Sample records for achievable control technology

  1. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

  2. achievable control technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DOE. Technology Assessment DVMCS p. 1TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT FOR Martin E. Cobern, Ph.D. 2004-01-01 285 CONTROL-THEORY AND...

  3. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  4. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency Milestones 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  6. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * General Motors Informal interactions on engine controls. * Woodward Governor Turbo-compounding. * Barber Nichols Development of integrated turbinegenerator expander....

  7. Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Bing Wu; Constantin Brif; Matthew R. James; Herschel Rabitz

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum optimal control theory, kinematic bounds are the minimum and maximum values of the control objective achievable for any physically realizable system dynamics. For a given initial state of the system, these bounds depend on the nature and state of the controller. We consider a general situation where the controlled quantum system is coupled to both an external classical field (referred to as a classical controller) and an auxiliary quantum system (referred to as a quantum controller). In this general situation, the kinematic bound is between the classical kinematic bound (CKB), corresponding to the case when only the classical controller is available, and the quantum kinematic bound (QKB), corresponding to the ultimate physical limit of the objective's value. Specifically, when the control objective is the expectation value of a quantum observable (a Hermitian operator on the system's Hilbert space), the QKBs are the minimum and maximum eigenvalues of this operator. We present, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the necessary and sufficient conditions for surpassing the CKB and reaching the QKB, through the use of a quantum controller. The general conditions are illustrated by examples in which the system and controller are initially in thermal states. The obtained results provide a basis for the design of quantum controllers capable of maximizing the control yield and reaching the ultimate physical limit.

  8. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

  9. Estimates of Savings Achievable from Irrigation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Fuchs, Heidi; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper performs a literature review and meta-analysis of water savings from several types of advanced irrigation controllers: rain sensors (RS), weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC), and soil moisture sensors (SMS).The purpose of this work is to derive average water savings per controller type, based to the extent possible on all available data. After a preliminary data scrubbing, we utilized a series of analytical filters to develop our best estimate of average savings. We applied filters to remove data that might bias the sample such as data self-reported by manufacturers, data resulting from studies focusing on high-water users, or data presented in a non-comparable format such as based on total household water use instead of outdoor water use. Because the resulting number of studies was too small to be statistically significant when broken down by controller type, this paper represents a survey and synthesis of available data rather than a definitive statement regarding whether the estimated water savings are representative.

  10. Environmental Control Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) study was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber and the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger this month as the effects of increased particulate loading are being studied. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. On September 13, 1996, the ECTC completed an independent test block for a third-party company, Air Purification Inc. (API). For this testing, the ECTC's staff (O&M and Testing) were contracted to conduct performance and validation testing across a new, integrated emissions control device, the Rotorfilter{trademark}. This testing was conducted for a thirty (30) day period simultaneously with the B&W/CHX test block. The HAP testing resumed as this third-party test block was completed. Testing in September at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) included tests from the Pilot Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block as part of EPRI's overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions. The 1996 program is being performed on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and the spray dryer/pulse jet fabric filter (SDA/PJFF) pilot units. The 1996 Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block is a continuation of the 1995 TER test block and will focus on up to five research areas, depending on experimental results. These areas are: (1) Mercury speciation methods; (2) Effect of FGD system operating variables on mercury removal; (3) Novel methods for elemental mercury control; (4) Catalytic methods for converting elemental mercury to oxidized mercury; and (5) Electrostatic charging of particulate material in the FGD inlet flue gas stream.

  11. EM-40 technology initiatives: Achieving a common goal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Breck, M. [Booz Allen, & Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration has a number of initiatives underway which are designed to infuse improved/innovative technologies into the Environmental Management Program. These initiatives are intended to help expedite cleanup by defining problem sets across the sites (i.e., the field), identifying appropriate technologies, assisting technology development, breaking down barriers to technology implementation, providing a standardized method for reporting technology cost and performance information, and allowing the marketplace to suggest the best technologies for doing the job.

  12. Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including issues of technology and cost un- certainties, areon NO x Control Technologies and Cost Effectiveness forand other factors on technology cost trends (hence, the

  13. Washington, D.C. and Indiana: Allison Hybrid Technology Achieves...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    systems for medium-duty and heavy-duty trucks. One of the main benefits of using Allison hybrid technology within WMATA's buses is the fuel savings realized from a kinetic energy...

  14. HTS Wire Development Group: Achievements, technology transfer, and plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, G.N. Jr. [American Superconductor Corp., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the HTS wire development group is to develop high performance HTS wire for use in electric power systems. The HTS wire development group personnel is listed. The HTS wire development group achievements are outlined. These achievements include: focusing on the development of high performance and cost effective HTS wire; HTS wires were fabricated in laboratory scale and production scale lengths; ACS has fabricated the only conductor in the world to meet or surpass the DOE FY94 goals for electric power applications development; these wire fabrication successes at ASC are a direct result of the long-term collaboration between ASC and the other HTS Wire Development Group members; and plans are in place for a successful FY95 program.

  15. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofingDepartmentAchieve

  16. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofingDepartmentAchieveMilestones |

  17. achieving behavioral control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jain Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 4 Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Achieving...

  18. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueckner, Keith A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  19. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  20. Achieving Better Building Performance and Savings Using Optimal Control Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    did not function properly; Install relay in series with the operator control aquastat. Setup both setpoints and schedule for the boiler control while maintaining the safe operation logic. The setpoint will be effective in the range between... control aquastat. Setup both setpoints and schedule for boiler control while maintaining the safe operation logic. The setpoint will be effective in the range between ambient temperature and the operator control setpoint. Not yet Completed...

  1. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3831E Achieving Energy Savings with Highly- Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Author-Controlled Lighting 1 of 50 April 19, 2010 Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open Berkeley National Laboratory #12;Highly-Controlled Lighting 2 of 50 April 19, 2010 DISCLAIMER This document

  2. Boiler MACT 35000FT: Maximum Achievable Control Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .2800 2.00E-03 0.022 5.70E-06 770 520 c Existing-Biomass Fuel Cells 0.0200 5.80E-03 0.022 5.70E-06 1,100 ND Existing-Biomass Hybrid Suspension Grate 0.4400 4.50E-04 0.022 5.70E-06 2...,400 2,000 c New-Biomass Dutch Ovens/Pile Burners 0.0032 3.90E-05 0.022 8.00E-07 330 520 c New-Biomass Fuel Cells 0.0200 2.90E-05 0.022 8.00E-07 910 ND New...

  3. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10|BlueFireBoiler MACT TechnicalFact

  4. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green BusNews andMay 30,What does

  5. CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 8. Technology Control Plans (TCPs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 8. Technology Control Plans (TCPs) This Section addresses and data from foreign nationals for whom the item is controlled, and would otherwise require an export; physical controls (laboratory security); IT controls (data file/computer access security); deemed export

  6. Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, John Mapes

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

  7. Effect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    ]. For control design purposes, the common approach is to use linear models obtained around a certain operationEffect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial-- This paper deals with feedback control of serial processes, that is, processes formed by the series

  8. CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 15. Technology Commercialization and Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 15. Technology Commercialization and Transfer This section addresses the export control requirements associated with CUNY's Technology Commercialization Transfer Agreements trigger export control requirements, CUNY's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) shall work directly

  9. Nuclear export and technology transfer controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.J.; Primeau, S.J. (Eagle Research Group, Inc., Arlington, VA (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the U.S. implementation of nuclear export and technology transfer controls is undertaken to assess whether the U.S. controls is undertaken to assess whether the U.S. controls meet the full scope of the international commitment toward non-proliferation controls. The international non-proliferation controls have been incorporated into CoCom, the Coordinating Committee of the multinational organization established to protect the mutual interests of the participating countries in the area of strategic export controls. However, this CoCom list is classified and each participating country implements these controls pursuant to its own laws. A comparison to the non-proliferation controls promulgated by the U.K. is used to verify that the U.S. controls are at least as comprehensive as the British controls.

  10. Innovative technologies for impurity control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygren, R.E. (ed.)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief discussion of the following topics is given in this report: Liquid Metal Divertors; Lithium Droplet Beam Divertor; Preferential Pumping of Helium; Reduced Erosion with Cu-Li, W-Li, etc.; Reduction of Erosion by Thermionic Emission; Reduced Erosion in Boronized Graphites; Proposal for Materials Experiments in TRIAM; Carbon-SiC for Plasma Facing Components; Helium Pumping with Palladium; Large Area Pump Limiter; Techniques for Enhanced Heat Removal; New Outlook on Gaseous Divertors; Gaseous Divertor Simulations; Impurity Seeding to Control ITER Particle and Heat Loads; Gaseous Divertor Experiments; Electrical Biasing to Control SOL Particle Fluxes; Biased Limiter in TEXTOR and Biased Divertor in PBX-M; Particle and Heat Flux Control Using Ponderomotive Forces; Helium Exhaust Using ICRF; Ergodic Magnetic Limiter Experiments in JFT-2M; and Helium Exhaust Using Fishbones.

  11. Demonstrating Optimum HCCI Combustion with Advanced Control Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimum HCCI Combustion with Advanced Control Technology Demonstrating Optimum HCCI Combustion with Advanced Control Technology Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

  12. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Technology and Regulations Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation:...

  13. The nuclear materials control technology briefing book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

  14. NREL's Controllable Grid Interface for Testing Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is an overview of NREL's Controllable Grid Interface capabilities for testing renewable energy technologies.

  15. Environmental control technology for biomass flash pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Seward, W.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid commercialization of biomass gasification and pyrolysis technologies will raise questions concerning the environmental impacts of these systems and the associated costs for appropriate control technologies. This study concentrates on characterizing the effluent emissions and control technologies for a dual fluid-bed pyrolysis unit run by Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. The ASU system produces a raw product gas that is passed through a catalytic liquefaction system to produce a fuel comparable to No. 2 fuel oil. Argonne National Laboratory is conducting a program that will survey several biomass systems to standardize the sampling techniques, prioritize standard analyses and develop a data base so that environmental issues later may be addressed before they limit or impede the commercialization of biomass gasification and pyrolysis technologies. Emissions will be related to both the current and anticipated emissions standards to generate material balances and set design parameters for effluent treatment systems. This will permit an estimate to be made of the capital and operating costs associated with these technologies.

  16. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA:...

  17. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines CumminsORNL-FEERC...

  18. CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 9. Information Technology (IT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 9. Information Technology (IT) This Section addresses the process for protecting export controlled proprietary technical data and when these protections are required, including Export Control policies & procedures. EAR and ITAR identified assets will be controlled strictly

  19. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of...

  1. Relationships between student achievement and levels of computer technology integration by Texas agriscience teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peake, Jason Boone

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    development opportunities for agriscience teachers. This information will also assist secondary schools in making decisions regarding technology purchases for agriscience departments. Instructional technology researchers have worked since the 1960s to gain a...

  2. NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

  3. United Technologies Corporation: Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE): Operating System Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, George

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    United Technologies Corporation (abbreviated UTC, NYSE ticker symbol UTX) is a large, industrial conglomerate that designs, manufactures, and services a broad range of products, ranging from air conditioners and elevators ...

  4. The Role of Technology for Achieving Climate Policy Objectives: Overview of the EMF 27 Study on Technology Strategies and Climate Policy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Weyant, John; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Krey, Volker; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Richels, Richard G.; Rose, Steven; Tavoni, Massimo; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the synthesis of results from the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum Study 27, an inter-comparison of 19 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. The study investigated the value of individual mitigation technologies such as energy intensity improvements, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), nuclear power, solar and wind power and bioenergy for climate mitigation. Achieving atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration targets at 450 and 550 ppm CO2 equivalent requires massive greenhouse gas emissions reductions. A fragmented policy approach at the level of current ambition is inconsistent with these targets. The availability of a negative emissions technology, in most models biofuels with CCS, proved to be a key element for achieving the climate targets. Robust characteristics of the transformation of the energy system are increased energy intensity improvements and the electrification of energy end use coupled with a fast decarbonization of the electricity sector. Non-electric energy end use is hardest to decarbonize, particularly in the transport sector. Technology is a key element of climate mitigation. Versatile technologies such as CCS and bioenergy have largest value, due in part to their combined ability to produce negative emissions. The individual value of low-carbon power technologies is more limited due to the many alternatives in the sector. The scale of the energy transformation is larger for the 450 ppm than for the 550 ppm CO2e target. As a result, the achievability and the costs of the 450 ppm target are more sensitive to variations in technology variability. Mitigation costs roughly double when moving from 550 ppm to 450 ppm CO2e, but remain below 3% of GDP for most models.

  5. Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units This project discusses a CARB Level 2+ verified active regeneration...

  6. Air Cooling Technology for Power Electronic Thermal Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lustbader National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tuesday May 10, 2011 Project ID: APE019 Air Cooling Technology for Power Electronics Thermal Control This presentation does not...

  7. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management Team: Ken Howden, Gurpreet Singh, Steve Goguen Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NO x Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2012 DOE Vehicle...

  8. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management Team: Gurpreet Singh, Ken Howden, Leo Breton Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NO x Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines, Self-Diagnosing...

  9. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management Team: Ken Howden, Gurpreet Singh, Steve Goguen Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NO x Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2013 DOE Vehicle...

  10. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Management Team: Ken Howden, Gurpreet Singh, Steve Goguen CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NO x Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2011 Vehicle...

  11. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  12. Achieve Steam System Excellence: Industrial Technologies Program BestPractices Steam Overview Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofingDepartmentAchieve Steam

  13. Impact of new pollution control technologies on all emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of new pollution control technologies on all emissions: the specific problem of high ratio of NO2 at tail pipe downstream of certain pollution control devices Impact of new...

  14. Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. New World Record Achieved in Solar Cell Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New TechnologyNelsonWithTom WalshtheNew World

  16. Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AGENDA Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University 9:30 a.m. ­ August. Resignations, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan, Retirements and Off Payroll E. Tentative 2012 Meeting Dates F. Michigan Technological University/Michigan Tech

  17. A Research Framework for Demonstrating Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research presented here is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report serves as an outline for planned research on the benefits of greater modernization in the main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

  18. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  19. MEMS technology for timing and frequency control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, CTC

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Kim, “Noise in microelectromechanical system resonators,”regard, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology,focus upon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and include

  20. Hamiltonian Control Systems Delft University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    of energy). #12;March 12, 2012 3 Hamiltonian Control Systems Port-Based Modeling of Physical Systems How Hamiltonian Control Systems Port-Based Modeling of Physical Systems #12;March 12, 2012 5 Hamiltonian Control Hamiltonian Control Systems Energy Storage How do we obtain H(x)? · Integral of power P = e f w.r.t. time

  1. Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document:  ft007_sluder_2013_o.pdfTechnology Area: Fuels and LubricantsPresenter: Scott SluderPresenting Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)Presentation date: Thursday, May 16,...

  2. Modeling and Control of Advanced Technology Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    in powertrain control systems, largely driven by government regulations aimed at improving fuel economy, and apply classical and modern control techniques to improve engine performance. Moreover, we study control systems. #12;c Anna Stefanopoulou 1996 All Rights Reserved #12;Dedicated to George, Kaite

  3. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  4. Building Technologies Office Load Control Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO researches and implements load control strategies, which support the Sustainable and Holistic IntegratioN of Energy storage and Solar PV (SHINES) FOA.

  5. Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7, I979 Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology Division Department of Energy Washington, D. C. 2Q545 Dear Mr. Mott: In response to your March 13,...

  6. Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Sub-50 HP Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sub-50 HP Engines with Low Exhaust Temperature Profiles Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Sub-50 HP Engines with Low Exhaust Temperature Profiles A new type of emission...

  7. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in NO x emissions from coal-fired power plants tocombustion of coal, emissions from coal-fired power plantsemission control technologies now required on all new coal-fired power

  8. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ft07sluder.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

  9. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  10. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  11. Sharing the excitement of deep ocean research The UK has long prided itself on its achievements in science, engineering and technology. They contribute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Sharing the excitement of deep ocean research The UK has long prided itself on its achievements in science, engineering and technology. They contribute directly to the country's prosperity and benefit Select Committee on Science and Technology produced its Investigating the Oceans report. It noted

  12. Achievable Secrecy Sum-Rate in a Fading MAC-WT with Power Control and without CSI of Eavesdropper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Shahid M; Sharma, Vinod

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two user fading Multiple Access Channel with a wire-tapper (MAC-WT) where the transmitter has the channel state information (CSI) to the intended receiver but not to the eavesdropper (eve). We provide an achievable secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control. We next provide a secrecy sum-rate with optimal power control and cooperative jamming (CJ). We then study an achievable secrecy sum rate by employing an ON/OFF power control scheme which is more easily computable. We also employ CJ over this power control scheme. Results show that CJ boosts the secrecy sum-rate significantly even if we do not know the CSI of the eve's channel. At high SNR, the secrecy sum-rate (with CJ) without CSI of the eve exceeds the secrecy sum-rate (without CJ) with full CSI of the eve.

  13. Export Control Regulations Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control (OFAC) Department of Justice Department of Energy Nuclear Regulatory Commission Department is not a protected individual. Green card = permanent resident. Student visa = not permanent resident. #12;22 CFR

  14. Innovative technology for contamination control in plasma processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The causes and contributing factors to wafer contamination during plasma processing are discussed in the context of future technologies for controlling particle contamination by tool and process design and by the development of wafer dry cleaning technology. The importance of these developments is linked with the history of technological innovation and with the continuing evolution of the cleanroom from a highly developed facility for reducing ambient particle levels to an integrated, synergistic approach involving facilities and tooling for impeding the formation and transport of particles while also actively removing particles from sensitive surfaces. The methods, strategy and requirements for innovation in contamination control for plasma processing is discussed from a diachronic viewpoint.

  15. Environmental control technology for atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M; Albanese, A S

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of fossil fuel use in the United States on worldwide CO/sub 2/ emissions and the impact of increased coal utilization on CO/sub 2/ emission rates are assessed. The aspects of CO/sub 2/ control are discussed as well as the available CO/sub 2/ control points (CO/sub 2/ removal sites). Two control scenarios are evaluated, one based on the absorption of CO/sub 2/ contained in power plant flue gas by seawater; the other, based on absorption of CO/sub 2/ by MEA (Mono Ethanol Amine). Captured CO/sub 2/ is injected into the deep ocean in both cases. The analyses indicate that capture and disposal by seawater is energetically not feasible, whereas capture and disposal using MEA is a possibility. However, the economic penalities of CO/sub 2/ control are significant. The use of non-fossil energy sources, such as hydroelectric, nuclear or solar energy is considered as an alternative for limiting and controlling CO/sub 2/ emissions resulting from fossil energy usage.

  16. Author's personal copy Forcing technological change: A case of automobile emissions control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author's personal copy Forcing technological change: A case of automobile emissions control their research and development (R&D) processes concerning automobile emissions control technologies amid

  17. INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology Annual Report 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Rueff; Bryce Wheeler; Todd Vollmer; Tim McJunkin; Robert Erbes

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to develop an interoperable set of tools to provide a comprehensive, consistent implementation of cyber security and overall situational awareness of control and sensor network implementations. The operation and interoperability of these tools will fill voids in current technological offerings and address issues that remain an impediment to the security of control systems. This report provides an FY 2012 update on the Sophia, Mesh Mapper, Intelligent Cyber Sensor, and Data Fusion projects with respect to the year-two tasks and annual reporting requirements of the INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology report (July 2010).

  18. Advanced environmental control technology for flue gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Drummond, C.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) oversees a substantial research and development effort to develop advanced environmental control technology for coal-fired sources. This Flue Gas Cleanup Program is currently divided into five areas: combined SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ control, SO/sub 2/ control, particulate control, NO/sub x/ control, and small-scale boiler emission control. Projects in these areas range from basic research studies to proof-of-concept-scale evaluations. Projects in the DOE program are conducted by universities, national laboratories, industrial organizations, and in-house research at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. An overview of the program, together with brief descriptions of the status of individual projects are given.

  19. Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Zhen Song, Prof. Vivian Loftness, Dr. Kun Ji, Dr. Sam Zheng, Mr. Bertrand Lasternas, Ms. Flore Marion, Mr. Yuebin Yu

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    we developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource Uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplaceâ??s northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance were measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building occupants and the building operator. Lifecycle cost analyses of the advanced building control were performed, and a Building Control System Guide was prepared and published to inform owners, architects, and engineers dealing with new construction or renovation of buildings.

  20. Detection Technologies, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Third/fourth quarters 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Stull, S; Talaber, C; Moulthrop, P [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is another in a series of issues about specific means for detecting and identifying proliferation and other suspect activities outside the realm of arms control treaties. All the projects discussed are funded by the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  1. CCLEP Retrofit and Innovative Controls to Achieve 56% Energy Savings for a Luxury Shopping Mall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, L.; Pang, X.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Lewis, T. G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    single fan dual-duct VAV AHUs, 123 dual-duct pneumatic controller pressure independent terminal boxes, and a central heating and cooling plant. Major retrofit efforts include upgrading from pneumatic to DDC controls for all AHUs, installing main hot deck...

  2. Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this technique at Colstrip is not seen. All the additives injected resulted in some reduction in mercury emissions. However, the target reduction of 55% was not achieved. The primary reason for the lower removal rates is because of the lower levels of mercury in the flue gas stream and the lower capture level of fine particles by the scrubbers (relative to that for larger particles). The reaction and interaction of the SEA materials is with the finer fraction of the fly ash, because the SEA materials are vaporized during the combustion or reaction process and condense on the surfaces of entrained particles or form very small particles. Mercury will have a tendency to react and interact with the finer fraction of entrained ash and sorbent as a result of the higher surface areas of the finer particles. The ability to capture the finer fraction of fly ash is the key to controlling mercury. Cost estimates for mercury removal based on the performance of each sorbent during this project are projected to be extremely high. When viewed on a dollar-per-pound-of-mercury removed basis activated carbon was projected to cost nearly $1.2 million per pound of mercury removed. This value is roughly six times the cost of other sorbent-enhancing agents, which were projected to be closer to $200,000 per pound of mercury removed.

  3. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving aexamples due to higher technology costs. To be published inwe find that at current technology costs, the nursing home

  4. IGR NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} control technology. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the term of this report substantial progress was made in two areas critical to the IGR NOx/SOx control technology. First, an acceptable methodology was developed for the preparation of the selective electrocatalysts required for NOx/SOx destruction. Second, a clear and reproducible destruction of both SOx and NOx was achieved in separate tests using electrocatalysts prepared by the current methodology.

  5. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If you could change the lighting in your office, what wouldapply. Highly-Controlled Lighting 50 of 50 April 19, 2010Europa 2009, 11th European Lighting Conference, Istanbul,

  6. ELM Control at the L-H Transition Achieved by Pellet Pacing in the All-metal Wall Tokamaks ASDEX Upgrade and JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELM Control at the L-H Transition Achieved by Pellet Pacing in the All-metal Wall Tokamaks ASDEX Upgrade and JET

  7. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  8. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

  9. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  10. Management of intermediated channels for high technology firms : achieving success in a dynamic and rapidly changing marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorsky, John Paul

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging problems for high technology firms in an increasingly global marketplace is the effective utilization of intermediated sales channels. As product development cycles shorten, there can be a ...

  11. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for carbon capture and sequestration technologies assumingin carbon capture and sequestration technologies applicable

  12. RESEARCH AT THE AUTOMATION AND CONTROL INSTITUTE OF TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong research emphasis on micro system technologies, intelligent systems and applying modern-aided simulation and control system design packages. #12;22 5 RESEARCH AT THE AUTOMATION AND CONTROL INSTITUTE OF TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

  13. Reviewing the impact of advanced control room technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelmsen, C.A.; Gertman, D.I.; Ostrom, L.T.; Nelson, W.R.; Galyean, W.J.; Byers, J.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress to date on assessing the nature of the expected changes in human performance and risk associated with the introduction of digital control, instrumentation, and display systems is presented. Expected changes include the shift toward more supervisory tasks, development of intervention strategies, and reallocation of function between human and machine. Results are reported in terms of the scope of new technology, human performance issues, and crews experience with digital control systems in a variety of industries petrochemical and aerospace. Plans to conduct a limited Probabilistic Risk Assessment/Human Reliability Assessment (PRA/HRA) comparison between a conventional NUREG-1150 series plant and that same plant retrofit with distributed control and advanced instrumentation and display are also presented. Changes needed to supplement existing HRA modeling methods and quantification techniques are discussed.

  14. Reviewing the impact of advanced control room technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelmsen, C.A.; Gertman, D.I.; Ostrom, L.T.; Nelson, W.R.; Galyean, W.J.; Byers, J.C.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress to date on assessing the nature of the expected changes in human performance and risk associated with the introduction of digital control, instrumentation, and display systems is presented. Expected changes include the shift toward more supervisory tasks, development of intervention strategies, and reallocation of function between human and machine. Results are reported in terms of the scope of new technology, human performance issues, and crews experience with digital control systems in a variety of industries petrochemical and aerospace. Plans to conduct a limited Probabilistic Risk Assessment/Human Reliability Assessment (PRA/HRA) comparison between a conventional NUREG-1150 series plant and that same plant retrofit with distributed control and advanced instrumentation and display are also presented. Changes needed to supplement existing HRA modeling methods and quantification techniques are discussed.

  15. Impact of Control System Technologies on Industrial Energy Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, P.; Pasmussen, B. P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 2010 Image: U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ESL-IE-14-05-40 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 INDUSTRIAL ENERGY... CONSUMPTION However, there’s still a need to look for newer energy saving ideas Image: U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/ieo/industrial.cfm Fresher energy saving ideas can be realized by focusing on the Control...

  16. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  17. Emerging NO sub x /SO sub x control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of advanced flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) technologies fro the control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions continues to be a very active area of research and development, both in this country and abroad. This activity is driven both by legislation (such as the recent revisions to the Clean Air Act) and by the desire to develop technologies that surpass current options in terms of performance, costs, operability, and waste/by-product properties. New issues, such as concern over global climate changes and the health effects of toxic air emissions ( air toxics''), are also helping to shape and prioritize the development programs. This paper provides a status report on a number of integrated FGC systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been rested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. While some information that was presented at the 1991 CIBO NO{sub x} IV Control Conference is repeated for the sake of completeness, we have updated each section to reflect the most recent reported developments. Although a wide variety of technologies is discussed, it should be noted that there are a number of other integrated approaches, such as slagging combustors, fluidized-bed combustion, gasification/combined-cycle systems, and various processes combining low-NO{sub x} burners with SO{sub 2}-sorbent injection in the furnace. These other approaches also offer features that should not be overlooked when evaluating alternatives for a specific application.

  18. Suitability of Agent Technology for Military Command and Control in the Future Combat System Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potok, TE

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army is faced with the challenge of dramatically improving its war fighting capability through advanced technologies. Any new technology must provide significant improvement over existing technologies, yet be reliable enough to provide a fielded system. The focus of this paper is to assess the novelty and maturity of agent technology for use in the Future Combat System (FCS). The FCS concept represents the U.S. Army's ''mounted'' form of the Objective Force. This concept of vehicles, communications, and weaponry is viewed as a ''system of systems'' which includes net-centric command and control (C{sup 2}) capabilities. This networked C{sup 2} is an important transformation from the historically centralized, or platform-based, C{sup 2} function since a centralized command architecture may become a decision-making and execution bottleneck, particularly as the pace of war accelerates. A mechanism to ensure an effective network-centric C{sup 2} capacity (combining intelligence gathering and analysis available at lower levels in the military hierarchy) is needed. Achieving a networked C{sup 2} capability will require breakthroughs in current software technology. Many have proposed the use of agent technology as a potential solution. Agents are an emerging technology, and it is not yet clear whether it is suitable for addressing the networked C{sup 2} challenge, particularly in satisfying battlespace scalability, mobility, and security expectations. We have developed a set of software requirements for FCS based on military requirements for this system. We have then evaluated these software requirements against current computer science technology. This analysis provides a set of limitations in the current technology when applied to the FCS challenge. Agent technology is compared against this set of limitations to provide a means of assessing the novelty of agent technology in an FCS environment. From this analysis we find that existing technologies will not likely be sufficient to meet the networked C{sup 2} requirements of FCS due to limitations in scalability, mobility, and security. Agent technology provides a number of advantages in these areas, mainly through much stronger messaging and coordination models. These models theoretically allow for significant improvements in many areas, including scalability, mobility, and security. However, the demonstration of such capabilities in an FCS environment does not currently exist, although a number of strong agent-based systems have been deployed in related areas. Additionally, there are challenges in FCS that neither current technology nor agent technology are particularly well suited, such as information fusion and decision support. In summary, we believe that agent technology has the capability to support most of the networked C{sup 2} requirements of FCS. However, we would recommend proof of principle experiments to verify the theoretical advantages of this technology in an FCS environment.

  19. The Effect of Student Learning Styles on the Learning Gains Achieved When Interactive Simulations Are Coupled with Real-Time Formative Assessment via Pen-Enabled Mobile Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalski, F V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes results from a project in an undergraduate engineering physics course that coupled classroom use of interactive computer simulations with the collection of real-time formative assessment using pen-enabled mobile technology. Interactive simulations (free or textbook-based) are widely used across the undergraduate science and engineering curriculia to help actively engaged students increase their understanding of abstract concepts or phenomena which are not directly or easily observable. However, there are indications in the literature that we do not yet know the pedagogical best practices associated with their use to maximize learning. This project couples student use of interactive simulations with the gathering of real-time formative assessment via pen-enabled mobile technology (in this case, Tablet PCs). The research question addressed in this paper is: are learning gains achieved with this coupled model greater for certain types of learners in undergraduate STEM classrooms? To answer t...

  20. R and D plans for advanced computer and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipakchi, A.; Wong, D.J. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (USA)); Wells, B. (Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (USA)); Skedzielewski, D. (Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (USA)); Taft, C. (Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (USA)); Valli, J. (Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., OH (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition, rising cost, and changes in technology have prompted many US electric utilities to consider new methods of power plant operation. One approach is the introduction of automation in an effort to increase productivity, reliability, efficiency, flexibility, and performance. The rapid advancement of computer technology has opened new opportunities for more sophisticated control and monitoring than ever before. The application of automation, though, has been through the use of a deluge of independent, specialized systems dedicated to specific needs. The utilities' quick adoption of these systems for solving specific problems has created Islands of automation''. These islands cannot pass information or communicate with one another. Each requires their own separate computer and terminal. The redundancy of data and sensors in order to collect needed information for each independent system have added to the confusion in the plant. These independent systems have rapidly pushed the key issue of integration to the forefront for plant automation. There is still a need for further development of techniques and technologies for plant automation, but the key issue is integration. This report presents the results of an EPRI sponsored study and planning project. The purpose of this project was to identify the current automation issues facing the utility power industry, and to develop a seven year R D plan for EPRI in this area. In addition to the R D plan, the report presents the results of a survey, and discusses topics such as plant-wide automation systems' architecture, communications, and man-machine interface. 25 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Faculty Expertise Index Advanced Artificial Intelligence, Technology, & Control Systems Development for Biological &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Faculty Expertise Index Advanced Artificial Intelligence, Technology, & Control Systems Development-Paul Schirle-Keller Food Additives ­ Artificial Sweeteners ­ Ted Labuza Food Analysis Chromatographic Processing (see Phytochemicals, Advanced Artificial Intelligence) Canning Technology ­ Ted Labuza Cheese

  2. The Navigation and Control technology inside the AR.Drone micro UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is that it is a stabilized aerial platform, remotely controlled through a user-friendly graphical interface runningThe Navigation and Control technology inside the AR.Drone micro UAV Pierre-Jean Bristeau François, FRANCE Abstract: This paper exposes the Navigation and Control technology embedded in a recently com

  3. Cooperative Efforts to Introduce New Environmental Control Technologies to Industry- A Case Study for Brayton Cycle Heat Pump Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enneking, J. C.

    COOPERATIVE EFFORTS TO INTRODUCE NEW ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES TO INDUSTRY - A CASE STUDY FOR BRAYTON CYCLE HEAT PUMP TECHNOLOGY JOSEPH C. ENNEKING Vice President NUCON International, Inc. Columbus, ABSTRACT New environmental... CASE STUDY FOR BRAYTON CYCLE HEAT PUMP TECHNOLOGY JOSEPH C. ENNEKING Vice President NUCON International, Inc. Columbus, Ohio Figure 1 Reverse Brayton Cycle DOE FUNDED PROGRA}1 Solvents Turbine 4 3 Regenerator Solvents 5 2 1 Compressor Work in New...

  4. 860 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 12, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2004 Stability Guaranteed Control: Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otaduy, Miguel A.

    model, we define "vir- tual input energy," which is a virtual source of energy for control, and "real for a motion control system. The developed method is tested with numerical simulation in the regulation of a single link flexible manipulator. Totally stable control is achieved under wide variety of operating

  5. The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5750E The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California was sponsored in part by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded

  6. Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies and strategies for energy efficiency are mappedchoice of DR and energy efficiency strategy is limited byDemonstration of Energy Management Control Strategies for

  7. IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed the anode field of fuel cell stack is considered partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas. We present a model-based control analysis and design

  8. Automatic Mobile Robot Control and Indication Method Using Augmented Reality Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Automatic Mobile Robot Control and Indication Method Using Augmented Reality Technology Koji Ohmori and remote indication using the augmented reality technology. Keywords: mobile robot, automatic control, Kobe 658-8501, Japan kunio@konan-u.ac.jp Abstract. A mobile robot is an automatic machine

  9. Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

  10. Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.; Raber, E.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

  11. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cumulative installed capacity of each technology. We1 C umulative installed capacity of wet lime/limestone FGDFigure 2 C umulative installed capacity of SCR systems on

  12. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ft007sluder2011...

  13. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ft007sluder2010...

  14. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    diesel out of the PM inventory * Technology is the state of optimization and cost reduction - Regeneration * LDD and MDD: engine management * HDD: auxiliary exhaust injection -...

  15. INTELLIGENT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR NATURAL VENLTILATION USED IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ventilation will be controlled by driving the windows open. First, the ventilation model using in greenhouse is constructed specially using actuators for driving windows one by one, and control model is analyzed making the control model for natural ventilation is not given as well as how to realize the control

  16. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  17. Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO 2005 Conference Paper September 1, 2005 LBNL # 58179 ADVANCED CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES AND STRATEGIES LINKING DEMAND RESPONSE AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY Sila Kiliccote Mary Ann Piette Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley..., and nationwide status is outlined. The role of energy management and control systems for DR is described. Building systems such as HVAC and lighting that utilize control technologies and strategies for energy efficiency are mapped on to DR and demand...

  18. active controls technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimal Control control study. The case study treated in the paper deals with a turbocharger power assist system (TPAS). The extent to which this system can reduce the diesel...

  19. active control technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimal Control control study. The case study treated in the paper deals with a turbocharger power assist system (TPAS). The extent to which this system can reduce the diesel...

  20. DOE and Industry Showcase New Control Systems Security Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and technologies designed to secure the nation's energy infrastructure from cyber attack on Tuesday through Thursday, March 23-25. Visit Booth 231 at the DistribuTECH 2010...

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Feed-Forward Control of Open Channel Flow Using Differential Flatness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the water flow are among the methods used to improve the efficiency of irrigation systems. These techIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Feed-Forward Control of Open Channel Flow Using is assessed. A comparison is made with a similar problem available in the lit- erature for thermal systems

  2. CONTROL-THEORY AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY Vol. 8, No.1, pp.17-35, March, 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    CONTROL-THEORY AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY Vol. 8, No.1, pp.17-35, March, 1992 C91012R @MITA PRESS basis, The method is applicable to systems where the transfer function from the control input to the controlled output is right- invertible and has no invariant zeros on the jw axis, Two applications are also

  3. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  4. New Signal Processing Methods and Information Technologies for the Real Time Control of JET Reactor Relevant Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Signal Processing Methods and Information Technologies for the Real Time Control of JET Reactor Relevant Plasmas

  5. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Environmental Energy Technologies Division March 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency ResourceBusiness Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resourcebusiness model on utility ROE 13   Table 1. Lifetime savings, resource costs and benefits of alternative energy efficiency

  6. Abstract--A scalable multi-agent paradigm is presented for control of distributed energy resources to achieve higher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    , stability. I. INTRODUCTION HE electric power industry in the 21st Century will see dramatic changes in both the reliability, stability, and quality of the electric grid. This change in a physical infrastructure combined with a trend toward deregulation of the electric power industry will result in new control and information

  7. advanced control technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    box chassis and the cabling between the boxes by integrating the electronics, thermal control and the structural support into one single element. The ultimate goal of the...

  8. advanced control technologies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    box chassis and the cabling between the boxes by integrating the electronics, thermal control and the structural support into one single element. The ultimate goal of the...

  9. INL Control System Situational Awareness Technology Final Report 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Rueff; Bryce Wheeler; Todd Vollmer; Tim McJunkin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Situational Awareness project is a comprehensive undertaking of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in an effort to produce technologies capable of defending the country’s energy sector infrastructure from cyber attack. INL has addressed this challenge through research and development of an interoperable suite of tools that safeguard critical energy sector infrastructure. The technologies in this project include the Sophia Tool, Mesh Mapper (MM) Tool, Intelligent Cyber Sensor (ICS) Tool, and Data Fusion Tool (DFT). Each is designed to function effectively on its own, or they can be integrated in a variety of customized configurations based on the end user’s risk profile and security needs.

  10. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  11. Gas Technology Institute and Encorp Inc.: Innovative Interconnection and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the work of the Gas Technology Institute and Encorp Inc., under contract to DOEs Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop interconnection and control systems for distributed power.

  12. Gas Technology Institute and Encorp Inc.: Innovative Interconnection and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the work of the Gas Technology Institute and Encorp Inc., under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop interconnection and control systems for distributed power.

  13. Operation Prognostics and Operation Diagnostics—Technologies for Enhanced Operations and Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, O.

    PROGNOSTICS AND OPERATION DIAGNOSTICS ? NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENHANCED OPERATIONS AND CONTROLS OLIVER BAUMANN, PRESIDENT 202-608-1334 EBERT & BAUMANN CONSULTING ENGINEERS, WASHINGTON D.C. The Methodologies of Operation Prognostics and Operation...

  14. Formal Session of the Board of Control Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-2015 General Fund Operating Budget N. Revision of EMC-DeLage Lease into Lease-Purchase Agreement. Board of Control Policy 6.7. Sabbatical Leave L. Board of Control Policy 8.9. Experience Tech Fee M. FY the University's overall budget reflect and support the academic priorities? 4.Are faculty personnel policies

  15. NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost. Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable EnergyNREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms. Today's utility-scale wind turbine structures are more complex and their compo- nents more

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel and...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about fuel and...

  18. Arms Control and nonproliferation technologies: Technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban, Second quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter contains reprinted papers discussing technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). These papers were presented to the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in May and June 1994. An interagency Verification Monitoring Task Force developed the papers. The task force included participants from the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the Intelligence Community, the Department of Interior, and the Department of State. The purpose of this edition of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is to share these papers with the broad base of stakeholders in a CTBT and to facilitate future technology discussions. The papers in the first group discuss possible technology options for monitoring a CTBT in all environments (underground, underwater, atmosphere, and space). These technologies, along with on-site inspections, would facilitate CTBT monitoring by treaty participants. The papers in the second group present possible associated measures, e.g., information exchanges and transparency measures, that would build confidence among states participating in a CTBT.

  19. Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 2. Environmental control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, W.; Hill, J. (eds.)

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental control technologies are essential elements to be included in the overall design of Imperial Valley geothermal power systems. Environmental controls applicable to abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions, cooling tower drift, noise, liquid and solid wastes, and induced subsidence and seismicity are assessed here. For optimum abatement of H{sub 2}S under a variety of plant operating conditions, removal of H{sub 2}S upstream of the steam turbine is recommended. The environmental impact of cooling tower drift will be closely tied to the quality of cooling water supplies. Conventional noise abatement procedures can be applied and no special research and development are needed. Injection technology constitutes the primary and most essential environmental control and liquid waste disposal technology for Imperial Velley geothermal operations. Subsurface injection of fluids is the primary control for managing induced subsidence. Careful maintenance of injection pressure is expected to control induced seismicity. (MHR)

  20. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium, New Orleans, LA, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA. Keeth,Symposium, Washington, D.C, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA. Keeth,analysis’, Proceeding of EPRI/DOE/EPA 1995 SO 2 Control

  1. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inc. Experience curves for power plant emission controlfor Coal-Fired Utility Power Plants, U.S. Environmental1/2, 2004 Experience curves for power plant emission control

  2. Autonomous Traffic Control System Using Agent Based Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M, Venkatesh; V, Srinivas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The way of analyzing, designing and building of real-time projects has been changed due to the rapid growth of internet, mobile technologies and intelligent applications. Most of these applications are intelligent, tiny and distributed components called as agent. Agent works like it takes the input from numerous real-time sources and gives back the real-time response. In this paper how these agents can be implemented in vehicle traffic management especially in large cities and identifying various challenges when there is a rapid growth of population and vehicles. In this paper our proposal gives a solution for using autonomous or agent based technology. These autonomous or intelligent agents have the capability to observe, act and learn from their past experience. This system uses the knowledge flow of precedent signal or data to identify the incoming flow of forthcoming signal. Our architecture involves the video analysis and exploration using some Intelligence learning algorithm to estimate and identify the...

  3. Description of emission control using fluidized-bed, heat-exchange technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, G.J.; Grogan, P.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental effects of fluidized-bed, waste-heat recovery technology are identified. The report focuses on a particular configuration of fluidized-bed, heat-exchange technology for a hypothetical industrial application. The application is a lead smelter where a fluidized-bed, waste-heat boiler (FBWHB) is used to control environmental pollutants and to produce steam for process use. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic information for the major sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and NO/sub x/ removal processes is presented and their application to fluidized-bed, waste heat recovery technology is discussed. Particulate control in fluidized-bed heat exchangers is also discussed.

  4. Using Heat Plumes in Controlled Breathing as Non-Contact Assistive Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    Using Heat Plumes in Controlled Breathing as Non- Contact Assistive Technology Howard E Michel to record the heat plumes associated with different breathing patterns in controlled experiments and then develop computer algorithms to process and characterize these heat plumes. To accomplish this processing

  5. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus Chiller Controls-related Energy Saving Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus Chiller Controls-related Energy Saving Opportunities in Federal.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 1 INTRODUCTION Chillers are a significant in recent years has been on optimization of set point and staging controls, improvements in chiller design

  6. Coal-fueled diesel technology development Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Kleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEESI Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a CWS fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size Emissions Control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation.Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine Emissions Characteristics and to evaluate Emissions Control concepts such a Barrier filtration, Granular bed filtration, and Cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical Emissions Control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the Envelope Filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration Envelope Filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This Envelope Filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

  7. Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)Overviewgreen h y dDepartmentEmissions

  8. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  9. Using Semantic Web Technologies to Develop Intrinsically Resilient Energy Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Jingshan [ORNL] [ORNL; Fetzer, Daniel T [ORNL] [ORNL; Morris, Thomas H [ORNL] [ORNL; Jonathan, Kirsch [Siemens Corporate Research] [Siemens Corporate Research; Goose, Stuart [Siemens Corporate Research] [Siemens Corporate Research; Wei, Dong [Siemens Corporate Research] [Siemens Corporate Research; Dang, Jiangbo [Siemens Corporate Research] [Siemens Corporate Research; Manz, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To preserve critical energy control functions while under attack, it is necessary to perform comprehensive analysis on root causes and impacts of cyber intrusions without sacrificing the availability of energy delivery. We propose to design an intrinsically resilient energy control system where we extensively utilize Semantic Web technologies, which play critical roles in knowledge representation and acquisition. While our ultimate goal is to ensure availability/resiliency of energy delivery functions and the capability to assess root causes and impacts of cyber intrusions, the focus of this paper is to demonstrate a proof of concept of how Semantic Web technologies can significantly contribute to resilient energy control systems.

  10. Air pollution control systems and technologies for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getz, N.P.; Amos, C.K. Jr.; Siebert, P.C. (Roy F. Weston, Inc., Burlington, MA (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary topics of concern to those planning, developing, and operating waste-to-energy (W-T-E) (also known as municipal waste combustors (MWCs)) facilities is air emissions. This paper presents a description of the state-of-the-art air pollution control (APC) systems and technology for particulate, heavy metals, organics, and acid gases control for W-T-E facilities. Items covered include regulations, guidelines, and control techniques as applied in the W-T-E industry. Available APC technologies are viewed in detail on the basis of their potential removal efficiencies, design considerations, operations, and maintenance costs.

  11. Optimal Control Dr. Gabriele De Chiara (Quantum Technology Group)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of liquid that has to be moved from A to B in the shortest time possible. One strategy is to go at constant. Moreover, there is the danger to spill it during the process. Another strategy is to accelerate first in an energy potential which is moved from A to B. Aims The aim of the project is the study of optimal control

  12. Systems and Controls Analysis and Testing; Harvesting More Wind Energy with Advanced Controls Technology (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet outlines the systems and controls analysis and testing that takes place at the NWTC on the Controls Advanced Research Turbines.

  13. 1350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 17, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2009 HCCI Engine Combustion-Timing Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    1350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 17, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2009 HCCI Engine´, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Homogenous-charge-compression-ignition (HCCI) engines have the benefit of high for the determination of an optimal combustion-timing setpoint on an experimental HCCI engine. The use of ES has

  14. Environment, health, socioeconomics and environmental control technology. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the important findings of a two-volume report that deals with the potential impacts and environmental controls associated with the operation of geothermal power plants in California's Imperial Valley. The valley contains nearly a third of the nation's total energy potential for identified hot-water resources. Possible impacts of developing those resources include violation of air quality standards if emissions of hydrogen sulfide are not abated, negative ecological effects resulting from increased in the salinity of the Salton Sea, and damage to irrigation systems caused by land subsidence induced by the extraction of geothermal fluids. Other minor impacts concern occupational health and safety, socioeconomics, and hazardous wastes. Analyses of environmental impacts and the control measures for minimizing negative impacts are based primarily on a projected production of 3000 MW of electrical power by the year 2010.

  15. Mercury Emissions Control Technologies (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case assumes that states will comply with the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency's new Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) regulation. CAMR is a two-phase program, with a Phase I cap of 38 tons of mercury emitted from all U.S. power plants in 2010 and a Phase II cap of 15 tons in 2018. Mercury emissions in the electricity generation sector in 2003 are estimated at around 50 tons. Generators have a variety of options to meet the mercury limits, such as: switching to coal with a lower mercury content, relying on flue gas desulfurization or selective catalytic reduction equipment to reduce mercury emissions, or installing conventional activated carbon injection (ACI) technology.

  16. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. First quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M [eds.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first quarter issue for 1995 highlights the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The SBIR program is managed by the DOE`s Basic Energy Sciences program within the Office of Energy Research. Each year, the SBIR program solicits research ideas of interest to the DOE. Articles contained in this issue include: The Small Business Innovation Research Program supported by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security; Automated cueing to man-made objects via multispectral image; Security systems get smart with advanced processing and thermal imaging; A breakthrough in cooling system technology; The APSTNG neutron probe; Lithium-doped fullerene neutron detector; Miniature GC-MS for on-site chemical analysis; and Winner of Sandia President`s Quality Award.

  17. BACT/LAER Clearinghouse: A compilation of control-technology determinations. Volume 1. Report summary and appendices A-G. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigerwald, J.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act as amended in 1977 prescribes several technology-based limitations affecting new or modified air pollution sources: (1) new source performance standards (NSPS); (2) best available control technology (BACT); and (3) lowest achievable emission rate (LAER). The basic purposes of the BACT/LAER Clearinghouse are to: (1) provide State and local air pollution control agencies with current information on case-by-case control technology determinations that are made nationwide and (2) promote communication, cooperation, and sharing of control technology information among the permitting agencies. The information presented in this compilation was abstracted from preconstruction permits and submitted voluntarily by the State and local air pollution control agencies. The Clearinghouse is intended as a reference for State and local agencies in making BACT/LAER decisions. Since the 1985 BLC document was published in June of that year, annual supplements containing only those determinations inserted or revised during the previous 12 months were published. A master edition containing all new/revised determinations completed during the past 5 years was planned to be published every 5 years. The report is the 5 year compilation containing all determinations inserted or updated since June 1985. The volume covers background information and improvements of the system as well as appendices A-G.

  18. BACT/LAER Clearinghouse: A compilation of control-technology determinations. Volume 2. Appendix H, source codes 1-3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigerwald, J.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act as amended in 1977 prescribes several technology-based limitations affecting new or modified air pollution sources: (1) new source performance standards (NSPS); (2) best available control technology (BACT); and (3) lowest achievable emission rate (LAER). The basic purposes of the BACT/LAER Clearinghouse are to: (1) provide State and local air pollution control agencies with current information on case-by-case control technology determinations that are made nationwide and (2) promote communication, cooperation, and sharing of control technology information among the permitting agencies. The information presented in the compilation was abstracted from preconstruction permits and submitted voluntarily by the State and local air pollution control agencies. The Clearinghouse is intended as a reference for State and local agencies in making BACT/LAER decisions. Since the 1985 BLC document was published in June of that year, annual supplements containing only those determinations inserted or revised during the previous 12 months were published. A master edition containing all new/revised determinations completed during the past 5 years was planned to be published every 5 years. The report is the 5 year compilation containing all determinations inserted or updated since June 1985. The volume contains appendice H which discusses detailed source listings for new determinations Source codes 1-3.

  19. BACT/LAERR Clearinghouse: A compilation of control-technology determinations. Volume 4. Appendix H, source codes 7 to 12. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigerwald, J.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act as amended in 1977 prescribes several technology-based limitations affecting new or modified air pollution sources: (1) new source performance standards (NSPS); (2) best available control technology (BACT); and (3) lowest achievable emission rate (LAER). The basic purposes of the BACT/LAER Clearinghouse are to: (1) provide State and local air pollution control agencies with current information on case-by-case control technology determinations that are made nationwide and (2) promote communication, cooperation, and sharing of control technology information among the permitting agencies. The information presented in this compilation was abstracted from preconstruction permits and submitted voluntarily by the State and local air pollution control agencies. The Clearinghouse is intended as a reference for State and local agencies in making BACT/LAER decisions. Since the 1985 BLC document was published in June of that year, annual supplements containing only those determinations inserted or revised during the previous 12 months were published. A master edition containing all new/revised determinations completed during the past 5 years was planned to be published every 5 years. The report is the 5 year compilation containing all determinations inserted or updated since June 1985. The volume is a continuation of appendice H which discusses detailed source listings for new determinations Source codes 8-12.

  20. BACT/LAER Clearinghouse: A compilation of control-technology determinations. Volume 3. Appendix H, source codes 4 to 6. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speigerwald, J.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act as amended in 1977 prescribes several technology-based limitations affecting new or modified air pollution sources: (1) new source performance standards (NSPS); (2) best available control technology (BACT); and (3) lowest achievable emission rate (LAER). The basic purposes of the BACT/LAER Clearinghouse are to: (1) provide State and local air pollution control agencies with current information on case-by-case control technology determinations that are made nationwide and (2) promote communication, cooperation, and sharing of control technology information among the permitting agencies. The information presented in this compilation was abstracted from preconstruction permits and submitted voluntarily by the State and local air pollution control agencies. The Clearinghouse is intended as a reference for State and local agencies in making BACT/LAER decisions. Since the 1985 BLC document was published in June of that year, annual supplements containing only those determinations inserted or revised during the previous 12 months were published. A master edition containing all new/revised determinations completed during the past 5 years was planned to be published every 5 years. The report is the 5 year compilation containing all determinations inserted or updated since June 1985. The volume is a continuation of appendice H which discusses detailed listings for new determinations Source codes 4-7.

  1. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  2. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control System Technologies: Nondestructive Examination Technologies - FY11 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Licensees of commercial nuclear power plants in the US are expected to submit license renewal applications for the period of operation of 60 to 80 years which has also been referred to as long term operation (LTO). The greatest challenges to LTO are associated with degradation of passive components as active components are routinely maintained and repaired or placed through maintenance programs. Some passive component degradation concerns include stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of metal components, radiation induced embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), degradation of buried piping, degradation of concrete containment structures, and degradation of cables. Proactive management of passive component aging employs three important elements including online monitoring of degradation, early detection of degradation at precursor stages, and application of prognostics for the prediction of remaining useful life (RUL). This document assesses several nondestructive examination (NDE) measurement technologies for integration into proactive aging management programs. The assessment is performed by discussing the three elements of proactive aging management identified above, considering the current state of the industry with respect to adopting these key elements, and analyzing measurement technologies for monitoring large cracks in metal components, monitoring early degradation at precursor stages, monitoring the degradation of concrete containment structures, and monitoring the degradation of cables. Specific and general needs have been identified through this assessment. General needs identified include the need for environmentally rugged sensors are needed that can operate reliably in an operating reactor environment, the need to identify parameters from precursor monitoring technologies that are unambiguously correlated with the level of pre-macro defect damage, and a methodology for identifying regions where precursor damage is most likely to initiate.

  3. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  4. Coal-fired power generation: Proven technologies and pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [University of Mah, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last two decades, significant advances have been made in the reduction of emissions from coal-fired power generating plants. New technologies include better understanding of the fundamentals of the formation and destruction of criteria pollutants in combustion processes (low nitrogen oxides burners) and improved methods for separating criteria pollutants from stack gases (FGD technology), as well as efficiency improvements in power plants (clean coal technologies). Future demand for more environmentally benign electric power, however, will lead to even more stringent controls of pollutants (sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

  5. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600°C and 800°C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs.

  6. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review of Advanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , “State of Practice of Energy Management, Control, andResearch to Practice , Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco,pdf Trends in Energy Management Technology

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermal control...

  8. Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

  9. Environmental control technology for mining and milling low-grade uranium resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weakley, S.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Long, L.W.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the type and level of wastes that would be generated in the mining and milling of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ from four potential domestic sources of uranium. The estimated costs of the technology to control these wastes to different degrees of stringency are presented.

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils Mario Zanon, S´ebastien Gros, Joel Andersson and Moritz Diehl Abstract--The Airborne Wind Energy paradigm Airborne Wind Energy enables flight in higher-altitude, stronger wind layers, the extra drag generated

  11. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Old Burial Ground (OBG) source control technology and inventory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.P.; Rehder, T.E.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been developed to support information needs for wastes buried in the Burial Ground Complex. Information discussed is presented in a total of four individual attachments. The general focus of this report is to collect information on estimated source inventories, leaching studies, source control technologies, and to provide information on modeling parameters and associated data deficiencies.

  12. Control Engineering Practice 12 (2004) 987988 Emerging technologies for active noise and vibration control systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    for a Cartesian robotic arm. The system is modeled as a cantilever beam with a trans- lation base support the enclosure. A reduced order model of the structure is then used to design a controller for broadband of a controller on a laboratory setup designed for this specific purpose. Kermani, Moallem and Patel propose

  13. Alternative flue gas treatment technologies for integrated SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Livengood, D.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enactment of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, as well as passage of legislation at the state level has raised the prospect of more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission regulations and has fueled research and development efforts on a number technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue gas cleanup systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  14. The Intelligent Systems and Control Laboratory in the Mechanical Engineering -Engineering Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University invites applications for a PhD Student Fellowship resume to Professor Gordon Parker at ggparker@mtu.edu. Michigan Technological University is an equal control, optimal control, etc.). Michigan Tech is in the small community of Houghton, Michigan. It lies

  15. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  16. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Environmental Energy Technologies DivisionMarch 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satchwell, Andrew; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency resource standards (EERS) are a prominent strategy to potentially achieve rapid and aggressive energy savings goals in the U.S. As of December 2010, twenty-six U.S. states had some form of an EERS with savings goals applicable to energy efficiency (EE) programs paid for by utility customers. The European Union has initiated a similar type of savings goal, the Energy End-use Efficiency and Energy Services Directive, where it is being implemented in some countries through direct partnership with regulated electric utilities. U.S. utilities face significant financial disincentives under traditional regulation which affects the interest of shareholders and managers in aggressively pursuing cost-effective energy efficiency. Regulators are considering some combination of mandated goals ('sticks') and alternative utility business model components ('carrots' such as performance incentives) to align the utility's business and financial interests with state and federal energy efficiency public policy goals. European countries that have directed their utilities to administer EE programs have generally relied on non-binding mandates and targets; in the U.S., most state regulators have increasingly viewed 'carrots' as a necessary condition for successful achievement of energy efficiency goals and targets. In this paper, we analyze the financial impacts of an EERS on a large electric utility in the State of Arizona using a pro-forma utility financial model, including impacts on utility earnings, customer bills and rates. We demonstrate how a viable business model can be designed to improve the business case while retaining sizable ratepayer benefits. Quantifying these concerns and identifying ways they can be addressed are crucial steps in gaining the support of major stakeholder groups - lessons that can apply to other countries looking to significantly increase savings targets that can be achieved from their own utility-administered EE programs.

  17. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  18. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new particulate filtration technologies. Major tasks during this period of the funded project's timeframe included: (1) Conducting pretests on a laboratory-scale simulated FBC system; (2) Completing detailed design of the bench-scale CFBC system; (3) Contracting potential bidders to fabricate of the component parts of CFBC system; (4) Assembling CFBC parts and integrating system; (5) Resolving problems identified during pretests; (6) Testing with available Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and co-firing of PRB coal with first wood pallet and then chicken wastes; and (7) Tuning of CFBC load. Following construction system and start-up of this 0.6 MW CFBC system, a variety of combustion tests using a wide range of fuels (high-sulfur coals, low-rank coals, MSW, agricultural waste, and RDF) under varying conditions were performed to analyze and monitor air pollutant emissions. Data for atmospheric pollutants and the methodologies required to reduce pollutant emissions were provided. Integration with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) slipstream unit did mimic the effect of flue gas composition, including trace metals, on the performance of the SCR catalyst to be investigated. In addition, the following activities were also conducted: (1) Developed advanced mercury oxidant and adsorption additives; (2) Performed laboratory-scale tests on oxygen-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion; and (3) Conducted statistical analysis of mercury emissions in a full-scale CFBC system.

  19. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; Songgeng Li

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility were completed. The riser, primary cyclone and secondary cyclone of Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Combustor have been erected. Second, the Mercury Control Workshop and the Grand Opening of Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET) were successfully held on February 22 and 23, 2006, respectively. Third, effects of hydrogen chlorine (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) on mercury oxidation were studied in a drop tube reactor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  20. Sandia technology. Volume 13, number 2 Special issue : verification of arms control treaties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear deterrence, a cornerstone of US national security policy, has helped prevent global conflict for over 40 years. The DOE and DoD share responsibility for this vital part of national security. The US will continue to rely on nuclear deterrence for the foreseeable future. In the late 1950s, Sandia developed satellite-borne nuclear burst detection systems to support the treaty banning atmospheric nuclear tests. This activity has continued to expand and diversify. When the Non-Proliferation Treaty was ratified in 1970, we began to develop technologies to protect nuclear materials from falling into unauthorized hands. This program grew and now includes systems for monitoring the movement and storage of nuclear materials, detecting tampering, and transmiting sensitive data securely. In the late 1970s, negotiations to further limit underground nuclear testing were being actively pursued. In less than 18 months, we fielded the National Seismic Station, an unattended observatory for in-country monitoring of nuclear tests. In the mid-l980s, arms-control interest shifted to facility monitoring and on-site inspection. Our Technical On-site Inspection Facility is the national test bed for perimeter and portal monitoring technology and the prototype for the inspection portal that was recently installed in the USSR under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces accord. The articles in the special issue of Sundiu Technology describe some of our current contributions to verification technology. This work supports the US policy to seek realistic arms control agreements while maintaining our national security.

  1. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Holloway

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

  2. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 49, NO. 3, MAY 2000 965 Truncated Power Control in Code-Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang W.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 49, NO. 3, MAY 2000 965 Truncated Power Control, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--We analyze the performance of truncated power control in a code-division multiple-access (CDMA) communication system. This power control scheme compensates for propagation gain

  4. CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one of the biggest changes to Title 24 standards. The latest of controls commissioning. All lighting control systems with two or more components --in both residential

  5. The integration of low NOx control technologies at the Southern Energy, Inc. Birchwood Power Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauber, J.A. [Southern Energy, Inc. (United States); Cohen, M.B.; Donais, R.E. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Energy, Inc. (SEI) Birchwood Power Facility, a cogeneration unit, represents the first application worldwide of the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The installation of these state-of-the-art NOx control technologies was necessary to meet strict Commonwealth of Virginia environmental regulations requiring a 0.10 lbs/10{sup 6} Btu (0.043 g/MJ) NOx emission rate based upon a 30-day rolling average. The plant successfully completed all performance and emission testing on September 24, 1996. Commercial operation began November 14, 1996. Stack NOx emission rates are consistently maintained below 0.10 lbs/10{sup 6} Btu. The paper describes the integration of both in-furnace and post-combustion NOx control technologies into the overall boiler design. Operational data depicting boiler outlet NOx, stack NOx and loss on ignition (LOI) are presented across the design load range from 32% to 100% boiler output. The description, arrangement, design parameters and operation of the NOx control equipment are discussed. Novel design features include a split economizer, an air heater suitable for ammonia applications, Dynamic{trademark} classifiers, and a multi-zone secondary air flow control system utilized for the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system.

  6. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  7. A role for arms control and technology in peace-keeping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indusi, J.; Allentuck, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a potential role for arms control monitoring technology in peace-keeping operations. The basic idea is to utilize monitoring technology developed or suggested for treaty verification (primarily Conventional Forces Europe (CFE), but other treaties as well) to minimize the exposure of humans as part of ``peace-keeping`` forces in various trouble spots throughout the world. The impetus comes from the dangers and high costs of stationing peace-keeping of forces in areas such as Bosnia-Herzegovina. Aside from the costs associated with such efforts the loss of life has escalated recently from 743 peace keepers lost from 1948 to 1988, to 180 lives lost in 1993 alone. Some potential advantages to using technology for certain monitoring roles are discussed in the paper and include: minimizing exposure/risk to peace-keeping personnel from hostile fire, hostage taking, etc.; sharable technology will allow all parties to view results, assess violations or transgressions, etc.; can be applied to equipment, railways, roads, etc., to confirm human and other monitoring capabilities; and provides data to settle disputes on which side initiated hostilities.

  8. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  9. Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted by Environ (Appendix A). That plan required the V&V contractor to: (1) Establish the as-found furnace operating conditions; (2) Tune the furnace using currently available technology to establish baseline conditions; (3) Tune the furnace using the FIA technology; and (4) Document the improved performance that resulted from application of the FIA technology. It is important to note that the testing was not designed to be a competition or comparison between two different methodologies that could be used for furnace tuning. Rather, the intent was to quantify improvements in furnace performance that could not be achieved with existing technology. Therefore, the measure of success is improvement beyond the furnace efficiency obtainable using existing furnace optimization methods rather than improvement from the as found condition.

  10. Assessment of H/sub 2/S control technologies for geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for controlling hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) from geothermal development are analyzed. Several technologies for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions from power plants are examined. The Hydrogen Peroxide Combination System, Stretford System and possibly EIC or Coury upstream controls appear capable of compliance with the emission limitations of 100 grams per hour per gross megawatt in 1980 (and 50 q/hr/(g) MW in 1985 or 1990) at the Geysers Dry stream field in Northern California. Unresolved problems still plague all these options. Well field operations result in H/sub 2/S releases from well drilling, well venting and steam stacking. Hydrogen peroxide reduces H/sub 2/S emissions during drilling and venting can be controlled with vent gathering (condensation/reinjection) systems. Steam stacking during power plant outages emit more H/sub 2/S over shorter periods than other field operations. Potential controls for stacking are: (1) upstream abatement, (2) automated well operation, (3) computerized wellfield operation (as of PG and E's Geysers Unit No. 15), and (4) further steamfield interconnection (cross-overs).

  11. Summary tables of six commercially available entry control and contraband detection technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, John Anthony

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing contraband detection and entry control devices such as metal detectors, X-ray machines, and radiation monitors were investigated for their capability to operate in an automated environment. In addition, a limited number of new devices for detection of explosives, chemicals, and biological agents were investigated for their feasibility for inclusion in future physical security systems. The tables in this document resulted from this investigation, which was part of a conceptual design upgrade for the United States Mints. This summary of commercially available technologies was written to provide a reference for physical security upgrades at other sites.

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. (Ebasco Services, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System and the Pulse Jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B and W/CHX Heat Exchanger project. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Inspections of these idled systems were conducted this month.

  14. Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; DeVault, Robert C [ORNL

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems, sensors, and communication technologies for demand response and load factor control applications

  15. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology A

  16. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology

  17. Demonstrations of control technology for secondary lead reprocessing. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.J.; Simonson, A.V.; Emmel, B.B.; Hunt, D.B.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several control technologies surveys were conducted to assess the efficiency of techniques used to reduce exposures to lead (7439921) (Pb) in lead reprocessing operations (SIC-3341). An evaluation of the central vacuum system at the Tonolli North America facility in Nesquehoning, Pennsylvania and the General Battery Corporation (GBC) installations in Reading and Hamburg, Pennsylvania, was evaluated. Studies were made of the effectiveness of emission controls on the tuyere nozzles of the blast furnaces at the East Penn Manufacturing Company's Pb smelter in Lyon Station, Pennsylvania. An evaluation was made of pavement cleaning equipment and methods as a means of reducing Pb exposure at the Lyon Station smelter of the East Penn Manufacturing Company. All the techniques and methods were found to be effective in reducing Pb exposure.

  18. Demonstration of Smart Building Controls to Manage Building Peak Loads: Innovative Non-Wires Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the non-wires solutions effort, BPA in partnership with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exploring the use of two distributed energy resources (DER) technologies in the City of Richland. In addition to demonstrating the usefulness of the two DER technologies in providing peak demand relief, evaluation of remote direct load control (DLC) is also one of the primary objectives of this demonstration. The concept of DLC, which is used to change the energy use profile during peak hours of the day, is not new. Many utilities have had success in reducing demand at peak times to avoid building new generation. It is not the need for increased generation that is driving the use of direct load control in the Northwest, but the desire to avoid building additional transmission capacity. The peak times at issue total between 50 and 100 hours a year. A transmission solution to the problem would cost tens of millions of dollars . And since a ?non wires? solution is just as effective and yet costs much less, the capital dollars for construction can be used elsewhere on the grid where building new transmission is the only alternative. If by using DLC, the electricity use can be curtailed, shifted to lower use time periods or supplemented through local generation, the existing system can be made more reliable and cost effective.

  19. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  20. Emerging NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Markussen, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of advanced flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) technologies fro the control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions continues to be a very active area of research and development, both in this country and abroad. This activity is driven both by legislation (such as the recent revisions to the Clean Air Act) and by the desire to develop technologies that surpass current options in terms of performance, costs, operability, and waste/by-product properties. New issues, such as concern over global climate changes and the health effects of toxic air emissions (``air toxics``), are also helping to shape and prioritize the development programs. This paper provides a status report on a number of integrated FGC systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been rested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. While some information that was presented at the 1991 CIBO NO{sub x} IV Control Conference is repeated for the sake of completeness, we have updated each section to reflect the most recent reported developments. Although a wide variety of technologies is discussed, it should be noted that there are a number of other integrated approaches, such as slagging combustors, fluidized-bed combustion, gasification/combined-cycle systems, and various processes combining low-NO{sub x} burners with SO{sub 2}-sorbent injection in the furnace. These other approaches also offer features that should not be overlooked when evaluating alternatives for a specific application.

  1. 718 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2001 Reactive Power and Unbalance Compensation Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    718 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2001 Reactive Power as reactive power and unbalance compensators, e.g., Static synchronous compensator (STATCOM). The approach practice. Index Terms--Active filters, adaptive control, dissipative sys- tems, nonlinear systems, reactive

  2. Achieving and Demonstrating Vehicle Technologies Engine Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    milestones * Regular status reports to DOE and ACEC Tech Team. * VanDyne SuperTurbos on turbo- compounding. * Barber-Nichols on bottoming cycle development. * One-on-one...

  3. Greenidge multi-pollutant project achieves emissions reduction goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance testing at the Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Project has met or exceeded project goals, indicating that deep emission reduciton sin small, difficult-to-retrofit power plants can be achieved. The technology fitted at the 107 MWe AES Greenridge Unit 4 includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction/selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control (NOxOUT CASCADE) and a Turbosorp circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system for SO{sub 2}, mercury, SO{sub 3} HC and Hf control. 2 figs.

  4. Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, J. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Confer, K. [Delphi Automotive Systems (United States)

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

  5. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Michael J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Jill M. Mackenzie; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to develop advanced innovative mercury control technologies to reduce mercury emissions by 50%-90% in flue gases typically found in North Dakota lignite-fired power plants at costs from one-half to three-quarters of current estimated costs. Power plants firing North Dakota lignite produce flue gases that contain >85% elemental mercury, which is difficult to collect. The specific objectives were focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The approach to developing Hg control technologies for North Dakota lignites involved examining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg capture upstream of an ESP using sorbent enhancement, Hg oxidation and control using dry scrubbers, enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel and oxidizing catalysts, and testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter.

  6. Preliminary survey report: control technology for brake lining at Northwest Local School District, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, T.C.; McGlothlin, J.D.; Godbey, F.W.; Sheehy, J.W.; O'Brien, D.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A walk-through survey of control technology for reducing asbestos exposure during maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes was conducted at Northwest Local School District, Cincinnati, Ohio in January, 1986. The primary method for controlling and collecting dust during brake servicing was a wet-washing technique and good work practices, ensuring that exposure to hazardous physical or chemical agents was reduced or eliminated. Also available was an enclosed-type brake assembly cleaner designed to be connected to the shop air and a vacuum system. The brake assembly cleaner did not have a viewing port to examine the area being cleaned. The operator had to remove the unit to inspect the cleaned area potentially exposing himself to any dust remaining on the brake shoes or hub. The unit itself was a potential dust source as it was designed to fit 16-inch wheels and did not form a tight seal on the smaller 15-inch wheels of the newer buses. The authors conclude that the wet wash technique is an excellent method for controlling asbestos emissions during brake maintenance. The vacuum brake-assembly cleaner is inadequate and potentially hazardous. An in-depth survey of the wet technique is recommended.

  7. Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High Efficiency While Avoiding Control Problems of HCCI Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

  8. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975, p. 48. "Clean Energy from Coal Technology," Office ofClean Ways to Burn Coal Estimated Busbar Power Costs for Coal-Electric TechnologiesClean Fuels from Coal," Cochran, N. P. , Office of Science and Technology,

  9. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Zhongxian Cheng; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2006 through September 30, 2006. The following activities have been completed: the steel floor grating around the riser in all levels and the three-phase power supply for CFBC System was installed. Erection of downcomers, loop seals, ash bunker, thermal expansion joints, fuel and bed material bunkers with load cells, rotary air-lock valves and fuel flow monitors is underway. Pilot-scale slipstream tests conducted with bromine compound addition were performed for two typical types of coal. The purposes of the tests were to study the effect of bromine addition on mercury oxidization. From the test results, it was observed that there was a strong oxidization effect for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The proposed work for next quarter and project schedule are also described.

  10. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: The non-proliferation experiment. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G.; Stull, S.; Talaber, C. [eds.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies we present the initial findings of the recent Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describe the overall experiment. This is followed by scientific and technical abstracts of the complex suite of experiments and analyses, which were presented at the Symposium on Non-Proliferation Experiment Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, April 19--21, 1994. Questions regarding the ongoing analysis and conclusions from the NPE should be directed to Leslie Casey in the Office of Research and Development within the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security of DOE. Her phone number is 202-586-2151.

  11. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental control technology. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block. A second phase of the lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG) was also conducted simultaneously on the Pilot System this month. This month the ECTC was off-line from 6/9 through 6/19 to complete a Facility retrofit project. During this brief outage, modifications were made to the ECTC Flue Gas Handling System to enhance the facility capabilities, and to prepare for future High Velocity Wet FGD Testing. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the low temperature performance testing resumed this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the new SCR catalysts.

  12. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  13. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Songgeng Li

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is nearly completed. The erection of the CFBC facility is expected to start in the second week of February, 2006. Second, effect of flue gas components on mercury oxidation was investigated in a drop tube reactor. As a first step, experiment for mercury oxidation by chlorine was investigated. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  14. 1192 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 16, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2008 Distributed MPC Strategies With Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    systems is achieved by designing local, subsystem-based controllers that ignore the interactions between-28, 2006. A. N. Venkat was with the Department of Chemical and Biological En- gineering, University@bevo.che.wisc.edu). I. A. Hiskens is with Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Univer- sity of Wisconsin

  15. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  16. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  17. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

  18. State-of-the-Art Review on Crystallization Control Technologies for water/LiBr Absorption Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kai [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key technical barrier to using water/lithium bromide (LiBr) as the working fluid in aircooled absorption chillers and absorption heat-pump systems is the risk of crystallization when the absorber temperature rises at fixed evaporating pressure. This article reviews various crystallization control technologies available to resolve this problem: chemical inhibitors, heat and mass transfer enhancement methods, thermodynamic cycle modifications, and absorption system-control strategies. Other approaches, such as boosting absorber pressure and J-tube technology, are reviewed as well. This review can help guide future efforts to develop water/LiBr air-cooled absorption chillers and absorption heatpump systems.

  19. New building blocks for the ALICE SDD readout and Detector Control System in a commercial 0.25 $\\mu$ m CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivetti, A; Idzik, M; Rotondo, F

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New building blocks for the ALICE SDD readout and Detector Control System in a commercial 0.25 $\\mu$ m CMOS technology

  20. Abstract. The problem of controlled nuclear fusion (CNF) is a colossal scientific and technological challenge on a global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. The problem of controlled nuclear fusion (CNF) is a colossal scientific and technological the feasibility of building a magnetic thermonuclear reactor''. The three papers below briefly outline the history044n08ABEH001068 The initial period in the history of nuclear fusion research at the Kurchatov

  1. Innovative technologies for impurity control. Report of the Review Panel on the Division of Development and Technology workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygren, R.E. [ed.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief discussion of the following topics is given in this report: Liquid Metal Divertors; Lithium Droplet Beam Divertor; Preferential Pumping of Helium; Reduced Erosion with Cu-Li, W-Li, etc.; Reduction of Erosion by Thermionic Emission; Reduced Erosion in Boronized Graphites; Proposal for Materials Experiments in TRIAM; Carbon-SiC for Plasma Facing Components; Helium Pumping with Palladium; Large Area Pump Limiter; Techniques for Enhanced Heat Removal; New Outlook on Gaseous Divertors; Gaseous Divertor Simulations; Impurity Seeding to Control ITER Particle and Heat Loads; Gaseous Divertor Experiments; Electrical Biasing to Control SOL Particle Fluxes; Biased Limiter in TEXTOR and Biased Divertor in PBX-M; Particle and Heat Flux Control Using Ponderomotive Forces; Helium Exhaust Using ICRF; Ergodic Magnetic Limiter Experiments in JFT-2M; and Helium Exhaust Using Fishbones.

  2. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. The effort in this quarter has concentrated on installing the CFBC Facility and for conducting cold fluidization operations tests in the CFBC facility. The assembly of the ash recirculation pipe duct from the cyclones back to the bed area of the combustor, including the upper and lower loop seals was completed. The electric bed pre-heater was installed to heat the fluidizing air as it enters the wind box. The induced draft fan along with its machine base and power supply was received and installed. The flue gas duct from secondary cyclone outlet to induced draft fan inlet was received and installed, as well as the induced fan flue gas discharge duct. Pressure testing from the forced draft fan to the outlet of the induced fan was completed. In related research a pilot-scale halogen addition test was conducted in the empty slipstream reactor (without (Selective Catalytic Reduction) SCR catalyst loading) and the SCR slipstream reactor with two commercial SCR catalysts. The greatest benefits of conducting slipstream tests can be flexible control and isolation of specific factors. This facility is currently used in full-scale utility and will be combined into 0.6MW CFBC in the future. This work attempts to first investigate performance of the SCR catalyst in the flue gas atmosphere when burning Powder River Basin (PRB), including the impact of PRB coal flue gas composition on the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) under SCR conditions. Secondly, the impacts of hydrogen halogens (Hydrogen fluoride (HF), Hydrogen chloride (HCl), Hydrogen Bromide (HBr) and Hydrogen Iodine (HI)) on Hg(0) oxidation and their mechanisms can be explored.

  3. Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  5. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This purpose of this report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the new Combustion Laboratory was occupied on June 15, 2005, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final painting stage. Second, the fabrication and manufacturing contract for the CFBC Facility was awarded to Sterling Boiler & Mechanical, Inc. of Evansville, Indiana. Sterling is manufacturing the assembly and component parts of the CFBC system. The erection of the CFBC system is expected to start September 1, 2005. Third, mercury emissions from the cofiring of coal and chicken waste was studied experimentally in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described.

  6. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  7. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Songgeng Li; John T. Riley

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building was completed. The experimental facilities have been moved into the CFB Combustor Building. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is in the final stage and is expected to be completed before November 30, 2005. Third, the drop tube reactor has been remodeled and installed to meet the specific requirements for the investigation of the effects of flue gas composition on mercury oxidation. This study will start in the next quarter. Fourth, the effect of sulfur dioxide on molecular chlorine via the Deacon reaction was investigated. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  8. 502 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 4, JULY 1999 Multivariable Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills Lalo Magni, Georges Bastin, and Vincent Wertz Abstract--A new multivariable controller for cement milling circuits is presented, which is based on a nonlinear model: a change of hardness of the raw material. Index Terms--Cement industry, multivariable control systems

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 15, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 403 Special Issue on Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    and fuel cells-based systems that hold promise for significant environmental impact. For all powerplants (such as fuel cells), to issues in transmission, driveline, and integrated pow- ertrain control of advanced control, estimation, prediction, and diagnostic algorithms, as well as emerging control system

  10. CFD Investigations of a Transonic Swept-Wing Laminar Flow Control Flight Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neale, Tyler P.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Laminar flow control has been studied for several decades in an effort to achieve higher efficiencies for aircraft. Successful implementation of laminar flow control technology on transport aircraft could significantly reduce drag and increase...

  11. achieve uniform sound: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Sound Renderer Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: sound waves propagation is achieved by the ECHO module using an original hierarchical radiant...

  12. 32 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2002 A Fuzzy Logic Approach to LQG Design With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Emmanuel

    32 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2002 A Fuzzy Logic F. Selekwa Abstract--One of the well-known deficiencies of most modern control methods [i.e., 2 based on "modern" control theory are based upon finding a control law that minimizes or con- strains

  13. Grout disposal facility vault exhauster: Technical background document on demonstration of best available control technology for toxics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rittman, P.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) is currently operated on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The GDF is located near the east end of the Hanford Site`s 200 East operations area, and is used for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes. In the grout treatment process, selected radioactive wastes from double-shell tanks are mixed with grout-forming solids; the resulting grout slurry is pumped to near-surface concrete vaults for solidification and permanent disposal. As part of this treatment process, small amounts of toxic particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be released to the atmosphere through the GDF`s exhaust system. This analysis constitutes a Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (T-BACT) study, as required in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 173-460) to support a Notice of Construction for the operation of the GDF exhaust system at a modified flow rate that exceeds the previously permitted value. This report accomplishes the following: assesses the potential emissions from the GDF; estimates air quality impacts to the public from toxic air pollutants; identifies control technologies that could reduce GDF emissions; evaluates impacts of the control technologies; and recommends appropriate emissions controls.

  14. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric loads in buildings: energy efficiency (for steady-of Building Controls and Energy Efficiency Options Usingof Building Controls and Energy Efficiency Options Using

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric Drive Vehicle Climate Control Load Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Vehicle Communications and Charging Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about vehicle...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Powertrain Controls Optimization for Heavy Duty Line Haul Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about powertrain...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about emissions...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Powertrain Controls Optimization for Heavy Duty Line Haul Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about powertrain...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Joint Development and Coordination of Emissions Control Data and Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about joint...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about particulate...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Drive Vehicle Climate Control Load Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about particulate...

  4. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 1999 555 Analysis and Control of Transient Torque Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NO ) in internal combustion engines and thus reduce one of the main and Control of Transient Torque Response in Engines with Internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation Anna G--Dynamic response, emissions, internal combus- tion engines, poles and zeros, pollution control, modeling, torque

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 1999 567 Centrifugal Compressor Surge and Speed Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    Compressor Surge and Speed Control Jan Tommy Gravdahl, Member, IEEE, and Olav Egeland, Member, IEEE Abstract--Previous work on stabilization of compressor surge is extended to include control of the angular velocity of the compressor. First a low-order centrifugal compressor model is presented where the states are mass flow

  7. 74 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 5, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 Robust Wide-Range Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    -Range Control of Steam-Electric Power Plants Chen-Kuo Weng and Asok Ray, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract-range robust control of commercial-scale steam-electric power plants. In the proposed methodology based on a nonlinear state-space model of a 525 MWe fossil-fueled power plant. The synthesis of an FFC

  8. Boe and Hannaford MS 95-081 1 Revised for IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of via-points connected by individual generic trajectories. In most industrial robots, the controller

  9. An adaptive control technology for flight safety in the presence of actuator anomalies and damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsutani, Megumi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenge of achieving safe flight comes into sharp focus in the face of adverse conditions caused by faults, damage, or upsets. When these situations occur, the corresponding uncertainties directly affect the safe ...

  10. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  11. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  12. Survey of historical incidences with Controls-Structures Interaction and recommended technology improvements needed to put hardware in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey for the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center. The purpose of the survey was to collect information documenting past incidences of problems with CSI during design, analysis, ground development, test and/or flight operation of space systems in industry. The survey was conducted to also compile recommended improvements in technology to support future needs for putting hardware into space. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. strategic directions achievement"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    jacaranda tree that graces the University of Sydney Quadrangle was planted in the 1920s. It has become inspired by achievement.......... 2 University structure and organisation.... 3 Research and innovation of existing practice - constructive but confronting. We seek sustainable economic development, and this means

  14. POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY JUSTICE IN SOCIETY: BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY) Project Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware First Publication in July 2010 Updated December 2010 #12;Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

  15. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability at MnDOT Cindy Carlsson MnDOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation 22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference May 24, 2011 #12;Sustainable practices respect Sustainability #12;Environmental Sustainability Sustainable practices · Are compatible with and may enhance

  16. Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Achieving Sustainability Cindy Carlsson Mn/DOT Office of Policy Analysis, Research and Innovation April 21, 2011 #12;Sustainability Is Not New Mn/DOT has long been a leader in CSS and environmental excellence. . . . . . so we're well along on the path to sustainability! #12;Today Sustainability is More

  17. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Cummins-ORNL\\FEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines, Self-Diagnosing SmartCatalyst Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about NOx control ...

  19. Applying IT governance principles of control, coordination, and communication in a shared services technology group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, Wendy-Kay (Wendy-Kay Ruth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IT governance focuses on how leadership can be effective and efficient in guiding an organization's use of technology to meet business needs. Over the past decade, IT governance has become a key issue of concern for senior ...

  20. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    power generation, energy policy, fuel economy ABSTRACT Prioritizing the numerous technology and policy Publications for book titled "Energy Consumption: Impacts of Human Activity, Current and Future Challenges, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 20, NO. 4, JULY 2012 1011 Brief Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Steering a Ferromagnetic Particle by Optimal Magnetic Feedback Control Arash Komaee, Member, IEEE, and Benjamin Shapiro Abstract--A class of feedback control policies for steering a mag- netic particle. Control design relies on a dynamical model which exploits the low-pass character of the electromagnets

  2. 438 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 15, NO. 3, MAY 2007 Nonlinear Observer-Based Control of Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    -Based Control of Load Transitions in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines Chia-Jui Chiang, Student% fuel burned ( 50) for a gasoline homogeneous charge compression ignition engine model during load and measurement noise through simulation and an estimate of the region of attraction. Index Terms

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 10, NO. 2, MARCH 2002 209 Speed Gradient Approach to Longitudinal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    differential action for varying grades. Index Terms--Automotive, braking, compression brake, heavy Approach to Longitudinal Control of Heavy-Duty Vehicles Equipped With Variable Compression Brake Maria of compression brake reduces the wear of the conventional friction brakes, and it is, thus, a preferred way

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 2, MARCH 1999 271 Sliding Mode Measurement Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    Measurement Feedback Control for Antilock Braking Systems Cem ¨Unsal, Member, IEEE, and Pushkin Kachroo, R. Takahashi. This material is based upon work supported by VDOT and Virginia Tech's Center of vehicle motion and stability by providing anti-skid braking and anti- spin acceleration. The design

  5. 606 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 1999 Damage Mitigating Controller Design for Structural Durability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Research Grants DMI-9424587 and CMS-9531835) and a family of damage-mitigating controllers by taking fatigue damage of turbine blades into consideration on a laboratory test apparatus to simultaneously ac

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 19, NO. 3, MAY 2011 567 Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Robust Control of Hydraulic Manipulators With Accurate Parameter Estimates Amit Mohanty, Student Member. In this paper, we consider the trajectory tracking of a robotic manipulator driven by electro-hydraulic actu of the hydraulic system. The online parameter estimates are obtained through a parameter adaptation algorithm

  7. Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    protocols standards like ISO/IEC 14908 have been developed specifically for this purpose. They incorporate all control communication layers into one common structure and are easily and cost effectively implemented in each device. The ISO/IEC 14908... continues to enhance the interoperability guidelines and provides a forum for organizations to develop and adopt interoperable controls using ISO/IEC 14908. Energy Efficiency ? Driving Smart Controls Energy efficiency, energy conservation, and energy...

  8. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Environmental Impact Statement: Proposed Federal Coalof "Environmental Impact and Cost of Control for Coalcoal gasification combined-cycles as well as the general environmental impact

  9. SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in ProceedingsControl Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water," August 1978.

  10. SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Control Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters,~~ inpyrolysized to produce shale oil, gas, a solid referred towaters are co-produced with shale oil and separated from it

  11. RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebber, I.; Dean, J.; Dominick, J.; Holland, G.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This was one of several demonstrations of new and underutilized commercial energy efficiency technologies. The consistent year-round demand for air conditioning and dehumidification in Hawaii provides an advantageous demonstration location for advanced rooftop control (ARC) retrofit kits to packaged rooftop units (RTUs). This report summarizes the field demonstration of ARCs installed on nine RTUs serving a 70,000-ft2 exchange store (large retail) and two RTUs, each serving small office buildings located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH).

  12. DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

  13. Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng and J. W. Grizzle University of Michigan Jason Liu and Matt Busdiecker Eaton Corporation Copyright © 2003 SAE International ABSTRACT The power management control system development management control system for the prototype truck produced by the Eaton Innovation Center

  14. CDP - Adaptive Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Technology for Infrastructure Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marco Carvalho; Richard Ford

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems are a type of Industrial Control System characterized by the centralized (or hierarchical) monitoring and control of geographically dispersed assets. SCADA systems combine acquisition and network components to provide data gathering, transmission, and visualization for centralized monitoring and control. However these integrated capabilities, especially when built over legacy systems and protocols, generally result in vulnerabilities that can be exploited by attackers, with potentially disastrous consequences. Our research project proposal was to investigate new approaches for secure and survivable SCADA systems. In particular, we were interested in the resilience and adaptability of large-scale mission-critical monitoring and control infrastructures. Our research proposal was divided in two main tasks. The first task was centered on the design and investigation of algorithms for survivable SCADA systems and a prototype framework demonstration. The second task was centered on the characterization and demonstration of the proposed approach in illustrative scenarios (simulated or emulated).

  15. DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and Daintree team up to increase adoption with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    the ease of system integration and illustrate energy efficiency gains through intelligent data analytics Technology Center is a not-for-profit RD&D facility dedicated to developing and commercializing energy-efficient of networked lighting controls. The widespread adoption of energy-efficient technologies such as lighting

  16. To appear in Proceedings of the 7 International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technologies (Vancouver, BC, Canada, 5-9 September 2004) TRANSPORTATION FUEL FROM COAL WITH LOW CO2 EMISSIONS) and electricity from coal. Four of the designs include capture of CO2 for long-term underground storage. We also% of global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. One option is making H2 from coal with CCS, which is expected

  17. Nox control technology data base for gas-fueled prime movers: Phase 1. Topical report, March 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thring, R.H.; Hull, R.W.; Ingalls, M.; Urban, C.; Ariga, S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of a study to expand the performance and life-cycle cost data base for NOx control of gas-fueled prime movers has been accomplished through experimental evaluations of fuel effects, technical literature reviews of Japanese and domestic approaches to NOx control and through direct contacts with manufacturers and users in the United States and Japan. Engine tests confirm literature findings that natural gas and methanol provide an advantage over petroleum fuels in limiting NOx formation. For lean-burn engines (e.g., two-cycle and gas turbine engines), selective catalytic reduction offers the greatest amount of NOx control. Installation, operating and maintenance costs are very high; the method has received moderate acceptance in Japan but limited use in the United States. For rich-burn engines, nonselective catalytic reduction is gaining acceptance for NOx control. This method is basically the adaption of automotive three-way catalyst technology. Further RandD is recommended for alternative methods of NOx control which include combustion-cycle modifications and noncatalytic exhaust aftertreatment.

  18. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2000. Trends in Energy Management TechnologyTrends in Energy Management Technology FEMP/NTDP TechnicalT. L. , "Trends in Energy Management Technology - Enabling

  19. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review of Advanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ExcelSyus - Excel Energy Technologies, Ltd. http://pdf Trends in Energy Management TechnologyTrends in Energy Management Technology Fault Detection and

  20. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these renewable energy and storage technologies would makechiller, energy storage, or solar-based technologies areStorage Technologies,” ACEEE 2008 Summer Study on Energy

  1. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

  2. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1, presented at the EPA/EPRI Particulate Control in EnergyPennsylvania State University, EPRI 335-1, February, 1976. "Institute, April, 1974, EPRI-SR-1. "Synthetic Fuel from

  3. Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency through intelligent control is a core element of any "Green Building". We need smarter, more efficient ways of managing the energy consuming elements within a building. But what we think of as "the building" ...

  4. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review ofAdvanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and InformationSystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the fourth in a series, we provide a review of advanced applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the Federal sector. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second article [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. The third article [3] evaluated several products that exemplify the current state of practice in EMCIS. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of articles provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  5. Energy technology characterizations handbook: environmental pollution and control factors. Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook deals with environmental characterization information for a range of energy-supply systems and provides supplementary information on environmental controls applicable to a select group of environmentally characterized energy systems. Environmental residuals, physical-resource requirements, and discussion of applicable standards are the principal information provided. The quantitative and qualitative data provided are useful for evaluating alternative policy and technical strategies and for assessing the environmental impact of facility siting, energy production, and environmental controls.

  6. Council's Occupational Excellence Achievement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts of Crude4-Year

  7. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  8. Furnace Pressure Controllers; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Energy Tips - Process Heating Tip Sheet #6 (Fact Sheet).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfittedof6 * September 2005 Industrial

  9. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  10. International Conference on Ground Control in Mining During the last 25 years, technological advancement and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are necessary for effective assessment and control of mining-induced subsidence, using examples and case studies, VA measured and theoretical case studies. This validation is made possible by developing new been tested extensively in numerous case studies (VPI&SU, 1987; Karmis et al., 1989; Newman et al

  11. CONTROL-THEORY AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY Vol. 9, No.2, pp.501-515, June, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    , H2 and H co optimal control. This paper is an extension of the results of Chen, Saberi and Sannuti transfer recovery (Zhang and Freudenberg, 1990), H2-optimization (Chen, Saberi, Sannuti and Shamash, 1992) and H co-optimization(Saberi et aI., 1991). Traditionally, the minimum phase/all-pass factorization has

  12. Demonstration and Transfer of Selected New Technologies for Animal Waste Pollution Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Gregory, Lucas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Report April 2009 D e m o n s tr a t i o n and Transfer of Selected New Technolo g i e s for Animal Waste Pollution Control TSSWCB Project 03-10 Final Report Prepared by: Dr. Saqib Mukhtar, Texas AgriLife Extension Service... ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............7 Technolo g y De monstr a t i o n s and Methodol o g y ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Geotube ? Dewater i n g System...

  13. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, G.M.; Sanford, N.M. [eds.] [eds.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  14. Achieving Superior Plant Energy Performance Utilizing Real-time Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanya, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . With the right Best Practices, however, using new methodologies and technologies unavailable only a few years ago, enterprises can achieve dramatic energy reductions and their resulting cost savings. These Best Practices are founded on 1) application of a...

  15. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

  16. Technical and economic assessment of particle control technology for direct coal fueled turbines: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, C.A.W.; Thomas, R.L.; Rubow, L.N.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbert/Commomwealth (1984) analyzed ten different concepts for high-temperature, high-pressure control of gas stream particulate matter in coal-fueled pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems. This paper analyzes the five higher ranking concepts of the Gilbert study at direct coal fueled turbine conditions which are even more severe than PFBC conditions. The five concepts are ceramic crossflow filter, ceramic bag filter, granular bed filter, and advanced cyclones. Five ranking factors were used: economic, design, operations complexity, materials/mechanical, and development status. (DLC)

  17. The mPED randomized controlled clinical trial: Applying mobile persuasive technologies to increase physical activity in sedentary women protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effectively apply these mobile technologies to increase andJS: Using internet and mobile phone technology to deliver anJS: Using internet and mobile phone technology to deliver an

  18. Technical status report development of lime based in-duct scrubbing - A cost effective SO/sub 2/ control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilling, N.Z.; Samuel, E.A.; Pennline, H.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime Based In-Duct Scrubbing (LIBIDS) was one of the candidate technologies receiving contract awards for pilot demonstration by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Acid Rain Precurser program. The concept as developed by General Electric utilizes rotary atomization of lime slurry directly within flue gas carrying ductwork to remove SO/sub 2/. This promises to be a very low capital cost method of SO/sub 2/ control with capital plus levelized operating cost estimated to be $364/KW. Several significant technical milestones have been passed relative to proof of principle and ultimate commercialization. Based on positive results from a laboratory and supporting analytical work, a detailed engineering design has begun for a pilot plant.

  19. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  20. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  1. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

  2. Achieving and Demonstrating FreedomCAR Engine Fuel Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    later this FY. Continued and new interactions with industry on turbocharger technology, turbo-compounding systems, and controls. 10 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of...

  3. The relationship between technology integration reading instruction and reading achievement in high performing campuses as reported by PEIMS and third grade classroom teachers in selected South Texas school districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Hilaria

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the state standards. The study concluded by presenting a series of recommendations to improve t e a c h e r s ? t e c h n o l o g y s k i l l l e v e l s a n d t h e l e v e l o f t e c h n o l o g y i n t e g r a t i o n i n t h e... the implementation of technology in the classroom impacts third grade readers with high reading scores in T A K S . T h e s e c o n d a r y p u r p o s e w a s t o i n v e s t i g a t e t h e d e g r e e o f t e a c h e r s ? t e c h n o l o g y...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNL/FEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins-ORNL...

  5. Achieve maximum application availability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Highlights Achieve maximum application availability and data protection using SQL Server AlwaysOn and other high availability features Reduce planned downtime significantly with SQL Server on Windows and management of high availability and disaster recovery using integrated tools Achieve maximum application

  6. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  7. United States Export Control Laws Current export laws control both hardware and information regarding a wide range of technologies in a way that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Export Control Laws Current export laws control both hardware and information Information and Guidelines: United States Export Control Laws, on the CSU Export Control website (http://web.research.colostate.edu/OSP/export.aspx). 1. What are Export Controls? The United States government has a vested interest in protecting

  8. One of the limitations of using refrigerant mixtures to achieve capacity modulation is that the range of capacity control and the temperature glide are both functions of the difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;One of the limitations of using refrigerant mixtures to achieve capacity modulation is limited by the degree to which the boiling points of the two refrigerants can differ without causing on refrigerant side * 10-ft (3 m) total tube length * ccunterflow arrangement * 1.0-in (25 mm) O.D. refrigerant

  9. High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Vehicle Level Model and Control Development and Validation Under Various Thermal Conditions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about vehicle level...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Los Alamos National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about robust...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Los Alamos National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about robust...

  13. A Year of Exceptional Achievements FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    devore, L; Chrzanowski, P

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 highlights: (1) Stockpile Stewardship and Complex Transformation - LLNL achieved scientific breakthroughs that explain some of the key 'unknowns' in nuclear weapons performance and are critical to developing the predictive science needed to ensure the safety, reliability, and security of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. In addition, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) passed 99 percent completion, an LLNL supercomputer simulation won the 2007 Gordon Bell Prize, and a significant fraction of our inventory of special nuclear material was shipped to other sites in support of complex transformation. (2) National and Global Security - Laboratory researchers delivered insights, technologies, and operational capabilities that are helping to ensure national security and global stability. Of particular note, they developed advanced detection instruments that provide increased speed, accuracy, specificity, and resolution for identifying and characterizing biological, chemical, nuclear, and high-explosive threats. (3) Exceptional Science and Technology - The Laboratory continued its tradition of scientific excellence and technical innovation. LLNL scientists made significant contributions to Nobel Prize-winning work on climate change. LLNL also received three R&D 100 awards and six Nanotech 50 awards, and dozens of Laboratory scientists and engineers were recognized with professional awards. These honors provide valuable confirmation that peers and outside experts recognize the quality of our staff and our work. (4) Enhanced Business and Operations - A major thrust under LLNS is to make the Laboratory more efficient and cost competitive. We achieved roughly $75 million in cost savings for support activities through organizational changes, consolidation of services, improved governance structures and work processes, technology upgrades, and systems shared with Los Alamos National Laboratory. We realized nonlabor cost savings of $23 million. Severe fiscal constraints necessitated a major workforce restructuring and reduction.

  14. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL AND EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS When planning a trip abroad, individuals sometimes take information, technology and equipment with them.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL AND EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS When planning a trip abroad, individuals to be aware of the impact of export control regulations when traveling internationally. Export control to most countries oftentimes does not raise any export control concerns. In some cases, an exclusion

  15. 654 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, MAY 2010 Model-Based Electrochemical Estimation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Based Electrochemical Estimation and Constraint Management for Pulse Operation of Lithium Ion Batteries Kandler A. Smith Technologies, Graduate Automotive Technology Education Pro- gram. This work was performed at the Pennsylvania-mail: kandlers@hotmail.com; kandler_smith@nrel.gov). C. D. Rahn and C.-Y. Wang are with the Department

  16. Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Taras KucmanTransmissionTransmissionApplication of

  17. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office research focuses much of its effort on improving vehicle fuel economy while meeting increasingly stringent emissions standards. Achieving these goals requires a...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Joint Development and Coordination of Emissions Control Data and Models (CLEERS Analysis and Coordination)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the joint...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Dilution Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct-Injection (SGDI) Combustion Control Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-dilution...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Dilution Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct-Injection (SGDI) Combustion Control Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-dilution...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Low Temperature Emission Control to Enable Fuel-Efficient Engine Commercialization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low temperature...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Temperature Emission Control to Enable Fuel-Efficient Engine Commercialization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low temperature...

  4. Using soil sensing technology to examine interactions and controls between ectomycorrhizal growth and environmental factors on soil CO2 dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselquist, Niles J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Allen, Michael F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant Soil (2010) 331:17–29 DOI 10.1007/s11104-y REGULAR ARTICLE Using soil sensing technology to examineand environmental factors on soil CO 2 dynamics Niles J.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 52, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2003 1447 Adaptive Predictive Power Control for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayed, Ali

    Power Control for the Uplink Channel in DS-CDMA Cellular Systems Mansour A. Aldajani, Member, IEEE, and Ali H. Sayed, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, we analyze the conventional closed-loop power-control an expression for the power-control error in terms of the channel fading, which suggests methods for reducing

  6. Achieving a "SIL 1" TCR Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomé, R; Scibile, L; Grau, S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIL 1 (Safety Integrity Level 1) refers to the quantification and measurement of the availability, reliability, maintenance and safety of the monitoring system. In the last few years the computer infrastructure used to acquire and to diffuse data to the TCR has evolved very rapidly. A number of measures in hardware, software and management have been introduced to cope with this situation. These include: the Multipurpose Monitoring Device (MMD), a standard data acquisition platform used in the renovation of old front end monitoring equipment, the Smart Equipment Controller (Dsec), a driver that reduces the layers in the data diffusion pyramid, the multiplatform monitoring software to integrate the different SCADA systems, a software configuration tool (RAZOR) for problem tracking and version control, and a complete development environment reproducing a real installation for thorough testing of any changes. To achieve SIL 1 objectives, while mastering the evolution of our systems will be the challenge for the c...

  7. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard [MIT

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  8. Achieve smokeless flaring -- Air or steam assist?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, M.; Diefenderfer, J.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the technological advances made during the past several years, flare system design has become more important with respect to the economics of plant operation. There are many options available to the engineer during the initial design phase of a flare system for a chemical process industries (CPI) plant. An earlier CEP article covered the basics of flare design and how to choose and size the right equipment, such as stack height and diameter, tip design, pilots and pilots flame detectors, seals, and so on. One of the most important factors is how to achieve smokeless operation, which is accomplished by either steam-assisted or air-assisted elevated flare stack assemblies. This article compares the two approaches and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of each with respect to economics, practicality, and operability. Table 1 summarizes the data for a typical plant in the U.S. Gulf Coast area that will be used as the basis for comparing costs.

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 21, NO. 4, JULY 2013 1207 A Model-Free Approach to Wind Farm Control Using Game Theoretic Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marden, Jason R.

    -Free Approach to Wind Farm Control Using Game Theoretic Methods Jason R. Marden, Member, IEEE, Shalom D. Ruben provably maximize energy production in wind farms without explicitly modeling the aerodynamic interaction amongst the turbines. Index Terms--Cooperative systems, networked control systems, wind farms. I

  10. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field. The International Thermal Storage Advisory Council was formed to help meet this perceived need. This paper will review activities of EPRI and ITSAC to achieve widespread acceptance of the technology....

  11. Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

  12. Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office PIER Buildings End-use Energy Efficiency Research Program www.energy.ca.gov/research/buildings May and purchasing decisions, are important factors in achieving energy savings in buildings. However, little efficiency programs for the residential sector? Technologies such as smart meters and home area networks

  13. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology Program The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) is a hands-on program based upon engineering technology fundamentals, engineering for employment or further education. The focus is on current engineering technology issues and applications used

  14. The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California Industrial Refrigerated Facilities Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Doug

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed the energy efficiency and demand response measuresto control both their energy usage and demand in order torequires balancing energy efficiency and demand response.

  15. Subject: Export Controls and Trade Sanctions While federal regulations restricting the export of goods and technologies related to national

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Subject: Export Controls and Trade Sanctions While federal regulations restricting the export that the University of Delaware must comply with all U.S. government export control regulations. While the vast majority of the work carried out on our campuses falls within the several exemptions to export licensing

  16. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 6, NO. I , JULY 1988 1199 Endless Polarization Control Systems for Coherent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    range retarders, which transform the polar- ization, should cause no significant intensity losses contain one or several retarders, i.e., birefringent elements. They transform the Manuscript received July of Research and Technology of the F.R.G and by Siemens AG. R. No6 was with Siemens AG, Munich, F.R.G. He 16

  17. Blast furnace control after the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyllenram, R.; Wikstroem, J.O. [MEFOS, Luleaa (Sweden); Hallin, M. [SSAB Tunnplaat AB, Luleaa (Sweden)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid technical development together with developments in work organization makes it important to investigate possible ways to achieve a cost efficient process control of different metallurgical processes. This paper describes a research project, and proposes a human oriented Information Technology Strategy, ITS, for control of the Blast Furnace process. The method used is that of deductive reasoning from a description of the prevailing technological level and experiences from various development activities. The paper is based on experiences from the No. 2 Blast Furnace at Luleaa Works but the conclusions do not at this stage necessarily reflect the opinion of the management and personnel or reflect their intentions for system development at SSAB.

  18. The Effects of the TI-Navigator System on Student Achievement (Algebra I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    The Effects of the TI-Navigator System on Student Achievement (Algebra I) Demographics of Sample (n in student understanding and attitudes when technology was used in Algebra I. 2. Used two types of technology and warranted. Other technologies could also be compared and developed to contribute to algebra students

  19. Assessment of solid-waste characteristics and control technology for oil-shale retorting. Final report for September 1983-February 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.K.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents information on oil-shale deposits in the eastern and western parts of the United States, their geological subdivisions, locations, tonnage, and physical and chemical characteristics. Characteristics of solid and liquid wastes produced from various oil-shale-processing technologies and control methods are presented. Also included are results from an experimental study to construct liners and covers for disposal of spent shale. A compilation of available data on the auto-ignition potential of raw and spent shales indicates a similarity between raw-shale fines and bituminous coals.

  20. 140 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 Fuzzy Damage-Mitigating Control of a Fossil Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    -data controller tracks a reference trajectory vector while the upper tier contains a fuzzy-logic-based damage component(s). The synthesis procedure is demonstrated on the model of a commercial-scale fossil-fueled power decision-making based on tradeoff be- tween performance enhancement and life extension [10]. The current

  1. The impact of the adoption of efficient electrical products and control technologies on office building energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsham, G.; Cornick, S.; Sander, D. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction; Mahdavi, A.; Mathew, P.; Brahme, R. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy savings attributable to efficient lighting and office equipment technologies are often quoted for the technology in isolation. However, total energy savings will depend on interactions with the building HVAC system. The authors predicted overall energy savings from parametric simulations of a typical North American office building. Cooling and heating energy impacts were expressed as a fraction of the direct electrical energy savings due to the adoption of efficient lighting and office equipment technologies ({Delta}C/{Delta}L and {Delta}H/{Delta}L, respectively). {Delta}C/{Delta}L varied little with the source and magnitude of the direct savings or with building envelope variations. However, cooling system type had a large effect. {Delta}H/{Delta}L varied substantially with envelope variations and the magnitude of direct savings. For cooling, the results agree with a previously published simplified method and may expand the method`s scope. However, for heating, the results suggest that the existing simplified method may not be generally valid.

  2. Assessment of energy and economic impacts of particulate-control technologies in coal-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Argonne National Laboratory, Midwest Research Institute has derived models to assess the economic and energy impacts of particulate-control systems for coal-fired power plants. The models take into account the major functional variables, including plant size and location, coal type, and applicable particulate-emission standards. The algorithms obtained predict equipment and installation costs, as well as operating costs (including energy usage), for five control devices: (1) cold-side electrostatic precipitators, (2) hot-side electrostatic precipitators, (3) reverse-flow baghouses, (4) shake baghouses, and (5) wet scrubbers. A steam-generator performance model has been developed, and the output from this model has been used as input for the control-device performance models that specify required design and operating parameters for the control systems under study. These parameters then have been used as inputs to the cost models. Suitable guideline values have been provided for independent variables wherever necessary, and three case studies are presented to demonstrate application of the subject models. The control-equipment models aggregate the following cost items: (1) first costs (capital investment), (2) total, first-year annualized costs, and (3) integrated cost of ownership and operation over any selected plant lifetime. Although the models have been programmed for rapid computation, the algorithms can be solved with a hand calculator.

  3. Mercury control in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjostrom, S.; Durham, M.; Bustard, J.; Martin, C. [ADA Environmental Solutions, Littleton, CO (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although activated carbon injection (ACI) has been proven to be effective for many configurations and is a preferred option at many plants sufficient quantities of powdered activated coking (PAC) must be available to meet future needs. The authors estimate that upcoming federal and state regulations will result in tripling the annual US demand for activated carbon to nearly 1.5 billion lb from approximately 450 million lb. Rapid expansion of US production capacity is required. Many PAC manufacturers are discussing expansion of their existing production capabilities. One company, ADA Carbon Solutions, is in the process of constructing the largest activated carbon facility in North America to meet the future demand for PAC as a sorbent for mercury control. Emission control technology development and commercialization is driven by regulation and legislation. Although ACI will not achieve > 90% mercury control at every plant, the expected required MACT legislation level, it offers promise as a low-cost primary mercury control technology option for many configurations and an important trim technology for others. ACI has emerged as the clear mercury-specific control option of choice, representing over 98% of the commercial mercury control system orders to date. As state regulations are implemented and the potential for a federal rule becomes more imminent, suppliers are continuing to develop technologies to improve the cost effectiveness and limit the balance of plant impacts associated with ACI and are developing additional PAC production capabilities to ensure that the industry's needs are met. The commercialisation of ACI is a clear example of industry, through the dedication of many individuals and companies with support from the DOE and EPRI, meeting the challenge of developing cost-effectively reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research and Creative Activities (Export Controls) will be contacted to verify that the work can be released.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    At the end of the secure period, Technology Transfer (for patent works) or the Office of Research a patent, OR 2. Works with Export Control restrictions. Graduate Studies 105 FPH, Provo, UT, 84602 Tel@byu.edu patent OR export control restrictions #12;

  5. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Thermal Control Technologies Advanced Vehicle Systems Technology Transfer Jet Cooling Alternative Coolants TIM Low R Structure Phase Change Spray Cooling Air Cooling...

  6. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO.) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO. to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal- fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: 1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels. 2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of- plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. 3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacturer under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties were explored by operating nine small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. In addition, the test facility operating experience provided a basis for an economic study investigating the implementation of SCR technology.

  7. Frameworks for Sustainability of GIS and Earth Observation Technologies in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    . To address the issues of achieving sustainable frameworks for geoinformation technological development

  8. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Poster presented at...

  9. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 19, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2011 1433 Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jongeun

    - duction of DI fuel systems for the internal combustion engine, port-fuel-injection fuel systems several fuel control strategies developed for internal combustion engines to improve the efficiency and ex of freedom for engine optimization to reduce emissions with improved fuel economy. The use of gasoline port

  11. Application of Sleeper Cab Thermal Management Technologies to Reduce Idle Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lustbader, J. A.; Venson, T.; Adelman, S.; Dehart, C.; Yeakel, S.; Castillo, M. S.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each intercity long-haul truck in the U.S. idles approximately 1,800 hrs per year, primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads. Including workday idling, over 2 billion gallons of fuel are used annually for truck idling. NREL's CoolCab project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling and fuel use. The impact of thermal load reduction technologies on idle reduction systems were characterized by conducting thermal soak tests, overall heat transfer tests, and 10-hour rest period A/C tests. Technologies evaluated include advanced insulation packages, a solar reflective film applied to the vehicle's opaque exterior surfaces, a truck featuring both film and insulation, and a battery-powered A/C system. Opportunities were identified to reduce heating and cooling loads for long-haul truck idling by 36% and 34%, respectively, which yielded a 23% reduction in battery pack capacity of the idle-reduction system. Data were also collected for development and validation of a CoolCalc HVAC truck cab model. CoolCalc is an easy-to-use, simplified, physics-based HVAC load estimation tool that requires no meshing, has flexible geometry, excludes unnecessary detail, and is less time-intensive than more detailed computer-aided engineering modeling approaches.

  12. Fusion reactor control study. Volume 2: Tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelbaum, T.N.; Madden, P.A.; Var, R.E.; Chang, F.R.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Included are the following: a description and performance analysis of the simulator, control instrumentation requirements, an analysis of burn control, an analysis of plasma position and shape control, including the development of a complete control system concept and the synthesis and evaluation of active feedback position controllers, an evaluation of divertor concepts and reevaluation of divertor physics, control requirements, and potential for TEPR impurity and shutdown (or abort) control, and finally a discussion of integrated, computer control implementation concepts that includes delineation of the state-of-the-art in redundant, fault-tolerant processors and integrated sensor-effector-processor networks. A major achievement of the study was the validation of a methodology for the systematic study of TEPR control problems using an integrated analysis and computer simulation approach, and the delineation of outstanding TEPR control and instrumentation problems that sets requirements for future TEPR control technology research and development.

  13. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). ASO Customer Services Div.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  14. Control technology of vinyl chloride in EDC-VCM and PVC plants at main source points and fugitive emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Dario Antonio

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a boiler and the combustion gases scrubbed with water or a caustic solution to remove the hydrogen chloride to form hydrochloric acid or sodium chloride. According to the Trane Thermal Company, thermal incineration is a basic proven process... and fugitive emissions, (b) collection of data by using a questionaire ? survey from industries located in the United States, and (c) a statistical analysis of the data. It was found that thermal incineration is considered the best approach to control...

  15. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  16. In-depth survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc., Lyon Station, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R.M.; Earnest, G.S.; Jensen, P.A.; Zimmer, A.T.

    1996-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to identify effective hazard control methods and work practices, an in depth evaluation was conducted at the East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc. (SIC-3341), Lyon Station, Pennsylvania, which had previously been identified as having the lowest air lead (7439921) concentrations in lead smelter areas during a previous survey. This facility was primarily involved in lead reclamation from recycled automobile and industrial batteries. Control methods employed included automation, local exhaust ventilation, partial enclosures, and enclosed ventilation systems in the reverberatory and blast furnaces, and in casting and refinery areas. Employees in production areas also wore filtered half mask respirators, adhered to strict company policies on personal hygiene, and participated in incentive programs designed to reduce blood lead levels and encourage good personal hygiene and work practices. The authors noted that there was a potential for significant lead exposure in the blast furnace area, reverberatory furnace area, refinery area, and front end load operations. The authors recommend that efforts be made to improve controls in these areas.

  17. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp® 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  18. Upside-Down Solar Cell Achieves Record Efficiencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cell is an exercise in efficient innovation - literally, as the technology boasted the highest demonstrated efficiency for converting sunlight into electrical energy at its debut in 2005. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) inverted the conventional photovoltaic (PV) structure to revolutionary effect, achieving solar conversion efficiencies of 33.8% and 40.8% under one-sun and concentrated conditions, respectively.

  19. ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , public education, ordinances, pet waste programs, erosion control plans. Regulatory Tools as Management · Identify new management opportunities · Identify critical areas in watershed where additional measures1 ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions, Along with the Critical

  20. USPAS Achievement in Accelerator Physics Award to Kwang-Je Kim...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kim of ASD October 22, 2013 Bookmark and Share Kwang-Je Kim The 2013 U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology has...

  1. ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS Supplement to California Energy. There are also likely additional savings from initiatives that are neither finalized nor funded are referred to as additional achievable energy efficiency (AAEE) impacts. Staff developed five AAEE

  2. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Development of an Open Architecture, Widely Applicable Smart Manufacturing...

  3. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  4. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  5. Achieving Better Building Performance and Savings Using Optimal Control Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will be energized. After the minimum on time has expired, the lag chiller will be de- energized, when the load is less than 40% of the capacity of the lead chiller. Either chilled #1 or chiller #2 is needed to carry the entire cooling load whenever..., chiller 3 will be energized. This chiller will run only if the tonnage on either chillers (#1 or #2) becomes less than or equal to 20 tons for a certain length of time and if there are 3 or less AHUs running within the building. The building...

  6. Portsmouth Site Achieves Regulatory Milestone after Successful Controlled

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrative Judgea.Work PlanNEPA/309EnergyProjectBurn |

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for Advanced Low-Pressure Drop Systems to Reduce Engine Fuel Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Filter Sensing Technologies, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor and Controls for Advanced Low-Pressure Drop Systems to Reduce Engine Fuel Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Filter Sensing Technologies, Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development...

  9. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. First and second quarterly technical progress reports, [January--June 1995]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor containing a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW nameplate capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.

  10. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Third quarterly technical progress report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  11. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3] and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  12. Walk-through survey report: Control technology for metal reclamation industries at East Penn Manufacturing Company Inc. , Lyon Station, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R.M.

    1994-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A walk through survey was conducted at the East Penn Manufacturing Company (SIC-3341), Lyon Station, Pennsylvania to identify and evaluate potentially effective controls and work practices in the lead (7439921) reclamation industry. The facility was a secondary lead smelter which operated 7 days a week, and recycled about 20,000 batteries a day, primarily automobile batteries. The company employed automation, local exhaust ventilation, partial enclosures, and enclosed ventilation systems in the reverberatory furnace operations, blast furnace operations, and casting and refinery area to reduce employee exposure to lead. The arsenic (7440382) personal exposure time weighted averages ranged from 0.10 to 1.14 microg/cubic m in the industrial battery breaking area and ranged from nondetected to 6.16 microg/cubic m in the alloying/pots area.

  13. Robi, Robichaud, Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RPS * Wind Technology Overview * Larger Rotors * Taller Towers * Improved Controls * Wind Resource * Improved Assessment 2 Innova+on for Our Energy Future National Wind Technology...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyScaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground Testing Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground...

  15. Export Control | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Export Control SHARE Export Control ORNL's Nuclear Security and Isotope Technology Division Export Control Team promotes the U.S. nonproliferation agenda by providing policy...

  16. Office of Inspector General audit report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s funds distribution and control system at the Federal Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1998, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) was responsible for managing about $723 million in budgetary resources. The objective of this audit was to determine if FETC had a funds distribution and control system to ensure appropriated funds were managed in accordance with congressional intent and applicable policies and procedures. Improvements are needed in FETC`s administration of budgetary and accounting transactions. FETC did not have a comprehensive system to allocate indirect costs to funding programs and work-for-others projects. In addition, FETC did not completely adhere to Headquarters Clean Coal budget direction. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) reached its conclusions despite a scope impairment. Written documentation was not always available, and the audit team did not have ready access to key personnel who could explain certain transactions and management practices and procedures. In order to strengthen the FETC financial management system, the OIG recommended (1) the development of policies, procedures, and practices to accurately collect and allocate indirect costs and (2) improvements in internal control procedures. The OIG also recommended that the Chief Financial Officer conduct a detailed for cause review of the financial management practices at FETC and work with the Office of Field Management to develop a schedule for reviewing the financial management systems of all Departmental elements.

  17. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swientoniewski M.D.

    2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

  18. Abstract--The deployment of wireless technologies in industrial networks is very promising mainly due to their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldi, Mario

    networks, medium access control, pipeline forwarding. I. INTRODUCTION Wireless technologies have achieved for mobility and easy reconfiguration. The same motivations are at the basis of the current trend motors and actuators. In fact, a possible solution to this issue is offered by intermediate hops being

  19. FMIT facility control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suyama, R.M.; Machen, D.R.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility, under construction at Richland, Washington, uses current techniques in distributed processing to achieve responsiveness, maintainability and reliability. Developmental experience with the system on the FMIT Prototype Accelerator (FPA) being designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described as a function of the system's design goals and details. The functional requirements of the FMIT control system dictated the use of a highly operator-responsive, display-oriented structure, using state-of-the-art console devices for man-machine communications. Further, current technology has allowed the movement of device-dependent tasks into the area traditionally occupied by remote input-output equipment; the system's dual central process computers communicate with remote communications nodes containing microcomputers that are architecturally similar to the top-level machines. The system has been designed to take advantage of commercially available hardware and software.

  20. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

  1. Using a Research Simulator for Validating Control Room Modernization Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Julius J. Persensky; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is a research, development, and deployment program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The program is operated in close collaboration with industry research and development programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants that are currently in operation. Advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the continued safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear control rooms. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe life extension of current reactors. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Current analog control rooms are growing obsolete, and it is difficult for utilities to maintain them. Using its reconfigurable control room simulator adapted from a training simulator, INL serves as a neutral test bed for implementing new control room system technologies and assisting in control room modernization efforts across.

  2. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  3. Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity 7 Our finances, transportation, health care, water supply, and emergency services depend on reliable energy. Building and...

  4. achievement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY JUSTICE IN SOCIETY: BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY) Project Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware First...

  5. NERSC HPC Achievements Award Recipients for 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of their inaugural High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Wednesday at the annual NERSC User Group meeting...

  6. NERSC Announces Third Annual HPC Achievement Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of its third annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Feb. 24, 2015, during the annual NERSC User...

  7. On Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    to the problem of optimizing end-to- end throughput in undirected data networks. We first illustrate the powerOn Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding Zongpeng Li, Baochun Li, Dan Jiang, Lap Chi Lau Abstract-- With the constraints of network topologies and link capacities, achieving the optimal end

  8. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  9. MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION JOB TITLE: BUILDING MECHANIC II (Pay, parking lots, elevators, snow conditions, HVAC equipment temperature control systems, pool systems, ice

  10. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

  11. An Online Controller Towards Self-Adaptive File System Availability and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    An Online Controller Towards Self-Adaptive File System Availability and Performance Xin Chen1 availability and high per- formance. Although many fault tolerance technologies have been proposed and used in both commercial and academic distributed file systems to achieve high avail- ability, most of them

  12. Top Three Topics and Achievements by Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Incorporate clean energy technologies at the Paducah site - solar, bio-fuels, clean coal, etc. Develop infrastructure assets at the site including electrical grid Develop...

  13. Secure and Efficient Routable Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Hadley, Mark D.; Manz, David O.; Winn, Jennifer D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the methods to secure routable control system communication in the electric sector. The approach of this document yields a long-term vision for a future of secure communication, while also providing near term steps and a roadmap. The requirements for the future secure control system environment were spelled out to provide a final target. Additionally a survey and evaluation of current protocols was used to determine if any existing technology could achieve this goal. In the end a four-step path was described that brought about increasing requirement completion and culminates in the realization of the long term vision.

  14. DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (in 2000) Trucks 700,000 Off-road equipment 500,000 Stationary and portable 65,000 Diesel PM Contribution to Risk 70% Diesel PM 3% 2% 3% 4% 8% 10% Diesel Exhaust PM10 (70%) 1,3...

  15. Diesel Emission Control Technology Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conf. 5-06 However, despite considerable increases in vehicle mass, power, and capacity, CO2 emissions have still dropped. 5 To sell European cars into the US market, a minimum of...

  16. Technology Integration Initiative In Support of Outage Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby; David Gertman

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Often, command and control during outages is maintained in the outage control center where many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. This research reports on the use of advanced integrating software technologies and hand held mobile devices as a means by which to reduce cycle time, improve accuracy, and enhance transparency among outage team members. This paper reports on the first phase of research supported by the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program that is performed in close collaboration with industry to examine the introduction of newly available technology allowing for safe and efficient outage performance. It is thought that this research will result in: improved resource management among various plant stakeholder groups, reduced paper work, and enhanced overall situation awareness for the outage control center management team. A description of field data collection methods, including personnel interview data, success factors, end-user evaluation and integration of hand held devices in achieving an integrated design are also evaluated. Finally, the necessity of obtaining operations cooperation support in field studies and technology evaluation is acknowledged.

  17. Achieving Energy Efficiency in Exis0ng Buildings How achieve significant commercial building energy efficiency?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    · Led BU Energy Audit over past 3 years · University Sustainability CommiAchieving Energy Efficiency in Exis0ng Buildings ·How achieve significant commercial building energy efficiency? Focus on HVAC. ·Our solu0on

  18. From Earth to Saturn: Los Alamos Achievements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMillan, Charlie; Wilson, Cathy; Nekimkem, Howard; Martinez, Johnnie; Martz, Joe; Albright, Brian

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A compilation of some of the remarkable achievements of Los Alamos National Laboratory staff over the past 12 months. Originally aired in the June 26, 2008 Director's all-employee meeting.

  19. Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-A: Growing a Water-Smart Bioeconomy Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy ProductionMay Wu, Principal Environmental System Analyst in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne...

  20. Awards and Achievements | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards and Achievements 2014 UChicago Pinnacle of Education Award Mike Kaminski 2014 UChicago Pinnacle of Education Award Seth Darling 2014 R&D 100 Award John Zhang 2014 R&D 100...

  1. Low Voltage White Phosphorescent OLED Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and its research partners at Princeton University and the University of Southern California have succeeded in developing a white phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) that achieved a record efficiency of 20 lumens per watt. This achievement is the result of the team's collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency of PHOLED lighting by focusing on two critical factors: lowering the drive voltages and increasing the amount of light extracted.

  2. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  3. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Demonstration/Development of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Vehicle Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Wisconsin Engine Research Consultants at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  5. Development of Black Silicon Antireflection Control and Passivation Technology for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-475

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, H. C.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work involves the development of a commercial manufacturing process for both multicrystalline and monocrystalline solar cells that combines Natcore's patent pending passivation technology.

  6. Investigating the Structure and Process of Academic Emphasis on Student Achievement: A Multi-Level Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, James Bakewell

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Academic emphasis is used as a predictor of student achievement in this multilevel analysis controlling for student and campus demographics. Academic emphasis represents a desirable characteristic in a school’s overall climate because it embodies...

  7. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes controlled hydrogen fleet & infrastructure analysis undertaken for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

  8. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

  9. Embedded Controllers Control. Connectivity. Security.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantner, Janos L.

    Application Summary MCF5282 HVAC and Security Control Panel Application Summary MCF5307 Music Media Player controllers to help get their products to market quickly and cost-effectively. Aggressive price of continuous innovative technology--provides customers with the opportunity to build market share

  10. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of refueling today's gasoline vehicles. Using currently available high-pressure tank storage technology that can achieve similar performance, at a similar cost, as gasoline fuel storage systems. Compressed gasFUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Storage Hydrogen

  11. Photonic quantum technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien; Akira Furusawa; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first quantum technology, which harnesses uniquely quantum mechanical effects for its core operation, has arrived in the form of commercially available quantum key distribution systems that achieve enhanced security by encoding information in photons such that information gained by an eavesdropper can be detected. Anticipated future quantum technologies include large-scale secure networks, enhanced measurement and lithography, and quantum information processors, promising exponentially greater computation power for particular tasks. Photonics is destined for a central role in such technologies owing to the need for high-speed transmission and the outstanding low-noise properties of photons. These technologies may use single photons or quantum states of bright laser beams, or both, and will undoubtably apply and drive state-of-the-art developments in photonics.

  12. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  13. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  14. Neural Network Technology as a Pollution Prevention Tool in the Electric Utility Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M. L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., April 1996. 5. Ungar, Hartman, Eric J, Keeler, James D. and Martin Greg D. Process Modeling and Control Using Neural Networks. Intelligent Systems in Process Engineering Conference Proceedings. July 1995 6. Lewis, Mike. 1996. The Lower Colorado.... Keeler, Jim, Havener H, Hartman, E. and Magnuson T. 1993. Achieving Compliance and Profits with a Predictive Emission Monitoring System: Pavilion's Software CEMTM. Pavilion Technologies, Inc., 9. Department of Energy Fact Sheet. 1994. More...

  15. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Chourey, Aashish [American Magnetics Inc.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNL s 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNL s Materials Processing Group s and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  16. achieving economic growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remain simpleITERATIVE COMBINATORIAL AUCTIONS: ACHIEVING ECONOMIC AND COMPUTATIONAL EFFICIENCY David Christopher Chen, Yiling 6 ITERATIVE COMBINATORIAL AUCTIONS: ACHIEVING...

  17. METAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    METAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Abstract Power input to the arc in gas metal arc welding to decouple these processes. Methods to achieve this decoupling are discussed. Pulsed-power welding is widely

  18. Nano-Machines Achieve Huge Mechanical Breakthrough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, David A.

    NANO TECH Nano-Machines Achieve Huge Mechanical Breakthrough Dublin, Ireland (SPX) Sep 08, 2005 that use molecular 'nano'-machines of this kind to help perform physical tasks. Nano-machines could also owners set to return to battered Orleans l Six dead, two missing after heavy rains hit Page 1 of 3Nano

  19. 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton University Reports Contents 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Campus Energy was established in 2008, the University has invested $5.3 million in energy-savings projects, resulting in annual of a 5.2-megawatt solar collector field. · Audit the remaining 20 of the top 50 energy- consuming

  20. Texas 4-H Member Achievement Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepley, Toby

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Member Achievement Plan (M.A.P.) provides 4-Hers with forms and journal pages to help them plan their 4-H projects, set goals and evaluate their accomplishments. Using this will help teach record-keeping skills. It is part of the new "For...

  1. Achieving Autonomous Power Management Using Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    24 Achieving Autonomous Power Management Using Reinforcement Learning HAO SHEN, Syracuse University University System level power management must consider the uncertainty and variability that come from the environ- ment, the application and the hardware. A robust power management technique must be able to learn

  2. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  3. Akamai technologies : an analysis of product and platform growth strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Victor L. (Victor Lawrence)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Akamai Technologies has achieved market leadership in content delivery and application acceleration services and is pursuing aggressive growth. Akamai has advised the market that growth to $5B by 2020 is achievable by ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the fuel effects...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about fuel effects on...

  6. Multinational achievement: PPPL collaborates on record fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the edge of the gas near the interior walls of the tokamak. Controlling these fast-growing instabilities, called "edge localized modes" (ELMs), produced a record life...

  7. STAFF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS NOMINATION PROCEDURE My nominee for a 2013 SFU Staff Achievement Award is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAFF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS NOMINATION PROCEDURE My nominee for a 2013 SFU Staff Achievement Award is: Award Category (Please check only one of the following categories) Athletic/Artistic Community clippings, plus a list of any additional media clippings · list of awards or other public recognition · any

  8. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inc. (EEA). 2001. Technology and Cost of Future Fuel Economyproduction leads to lower technology costs. In the case ofpollution control technology costs. As a result, the cost-

  9. Alternative Landfill Cover. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of an engineered cover is to isolate the underlying waste. A key element to isolating the wastes from the environment, engineered covers should minimize or prevent water from infiltrating into the landfill and coming into contact with the waste, thereby minimizing leachate generation. The U.S. EPA construction guidelines for soil hydraulic barriers specify that the soil moisture content and compactive effort may be increased to ensure that the barrier achieves a specified permeability of 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. However, constructing a soil barrier with high moisture content makes the soil more difficult to work and increases the required compactive effort to achieve the specified density, ultimately increasing the construction cost of the barrier. Alternative landfill cover designs rely on soil physical properties, hydraulic characteristics, and vegetation requirements to lower the flux rate of water through the cover. They can achieve greater reliability than the prescriptive RCRA Subtitle C design, especially under arid or semi-arid environmental conditions. With an alternative cover design, compacted soil barriers can be constructed with a soil moisture content that makes placement and compaction of the soil easier and less expensive. Under these conditions, the soil barrier has more capacity to absorb and control moisture within it, thereby enhancing the reliability of the barrier. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance, data.

  10. Achieving Superior Energy Performance in US Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheihing, P.

    U.S. industry has the capacity to significantly improve its overall energy performance and help meet both private-sector and national goals for energy and the environment. TheUS Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program (ITP...

  11. ORNL technology transfer continues strong upward trend | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help utilities achieve deeper and broader energy savings from their energy efficiency and demand-response programs. Dry Surface Technologies of Guthrie, Okla, licensed Barrian, a...

  12. Real Time Monitoring: Achieving Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouse, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: IECBO?s International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations November 17-18, 2009 Austin, Texas. Energy @ Work www.Energy-Efficiency.com File: Rouse_ Abstract Contact: scott.rouse@energy-efficiency....com, (416) 402-0525 Proposal Type: o Electronic proposal for presentation Title of Paper: o Real Time Monitoring: Achieving Energy Efficiency! Conference: o ICEBO?s International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations Submitted by: o...

  13. Real Time Monitoring: Achieving Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouse, S.

    ABSTRACT: IECBO?s International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations November 17-18, 2009 Austin, Texas. Energy @ Work www.Energy-Efficiency.com File: Rouse_ Abstract Contact: scott.rouse@energy-efficiency....com, (416) 402-0525 Proposal Type: o Electronic proposal for presentation Title of Paper: o Real Time Monitoring: Achieving Energy Efficiency! Conference: o ICEBO?s International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations Submitted by: o...

  14. ACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE OF HYDRAULICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    to validate the concept and the numerical models. NOMENCLATURE A0 The orifice area of the control valve inletACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE and controllability. As a proof-of-concept for this ap- proach, we are pursuing the design of a novel, dexterous

  15. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutdka, G. M.; Chourey, A. (American Magnetics, Inc.)

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNL’s 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNL’s Materials Processing Group’s and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  16. Proceedings of the Technology Roadmap Workshop on Communication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings of the Technology Roadmap Workshop on Communication and Control Systems for Distributed Energy Implementation and Testing, May 2002 Proceedings of the Technology...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNL/FEERC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions...

  18. Proceedings of the SPIE International Symposium on Intelligent Systems and Advanced Manufacturing: Modeling, Simulation, and Control Technologies for Manufacturing, Philadelphia, October, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Amy

    and Recovery (EDR) framework of Donald was developed to deal with these inadequacies of the guaranteed planning framework. EDR strategies will either achieve a goal if it is recognizably reachable, or signal failure. Given a geometrically­specified goal region G, an EDR strategy involves computing a failure region H

  19. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG) demonstrated a combination of technologies at its Milliken Station in Lansing, New York, designed to: (1) achieve high sulfur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency, (2) bring nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions into compliance with Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), (3) maintain high station efficiency, and (4) eliminate waste water discharge. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advance coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of nine selected in January 1991 from 33 proposals submitted in response to the program?s fourth solicitation.

  20. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sluder.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...

  1. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  2. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  3. HYAPPROVAL HANDBOOK FOR THE APPROVAL OF HYDROGEN REFUELLING STATIONS FIRST PRELIMINARY ACHIEVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Achievements during the first 15 months: analyses of HRS technology concepts and of equipment and safety levels/ database of Fire Associations & First Responders/ calendar of hydrogen events/ general description of CGH2 interfaces. Introduction Hydrogen already plays a significant role in the world's energy

  4. Applying Nonlinear Signal Analysis Technologies to Flame Scanner Signals to Improve Staging of Cyclone Boilers for NOx control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, The; Bailey, R. T. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, The; Fuller, T. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, The; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Stallings, J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Himes, R. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Bermke, R. [Alliant Energy

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyclone{trademark} boiler owners continue to drive down NO{sub x} emissions by increasingly sophisticated staging and air distribution schemes. For example, Alliant Energy has employed RMT's SmartBurn{reg_sign} technology, and Ameren UE has pioneered neural nets to reduce emissions. Over the last 11 years under sponsorship of EPRI, the team of ORNL and B&W has developed pulverized coal burner diagnostic technology by applying nonlinear signal analysis techniques to flame scanner signals. The team has extended the technology to cyclones to facilitate deeper staging of the cyclones to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Development projects were conducted at the Alliant Energy Edgewater Units 3 and 4, and Ameren UE Sioux Unit 1. Nonlinear analysis statistics were correlated to upsets in cyclone operation resulting from poor air distribution in the burner and barrel. The team demonstrated that the lighter and main flame scanners can be used to independently guide adjustments to the burner and barrel.

  5. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  6. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  7. Achievable Qubit Rates for Quantum Information Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulya Yadsan-Appleby; Tobias J. Osborne

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppose Alice and Bob have access to two separated regions, respectively, of a system of electrons moving in the presence of a regular one-dimensional lattice of binding atoms. We consider the problem of communicating as much quantum information, as measured by the qubit rate, through this quantum information wire as possible. We describe a protocol whereby Alice and Bob can achieve a qubit rate for these systems which is proportional to N^(-1/3) qubits per unit time, where N is the number of lattice sites. Our protocol also functions equally in the presence of interactions modelled via the t-J and Hubbard models.

  8. Secretary's Achievement Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle| DepartmentAchievement Award Secretary's

  9. PNNL: About PNNL - Achievements and Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11:Tel.:162 Prepared for the U.S.Achievements Energy

  10. Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrhein, G.T.

    1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

  11. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

  12. New Nissan Paint Plant Achieves 30% Energy Savings | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Nissan Paint Plant Achieves 30% Energy Savings New Nissan Paint Plant Achieves 30% Energy Savings May 6, 2013 - 5:55pm Addthis New Nissan Paint Plant Achieves 30% Energy...

  13. Export Controls and International Safeguards: Strengthening Nonproliferation through Interdisciplinary Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Danielle J.; Goorevich, Richard; Hooper, Rich; Scheinman, Lawrence; Tape, James W.

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    International safeguards and export controls are central to ensuring international confidence in the peaceful uses of nuclear materials and technologies and to achieving adequate oversight on the transfer and use of nuclear materials, technology, and equipment required for the development of proliferation-sensitive parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although the independent strengths of international safeguards and export controls rely largely on universal adherence, there may be opportunities to exploit the shared strengths of these systems. This article provides background information on the separate evolution of export controls and international safeguards, considers how these two elements of the nonproliferation regime interact, and identifies some possible avenues that could, over time, lead to wholly integrated activities.

  14. Design to Achieve Fault Tolerance and Resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Richard Bockhorst; Craig Peterson; Gregg Swindlehurst

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide initial scoping for follow on work designed to improve nuclear plant operation. The focus of this report is twofold. Selected trips over the last five years are examined to determine if there are potential opportunities to automate tasks that are currently performed manually. The second area is to evaluate the potential for avoiding reactor trips by reducing power in a controlled manner upon the loss of turbine generator load. Some candidate opportunities to reduce the frequency on reactor trips identified in this report are redundant feedwater controls, automated response to a feedwater or condensate pump trip reducing power vice a reactor trip, and elimination of air operators for the feedwater control valves or providing redundant air supplies.

  15. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  16. Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Photo of an energy-efficient home with modern architecture. The...

  17. SciTech Connect: Achievements of structural genomics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Achievements of structural genomics You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's...

  18. Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production - A Case Study Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production - A Case Study This presentation summarizes the...

  19. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  20. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia National Laboratory High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia National Laboratory May...

  1. Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success August 26, 2014 - 12:34pm Addthis Dynalene Inc. of Whitehall,...

  2. DOE Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help Develop Cheaper Biofuels DOE Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help Develop Cheaper Biofuels...

  3. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency Guide describes information...

  4. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks June...

  5. Secretary's 2013 Achievement Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle| Department ofReliability |MillionDepartmentTechnology

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and...

  7. advanced robot control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium on Measurement and Control in Robotics -Toward Advanced Robots: Design, Sensors, Control and Applications - Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  8. Leveraging Intelligent Vehicle Technologies to Maximize Fuel Economy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancements in vehicle electronics, along with communication and sensing technologies, have led to a growing number of intelligent vehicle applications. Example systems include those for advanced driver information, route planning and prediction, driver assistance, and crash avoidance. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is exploring ways to leverage intelligent vehicle systems to achieve fuel savings. This presentation discusses several potential applications, such as providing intelligent feedback to drivers on specific ways to improve their driving efficiency, and using information about upcoming driving to optimize electrified vehicle control strategies for maximum energy efficiency and battery life. The talk also covers the potential of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and related technologies to deliver significant fuel savings in addition to providing safety and convenience benefits.

  9. Combined SO sub 2 /NO sub x reduction technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments and passage of state legislation leading to more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) regulations have fueled research and development efforts on technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  10. NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS in manufacturing technology, quality control, and techniques for ensuring product reliability and cost concerns compete strongly in world markets. (3) Improvements in manufacturing and product technology depend

  11. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  12. Distribution ICategory: General Reactor Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    --- Distribution ICategory: General Reactor Technology (UC-520) ANl-92/23 AR(;ONNE NATIONAL, progressively by Huygens, Maxwell and Roentgen, mankind has learned to observe it, measure it, control it

  13. Energy-Efficient Commercial Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses energy-efficient technologies such as boilers, air conditioners, heat pumps, humidity controls, combined heat and power (CHP), and more.

  14. FACULTY ANNUAL ACHIEVEMENT The purpose of the Faculty Annual Achievement Report (formerly the Faculty Annual Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    BUS Accounting ACC Economics ECO Executive MBA EMBA Finance FIN Marketing & International Business MKT MBA MBA Management, Entrepreneurship & Technology MGT Community Health Sciences, School CHS Environmental & Occupational Health EOH Health Promotion Program HPP Health Care Administration & Policy HCA

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    waste heat recovery devices for vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling...

  16. Energy Efficiency Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    these spectrums and control glare-the major factor determining the ability to utilize daylight to replace electrical lighting in buildings. DOE Resources: Building Technologies...

  17. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Boiler Control...

  18. Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

  19. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge,...

  20. Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Efficiency Improvement Controls Variable Valve Actuation Variable Intake Swirl Turbo Technology Electrically Driven Components Aftertreatment Integration of Cummins...

  1. Demonstration of improved vehicle fuel efficiency through innovative tire design, materials, and weight reduction technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, Tim [Cooper Tire & Rubber Company Incorporated, Findlay, OH (United States)

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooper completed an investigation into new tire technology using a novel approach to develop and demonstrate a new class of fuel efficient tires using innovative materials technology and tire design concepts. The objective of this work was to develop a new class of fuel efficient tires, focused on the “replacement market” that would improve overall passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 3% while lowering the overall tire weight by 20%. A further goal of this project was to accomplish the objectives while maintaining the traction and wear performance of the control tire. This program was designed to build on what has already been accomplished in the tire industry for rolling resistance based on the knowledge and general principles developed over the past decades. Cooper’s CS4 (Figure #1) premium broadline tire was chosen as the control tire for this program. For Cooper to achieve the goals of this project, the development of multiple technologies was necessary. Six technologies were chosen that are not currently being used in the tire industry at any significant level, but that showed excellent prospects in preliminary research. This development was divided into two phases. Phase I investigated six different technologies as individual components. Phase II then took a holistic approach by combining all the technologies that showed positive results during phase one development.

  2. Postprint of article in Information and Software Technology (2012) On the adoption of MC/DC and control-flow adequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /DC and control-flow adequacy for a tight integration of program testing and statistical fault localization*,** Bo programs using three adequacy criteria, 16 test case prioritization techniques, and four statistical fault, Beijing, China A B S T R A C T Context: Testing and debugging consume a significant portion of software

  3. Low-Emissions Exhaust Quality Control System to Optimize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this control technology to microturbines with absorption chillers. The project anticipates an improvement

  4. Proceedingsof the 39* IEEE Conferenceon Decision and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Seth

    Hybrid Image-Based Visual Servo Control Peter I. Corke CSIRO Manufacturing Science & Technology Pinjarra

  5. Advanced Wind Turbine Controls Reduce Loads (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

  6. NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishler, B

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

  7. Design of High-Fidelity Testing Framework for Secure Electric Grid Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solution methodology and implementation components are presented that can uncover unwanted, unintentional or unanticipated effects on electric grids from changes to actual electric grid control software. A new design is presented to leapfrog over the limitations of current modeling and testing techniques for cyber technologies in electric grids. We design a fully virtualized approach in which actual, unmodified operational software under test is enabled to interact with simulated surrogates of electric grids. It enables the software to influence the (simulated) grid operation and vice versa in a controlled, high fidelity environment. Challenges in achieving such capability include achieving low-overhead time control mechanisms in hypervisor schedulers, network capture and time-stamping, translation of network packets emanating from grid software into discrete events of virtual grid models, translation back from virtual sensors/actuators into data packets to control software, and transplanting the entire system onto an accurately and efficiently maintained virtual-time plane.

  8. Silicon on insulator achieved using electrochemical etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk crystalline silicon wafers are transferred after the completion of circuit fabrication to form thin films of crystalline circuitry on almost any support, such as metal, semiconductor, plastic, polymer, glass, wood, and paper. In particular, this technique is suitable to form silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, whereby the devices and circuits formed exhibit superior performance after transfer due to the removal of the silicon substrate. The added cost of the transfer process to conventional silicon fabrication is insignificant. No epitaxial, lift-off, release or buried oxide layers are needed to perform the transfer of single or multiple wafers onto support members. The transfer process may be performed at temperatures of 50.degree. C. or less, permits transparency around the circuits and does not require post-transfer patterning. Consequently, the technique opens up new avenues for the use of integrated circuit devices in high-brightness, high-resolution video-speed color displays, reduced-thickness increased-flexibility intelligent cards, flexible electronics on ultrathin support members, adhesive electronics, touch screen electronics, items requiring low weight materials, smart cards, intelligent keys for encryption systems, toys, large area circuits, flexible supports, and other applications. The added process flexibility also permits a cheap technique for increasing circuit speed of market driven technologies such as microprocessors at little added expense.

  9. Achieving agility through parameter space qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diegert, K.V.; Easterling, R.G.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Forsythe, C.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.

  10. Partnering to achieve success in energy management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, T.C.; Caldwell, S.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Army National Guard (ARNG) has over 110,000,000 square feet of heated, cooled and lighted facilities in all 50 States and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam. Facilities mix runs the gamut from aviation hangers to weekend use armories. Utility costs are paid by Federal, State, and local agencies, and sometimes with different agencies sharing costs in the same facility. Facilities ages range from early 1900s converted horse stables to current ultra-modern office buildings. Each ARNG State energy manager has a formidable challenge and many innovative ideas for reducing energy costs have evolved. These ideas can be summed up in a concept referred to as {open_quotes}Partnering.{close_quotes} This concept of partnering at all levels of government has enabled the National Guard to lower its overall utility costs by 10% in the last three years. In its {open_quotes}Road Map to Facilities Energy Management,{close_quotes} an ARNG Handbook developed for Energy Managers, Partnering has a separate chapter with a mission statement of `Developing partnerships is to encourage agencies to work together to maximize energy savings and promote energy conservation awareness.` This presentation will cover how the Army National Guard has partnered with Federal, State, Regional, and local government agencies to achieve its Facility Energy Management Successes. Examples will be presented showing successful partnering with government agencies and partnerships with manufacturers and Energy Service Companies in conducting audits and ESPC contracting. The projects performed range from Eskimo Scout Armories in Alaska, installing Solar Hot Water heating in Colorado, and Waste Oil burners in Maine, developing plans for wind energy generators in Utah. and conducting lighting projects in Mississippi. Inventive partnering has allowed the Army National Guard to really stretch its utility dollars.

  11. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  12. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  13. Office of Technology Transitions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Technology Commercialization activities in 2009-13 have involved three broad areas of focus. The primary focus of technology commercialization has continued to be through new technologies developed at the National Laboratories and Facilities. As a second focus, to support and streamline commercialization of these DOE technologies, DOE has carried out a number of new initiatives and pilot projects. Finally, DOE's Department-wide commitment to using commercialization as one mechanism to support U.S. economic growth has led to new cross-cutting programs. U.S. Department of Energy researchers won 31 of the 100 awards in 2014, 36 awards in each of 2013, 2012 and 2011, and 46 in 2010, for a total of 185 over the period of 2009-13. A subset of these awards and other DOE developed technologies are described in Appendix E. These represent a spectrum of commercial areas including DOE mission areas of energy, efficiency, environment and security, as well as spin-off applications in the agricultural, aeronautical, medical, semiconductor and information technology industries, and broad applications in cyber security and sensing/control systems.

  14. Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

  15. 4. international workshop on expert evaluation and control of compound semiconductor materials and technologies (EXMATEC `98): Conference program, abstracts and exhibition guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial contents include: Latest developments in VGF technology -- GaAs InP, and GaP; Photoelastic characterization of residual strain in GaAs wafers annealed in different holder geometrics; Nondestructive mode index measurement using resonant coupling; X-ray characterization of InP substrates; Reliability issues due to hot electrons in GaAs and InP HEMTS; Optical and structural analysis of degraded high power in InGaAlAs/As/AlGaAs lasers; Failure analysis of heavily proton irradiated InGaP solar cells by EBIC and cathodoluminescence; Electron irradiation and thermal annealing effects on GaAs solar cells; Structural characterization of InGaP/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors; III-Nitrides for red and IR applications; and Large area GaN substrates.

  16. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  17. RECOMMENDED SECURITY CONTROLS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2005 RECOMMENDED SECURITY CONTROLS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: GUIDANCE FOR SELECTING COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROLS USING A RISK-BASED PROCESS Shirley Radack, Editor, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Security controls are the management

  18. Application of organosilicon pre-sic polymer technology to optimize rapid prototyping of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, C.K.; Zank, G. [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI (United States); Ghosh, A. [Philips Display Components Co., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments of applications of advanced ceramics e.g., SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, CMCs need to be on a faster track than what the current processing technologies can afford. Rapid reduction in time to market of new and complex products can be achieved by using Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing Technologies (RP&M) e.g., 3D-printing, selective laser sintering, stereolithography etc. These technologies will help advanced ceramics meet the performance challenges at an affordable price with reliable manufacturing technologies. The key variables of the RP&M technologies for ceramics are the nature of the polymer carrier and/or the binder, and the powder. Selection and/or the production of a proper class of polymer carrier/binder, understanding their impact on the processing of ceramics such as polymer-powder interaction, speed of hardening the green body in a controlled manner, ability to retain shape during forming and consolidation, delivering desirable properties at the end, are crucial to develop the low cost, high quality ceramic products. Organosilicon pre-SiC polymer technology route to advanced ceramics is currently being commercialized by Dow Corning. Methods to use this class of polymer as a processing aid in developing potentially better RP&M technologies to make better ceramics have been proposed in this work.

  19. Radiation Control Coatings Installed on Federal Buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaba, R.L.; Petrie, T.W.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical objectives of this CRADA comprise technology deployment and energy conservation efforts with the radiation control coatings industry and the utility sector. The results of this collaboration include a high-level data reporting, analysis and management system to support the deployment efforts. The technical objectives include successfully install, commission, operate, maintain and document the performance of radiation control coatings on roofs at Tyndall AFB and the Buildings Technology Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; determine the life cycle savings that can be achieved by using radiation control coatings on entire roofs at Tyndall AFB, based on documented installed cost and operating maintenance costs with and without the coatings; determine if any specific improvements are required in the coatings before they can be successfully deployed in the federal sector; determine the most effective way to facilitate the widespread and rapid deployment of radiation control coatings in the federal sector; and clearly define any barriers to deployment.

  20. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.; Kelsey, J.R.; Wesenberg, D.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-range plan for the development of new technology that will reduce the cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is presented. The role of this program in relation to the total Federal Geothermal Energy Program is defined and specific program goals are identified. Then, the current status of the program, initiated in FY 1978, is presented, and research and development activities planned through 1987 are described. Budget and milestone estimates for each task are provided. The management plan for implementing the program is also discussed. The goals of this program are to develop the technology required to reduce the cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells by 25% in the near term and by 50% in the long term. Efforts under this program to date have resulted in new roller bit designs that will reduce well costs by 2% to 4%, new drag bits that have demonstrated marked increases in penetration rate, and the field verification of the effectiveness of inert drilling fluids in reducing drill pipe corrosion. Activities planned for the next six years for achieving the program goals are described. Technical activities include work in the areas of drilling hardware, drilling fluids, lost circulation control methods, completion technology, advanced drilling systems, and supporting technology.