninductive current drive (e.g., lower-hybrid current drive) at high fusion gain (Q > 5) for a duration of 1 to 3 current redistribution times.

  13. Application of reliability analysis method to fusion component testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, A.Y.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The term reliability here implies that a component satisfies a set of performance criteria while under specified conditions of use over a specified period of time. For fusion nuclear technology, the reliability goal to be pursued is the development of a mean time between failures (MTBF) for a component which is longer than its lifetime goal. While the component lifetime is mainly determined by the fluence limitation (i.e., damage level) which leads to performance degradation or failure, the MTBF represents an arithmetic average life of all units in a population. One method of assessing the reliability goal involves determining component availability needs to meet the goal plant availability, defining a test-analyze-fix development program to improve component reliability, and quantifying both test times and the number of test articles that would be required to ensure that a specified target MTBF is met. Statistically, constant failure rates and exponential life distributions are assumed for analyses and blanket component development is used as an example. However, as data are collected the probability distribution of the parameter of interest can be updated in a Bayesian fashion. The nuclear component testing program will be structured such that reliability requirements for DEMO can be achieved. The program shall not exclude the practice of a good design (such as reducing the complexity of the system to the minimum essential for the required operation), the execution of high quality manufacturing and inspection processes, and the implication of quality assurance and control for component development. In fact, the assurance of a high quality testing/development program is essential so that there is no question left for reliability.

  14. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart (PPPL) [PPPL

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  15. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  16. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  17. 05/22/2006 12:33 PMnews @ nature.com -Chaos could keep fusion under control -A leaky magnetic bottle may prove key to making a reactor. Page 1 of 3http://www.nature.com/news/2006/060522/full/060522-2.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) achieve its goal of generating net energy from fusion. Fusion occurs when two light elements, usually hydrogen, collide to form a new element, usually helium, releasing an enormous amount of energy and produces less long-lived radioactive waste. Scientists have worked for decades to build a fusion reactor

  18. ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Ed, R.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were derived from a MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY STAFF W, Kunkel (H. 1. F. Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion Half-year Report October 1,LBL-12594 (1981). Heavy Ion Fusion Staff, Heavy Ion Fusion

  19. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are to (1) conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; and (3) train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. During FY 1995, a number of significant scientific advances were achieved at the IFS, both in long-range fundamental problems as well as in near-term strategic issues, consistent with the Institute`s mandate. Examples of these achievements include, for example, tokamak edge physics, analytical and computational studies of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulent transport, alpha-particle-excited toroidal Alfven eigenmode nonlinear behavior, sophisticated simulations for the Numerical Tokamak Project, and a variety of non-tokamak and non-fusion basic plasma physics applications. Many of these projects were done in collaboration with scientists from other institutions. Research discoveries are briefly described in this report.

  20. Fusion rules and singular vectors of the osp(1|2) current algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. P. Ennes; A. V. Ramallo

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion of Verma modules of the osp(1|2) current algebra is studied. In the framework of an isotopic formalism, the singular vector decoupling conditions are analyzed. The fusion rules corresponding to the admissible representations of the osp(1|2) algebra are determined. A relation between the characters of these last representations and those corresponding to the minimal superconformal models is found. A series of equations that relate the descendants of the highest weight vectors resulting from a fusion of Verma modules are obtained. Solving these equations the singular vectors of the theory can be determined.

  1. Dispersion relation approach to sub-barrier heavy-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzin, V.L.M.; Hussein, M.S.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the conditions under which the dispersion relation technique, extensively employed in the context of elastic scattering, can be used in the analysis of heavy-ion fusion reactions. General unitarity defect arguments are used for this purpose. With the aid of an inverse dispersion relation, which gives the imaginary part of the fusion inclusive polarization potential in terms of the principal part integral involving the real part of the inclusive polarization potential, the sub-barrier fusion of heavy ions is discussed. The system /sup 16/O+/sup A/Sm is taken as an example.

  2. An Information Fusion Framework for Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern enterprises are becoming increasingly sensitive to the potential destructive power of small groups or individuals with malicious intent. In response, significant investments are being made in developing a means to assess the likelihood of certain threats to their enterprises. Threat assessment needs are typically focused in very specific application areas where current processes rely heavily on human analysis to both combine any available data and draw conclusions about the probability of a threat. A generic approach to threat assessment is proposed, including a threat taxonomy and decision-level information fusion framework, that provides a computational means for merging multi-modal data for the purpose of assessing the presence of a threat. The framework is designed for flexibility, and intentionally accounts for the accuracy of each data source, given the environmental conditions, in order to manage the uncertainty associated with any acquired data. The taxonomy and information fusion framework is described, and discussed in the context of real-world applications such as shipping container security and cyber security.

  3. Graph fusion algebras of WLM(p,p')

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the W-extended logarithmic minimal model WLM(p,p'). As in the rational minimal models, the so-called fundamental fusion algebra of WLM(p,p') is described by a simple graph fusion algebra. The fusion matrices in the regular representation thereof are mutually commuting, but in general not diagonalizable. Nevertheless, we show that they can be brought simultaneously to block-diagonal forms whose blocks are upper-triangular matrices of dimension 1, 3, 5 or 9. The directed graphs associated with the two fundamental modules are described in detail. The corresponding adjacency matrices share a complete set of common generalized eigenvectors organized as a web constructed by interlacing the Jordan chains of the two matrices. This web is here called a Jordan web and it consists of connected subwebs with 1, 3, 5 or 9 generalized eigenvectors. The similarity matrix, formed by concatenating these vectors, simultaneously brings the two fundamental adjacency matrices to Jordan canonical form modulo permutation similarity. The ranks of the participating Jordan blocks are 1 or 3, and the corresponding eigenvalues are given by 2cos(j\\pi/n) where j=0,...,n and n=p,p'. For p>1, only some of the modules in the fundamental fusion algebra of WLM(p,p') are associated with boundary conditions within our lattice approach. The regular representation of the corresponding fusion subalgebra has features similar to the ones in the regular representation of the fundamental fusion algebra, but with dimensions of the upper-triangular blocks and connected Jordan-web components given by 1, 2, 3 or 8. Some of the key results are illustrated for W-extended critical percolation WLM(2,3).

  4. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

  5. Fusion Rules for Affine sl(2|1;C) at Fractional Level k=-1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin Johnstone

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate fusion rules for the admissible representations of the affine superalgebra sl(2|1;C) at fractional level k=-1/2 in the Ramond sector. By representing 3-point correlation functions involving a singular vector as the action of differential operators on the sl(2|1;C) invariant 3-point function, we obtain conditions on permitted quantum numbers involved. We find that in this case the primary fields close under fusion.

  6. A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Final Report to Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Fusion Development Path Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a plan for the deployment of a fusion demonstration power plant within 35 years, leading to commercial application of fusion energy by mid-century. The plan is derived from the necessary features of a demonstration fusion power plant and from the time scale defined by President Bush. It identifies critical milestones, key decision points, needed major facilities and required budgets.

  7. Role of atomic collisions in fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, D.E.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

  8. Exhibitions Fusion Expo and Eindhoven University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exhibitions Fusion Expo and Eindhoven University Culham Publication Services was asked to produce with plasma for the Fusion Test Centre at Eindhoven University. These were well received by both clients. "The

  9. Image fusion for a nighttime driving display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrington, William Frederick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information: Brad Merrill 208-526-0395 Email Contact Fusion Safety Program Thermonuclear fusion powers the Sun and the stars and is the most powerful energy source known....

  11. FUSION-3792; No.of Pages15 Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxxxxx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUSION-3792; No.of Pages15 Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Recent progress.07.087 #12;FUSION-3792; No.of Pages15 2 F. Najmabadi, A.R. Raffray / Fusion Engineering and Design xxx (2006) xxx­xxx of any stellarator configuration represents a large number of trade-offs among physics

  12. Inside ITER seminar on History of Fusion Page 1 History of Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Union thermonuclear explosion 400kT #12;Inside ITER seminar on History of Fusion Page 4 Big IvanInside ITER seminar on History of Fusion Page 1 History of Fusion Personal view V. Chuyanov 9 July 2009 Special thanks to ITER Communication Division. #12;Inside ITER seminar on History of Fusion Page 2

  13. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2008 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2008 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile by Subprogram (dollars in thousands) FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request Fusion Energy,182 31,317 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences 280,683a 318,950 427,850 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law

  14. A Strategic Program Plan for Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Strategic Program Plan for Fusion Energy Sciences 1 Fusion Energy Sciences #12;2 Bringing independence. Fusion power plants will provide economical and abundant energy without greenhouse gas emissions, while creating manageable waste and little risk to public safety and health. Making fusion energy a part

  15. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges these issues. 2 #12;FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials Fusion Nuclear Science & Technology (FNST) FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials for the fusion nuclear

  16. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges on MFE Roadmapping in the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 7-10 September 2011 1 #12;Fusion Nuclear Science never done any experiments on FNST in a real fusion nuclear environment we must be realistic on what

  17. 2002 Summer Fusion Study 1 July 19, 2002 2002 Fusion Summer Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002 Summer Fusion Study 1 July 19, 2002 2002 Fusion Summer Study Snowmass Village, CO. July 19, 2002 For Immediate Release Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy leading scientists from the U.S. and international fusion community concluded a two-week forum assessing

  18. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

  19. Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

  20. Report ofReport of Nuclear Fusion Section,Nuclear Fusion Section,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report ofReport of Nuclear Fusion Section,Nuclear Fusion Section, National Committee for NuclearJapan Atomic Energy Research Institute On the New Way of Nuclear Fusion ResearchOn the New Way of Nuclear on the new way of developing nuclear fusion under the new circumstances (chair: Prof. A. Koyama) under

  1. JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20101 Fusion Energy & ITER:Fusion Energy & ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JJ, IAP Cambridge January 20101 Fusion Energy & ITER:Fusion Energy & ITER: Challenges Billions ITERITER startsstarts DEMODEMO decisiondecision:: Fusion impact? Energy without greenEnergy Fusion fuel: deuterium et tritium Deuterium: plenty in the ocean Tritium: made in situ from Lithium

  2. Progress in Fusion Materials Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and computational science tools ENIACENIAC 1 Gflops achieved; high performance computing centers established 1

  3. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  4. Nuclear Fusion: Bringing a star down to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fusion offers the potential for being a near limitless energy source by fusing together deuterium and tritium nuclei to form helium inside a plasma burning at 100 million kelvin. However, scientific and engineering challenges remain. This paper describes how such a plasma can be confined on Earth and discusses the similarities and differences with fusion in stars. It focusses on the magnetic confinement technique and, in particular, the method used in a tokamak. The confinement achieved in the equilibrium state is reviewed and it is shown how the confinement can be too good, leading to explosive instabilities at the plasma edge called Edge Localised modes (ELMs). It is shown how the impact of ELMs can be minimised by the application of magnetic perturbations and discusses the physics behind the penetration of these perturbations into what is ideally a perfect conducting plasma.

  5. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanova, L. N. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, State Scientific Center of Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Bom, V. R. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Demin, A. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Demin, D. L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Eijk, C. W. E. van [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Filchagin, S. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)], E-mail: grafov@nusun.jinr.ru; Grishechkin, S. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Kuryakin, A. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Medved', S. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Musyaev, R. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Rudenko, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  6. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  7. Breakthrough: Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGreevy, Robert

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    How Oak Ridge National Laboratory is helping to solve the world's energy problems through fusion energy research.

  8. Exo-endo cellulase fusion protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bower, Benjamin S. (Palo Alto, CA); Larenas, Edmund A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct, which encodes a fusion protein having cellulolytic activity comprising a catalytic domain derived from a fungal exo-cellobiohydrolase and a catalytic domain derived from an endoglucanase. The invention also relates to vectors and fungal host cells comprising the heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct as well as methods for producing a cellulase fusion protein and enzymatic cellulase compositions.

  9. The automorphisms of affine fusion rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gannon

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion rings associated to affine Kac-Moody algebras appear in several different contexts in math and mathematical physics. In this paper we find all automorphisms of all affine fusion rings, or equivalently the symmetries of the corresponding fusion coefficients. Most of these are directly related to symmetries of the corresponding Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. We also find all pairs of isomorphic affine fusion rings.

  10. Polynomial Fusion Rings of Logarithmic Minimal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify quotient polynomial rings isomorphic to the recently found fundamental fusion algebras of logarithmic minimal models.

  11. Breakthrough: Neutron Science for the Fusion Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGreevy, Robert

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    How Oak Ridge National Laboratory is helping to solve the world's energy problems through fusion energy research.

  12. 1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the abstracts of the paper presented at the 1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference.

  13. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  14. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoberne, F. (comp.) [comp.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements in the Los Alamos National Laboratory eight-beam Helios system are described. These improvements increased the reliability of the laser and permitted the firing of 290 shots, most of which delivered energies of approximately 8 kJ to the target. Modifications to Gemini are outlined, including the installation of a new target-insertion mechanism. The redirection of the Antares program is discussed in detail, which will achieve a total energy of approximatey 40 kJ with two beams. This redirection will bring Antares on-line almost two years earlier than was possible with the full six-beam system, although at a lower energy. Experiments with isentropically imploded Sirius-B targets are discussed, and x-ray radiation-loss data from gold microballoons are presented, which show that these results are essentially identical with those obtained at glass-laser wavelengths. Significant progress in characterizing laser fusion targets is reported. New processes for fabricating glass miroballoon x-ray diagnostic targets, the application of high-quality metallic coatings, and the deposition of thick plastic coatings are described. Results in the development of x-ray diagnostics are reported, and research in the Los Alamos heavy-ion fusion program is summarized. Results of investigations of phase-conjugation research of gaseous saturable absorbers and of the use of alkali-halide crystals in a new class of saturable absorbers are summarized. New containment-vessel concepts for Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors are discussed, and results of a scoping study of four fusion-fission hybrid concepts are presented.

  15. Reviewers Comments on the 5th Symposium and the Status of Fusion Research 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, R F

    2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Better to understand the status of fusion research in the year 2003 we will first put the research in its historical context. Fusion power research, now beginning its sixth decade of continuous effort, is unique in the field of scientific research. Unique in its mixture of pure and applied research, unique in its long-term goal and its promise for the future, and unique in the degree that it has been guided and constrained by national and international governmental policy. Though fusion research's goal has from the start been precisely defined, namely, to obtain a net release of energy from controlled nuclear fusion reactions between light isotopes (in particular those of hydrogen and helium) the difficulty of the problem has spawned in the past a very wide variety of approaches to the problem. Some of these approaches have had massive international support for decades, some have been pursued only at a ''shoestring'' level by dedicated groups in small research laboratories or universities. In discussing the historical and present status of fusion research the implications of there being two distinctly different approaches to achieving net fusion power should be pointed out. The first, and oldest, approach is the use of strong magnetic fields to confine the heated fuel, in the form of a plasma and at a density typically four or five orders of magnitude smaller than the density of the atmosphere. In steady state this fusion fuel density is still sufficient to release fusion energy at the rate of many megawatts per cubic meter. The plasma confinement times required for net energy release in this regime are long--typically a second or more, representing an extremely difficult scientific challenge --witness the five decades of research in magnetic fusion, still without having reaching that goal. The second, more recently initiated approach, is of course the ''inertial'' approach. As its name implies, the ''confinement'' problem is solved ''inertially,'' that is by compressing and heating a tiny pellet of frozen fusion fuel in nanoseconds, such that before disassembly the pellet fuses and releases its energy as a micro-explosion. The first, and most thoroughly investigated means to create this compression and heating is to use multiple laser beams, with total energies of megajoules, focused down to impinge uniformly on the pellet target. To illustrate the extreme difference between the usual magnetic confinement regime at that of inertial fusion, there are twenty orders of magnitude in fusion power density (ten orders of magnitude in plasma density) between the two regimes. In principle fusion power systems could operate at any density between these extremes, if means were to be found to exploit this possibility.

  16. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  17. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Hicks, Randall K. (Stockton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  18. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  19. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  20. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitanvis, S M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  1. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sozzi, Carlo, E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Alessi, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Figini, L., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Galperti, G., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Lazzaro, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Marchetto, C., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Nowak, S. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, CNR, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Milano (Italy); Mosconi, M. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  2. A1.5 Fusion Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amendt, P

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis and radiation hydrodynamics simulations for expected high-gain fusion target performance on a demonstration 1-GWe Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant in the mid-2030s timeframe are presented. The required laser energy driver is 2.2 MJ at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength, and a fusion target gain greater than 60 at a repetition rate of 16 Hz is the design goal for economic and commercial attractiveness. A scaling-law analysis is developed to benchmark the design parameter space for hohlraum-driven central hot-spot ignition. A suite of integrated hohlraum simulations is presented to test the modeling assumptions and provide a basis for a near-term experimental resolution of the key physics uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF is poised to demonstrate ignition by 2012 based on the central hot spot (CHS) mode of ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn [1]. This immediate prospect underscores the imperative and timeliness of advancing inertial fusion as a carbon-free, virtually limitless source of energy by the mid-21st century to substantially offset fossil fuel technologies. To this end, an intensive effort is underway to leverage success at the NIF and to provide the foundations for a prototype 'LIFE.1' engineering test facility by {approx}2025, followed by a commercially viable 'LIFE.2' demonstration power plant operating at 1 GWe by {approx}2035. The current design goal for LIFE.2 is to accommodate {approx}2.2 MJ of laser energy (entering the high-Z radiation enclosure or 'hohlraum') at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength operating at a repetition rate of 16 Hz and to provide a fusion target yield of 132 MJ. To achieve this design goal first requires a '0-d' analytic gain model that allows convenient exploration of parameter space and target optimization. This step is then followed by 2- and 3-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations that incorporate laser beam transport, x-ray radiation transport, atomic physics, and thermonuclear burn [2]. These simulations form the basis for assessing the susceptibility to hydrodynamic instability growth, target performance margins, laser backscatter induced by plasma density fluctuations within the hohlraum, and the threat spectrum emerging from the igniting capsule, e.g., spectra, fluences and anisotropy of the x rays and ions, for input into the chamber survivability calculations. The simulations follow the guidelines of a 'point design' methodology, which formally designates a well-defined milestone in concept development that meets established criteria for experimental testing. In Section 2, the 0-d analytic gain model to survey gain versus laser energy parameter space is discussed. Section 3 looks at the status of integrated hohlraum simulations and the needed improvements in laser-hohlraum coupling efficiency to meet the LIFE.2 threshold (net) target gain of {approx}60. Section 4 considers advanced hohlraum designs to well exceed the LIFE.2 design goal for satisfactory performance margins. We summarize in Sec. 5.

  3. 2002 Fusion Summer Study Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a plasma dominated by self-heating from fusion reactions and filling this crucial and now missing element the possibility of discoveries in a plasma dominated by self- heating from fusion reactions. This exciting next are summarized the principal conclusions: 1. The study of burning plasmas, in which self-heating from fusion

  4. Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and Related Research Projects Ghassan Antar Fusion 2. Research on Turbulence (Theory and Experiment) 3. Research on Disruptions 4. Research on Plasma Facing Components #12;Ghassan Y. ANTAR 3 Fusion Occurs when Two Nuclei Unite to Form One The Energy

  5. *****I* ****f?* Fusion Programme Evaluation Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Community's programme in the field of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion; to appraise the environmental, safety*****I* ****f?* Report of the Fusion Programme Evaluation Board prepared for the Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CHAPTER ONE: NUCLEAR FUSION AND ITS POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORLD'S ENERGY NEEDS 1

  6. White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the international fusion program, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is now halfwayWhite Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies Prepared for The President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Prepared by David E. Baldwin Senior Vice President for Fusion General

  7. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Strategic Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D R A F T Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Report on Strategic Planning: Priorities ............................................................................................................... 68 #12; iii Preface Fusion, the energy source that powers our sun and the stars. Fusion energy could therefore fulfill one of the basic needs of modern civili- zation: abundant energy

  8. Energy Sources Used for Fusion Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) Energy Sources Used for Fusion Welding Thomas W. Eagar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology reliability. The Section "Fusion Welding Processes" in this Volume provides details about equipment and systems for the major fusion welding proc- esses. The purpose of this Section of the Volume is to discuss

  9. Introduction to Fusion Energy Jerry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction to Fusion Energy Jerry Hughes IAP @ PSFC January 8, 2013 Acknowledgments: Catherine) a practical energy source on earth 2 mcE #12;Fusion is a form of nuclear energy · A huge amount of energy;Terrestrial energy sources have their origin in the nuclear fusion reactions of stars Supernova produces

  10. FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical for fusion power plants is given and their economic, safety, and environmental features are explored. Concep- tual design studies predict that fusion power plants will be capital intensive and will be used

  11. Fusion rules for N=2 superconformal modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Wakimoto

    1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we calculate the fusion coefficients for minimal series representations of the N=2 superconformal algebra by using a modified Verlinde's formula, and obtain associative and commutative fusion algebras with non-negative integral fusion coefficients at each level. Some references are added.

  12. Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York (1978) Teller, E. : Fusion. Academic Press, New York (O R I G I N A L A RT I C L E Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch H.U.implosion the sim- ulated fusion-energy yield is 7.6 MJ,

  13. the fusion trend line Stan Milora (ORNL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­materials and fusion nuclear science and technology ReNeW findings VLT Virtual Laboratory for Technology://vlt.ornl.gov/ VLT Virtual Laboratory for Technology For Fusion Energy Science #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U: Greenwald report on Priorities, Gaps and Opportunities identifies glaring gaps in materials, fusion nuclear

  14. Criteria for Practical Fusion Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criteria for Practical Fusion Power Systems: Report from the EPRI Fusion Panel By Jack Kaslow1 development of commercially vi- able fusion systems, the Electric Power Re- search Institute (EPRI) -- the R developers toward practical power systems that can obtain the financial, public, and regulatory support

  15. A Roadmap to Laser Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the radioactive environment, for easier maintenance. · No ultra-high vacuum or superconducting magnets. LaserA Roadmap to Laser Fusion Energy Stephen E. Bodner Retired (former head of the NRL laser fusion Energy Systems January 30, 2011 #12;In 1971-1972 LLNL announced that they had an idea for laser fusion

  16. Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Fusion -A clean future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , scientists and engineers are working to make fusion a real option for our electricity supply.At the forefront consumption is expected to grow dramatically over the next fifty years as the world's population expands; Governments are divided over whether to include nuclear fission in their energy portfolios; and renewable

  17. OPTIONS FOR A STEADY-STATE COMPACT FUSION NEUTRON SOURCE M.P. Gryaznevich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Nuclear Power production: the emerging shortage of fissile fuel, disposal and storage of nuclear waste. This can be achieved in several ways: by recycling high level nuclear waste from conventional nuclear of nuclear waste and fuel and removing Pu from the spent fuel. This combination of "fission + fusion

  18. Fusion Engineering and Design 85 (2010) 14881491 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of a small fusion­fission facility for spent uranium-oxide and inert matrix fuels Christian Di Fuel (SNF) radiotoxicity on the long run; if complete removal of TRUs could be achieved, the SNF radiotoxicity would reach the level of natural uranium ore radiotoxicity in about 300 years instead of thousands

  19. Fusion Rules for the q-deformed Vertex Operators of U_q(sl(2)^)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Awata; Y. Yamada

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the properties of the q-vertex operators of U_q(sl(2)^) introduced by Frenkel and Reshetikhin. As the condition for the null vector decoupling, we derive the existence condition of the q-vertex operators ( the fusion rules ).

  20. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

  1. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Pulsed Power Sciences Center

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

  2. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  3. Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Test Facilities John Sheffield ISSE - University of Tennessee FPA meeting Livermore December Stambaugh, and their colleagues #12;Destructive Testing · It is common practice to test engineered components to destruction prior to deployment of a system e.g., - Automobile crash tests - Airplane wing

  4. Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM coils. The magnets are liquid nitrogen cooled and the entire device is surrounded by a thermal enclosure. The double wall vacuum vessel integrates cooling and shielding in a shape that maximizes shielding of ex

  5. newsletternewsletter EUROPEAN FUSION DEVELOPEMENT AGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, the Slovak Republic, and Slovenia Association EURATOM/ University of Latvia Institute of Solid State Physics, Riga http://www.cfi.lu.lv/ Poland, it is essential to present fusion research within the general context of energy research and to explain societal

  6. actinide-based complete fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  7. aml1-eto fusion protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  8. antibody-photosensitizer fusion protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  9. antibody-gdnf fusion protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  10. akar2-akap12 fusion protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  11. active maltose-binding fusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Energy Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: , .... Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential - Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion...

  12. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  13. Data security on the national fusion grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  14. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  15. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

  16. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  17. Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy: Three recent examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are 1) protecting the first wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of x rays, target debris, and high energy neutrons, and 2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 5-10 Hz (i.e., re-establishing, the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall from x rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted to 1) reduce the cost of electricity by avoiding the cost and down time of changing damaged structures, and 2) reduce the cost of development by avoiding the cost of developing a new, low-activation material. Various schemes have been proposed to assure chamber clearing and renewal of the protective features at the required pulse rate. Representative chamber concepts are described, and key technical feasibility issues are identified for each class of chamber. Experimental activities (past, current, and proposed) to address these issues and technology research and development needs are discussed.

  18. Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Some Observations An economic for the DOE/NNSA 2 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: Part of a plan B · May allow more efficient drivers, lower Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 3 #12;A Wide Range of Driver

  19. ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS Supplement to California Energy. There are also likely additional savings from initiatives that are neither finalized nor funded are referred to as additional achievable energy efficiency (AAEE) impacts. Staff developed five AAEE

  20. A proposed mechanism for equiaxed grain formation along the fusion boundary in aluminum-copper-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, A. [United Airlines Repair Facility, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of welding conditions, composition and solidification substrate have been systematically studied in an effort to determine the nature of nondendritic equiaxed grain formation in Al-Cu-Li welds. The equiaxed zone (EQZ) in these alloys forms preferentially at the fusion boundary of arc welds and may have important implications with respect to both weld cracking susceptibility and structural integrity. Over a wide range of weld heat input, achieved by varying weld travel speed and current during autogenous gas tungsten arc welding, it was not possible to eliminate this zone, although its width and the grain size varied considerably. The solidification substrate had a profound effect on EQZ formation. The EQZ did not form when solidification occurred from an as-cast weld metal substrate. Under other substrate conditions, including the as-cast/solution heat treated condition, an EQZ was always present. Both lithium and zirconium influence EQZ formation, with zirconium exhibiting a more dominant effect. At low levels of lithium and zirconium (0.5 Li, 0.03 Zr), an EQZ was not observed. A unified heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is proposed to describe EQZ formation in Al-Cu-Li welds.

  1. Measurement of the Fusion Probability, PCN, for Hot Fusion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; W. Loveland; J. S. Barrett; L. Yao; B. B. Back; S. Zhu; T. L. Khoo

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The cross section for forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the capture cross section, the fusion probability, PCN, i.e., the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than re-separating (quasifission), and the survival of the completely fused system against fission. PCN is the least known of these quantities. Purpose: To measure PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au. Methods: We measured the fission fragment angular distributions for these reactions and used the formalism of Back to deduce the fusion-fission and quasifission cross sections. From these quantities we deduced PCN for each reaction. Results: The values of PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au are 0.66, 1.00, 0.06, 0.13, respectively. Conclusions: The new measured values of PCN agree roughly with the semi-empirical system- atic dependence of PCN upon fissility for excited nuclei.

  2. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  3. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  4. Inertial fusion energy: A clearer view of the environmental and safety perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J.F.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If fusion energy is to achieve its full potential for safety and environmental (S&E) advantages, the S&E characteristics of fusion power plant designs must be quantified and understood, and the resulting insights must be embodied in the ongoing process of development of fusion energy. As part of this task, the present work compares S&E characteristics of five inertial and two magnetic fusion power plant designs. For each design, a set of radiological hazard indices has been calculated with a system of computer codes and data libraries assembled for this purpose. These indices quantify the radiological hazards associated with the operation of fusion power plants with respect to three classes of hazard: accidents, occupational exposure, and waste disposal. The three classes of hazard have been qualitatively integrated to rank the best and worst fusion power plant designs with respect to S&E characteristics. From these rankings, the specific designs, and other S&E trends, design features that result in S&E advantages have been identified. Additionally, key areas for future fusion research have been identified. Specific experiments needed include the investigation of elemental release rates (expanded to include many more materials) and the verification of sequential charged-particle reactions. Improvements to the calculational methodology are recommended to enable future comparative analyses to represent more accurately the radiological hazards presented by fusion power plants. Finally, future work must consider economic effects. Trade-offs among design features will be decided not by S&E characteristics alone, but also by cost-benefit analyses. 118 refs., 35 figs., 35 tabs.

  5. Paramyxovirus fusion: Real-time measurement of parainfluenza virus 5 virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Sarah A. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3500 (United States); Lamb, Robert A. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3500 (United States) and Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3500 (United States)]. E-mail: ralamb@northwestern.edu

    2006-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cell-cell fusion assays are useful surrogate methods for studying virus fusion, differences between cell-cell and virus-cell fusion exist. To examine paramyxovirus fusion in real time, we labeled viruses with fluorescent lipid probes and monitored virus-cell fusion by fluorimetry. Two parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) isolates (W3A and SER) and PIV5 containing mutations within the fusion protein (F) were studied. Fusion was specific and temperature-dependent. Compared to many low pH-dependent viruses, the kinetics of PIV5 fusion was slow, approaching completion within several minutes. As predicted from cell-cell fusion assays, virus containing an F protein with an extended cytoplasmic tail (rSV5 F551) had reduced fusion compared to wild-type virus (W3A). In contrast, virus-cell fusion for SER occurred at near wild-type levels, despite the fact that this isolate exhibits a severely reduced cell-cell fusion phenotype. These results support the notion that virus-cell and cell-cell fusion have significant differences.

  6. Fusion of \\ade Lattice Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-kui Zhou; Paul A. Pearce

    1994-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion hierarchies of \\ade face models are constructed. The fused critical $D$, $E$ and elliptic $D$ models yield new solutions of the Yang-Baxter equations with bond variables on the edges of faces in addition to the spin variables on the corners. It is shown directly that the row transfer matrices of the fused models satisfy special functional equations. Intertwiners between the fused \\ade models are constructed by fusing the cells that intertwine the elementary face weights. As an example, we calculate explicitly the fused $2\\times 2$ face weights of the 3-state Potts model associated with the $D_4$ diagram as well as the fused intertwiner cells for the $A_5$--$D_4$ intertwiner. Remarkably, this $2\\times 2$ fusion yields the face weights of both the Ising model and 3-state CSOS models.

  7. Fusion rules of chiral algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gaberdiel

    1993-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently (hep-th/9307183) we showed that for the case of the WZW- and the minimal models fusion can be understood as a certain ring-like tensor product of the symmetry algebra. In this paper we generalize this analysis to arbitrary chiral algebras. We define the tensor product of conformal field theory in the general case and prove that it is associative and symmetric up to equivalence. We also determine explicitly the action of the chiral algebra on this tensor product. In the second part of the paper we demonstrate that this framework provides a powerful tool for calculating restrictions for the fusion rules of chiral algebras. We exhibit this for the case of the $W_{3}$-algebra and the $N=1$ and $N=2$ NS superconformal algebras.

  8. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D. [Institution PROJECT CENTER ITER, 1, Akademik Kurchatov Sq., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  9. Nuclear Fusion in Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, R. F. [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard theory of nuclear fusion rates in strongly interacting plasmas can be (correctly) derived only when the energy release Q is large compared to other energies in the problem. We exhibit a result for rates that provides a basis for calculating the finite Q corrections. Crude estimates indicate a significant defect in the conventional results for some regions of high density and strong plasma coupling. We also lay some groundwork for a path integral calculation of the new effects.

  10. Photons & Fusion Newsletter - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision,4news Photons & Fusion

  11. Intraoperative Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Fusion can Enhance Prostate Brachytherapy Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orio, Peter F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tutar, Ismail B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Narayanan, Sreeram [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Arthurs, Sandra [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Cho, Paul S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Yongmin [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)], E-mail: kent.wallner@med.va.gov

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry system. Method and Materials: Twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer with Pd-103 implantation. After the execution of the treatment plan, two sets of TRUS images were collected using the longitudinal and axial transducers of a biplanar probe. Then, three fluoroscopic images were acquired at 0, -15 and +15{sup o}. The three-dimensional locations of all implanted seeds were reconstructed from fluoroscopic images. A subset of the implanted seeds was manually identified in TRUS images and used as fiducial markers to perform TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion. To improve the implant quality, additional seeds were placed if adverse isodose patterns were identified during visual inspection. If additional seeds were placed, intraoperative dosimetry was repeated. Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry was compared with final intraoperative dosimetry to validate dosimetry achieved in the implant suite. Results: An average of additional 4.0 seeds was implanted in 16 patients after initial intraoperative dose evaluation. Based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based dosimetry, the V100 improved from 86% to 93% (p = 0.005), whereas D90 increased from 94% to 109% (p = 0.011) with the guided additional seed implantation. No statistical difference was observed in V200 and V300 values. V100 and D90 values were 95 {+-} 4% and 120 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on the final intraoperative dosimetry evaluation, compared with 95 {+-} 4% and 122 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry. Conclusions: Implantation of extra seeds based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry can improve the final V100 and D90 values with minimal increase in V200 and V300 values.

  12. Fusion reactor blanket-main design aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strebkov, Yu.; Sidorov, A.; Danilov, I. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main function of the fusion reactor blanket is ensuring tritium breeding and radiation shield. The blanket version depends on the reactor type (experimental, DEMO, commercial) and its parameters. Blanket operation conditions are defined with the heat flux, neutron load/fluence, cyclic operation, dynamic heating/force loading, MHD effects etc. DEMO/commercial blanket design is distinguished e.g. by rather high heat load and neutron fluence - up to 100 W/cm{sup 2} and 7 MWa/m{sup 2} accordingly. This conditions impose specific requirements for the materials, structure, maintenance of the blanket and its most loaded components - FW and limiter. The liquid Li-Pb eutectic is one of the possible breeder for different kinds of blanket in view of its advantages one of which is the blanket convertibility that allow to have shielding blanket (borated water) or breeding one (Li-Pb eutectic). Using Li-Pb eutectic for both ITER and DEMO blankets have been considered. In the conceptual ITER design the solid eutectic blanket was carried out. The liquid eutectic breeder/coolant is suggested also for the advanced (high parameter) blanket.

  13. National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" Progress in Magnetic Fusion TechnologyProgress in Magnetic Fusion Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :Tokamak Cooling Water System (US) First delivery of Plant Components Test Convoys Test Convoys #12National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute" Progress in Magnetic Fusion TechnologyProgress, INTEGRATION&POWER PLANT DESIGN FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS SAFETY ECONOMIC

  14. Perspectives on a Constrained Fusion Ten-Year Fusion Program (Comments on FESAC charge #2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roadmap to a demonstration power plant. It is imperative that the US program, stellarators, next-step planning activities, spherical tokamaks, and fusion simulation), and harnessing fusion power (surviving neutron fluxes, producing tritium and heat

  15. Is Fusion Inhibited for Weakly Bound Nuclei?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, J.; Munhoz, M.; Szanto, E.M.; Carlin, N.; Added, N.; Suaide, A.A.; de Moura, M.M.; Liguori Neto, R.; Szanto de Toledo, A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Institute de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Caixa Postal 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, (Brasil)] [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Institute de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Caixa Postal 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, (Brasil); Canto, L.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brasil)] [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brasil)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete fusion of light radioactive nuclei is predicted to be hindered at near-barrier energies. This feature is investigated in the case of the least bound stable nuclei. Evaporation residues resulting from the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 9}Be and {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 12}C fusion reactions have been measured in order to study common features in reactions involving light weakly bound nuclei. The experimental excitation functions revealed that the fusion cross section is significantly smaller than the total reaction cross section and also smaller than the fusion cross section expected from the available systematics. A clear correlation between the fusion probability and nucleon (cluster) separation energy has been established.The results suggest that the breakup process has a strong influence on the hindrance of the fusion cross section. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  17. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  18. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1999 Report of the FEAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    participation in the of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the Office of International Thermonuclear ReactorJournal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1999 Report of the FEAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review. S. Department of Energy Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) review of its Inertial Fusion Energy

  19. Nuclear Fusion: A Solution to the GlobalNuclear Fusion: A Solution to the Global Energy CrisisEnergy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Nuclear Fusion: A Solution to the GlobalNuclear Fusion: A Solution to the Global Energy Crisis.maclellan@strath.ac.uk Introduction and Motivation What is Nuclear Fusion? Laser Plasma Interactions The world, and particularly is harnessing the power of nuclear fusion. It is however, extremely difficult to sustain a fusion reaction

  20. Cold nuclear fusion and muon-catalyzed fusion. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning a nuclear fusion process which occurs at lower temperatures and pressures than conventional fusion reactions. The references describe theoretical and experimental results for a proposed muon-catalyzed fusion reactor, and for studies on muon sticking and reactivation. The temperature dependence of fusion rates, and resolution of some engineering challenges are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Technical Feasibility of Fusion Energy Extension of the Fusion Program and Basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Radiological Toxic Hazard Potential between Light-Water Reactor Plant, Fusion Reactor Plant, and Coal-Fired

  2. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  3. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  4. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  5. PPPL Races Ahead with Fusion Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research. All rights reserved. NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT In compliance with Title IX of...

  6. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

    1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

  7. On the classification of fusion rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Gepner; A. Kapustin

    1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion rules and modular matrix of a rational conformal field theory obey a list of properties. We use these properties to classify rational conformal field theories with not more than six primary fields and small values of the fusion coefficients. We give a catalogue of fusion rings which can arise for these field theories. It is shown that all such fusion rules can be realized by current algebras. Our results support the conjecture that all rational conformal field theories are related to current algebras.

  8. Fusion Rings Related to Affine Weyl Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Furlan; V. B. Petkova

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of the fusion ring of a quasi-rational CFT based on $\\hat{sl}(3)_k$ at generic level $k\

  9. Cavitation-Induced Fusion: Proof of Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max I. Fomitchev-Zamilov

    2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavitation-induced fusion (also known as bubble fusion or sonofusion) has been a topic of much debate and controversy and is generally (albeit incorrectly) perceived as unworkable. In this paper we present the theoretical foundations of cavitation-induced fusion and summarize the experimental results of the research conducted in the past 20 years. Based on the systematic study of all available data we conclude that the cavitation-induced fusion is feasible, doable, and can be used for commercial power generation. We present the results of our own research and disclose a commercial reactor prototype.

  10. Fusion Engineering and Design 41 (1998) 337347 Prospects and issues for commercial fusion power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fusion power concepts, most recently, the ARIES-RS conceptual power plant design based upon the tokamak requirements. We review the present status of this and other power plant designs, identify the key fusion R in an increasingly competi- tive and diverse energy marketplace. Based on a series of conceptual fusion power plant

  11. Strengthening and AcceleratingStrengthening and Accelerating the Development of Fusion Powerthe Development of Fusion Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of Fusion Power Chris Llewellyn Smith Director, UKAEA Culham Chairman Consultative Committee) people of the importance of developing fusion as (potentially) an environmentally responsible source (used to fuel a fusion power station) 200,000 KW-hrs = (total US electricity production for 15 years

  12. AnnualReport06/07EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association Nuclear fusion, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AnnualReport06/07EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association #12;Nuclear fusion, which powers the sun station-sized experimental fusion device called ITER (the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and heating systems for ITER is a growing part of the UK programme, which also contains very strong theory

  13. Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium Fusion and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory, UK 10:00 Break 10:30 European Fusion Development Strategy - R. Andreani, EFDA, Garching 11Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium Fusion and Energy Policy October 11-12, 2005. Dean, President, FPA 8:40 Overview of Energy Policies at the USDOE ­ Robert C. Marlay, USDOE Office

  14. High Current Ion Source Development for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing high-current-density high-brightness sources for Heavy Ion Fusion applications. Heavy ion driven inertial fusion requires beams of high brightness in order to achieve high power density at the target for high target gain. At present, there are no existing ion source types that can readily meet all the driver HIF requirements, though sources exist which are adequate for present experiments and which with further development may achieve driver requirements. Our two major efforts have been on alumino-silicate sources and RF plasma sources. Experiments being performed on a 10-cm alumino-silicate source are described. To obtain a compact system for a HIF driver we are studying RF plasma sources where low current beamlets are combined to produce a high current beam. A 80-kV 20-{micro}s source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. The extraction current density was 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We present measurements of the extracted current density as a function of RF power and gas pressure, current density uniformity, emittance, and energy dispersion (due to charge exchange).

  15. Overview of Recent Japanese Activities in Fusion Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Yamamoto, I. [Nagoya University (Japan); Sagara, A. [NIFS (Japan)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After the ITER/EDA study, Japanese activities in fusion technology have been mainly devoted to DEMO reactors. The paper intends to overview these activities.With respect to the test blanket modules, solid breeder blankets with ferritic steel structure cooled by helium and water are being developed by JAERI in cooperation with universities and NIFS. Advanced blankets are being developed by universities and NIFS. In the area of tritium processing technology, R and D has been focused on the blanket tritium recovery technology. In terms of the superconducting magnet, JAERI has performed basic research for the Fusion Power Demonstration Plant, aiming at realization of toroidal filed higher than 13 T using innovative superconductors, such as Nb{sub 3}Al and High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). In the R and D of negative ion based NBI technologies, a H{sup -} beam of 110 mA has been stably accelerated up to 0.9 MeV, which corresponds to the current density of 80 A/m{sup 2}. A beam power of 13.1 MW at 180 keV has been injected from three injectors in the LHD N-NBI. With respect to the radio-frequency heating technology, development of 170GHz ITER gyrotron has been progressed to achieve a 500kW for 100 sec operation in JAERI. Long pulse injection for 766 sec with 72 kW at 84 GHz was achieved in a LHD ECH experiment.

  16. FUSION CROSS-SECTIONS AND THE NEW DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olmi, 0. Schwalm and W. Wb'lfli, "Fusion Reaction Studies ofin I n i t i a t i n g Fusion between Very High Ions", GSI-Alexander and G.R. Satchler, "Fusion Barriers, Empirical and

  17. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  18. Fusion action systems by Matthew J.K. Gelvin.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelvin, Matthew J. K. (Matthew Justin Karcher)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of fusion first arose in the local theory of finite groups. Puig abstracted the fusion data of a finite group to the notion of fusion system, an object that reflects local data in more abstract algebraic settings, ...

  19. ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11, 1980, p. 725. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Staff W. Kunkel andsupport) Accelerator and Fusion Research Division N.Abt Y.Wong J. Zatver HEAVY ION FUSION Work continued during FY80

  20. Summary of the report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdren, J.P.; Berwald, D.H.; Budnitz, R.J.; Crocker, J.G.; Delene, J.G.; Endicott, R.D.; Kazimi, M.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Logan, B.G.; Schultz, K.R.

    1987-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) has assessed magnetic fusion energy's prospects for providing energy with economic, environmental, and safety characteristics that would be attractive compared with other energy sources (mainly fission) available in the year 2015 and beyond. ESECOM gives particular attention to the interaction of environmental, safety, and economic characteristics of a variety of magnetic fusion reactors, and compares them with a variety of fission cases. Eight fusion cases, two fusion-fission hybrid cases, and four fission cases are examined, using consistent economic and safety models. These models permit exploration of the environmental, safety, and economic potential of fusion concepts using a wide range of possible materials choices, power densities, power conversion schemes, and fuel cycles. The ESECOM analysis indicates that magnetic fusion energy systems have the potential to achieve costs-of-electricity comparable to those of present and future fission systems, coupled with significant safety and environmental advantages. 75 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Reliable clock estimation using linear weighted fusion based on pairwise broadcast synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xin, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Zhao, Xiangmo, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Hui, Fei, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Ma, Junyan, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com; Yang, Lan, E-mail: xinshih86029@gmail.com [School of Information Engineering, Chang'an University, Xi'an City (China)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Clock synchronization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been studied extensively in recent years and many protocols are put forward based on the point of statistical signal processing, which is an effective way to optimize accuracy. However, the accuracy derived from the statistical data can be improved mainly by sufficient packets exchange, which will consume the limited power resources greatly. In this paper, a reliable clock estimation using linear weighted fusion based on pairwise broadcast synchronization is proposed to optimize sync accuracy without expending additional sync packets. As a contribution, a linear weighted fusion scheme for multiple clock deviations is constructed with the collaborative sensing of clock timestamp. And the fusion weight is defined by the covariance of sync errors for different clock deviations. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach can achieve better performance in terms of sync overhead and sync accuracy.

  2. Security Conditions

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice ensures that DOE uniformly meets the requirements of the Homeland Security Advisory System outlined in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-3, Threat Conditions and Associated Protective Measures, dated 3-11-02, and provides responses specified in Presidential Decision Directive 39, U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism (U), dated 6-21-95. It cancels DOE N 473.8, Security Conditions, dated 8-7-02. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels DOE N 473.8

  3. Upside-Down Solar Cell Achieves Record Efficiencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cell is an exercise in efficient innovation - literally, as the technology boasted the highest demonstrated efficiency for converting sunlight into electrical energy at its debut in 2005. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) inverted the conventional photovoltaic (PV) structure to revolutionary effect, achieving solar conversion efficiencies of 33.8% and 40.8% under one-sun and concentrated conditions, respectively.

  4. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  5. Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity 7 Our finances, transportation, health care, water supply, and emergency services depend on reliable energy. Building and...

  6. achievement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY JUSTICE IN SOCIETY: BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY) Project Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware First...

  7. NERSC HPC Achievements Award Recipients for 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of their inaugural High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Wednesday at the annual NERSC User Group meeting...

  8. NERSC Announces Third Annual HPC Achievement Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of its third annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Feb. 24, 2015, during the annual NERSC User...

  9. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

  10. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Need for Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program ­Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) ­Key R&D Areas to begin NOW (modeling 12, 2010 #12;Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) FNST is the science engineering technology

  11. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3.3 Fission-Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy 2.1 Potentialaspects of magnetic fusion energy, September 1989. 1.1.3.2 [

  12. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3.3.4 Chamber Radius and Fusion Neutron Flux . . . . .1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . .1.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purpose

  13. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called theof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevinof a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System by Kevin

  14. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Review Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Items 10 Review Background and Structure 11 Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Overview 14 Case Studies 17 1 Fusion Facilities: International Perspective 17 2 General Atomics:...

  15. analysing fusion plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    produced by fusion reactions and auxiliary Lin, Zhihong 63 Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion CiteSeer Summary: Reviewed are the present status...

  16. accelerator fusion research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering 17 Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Physics...

  17. association fusion research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering 18 Research Needs Workshop for Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Physics...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: U.S. fusion program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fusion program Sandia-UC Davis Collaboration Funded by DOE Office of Fusion Energy On March 4, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Research &...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Office of Fusion Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Energy Sandia-UC Davis Collaboration Funded by DOE Office of Fusion Energy On March 4, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Research &...

  20. activity fusion reactions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Fusion reactions in multicomponent dense matter CERN Preprints Summary: We analyze thermonuclear and pycnonuclear fusion reactions in dense matter containing atomic nuclei...

  1. advanced fusion reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborators 7 China To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project reached agreement in...

  2. ORNL's Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peng Wins Leadership Award ORNL's Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award Morgan McCorkle - August 17, 2010 ORNL's Martin Peng, recipient of Fusion Power Associates'...

  3. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program - Status and plans...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program - Status and plans for tritium research Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program - Status and plans for tritium research...

  4. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products...

  5. Radiation Shielding for Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, R.T.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel.

  6. Kinematics in Vector Boson Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Green

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The vector boson fusion process leads to two forward/backward jets (tag jets) and the produced state, a Higgs boson in this case, moving slowly in the p-p C.M. frame at the LHC. For the case of Higgs decaying to W+W (W*) with Higgs mass below 180 GeV, the W bosons have low momentum in the Higgs C.M. For the case of W leptonic decays, this fact allows for an approximate reconstruction of the two final state neutrinos. In turn, those solutions then provide additional kinematic cuts against background.

  7. Photons & Fusion Newsletter - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudyingFebruary Photons & Fusion is a

  8. Photons & Fusion Newsletter - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudyingFebruary Photons & Fusion is

  9. Neutron Catalysis of Resonance Fusion in Stellar Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nurgali Takibayev

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of resonance fusion study in stellar matter the features of system consisted of two alpha particles and one neutron have been investigated at astrophysical energies. Consideration of three body scattering has been carried out on base of well-known Faddeev's equations. It is found that under certain conditions the series of resonance states appear in this system at very low energies. The lifetimes of these three body resonances are close to the lifetime of unstable nucleus 8Be. The simple forms of two body repulsive potentials are taken into account to describe the parameters of the alpha, alpha resonance and to satisfy n, alpha scattering data at very low energies. The explanation of resonance phenomena in n, alpha, alpha system is offered on base of physical model. The effect results from resonance quantum phenomena in few body dynamics. In turn, the resonance fusion can give influence on many astrophysical phenomena. The possibility of catalyzing this new mode of fusion by free neutrons in alpha particle matter is considered too.

  10. Fast Neutron Detector for Fusion Reactor KSTAR Using Stilbene Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seung Kyu Lee; Byoung-Hwi Kang; Gi-Dong Kim; Yong-Kyun Kim

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Various neutron diagnostic tools are used in fusion reactors to evaluate different aspects of plasma performance, such as fusion power, power density, ion temperature, fast ion energy, and their spatial distributions. The stilbene scintillator has been proposed for use as a neutron diagnostic system to measure the characteristics of neutrons from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) fusion reactor. Specially designed electronics are necessary to measure fast neutron spectra with high radiation from a gamma-ray background. The signals from neutrons and gamma-rays are discriminated by the digital charge pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method, which uses total to partial charge ratio analysis. The signals are digitized by a flash analog-to-digital convertor (FADC). To evaluate the performance of the fabricated stilbene neutron diagnostic system, the efficiency of 10 mm soft-iron magnetic shielding and the detection efficiency of fast neutrons were tested experimentally using a 252Cf neutron source. In the results, the designed and fabricated stilbene neutron diagnostic system performed well in discriminating neutrons from gamma-rays under the high magnetic field conditions during KSTAR operation. Fast neutrons of 2.45 MeV were effectively measured and evaluated during the 2011 KSTAR campaign.

  11. A Virtualized Computing Platform For Fusion Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T; Adams, P; Fisher, J; Talbot, A

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. 2,500 servers, 400 network devices and 700 terabytes of networked attached storage provide the foundation for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and Experimental Data Archive. This talk discusses the rationale & benefits for server virtualization in the context of an operational experimental facility, the requirements discovery process used by the NIF teams to establish evaluation criteria for virtualization alternatives, the processes and procedures defined to enable virtualization of servers in a timeframe that did not delay the execution of experimental campaigns and the lessons the NIF teams learned along the way. The virtualization architecture ultimately selected for ICCS is based on the Open Source Xen computing platform and 802.1Q open networking standards. The specific server and network configurations needed to ensure performance and high availability of the control system infrastructure will be discussed.

  12. The properties and weldability of materials for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, B.A.; Kee, C.K.; Wilcox, R.C. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Zinkle, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steels have been suggested for applications within fusion reactors. The use of these nickel-free steels will help to reduce the radioactive waste management problem after service. one requirement for such steels is the ability to obtain sound welds for fabrication purposes. Thus, two austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn alloys were studied to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties. The two steels investigated were a Russian steel (Fe-11.6Cr19.3Mn-0.181C) and an US steel (Fe-12.lCr-19.4Mn-0.24C). Welding was performed using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microscopic examinations of the structure of both steels were conducted. The as-received Russian steel was found to be in the annealed state. Only the fusion zone and the base metal were observed in the welded Russian steel. No visible heat affected zone was observed. Examination revealed that the as-received US steel was in the cold rolled condition. After welding, a fusion zone and a heat affected zone along with the base metal region were found.

  13. High-Level Fusion Physics and Materials Interface Challenges July 27, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Level Fusion Physics and Materials Interface Challenges July 27, 2012 a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), to test materials under severe and fusion.S. fusion program complete the near term critical research and development (R

  14. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

  15. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ); Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Valeo, Ernest J. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Goldhaber, Maurice (Bayport, NY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  16. Fusion Power Associates Meeting 1 December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collision with low density foam foil Areal density ringing after short laser pulse #12;Laser Plasma drive laser fusion with the KrF laser Presented by: Steve Obenschain Plasma Physics Division U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Work by the NRL laser fusion research team Work supported by: the Office of Naval

  17. ERDA-76/110/l FUSION POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ERDA-76/110/l UC-20 FUSION POWER BY MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT PROGRAMPLAN VOLUME I SUMMARY JULY 1976 electric plants. These include direct production of hydrogen gas and/or synthetic fuels; direct energy production for chemical processing; fissile fuel production; fission product waste disposal; and fusion

  18. Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the world. The FIRE web site has been chosen as a selection for the Scout Report for Science and EngineeringFusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2000 Issued on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering

  19. Sean Finnegan & Ann Satsangi Fusion Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy (IFE) science. #12;HEDLP definition "High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physicsSean Finnegan & Ann Satsangi Fusion Energy Sciences Program Management Team for HEDLP Fusion Power Associates15 December 2011 Comments on the DOE-SC Program in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasma Science

  20. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  1. Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Schematic illustrating ion or electron electron beam target interaction 4 2 Flow chart of A8THERMAL-2Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) Inertia! Confinement Fusion (UC-21) ANL and square time pulse 16 11 The effect of higher initial temperatures and energy densities on the melting

  2. EPRI Fusion Energy Assessment July 19, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parallelization and increased risk management (from FESAC "Plan for Development of Fusion Energy" DOE/SC-0074EPRI Fusion Energy Assessment July 19, 2011 Palo Alto, CA Roadmapping an MFE Strategy R.J. Fonck ENERGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT · The U.S. MFE program can break out into a directed energy development

  3. On Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    to the problem of optimizing end-to- end throughput in undirected data networks. We first illustrate the powerOn Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding Zongpeng Li, Baochun Li, Dan Jiang, Lap Chi Lau Abstract-- With the constraints of network topologies and link capacities, achieving the optimal end

  4. Chamber and target technology development for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M; Besenbruch, G; Duke, J; Forman, L; Goodin, D; Gulec, K; Hoffer, J; Khater, H; Kulcinsky, G; Latkowski, J F; Logan, B G; Margevicious, B; Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Morley, N; Nobile, A; Payne, S; Peterson, P F; Peterson, R; Petzoldt, R; Schultz, K; Steckle, W; Sviatoslavsky, L; Tillack, M; Ying, A

    1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion chambers and high pulse-rate target systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) must: regenerate chamber conditions suitable for target injection, laser propagation, and ignition at rates of 5 to 10 Hz; extract fusion energy at temperatures high enough for efficient conversion to electricity; breed tritium and fuel targets with minimum tritium inventory; manufacture targets at low cost; inject those targets with sufficient accuracy for high energy gain; assure adequate lifetime of the chamber and beam interface (final optics); minimize radioactive waste levels and annual volumes; and minimize radiation releases under normal operating and accident conditions. The primary goal of the US IFE program over the next four years (Phase I) is to develop the basis for a Proof-of-Performance-level driver and target chamber called the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE will explore beam transport and focusing through prototypical chamber environment and will intercept surrogate targets at high pulse rep-rate. The IRE will not have enough driver energy to ignite targets, and it will be a non-nuclear facility. IRE options are being developed for both heavy ion and laser driven IFE. Fig. 1 shows that Phase I is prerequisite to an IRE, and the IRE plus NIF (Phase II) is prerequisite to a high-pulse rate. Engineering Test Facility and DEMO for IFE, leading to an attractive fusion power plant. This report deals with the Phase-I R&D needs for the chamber, driver/chamber interface (i.e., magnets for accelerators and optics for lasers), target fabrication, and target injection; it is meant to be part of a more comprehensive IFE development plan which will include driver technology and target design R&D. Because of limited R&D funds, especially in Phase I, it is not possible to address the critical issues for all possible chamber and target technology options for heavy ion or laser fusion. On the other hand, there is risk in addressing only one approach to each technology option. Therefore, in the following description of these specific feasibility issues, we try to strike a balance between narrowing the range of recommended R&D options to minimize cost, and keeping enough R&D options to minimize risk.

  5. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filone, Claire Marie [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania, 301 Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Heise, Mark [Departments of Genetics and Microbiology and Immunology, The Carolina Vaccine Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Doms, Robert W. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania, 301 Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania, 301 Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  6. Thermonuclear Fusion with the Sheared Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterberg, F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two basic approaches to producing thermonuclear fusion with a sheared flow stabilized z-pinch are considered. One consists of heating the entire length of the z-pinch column to the required temperatures. The other basic approach considered here involves the concept of fast ignition. A localized "hot-spot" is produced under the proper conditions to ignite a thermonuclear burn wave in the z-pinch plasma. Here we demonstrate that sheared flow stabilization is more efficient in the fast-ignition method with isentropic compression then in a z-pinch where the entire plasma column is heated.

  7. Fusion Potentials for G_k and Handle Squashing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Crescimanno

    1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Chern-Simons gauge theory, we show that the fusion ring of the conformal field theory G_k is isomorphic to P(u)/(\\del V), where V is a polynomial in u and (\\del V) is the ideal generated by the conditions \\del V=0. We also derive a residue-like formula for the correlation functions in the Chern-Simons theory thus providing a RCFT version of the residue formula for the TLG models. An operator that acts like the measure in the residue formula has the ionterpretation of a handle squashing operator and an explicit formula for this operator is given.

  8. Technical Letter Report - Preliminary Assessment of NDE Methods on Inspection of HDPE Butt Fusion Piping Joints for Lack of Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Hall, Thomas E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has a multi-year program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide engineering studies and assessments of issues related to the use of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for the reliable inspection of nuclear power plant components. As part of this program, there is a subtask 2D that was set up to address an assessment of issues related to the NDE of high density polyethylene (HDPE) butt fusion joints. This work is being driven by the nuclear industry wanting to employ HDPE materials in nuclear power plant systems. This being a new material for use in nuclear applications, there are a number of issues related to its use and potential problems that may evolve. The industry is pursuing ASME Code Case N-755 entitled “Use of Polyethylene (PE) Plastic Pipe for Section III, Division 1, Construction and Section XI Repair/Replacement Activities” that contains the requirements for nuclear power plant applications of HDPE. This Code Case requires that inspections be performed after the fusion joint is made by visually examining the bead that is formed and conducting a pressure test of the joint. These tests are only effective in general if gross through-wall flaws exist in the fusion joint. The NRC wants to know whether a volumetric inspection can be conducted on the fusion joint that will reliably detect lack-of-fusion conditions that may be produced during joint fusing. The NRC has requested that the work that PNNL is conducting be provided to assist them in resolving this inspection issue of whether effective volumetric NDE can be conducted to detect lack of fusion (LOF) in the butt HDPE joints. PNNL had 24 HDPE pipe specimens manufactured of 3408 material to contain LOF conditions that could be used to assess the effectiveness of NDE in detecting the LOF. Basic ultrasonic material properties were measured and used to guide the use of phased arrays and time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) work that was conducted. Millimeter (mm) waves were also used to inspect these assemblies. Fluor and NDE Innovations, Inc. conducted TOFD inspections using their commercially available equipment on all 24 specimens. These NDE inspection results were reviewed and several of the specimens were selected for destructive evaluation using a microtome to slice small blocks of blank and fusion joint material. This interim report provides a status/summary of the work that has been conducted to date. In the areas selected for destructive testing where there were strong acoustic responses, LOF was verified. In areas where there were no NDE responses, no LOF was found. It needs to be noted that only a small amount of material has been destructively characterized at this point and further work is planned to determine if these trends hold up. Some of the material from three of the assemblies was sent off for mechanical testing but the results were not available to be included in this status report. The initial work shows that at least some of the LOF is providing NDE responses that have been verified through destructive testing. Thus, there is promise that a volumetric examination can be conducted on HDPE butt fusion joints. The future work will lead to quantifying what various NDE methods can detect, what they miss, and what they incorrectly characterize as defective.

  9. A program toward a fusion reactor* P.-H. Rebut,+ M. L. Watkins, D. J. Gambier, and D. Boucher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between the model and JET data. The main predictions are also consistent with statistical scaling laws without a significant increase in world funding. I. INTRODUCTION Present fusion research programs out the main results achieved in JET. Furthermore, a clearer picture of energy and particle transport

  10. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hoffman, N. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kagan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  11. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  12. fusion

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A

  13. Fusion Materials Science and Technology Research Opportunities now and during the ITER Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Blanchard, James; Callis, Richard W.; Kessel, Charles E.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lee, Peter J.; Mccarthy, Kathryn; Morley, Neil; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Nygren, Richard; Tynan, George R.; Whyte, Dennis G.; Willms, Scott; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Several high-priority near-term potential research activities to address fusion nuclear science challenges are summarized. General recommendations include: 1) Research should be preferentially focused on the most technologically advanced options (i.e., options that have been developed at least through the single-effects concept exploration stage, Technology Readiness Levels >3), 2) Significant near-term progress can be achieved by modifying existing facilities and/or moderate investment in new medium-scale facilities, and 3) Computational modeling for fusion nuclear sciences is generally not yet sufficiently robust to enable truly predictive results to be obtained, but large reductions in risk, cost and schedule can be achieved by careful integration of experiment and modeling.

  14. Fusion materials science and technology research opportunities now and during the ITER era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Zinkle; J.P. Planchard; R.W. Callis; C.E. Kessel; P.J. Lee; K.A. McCarty; Various Others

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several high-priority near-term potential research activities to address fusion nuclear science challenges are summarized. General recommendations include: (1) Research should be preferentially focused on the most technologically advanced options (i.e., options that have been developed at least through the singleeffects concept exploration stage, technology readiness levels >3), (2) Significant near-term progress can be achieved by modifying existing facilities and/or moderate investment in new medium-scale facilities, and (3) Computational modeling for fusion nuclear sciences is generally not yet sufficiently robust to enable truly predictive results to be obtained, but large reductions in risk, cost and schedule can be achieved by careful integration of experiment and modeling.

  15. Contribution to Fusion Materials Semiannual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marian, J; Meier, W

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work are the following: (1) The application of micro and mesoscale modeling techniques to study dislocation properties in ferritic and W-based materials; and (2) The development of computational models and tools to study damage accumulation in >1 dpa (fusion-like) conditions, both for Fe and W-based alloys. The high-temperature strength of structural ferritic alloys (ferritic/martensitic steels, ODS steels, bcc refractory alloys) hinges on the thermal stability of second phase particles and their interactions with dislocations. Irradiation damage can modify the structure and stability of both the particles and dislocations, particularly by the introduction of gas atoms, point defects and point defect clusters. The three aspects of materials strength that we are studying are: (a) Computation of dislocation mobility functions (stress-velocity relations) as a function of temperature and dislocation character. This will be done via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single dislocation motion under applied shear stress. This is a fundamental input to dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and also provides fundamental insights into the high-temperature plastic behavior of ferritic materials. (b) Simulations of dislocation-obstacle interactions using MD and DD. This subtask includes simulating the effect on dislocation glide of precipitates (e.g., {alpha}' Cr precipitates), ODS particles, and irradiation induced defect clusters (e.g. voids, dislocation loops, etc.). (c) Implementation of this information (dislocation mobilities and dislocation-defect interaction rules) into DD codes that will allow us to study plasticity of single crystals Fe alloys under relevant irradiation conditions.

  16. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Grigory; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Huang, C -K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot-spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydro-instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. The ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at National Ignition Facility.

  17. Achieving Energy Efficiency in Exis0ng Buildings How achieve significant commercial building energy efficiency?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    · Led BU Energy Audit over past 3 years · University Sustainability CommiAchieving Energy Efficiency in Exis0ng Buildings ·How achieve significant commercial building energy efficiency? Focus on HVAC. ·Our solu0on

  18. Parameterizing loop fusion for automated empirical tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y; Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; Quinlan, D; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional compilers are limited in their ability to optimize applications for different architectures because statically modeling the effect of specific optimizations on different hardware implementations is difficult. Recent research has been addressing this issue through the use of empirical tuning, which uses trial executions to determine the optimization parameters that are most effective on a particular hardware platform. In this paper, we investigate empirical tuning of loop fusion, an important transformation for optimizing a significant class of real-world applications. In spite of its usefulness, fusion has attracted little attention from previous empirical tuning research, partially because it is much harder to configure than transformations like loop blocking and unrolling. This paper presents novel compiler techniques that extend conventional fusion algorithms to parameterize their output when optimizing a computation, thus allowing the compiler to formulate the entire configuration space for loop fusion using a sequence of integer parameters. The compiler can then employ an external empirical search engine to find the optimal operating point within the space of legal fusion configurations and generate the final optimized code using a simple code transformation system. We have implemented our approach within our compiler infrastructure and conducted preliminary experiments using a simple empirical search strategy. Our results convey new insights on the interaction of loop fusion with limited hardware resources, such as available registers, while confirming conventional wisdom about the effectiveness of loop fusion in improving application performance.

  19. From Earth to Saturn: Los Alamos Achievements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMillan, Charlie; Wilson, Cathy; Nekimkem, Howard; Martinez, Johnnie; Martz, Joe; Albright, Brian

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A compilation of some of the remarkable achievements of Los Alamos National Laboratory staff over the past 12 months. Originally aired in the June 26, 2008 Director's all-employee meeting.

  20. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart Bioeconomy Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy ProductionMay Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne...

  1. Awards and Achievements | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards and Achievements 2014 UChicago Pinnacle of Education Award Mike Kaminski 2014 UChicago Pinnacle of Education Award Seth Darling 2014 R&D 100 Award John Zhang 2014 R&D 100...

  2. Annual Report08/09 EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infusion of cash would, indeed, dramatically accelerate progress. On the other hand, commercial fusion

  3. Taming turbulence in magnetized plasmas: from fusion energy to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    occurs (fusion of particle beams will not work...) Thermonuclear fusion in a confined plasma (T~10 keTaming turbulence in magnetized plasmas: from fusion energy to black hole accretion disks Troy?: In fusion plasmas turbulent leakage of heat and particles is a key issue. Sheared flow can suppress

  4. MSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    . Thermonuclear fusion provides unlimited energy for all the world which is clean from long lived radioactiveMSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy Why laser fusionDescription of the course fusion for energy production. This unique training scheme involves eight leading European centres

  5. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), now being constructed in Caderache, France [5]. In contrast, inertial fusion

  6. Potential of Mirror Systems as Future Fusion Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, Guenter; Kulcinski, Gerald L. [University of Madison (United States)

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mirror based fusion reactors - as other fusion reactor concepts - have considerable environmental and safety advantages. They could make available energy resources for many 1000 years. Mirror type fusion reactors have additional technical advantages over other fusion reactor concepts. These are: simple design topology, steady state power generation, decoupling of end plugs from central power producing regions, small power units as demonstration facilities.

  7. 2002 Fusion Summer Study Subgroup E4 -Development Pathway Subgroup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    2002 Fusion Summer Study Subgroup E4 - Development Pathway Subgroup Draft by: Farrokh Najmabadi A burning plasma experiment is a key step in developing fusion. The realization of fusion, however, requires and fusion power technologies, etc. An important discriminator among various embodiments of burning plasma

  8. M. Abdou April 2013 Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    M. Abdou April 2013 Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Challenges and Required R&D Mohamed Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Challenges and Required R&D Presentation Outline Introduction to realizing fusion power and the Central Role of Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) 4 #12;M. Abdou

  9. Department of Advanced Energy Nuclear Fusion Research Education Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    24 Department of Advanced Energy Nuclear Fusion Research Education Program 23 8 23 to Nuclear Fusion Research Education Program 277-8561 5-1-5 1 04-7136-4092 http://www.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/fusion: nemoto@criepi.denken.or.jp tel: 046-856-2121 12 http://www. k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/fusion-pro/ #12

  10. Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DnT v #12;FUSION "SELF-HEATING" POWER BALANCE 274-01/rs FUSION POWER DENSITY: pf = Rf = n f for n FUSION Fission initiated by electrically neutral particle [neutron] and can occur at room temperature electrically charged particles at very high energy: Threshold temperature for most reactive fusion reaction

  11. Low Voltage White Phosphorescent OLED Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and its research partners at Princeton University and the University of Southern California have succeeded in developing a white phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) that achieved a record efficiency of 20 lumens per watt. This achievement is the result of the team's collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency of PHOLED lighting by focusing on two critical factors: lowering the drive voltages and increasing the amount of light extracted.

  12. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  13. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  14. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a reactor-scale FRC, and the FIREX program was intended to test the ideas behind this approach. We will describe in this report the technological development path and advances in physics understanding that allowed FIREX to reach a regime in which ion rings were reproducibly created with up to about half the current necessary to produce field reversal. Unfortunately, the experiments were limited to this level by a fundamental, unanticipated aspect of the physics of strong ion rings in plasma. The FIREX ring is a strongly anisotropic, current-carrying population of ions moving faster than the Alfven speed in the background plasma. The rapidly changing ring current excites very large-amplitude Alfven waves in the plasma, and these waves strongly affect the ring, causing rapid energy loss in a way that is not compatible with the success of the ring trapping scenario around which FIREX was designed. The result was that FIREX rings were always very short-lived. We will discuss the implication of these results for possible future use of large-orbit ions in FRCs. In short, it appears that a certain range of the parameters characterizing the ring Alfven mach number and distribution function must be avoided to allow the existence of a long-lived energetic ion component in an FRC. This report will explain why FIREX experimental results cannot be directly scaled to quantitatively predict this range for a particular FRC configuration. This will require accurate, three-dimensional simulations. FIREX results do constitute a very good dataset for validating such a code, and simulations already carried out during this program provide a guide to the important physics involved.

  15. Quantum state fusion in photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiara Vitelli; Nicolò Spagnolo; Lorenzo Aparo; Fabio Sciarrino; Enrico Santamato; Lorenzo Marrucci

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Photons are the ideal carriers of quantum information for communication. Each photon can have a single qubit or even multiple qubits encoded in its internal quantum state, as defined by optical degrees of freedom such as polarization, wavelength, transverse modes, etc. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a physical process, named "quantum state fusion", in which the two-dimensional quantum states (qubits) of two input photons are combined into a single output photon, within a four-dimensional quantum space. The inverse process is also proposed, in which the four-dimensional quantum state of a single photon is split into two photons, each carrying a qubit. Both processes can be iterated, and hence may be used to bridge multi-particle protocols of quantum information with the multi-degree-of-freedom ones, with possible applications in quantum communication networks.

  16. Fusion Utility in the Knudsen Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Seth [PPPL; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [PPPL

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confi#12;nement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared to those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer e#11;ffect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate restoring the reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

  17. Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

  18. Fusion utility in the Knudsen layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In inertial confinement fusion, the loss of fast ions from the edge of the fusing hot-spot region reduces the reactivity below its Maxwellian value. The loss of fast ions may be pronounced because of the long mean free paths of fast ions, compared with those of thermal ions. We introduce a fusion utility function to demonstrate essential features of this Knudsen layer effect, in both magnetized and unmagnetized cases. The fusion utility concept is also used to evaluate the restoring reactivity in the Knudsen layer by manipulating fast ions in phase space using waves.

  19. Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

  20. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Claire Y.-H., E-mail: CHuang1@cdc.go [Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 3150 Rampart Rd., Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas [Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 3150 Rampart Rd., Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Erb, Steven M. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M. [Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 3150 Rampart Rd., Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Roehrig, John T. [Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 3150 Rampart Rd., Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  1. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    physics and heavy ion fusion energy drivers, including bothoptions towards inertial fusion energy. Acknowledgements:fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction A

  2. The ITERThe ITER eraera : the 10: the 10 yearyear roadmaproadmap for the French fusion programmefor the French fusion programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2035 : The Fusion Energy Era of magnetic fusion research ITER thermonuclear plasmasITER thermonuclear plasmasThe ITERThe ITER eraera : the 10: the 10 yearyear roadmaproadmap for the French fusion programmefor the French fusion programme E. Tsitrone1 on behalf of IRFM and Tore Supra team 1 : CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint

  3. Fusion energy Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion energy · Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high temperatures (15 million degrees) releasing a large amount of energy. · The aim of fusion research is to use of hydrogen). In the plasma the deuterium and tritium fuse to produce energy. · Fusion is a very efficient

  4. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 15, Nos. 3/4, 1996 Report of the FESAC Inertial Fusion Energy Review Marshall Rosenbluth, H,~3 William Tang, 12 and Ernest Valeo 12 Dr. Robert W. Conn, Chair Fusion Energy on a specific recommendation made by your Committee in its report, "A Restructured Fusion Energy Sciences Pro

  5. Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials Science Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials, Columbia University 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT December 19, 2011 Summary The proposal for tritium-suppressed D-D fusion and the understanding of the turbulent pinch in magnetically confined plasma

  6. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , Livermore, CA 94551. 6 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. 7 Columbia University, New York, NY 10027Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on the Review of the Fusion

  7. Fusion Engineering and Design 54 (2001) 181247 On the exploration of innovative concepts for fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    for fusion chamber technology M.A. Abdou a, *, The APEX TEAM, A. Ying a , N. Morley a , K. Gulec a , S-310-8252599. E-mail address: abdou@fusion.ucla.edu (M.A. Abdou). 0920-3796/01/$ - see front matter © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S0920-3796(00)00433-6 #12;M.A. Abdou et al. / Fusion

  8. Fusion of Superalgebras and D=3, N=4 Quiver Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fa-Min Chen; Yong-Shi Wu

    2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    For further investigating the underlying structures of the D=3, N=4 Chern-Simons-matter (CSM) theories, we suggest a new concept and procedure for "fusing" two superalgebras into a single new superalgebra. The starting superalgebras may be those used in the previous construction of the double-symplectic 3-algebras in the N=4 CSM theories: The bosonic parts of these two superalgebras share at least one simple factor or U(1) factor. We are able to provide two different methods to do the "fusion". Several explicit examples are presented to demonstrate the "fusion" procedure. We also generalize the "fusion" procedure so that more than two superaglebras can be fused into a single one, provided some conditions are satisfied. It is shown that two or more N=4 theories with different gauge groups may be associated with the same "fused" superalgebra.

  9. Nuclear fusion as a probe for octupole deformation in $^{224}$Ra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Raj; Vitturi, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\textit{Background}$: Nuclear fusion has been shown to be a perfect probe to study the different nuclear shapes. However, the possibility of testing octupole deformation of a nucleus with this tool has not been fully explored yet. The presence of a stactic octupole deformation in nuclei will enhanced a possible permanent electric dipole moment, leading to a possible demonstration of parity violation. $\\textit{Purpose}$: To check whether static octupole deformation or octupole vibration in fusion give qualitatively different results so that both situations can be experimentally disentangled. $\\textit{Method}$: Fusion cross sections are computed in the Coupled-Channels formalism making use of the Ingoing-Wave Boundary Conditions (IWBC) for the systems $^{16}$O+$^{144}$Ba and $^{16}$O+$^{224}$Ra. $\\textit{Results}$: Barrier distributions of the two considered schemes show different patterns. For the $^{224}$Ra case, the octupole deformation parameter is large enough to create a sizeable difference. $\\textit{Con...

  10. Femtosecond spectroscopy probes the folding quality of antibody fragments expressed as GFP fusions in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Didier, P. [Faculte de Pharmacie, UMR 7175, 74, route du Rhin, 67412 Illkirch (France); Weiss, E.; Sibler, A.-P. [Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7175, Boulevard Sebastien Brant, F-67412 Illkirch (France); Philibert, P.; Martineau, P. [Centre de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, UMR 5160, Val d'Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Bigot, J.-Y. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Guidoni, L. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)], E-mail: luca.guidoni@univ-paris-diderot.fr

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved femtosecond spectroscopy can improve the application of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as protein-folding reporters. The study of ultrafast excited-state dynamics (ESD) of GFP fused to single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody fragments, allowed us to define and measure an empirical parameter that only depends on the folding quality (FQ) of the fusion. This method has been applied to the analysis of genetic fusions expressed in the bacterial cytoplasm and allowed us to distinguish folded and thus functional antibody fragments (high FQ) with respect to misfolded antibody fragments. Moreover, these findings were strongly correlated to the behavior of the same scFvs expressed in animal cells. This method is based on the sensitivity of the ESD to the modifications in the tertiary structure of the GFP induced by the aggregation state of the fusion partner. This approach may be applicable to the study of the FQ of polypeptides over-expressed under reducing conditions.

  11. The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santilli, R M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadron...

  12. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schowalter, Rachel M. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, 741 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); Wurth, Mark A. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, 741 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); Aguilar, Hector C. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lee, Benhur [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Moncman, Carole L. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, 741 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); McCann, Richard O. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, 741 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); Dutch, Rebecca Ellis [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, 741 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States)]. E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  13. OPERATION OF FUSION REACTORS IN ONE ATMOSPHERE OF AIR INSTEAD OF VACUUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, J. Reece [UT Plasma Sciences Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States)

    2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering design studies of both magnetic and inertial fusion power plants have assumed that the plasma will undergo fusion reactions in a vacuum environment. Operation under vacuum requires an expensive additional major system for the reactor-a vacuum vessel with vacuum pumping, and raises the possibility of sudden unplanned outages if the vacuum containment is breached. It would be desirable in many respects if fusion reactors could be made to operate at one atmosphere with air surrounding the plasma, thus eliminating the requirement of a pressure vessel and vacuum pumping. This would have obvious economic, reliability, and engineering advantages for currently envisaged power plant reactors; it would make possible forms of reactor control not possible under vacuum conditions (i.e. adiabatic compression of the fusion plasma by increasing the pressure of surrounding gas); it would allow reactors used as aircraft engines to operate as turbojets or ramjets in the atmosphere, and it would allow reactors used as fusion rockets to take off from the surface of the earth instead of low earth orbit.

  14. ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY R LE DE L'NERGIE DE FUSION DANS UNE STRATGIE D'NERGIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1-1 ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY RÔ LE DE L'ÉNERGIE DE FUSION DANS. 1. Introduction 1. Introduction 1.1. Fusion energy 1.1. Energie de fusion Fusion energy is one of only a few truly long-term energy options. Since its inception in the 1950s, the vision of the fusion

  15. ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY RLE DE L'NERGIE DE FUSION DANS UNE STRATGIE D'NERGIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    1-1 ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY IN A SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL ENERGY STRATEGY RÔLE DE L'ÉNERGIE DE FUSION DANS. 1. Introduction 1. Introduction 1.1. Fusion energy 1.1. Energie de fusion Fusion energy is one of only a few truly long-term energy options. Since its inception in the 1950s, the vision of the fusion

  16. COMMENTARIES ON CRITICISMS OF MAGNETIC FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is probably greater than the energy content of fossil or uranium fuels, and the fusion fuel is virtually by substantial technology R&D, has been developed for a tokamak experiment which would explore burning plasma

  17. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    progress with more modest near-term budgets. #12;Slide 5 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National requirement: modest growth of HIFS-VNL budget from present 7.7 M$/yr to ~16M$/yr, including suppo

  18. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  19. Potential inversion with subbarrier fusion data revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; Y. Watanabe

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We invert experimental data for heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies well below the Coulomb barrier in order to directly determine the internucleus potential between the colliding nuclei. In contrast to the previous applications of the inversion formula, we explicitly take into account the effect of channel couplings on fusion reactions, by assuming that fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies are governed by the lowest barrier in the barrier distribution. We apply this procedure to the $^{16}$O +$^{144}$Sm and $^{16}$O +$^{208}$Pb reactions, and find that the inverted internucleus potential are much thicker than phenomenological potentials. A relation to the steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections recently found at deep subbarrier energies is also discussed.

  20. Fusion in the W_3 algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. T. Watts

    1994-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the notions of fusion for representations of the W_3 algebra along the lines of Feigin and Fuchs. We present some explicit calculations for a W_3 minimal model.

  1. Renew Workshop on Fusion-Fission Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Final Report #12;4 The Workshop Sponsored by OFES, NE, NNSA About 100 attendees From fusion (DOE) DOE NNSA perspective Kirk Levedahl (DOE) Nuclear industry perspective Adrian Heymer (NEI

  2. 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a guide to the 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference. It consists largely of abstracts of the oral and poster presentations that were to be made, and gives some general information about the conference and its schedule.

  3. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  4. Fusion materials modeling: Challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, B. D.

    The plasma facing components, first wall, and blanket systems of future tokamak-based fusion power plants arguably represent the single greatest materials engineering challenge of all time. Indeed, the United States National ...

  5. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Richard

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring...

  6. Data Fusion for Improved Respiration Rate Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemati, Shamim

    We present an application of a modified Kalman-Filter (KF) framework for data fusion to the estimation of respiratory rate from multiple physiological sources which is robust to background noise. A novel index of the ...

  7. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  8. Volume Ignition via Time-like Detonation in Pellet Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csernai, L P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic fluid dynamics and the theory of relativistic detonation fronts are used to estimate the space-time dynamics of the burning of the D-T fuel in Laser driven pellet fusion experiments. The initial "High foot" heating of the fuel makes the compressed target transparent to radiation, and then a rapid ignition pulse can penetrate and heat up the whole target to supercritical temperatures in a short time, so that most of the interior of the target ignites almost simultaneously and instabilities will have no time to develop. In these relativistic, radiation dominated processes both the interior, time-like burning front and the surrounding space-like part of the front will be stable against Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. To achieve this rapid, volume ignition the pulse heating up the target to supercritical temperature should provide the required energy in less than ~ 10 ps.

  9. Laser Fusion: The First Ten Years 1962-1972

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kidder, R E

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This account of the beginning of the program on laser fusion at Livermore in 1962, and its subsequent development during the decade ending in 1972, was originally prepared as a contribution to the January 1991 symposium 'Achievements in Physics' honoring Professor Keith Brueckner upon his retirement from the University of San Diego at La Jolla. It is a personal recollection of work at Livermore from my vantage point as its scientific leader, and of events elsewhere that I thought significant. This period was one of rapid growth in which the technology of high-power short-pulse lasers needed to drive the implosion of thermonuclear fuel to the temperature and density needed for ignition was developed, and in which the physics of the interaction of intense light with plasmas was explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  10. Recirculating induction accelerators as drivers for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Deadrick, F.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Griffith, L.V.; Kirbie, H.C.; Neil, V.K.; Newton, M.A.; Paul, A.C.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Bangerter, R.O.; Faltens, A.; Fong, C.G.; Judd, D.L.; Lee, E.P.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., 10529-B Braddock Rd., Fairfax, Virginia 22302 (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study of recirculating induction heavy ion accelerators as low-cost driver for inertial-fusion energy applications was recently completed. The projected cost of a 4 MJ accelerator was estimated to be about $500 M (million) and the efficiency was estimated to be 35%. The principal technology issues include energy recovery of the ramped dipole magnets, which is achieved through use of ringing inductive/capacitive circuits, and high repetition rates of the induction cell pulsers, which is accomplished through arrays of field effect transistor (FET) switches. Principal physics issues identified include minimization of particle loss from interactions with the background gas, and more demanding emittance growth and centroid control requirements associated with the propagation of space-charge-dominated beams around bends and over large path lengths. In addition, instabilities such as the longitudinal resistive instability, beam-breakup instability and betatron-orbit instability were found to be controllable with careful design.

  11. Fusion transmutation of waste and the role of the In-Zinerator in the nuclear fuel cycle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Z-Pinch fusion experiment at Sandia National Laboratories has been making significant progress in developing a high-energy fusion neutron source. This source has the potential to be used for the transmutation of nuclear waste. The goal of this research was to do a scoping-level design of a fusion-based transmuter to determine potential transmutation rates along with the fusion yield requirements. Two ''In-Zinerator'' designs have been developed to transmute the long-lived actinides that dominate the heat production in spent fuel. The first design burns up all transuranics (TRU) in spent fuel (Np, Pu, Am, Cm), and the second is focused only on burning up Am and Cm. The TRU In-Zinerator is designed for a fuel cycle requiring burners to get rid of all the TRU with no light water reactor (LWR) recycle. The Am/Cm In-Zinerator is designed for a fuel cycle with Np/Pu recycling in LWRs. Both types of In-Zinerators operate with a moderate fusion source driving a sub-critical actinide blanket. The neutron multiplication is 30, so a great deal of energy is produced in the blanket. With the design goal of generating 3,000 MW{sub th}, about 1,200 kg/yr of actinides can be destroyed in each In-Zinerator. Each TRU In-Zinerator will require a 20 MW fusion source, and it will take a total of 20 units (each producing 3,000 MWth) to burn up the TRU as fast as the current LWR fleet can produce it. Each Am/Cm In-Zinerator will require a 24 MW fusion source, and it will take a total of 2 units to burn up the Am/Cm as fast as the current LWR fleet can produce it. The necessary fusion yield could be achieved using a 200-240 MJ target fired once every 10 seconds.

  12. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion.

  13. Implications of Theoretical Ideas Regarding Cold Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afsar Abbas

    1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon.

  14. Traces on Module Categories over Fusion Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Schaumann

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider traces on module categories over pivotal fusion categories which are compatible with the module structure. It is shown that such module traces characterise the Morita classes of special haploid symmetric Frobenius algebras. Moreover, they are unique up to a scale factor and they equip the dual category with a pivotal structure. This implies that for each pivotal structure on a fusion category over the complex numbers there exists a conjugate pivotal structure defined by the canonical module trace.

  15. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  16. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy ion inertial fusion energy. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thisheavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralizedto drift axially). For fusion energy applications, either

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  2017  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences:  Target  and  Context   DOE’s  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  program  

  18. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulations of fusion and energy systems with unprecedentedRequirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  

  19. Progress in heavy ion drivers inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ION DRIVEN INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY: FROM SCALED EXPERIMENTSThe promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ionleading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus

  20. Influence of projectile neutron number on cross section in cold fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragojevic, I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON CROSS SECTION IN COLD FUSION REACTIONS I. Dragojevi? ,type of reaction has been referred to as “cold fusion. ”The study of cold fusion reactions is an indispensable