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1

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

2

DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Video User' s Guide Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond

3

Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on each response disciplines' activities or duties at the scene. During this discussion, the instructor can present response scenarios, each of which would have a different discipline arriving first at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion

4

Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on how the decontamination dressdown process is implemented. During this discussion, the instructor can present various scenarios, each of which would discuss decontamination at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion would be to cover how responders

5

Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams at GANIL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......February 2004 research-article Articles Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams...been used to produce exotic nuclei via fusion evaporation or to study reaction mechanisms...Physics Supplement No. 154, 2004 113 Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams......

Gilles de France

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiological Protection Policy for the Disposal of Radioactive...Contaminated Areas after a Nuclear Accident or a Radiation...SITUATIONS RESULTING FROM A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT. | In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive......

Daisuke Sugiyama; Takatoshi Hattori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks 禄 Accidents Health Risks 禄 Accidents DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Accidents A discussion of accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders, including possible health effects, accident risk, and accident history. Potential Health Effects from Cylinder Accidents Accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders are a concern because they could result in an uncontrolled release of UF6 to the environment, which could potentially affect the health of workers and members of the public living downwind of the accident site. Accidental release of UF6 from storage cylinders or during processing activities could result in injuries or fatalities. The most immediate hazard after a release would be from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when

9

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Roughly one out of every four accidents (25%) involves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Roughly one out of every four accidents (25%) involves at an unsafe speed 路 Failure to check mirrors often Fleet Safety: Backing Accidents Safety Tip #2 Accidents hurt-- safety doesn't. All backing accidents are preventable. The key is to plan ahead to avoid backing

Minnesota, University of

10

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident ... Large amts. of radioactive substances were released into the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants in eastern Japan as a consequence of the great earthquake (M 9.0) and tsunami of 11 March 2011. ... Proceedings of the International Symposium on Environmental Monitoring and Dose Estimation of Residents after Accident of TEPCO抯 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station; Shiran Hall, Kyoto, Japan, Dec 14, 2012; http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/anzen_kiban/outcome/. ...

Tetsuo Ishikawa; Atsuyuki Sorimachi; Hideki Arae; Sarata Kumar Sahoo; Miroslaw Janik; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Tort Law in road accidents. The involvement of police vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some members of Law Enforcement must use motor vehicles to fulfill its constitutional mission. To face up to traffic accidents, the Spanish Criminal Policy has been implemented criminal, procedural, administra...

F閘ix Francisco Serrano Gallardo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents involving fuel Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education for the newspaper NRC- Summary: , since it tells you how many kilomters an automobile has to travel before it is involved in an accident... one kilometer by automobile...

14

Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

Aldrich, David C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Radioactive contamination of fishes in lake and streams impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 emitted radioactive substances into the environment, contaminating a wide array of organisms including fishes. We found higher concentrations of radioactive cesium (137Cs) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) than in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus nerka), and 137Cs concentrations in brown trout were higher in a lake than in a stream. Our analyses indicated that these differences were primarily due to differences in diet, but that habitat also had an effect. Radiocesium concentrations (137Cs) in stream charr (Salvelinus leucomaenis) were higher in regions with more concentrated aerial activity and in older fish. These results were also attributed to dietary and habitat differences. Preserving uncontaminated areas by remediating soils and releasing uncontaminated fish would help restore this popular fishing area but would require a significant effort, followed by a waiting period to allow activity concentrations to fall below the threshold limits for consumption.

Mayumi Yoshimura; Tetsuya Yokoduka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Radioactive material (RAM) transportation accident and incident experience in the U.S.A. (1971--1997)  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the National Transportation Program (EM-70) of the US Department of Energy. Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident incident events in the US for the period 1971--1997. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred.

McClure, J.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Fagan, H.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Analysis Dept.; Thomas, T. [Dept. of Energy National Transportation Program (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Accident analysis of railway transportation of low-level radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes: Application of the /open quotes/Maximum Credible Accident/close quotes/ concept  

SciTech Connect

The maximum credible accident (MCA) approach to accident analysis places an upper bound on the potential adverse effects of a proposed action by using conservative but simplifying assumptions. It is often used when data are lacking to support a more realistic scenario or when MCA calculations result in acceptable consequences. The MCA approach can also be combined with realistic scenarios to assess potential adverse effects. This report presents a guide for the preparation of transportation accident analyses based on the use of the MCA concept. Rail transportation of contaminated wastes is used as an example. The example is the analysis of the environmental impact of the potential derailment of a train transporting a large shipment of wastes. The shipment is assumed to be contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and low-level radioactivities of uranium and technetium. The train is assumed to plunge into a river used as a source of drinking water. The conclusions from the example accident analysis are based on the calculation of the number of foreseeable premature cancer deaths the might result as a consequence of this accident. These calculations are presented, and the reference material forming the basis for all assumptions and calculations is also provided.

Ricci, E.; McLean, R.B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents involving external Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

19

Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......people living in long-term-contaminated...Radioactive waste management in...longer-term storage and appropriate...appropriate for the long-term assessment...long-lived radioactive wastes in planned exposure...People Living in Long-term Contaminated...from Radioactive Waste Management in......

Daisuke Sugiyama; Takatoshi Hattori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radioactive cesium from the Chernobyl accident in the Greenland Ice Sheet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...snowfall on 5 June, airborne concentrations of 134CS...If we assume that airborne concentrations at Dye...indicate calculated airborne concentrations great-er...therefore likely that a fraction of the measured radioactive...modeling of radioactivity releases from the Chernobyl event...

CI Davidson; Harrington JR; MJ Stephenson; MC Monaghan; J Pudykiewicz; WR Schell

1987-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Severe Accident Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Severe Accident Studies Severe Accident Studies Christopher S. Bajwa Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards USNRC 2012 U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) May 15 - 17, 2012 Knoxville, TN * Going The Distance? - The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States * Released February 9, 2006 * Conclusions: * NRC safety regulations are adequate to ensure package containment effectiveness over a wide range of transport conditions, including most credible accident conditions. * The radiological risks are well understood and are generally low, with the possible exception of risks from releases in extreme accidents involving long duration, fully engulfing fires.

22

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

23

Development of a computer model for calculation of radioactive materials into the atmosphere after an accident  

SciTech Connect

Secondary atmospheric contamination with radioactive dust and chemical species deposited on the ground and resuspended by wind occur very widely. This process is particularly pronounced in case of extensive contamination of soil and under extreme weather conditions, for example, during dust storms. The mechanism of wind dust generation consists in the following. At low wind speed U=2-3 m/s, which is most common in midlatitude, small radioactive dust particles (diameter of hundredth of a micron to 10-20 microns) are lifted from soil surface due to turbulent vortexes. Under the gravitational force the particles of 1-2 micron diameter practically do not settle. Larger dust particles cannot remain in the air for a long time: they are lifted by turbulent vortexes and settle, their motion in the wind flow is jump-wise and the interaction of particles with the flow is called saltation /I/. Saltation is the main mechanism of dust generation up to the wind velocity at which wind erosion starts. The size of dust particles can be as large as 100 pm. When dropping they can be ricocheting from ground or pass the impulse to other particles which begin rolling over and jumping up. The process of dust transport by wind can be compared to a chain reaction. At the velocity of 10 m/s large particles of about 500 pm stop skipping and roll over only, while particles of more than 1 mm remain stationary. Thus, the fine fraction is blown out from the polydispersed soil particles. The intensity of wind resuspension of radioactive dust from the ground is characterized either by a resuspension factor or a resuspension rate.

Schershakov, V. [Federal Information Analytical Centre, Obinski (Russia)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Multibody Models for Vehicle Accident Reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simplified multibody models can be used to reconstruct accidents involving complex dynamics, particularly, in the first stages of accident investigation, accidents involving motorcycles and pedestrians [1], [2].

Ricardo J. F. Portal; Jo鉶 M. P. Dias

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Co-relation of Variables Involved in the Occurrence of Crane Accidents in U.S. through Logit Modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were divided into categories with respect to accident types, construction operations, degree of accident, fault, contributing factors, crane types, victim抯 occupation, organs affected and load. Descriptive analysis was performed to compliment...

Bains, Amrit Anoop Singh

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shutdown mechanisms for a hypothetical criticality accident involving HEU powder: Preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

This work examines the physical processes that would cause an accidental criticality involving higly enriched uranium(HEU) powder to shut down naturally. The study analyses an excursion resulting from the continous poring of slightly damp HEU powder (either UO{sub 3} or UF{sub 4} containing 1.5% water) onto a concrete floor.

Bentley, C.; Basoglu, B.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Ruggles, A.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

SciTech Connect

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

Experiences in methods to involve key players in planning protective actions in the case of a nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......parliamentarians and experts see nuclear power. Energy Policy 19 (5), 464-472...IN THE CASE OF A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT 131 9...for environmental policy alternatives. J...parliamentarians and experts see nuclear power. Energy Policy 19 (5), 464......

K. Sinkko; R. P. H鋗鋖鋓nen; R. H鋘ninen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems  

SciTech Connect

The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.15/sup 0/K and one atmosphere.

Benson, L.V.; Teague, L.S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Using Software Development Standards to Analyse Accidents Involving Electrical, Electronic or Programmable, Electronic Systems: The Blade Mill PLC Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigating the immediate and underlying causes of incidents and accidents to ensure that remedial action techniques that might be used to investigate the underlying causes of E/E/PES related incidents. The following sections, therefore, introduce two techniques to support the investigation of this class

Johnson, Chris

33

SAS4A LMFBR whole core accident analysis code  

SciTech Connect

To ensure that public health and safety are protected even under accident conditions in an LMFBR, many accidents are analyzed for their potential consequences. Extremely unlikely accidents that might lead to melting of reactor fuel and release of radioactive fission products are referred to as hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs). The evaluation of such accidents involves the simultaneous evaluation of thermal, mechanical, hydraulic and neutronic processes and their interactions. The complexity of this analysis requires the use of large, integrated computer codes which address the response of the reactor core and several important systems. The SAS family of codes, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, provides such an analysis capability. The SAS4A code, the latest generation of this series of codes, has recently been completed and released for use to the LMFBR safety community. This paper will summarize the important new capabilitites of this analysis tool and illustrate an application of the integrated capability, while highlighting the importance of specific phenomenological models.

Weber, D.P.; Birgersson, G.; Bordner, G.L.; Briggs, L.L.; Cahalan, J.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Kalimullah; Miles, K.J.; Prohammer, F.G.; Tentner, A.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

S.O. Bader

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the February 20, 1996, Fall Fatality at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Transuranic Storage Area- Retrieval Enclosure, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type A Accident Investigation Board appointed by Tara O扵oole, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH-1).

36

Accident Response Group  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the February 27, 1998, Shipping Violations Involving the Corehole 8 Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennesee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type B Investigation Board appointed by James C. Hall, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy. The Board was appointed to perform a Type B investigation of these incidents and to prepare an investigation report in accordance with DOE Order 225.1A, Accident Investigations.

40

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste 路 Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste 路 Program requires 路 Generator support 路 Proper segregation 路 Packaging 路 labeling #12;Radioactive Waste 路 What is radioactive waste? 路 Anything that 路 Contains 路 or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

42

Microsoft Word - Unrelated Accident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., October 1, 2009 - A Wednesday night truck accident north of Albuquerque on Highway 165 that involved an 18-wheeler is not related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste shipments. Involved in the accident was a load of new, unused 55-gallon drums manufactured in Carlsbad that was en route to Richland, Washington. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic waste from people and the environment. Waste temporarily stored at sites around the country is shipped to WIPP and permanently disposed in rooms mined out of an ancient salt formation 2,150 feet below the surface. WIPP, which began waste

43

Accident Investigations  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and activities.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nuclear accident and incident public affairs (pa) guidance  

SciTech Connect

This Directive reissues reference (a) DoD Directive 5230.16 to update DoD policy, responsibilities, and procedures for the prompt release of information to the public in the interest of public safety, and to prevent public alarm in the event of accidents or significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear components, radioactive material, nuclear weapon launch or transport vehicles (when a nuclear weapon is aboard), or nuclear reactors under DoD control. It updates DoD policy, responsibilities, and procedures during an improvised nuclear device (IND) incident.

Not Available

1993-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the release of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphereRadioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects by Thormod Henriksen #12;Preface 颅 7 Chapter 2. What is radioactivity page 8 颅 27 Chapter 3. Radioactive decay laws page 28 颅 35

Sahay, Sundeep

46

Quantification of margins and uncertainties: Example analyses from reactor safety and radioactive waste disposal involving the separation of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with the national security laboratories (i.e., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories) initiated development of a process designated quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for the use of risk assessment methodologies in the certification of the reliability and safety of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. A previous presentation, 換uantification of Margins and Uncertainties: Conceptual and Computational Basis, describes the basic ideas that underlie QMU and illustrates these ideas with two notional examples. The basic ideas and challenges that underlie NNSA's mandate for QMU are present, and have been successfully addressed, in a number of past analyses for complex systems. To provide perspective on the implementation of a requirement for QMU in the analysis of a complex system, three past analyses are presented as examples: (i) the probabilistic risk assessment carried out for the Surry Nuclear Power Station as part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) reassessment of the risk from commercial nuclear power in the United States (i.e., the NUREG-1150 study), (ii) the performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant carried out by the DOE in support of a successful compliance certification application to the U.S. Environmental Agency, and (iii) the performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, carried out by the DOE in support of a license application to the NRC. Each of the preceding analyses involved a detailed treatment of uncertainty and produced results used to establish compliance with specific numerical requirements on the performance of the system under study. As a result, these studies illustrate the determination of both margins and the uncertainty in margins in real analyses.

Jon C. Helton; Jay D. Johnson; C閐ric J. Sallaberry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident additional information Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 13 September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS Summary: information with the other people involved in the accident. You...

48

Radioactivity in man: levels, effects and unknowns  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the potential for significant human exposure to internal radiation. Sources of radiation considered include background radiation, fallout, reactor accidents, radioactive waste, and occupational exposure to various radioisotopes. (ACR)

Rundo, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview  

SciTech Connect

Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an accident and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of accidents in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor  

SciTech Connect

The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination of爄ndividuals who have entered a 揾ot zone during transportation incidents involving radioactive.

52

Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents  

SciTech Connect

As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches@to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

Weiss, R.C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents  

SciTech Connect

As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

Weiss, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

An Integrated Accident & Consequence Analysis Approach for Accidental Releases through Multiple Leak Paths  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a consequence analysis for a postulated fire accident on a building containing plutonium when the resulting outside release is partly through the ventilation/filtration system and partly through other pathways such as building access doorways. When analyzing an accident scenario involving the release of radioactive powders inside a building, various pathways for the release to the outside environment can exist. This study is presented to guide the analyst on how the multiple building leak path factors (combination of filtered and unfiltered releases) can be evaluated in an integrated manner starting with the source term calculation and proceeding through the receptor consequence determination. The analysis is performed in a two-step process. The first step of the analysis is to calculate the leak path factor, which represents the fraction of respirable radioactive powder that is made airborne that leaves the building through the various pathways. The computer cod e of choice for this determination is MELCOR. The second step is to model the transport and dispersion of powder material released to the atmosphere and to estimate the resulting dose that is received by the downwind receptors of interest. The MACCS computer code is chosen for this part of the analysis. This work can be used as model for performing analyses for systems similar in nature where releases can propagate to the outside environment via filtered and unfiltered pathways. The methodology provides guidance to analysts outlining the essential steps needed to perform a sound and defensible consequence analysis.

POLIZZI, LM

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lessons from Major Accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The following lessons emerged from the accident, and have applications for the design of semi-submersible floating units: Cracks introduced during construction must be d...

Jan-Erik Vinnem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Accident Investigation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On February 7, 2014, Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security, and Quality Programs Environmental Management, DOE, formally appointed an Accident Investigation Board to...

57

Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.  

SciTech Connect

The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Phase 1 of this accident investigation report is an independent product of the Accident Investigation Board appointed by Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Safety, Security, and Quality...

59

Modeling of a confinement bypass accident with CONSEN, a fast-running code for safety analyses in fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The CONSEN (CONServation of ENergy) code is a fast running code to simulate thermal-hydraulic transients, specifically developed for fusion reactors. In order to demonstrate CONSEN capabilities, the paper deals with the accident analysis of the magnet induced confinement bypass for ITER design 1996. During a plasma pulse, a poloidal field magnet experiences an over-voltage condition or an electrical insulation fault that results in two intense electrical arcs. It is assumed that this event produces two one square meters ruptures, resulting in a pathway that connects the interior of the vacuum vessel to the cryostat air space room. The rupture results also in a break of a single cooling channel within the wall of the vacuum vessel and a breach of the magnet cooling line, causing the blow down of a steam/water mixture in the vacuum vessel and in the cryostat and the release of 4燢 helium into the cryostat. In the meantime, all the magnet coils are discharged through the magnet protection system actuation. This postulated event creates the simultaneous failure of two radioactive confinement barrier and it envelopes all type of smaller \\{LOCAs\\} into the cryostat. Ice formation on the cryogenic walls is also involved. The accident has been simulated with the CONSEN code up to 32爃. The accident evolution and the phenomena involved are discussed in the paper and the results are compared with available results obtained using the MELCOR code.

Gianfranco Caruso; Fabio Giannetti; Maria Teresa Porfiri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies  

SciTech Connect

Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comments on a paper tilted `The sea transport of vitrified high-level radioactive wastes: Unresolved safety issues`  

SciTech Connect

The cited paper estimates the consequences that might occur should a purpose-built ship transporting Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) be involved in a severe collision that causes the VHLW canisters in one Type-B package to spill onto the floor of a major ocean fishing region. Release of radioactivity from VHLW glass logs, failure of elastomer cask seals, failure of VHLW canisters due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and the probabilities of the hypothesized accident scenario, of catastrophic cask failure, and of cask recovery from the sea are all discussed.

Sprung, J.L.; McConnell, P.E.; Nigrey, P.J.; Ammerman, D.J. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Visibility and Road Accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... road accidents from a very unusual point of view. These writers investigated the beliefs of pedestrians regarding their own visibility, to see how far these beliefs compared with their actual ... drive.

1940-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Accident resistant transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced 揜ISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced 揜ISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

67

Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Includes Pre-March 2011 Type A Reports September 1, 1998 Type A Accident Investigation...

68

Accident Investigation Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSI NOT MEAS UREMENT TIVE D DOE-HDBK-1 1208-2012 July 2012 DOE E HA ANDBOOK K Ac ccide ent and d Op pera ational Sa afety y An naly ysis Volume e I: Ac ccide ent A Analy ysis Tec chniq ques U.S. Depar rtmen nt of En nergy Was shingto on, D.C C. 205 85 DOE-HDBK-1208-2012 INTRODUCTION - HANDBOOK APPLICATION AND SCOPE Accident Investigations (AI) and Operational Safety Reviews (OSR) are valuable for evaluating technical issues, safety management systems and human performance and environmental conditions to prevent accidents, through a process of continuous organizational learning. This Handbook brings together the strengths of the experiences gained in conducting Department of Energy (DOE) accident investigations over the past many years. That experience encourages us

69

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel shipping container characteristics and shipping practices * Gain understanding of how the NNPP escorts who accompany the spent fuel shipments will interact with civilian emergency services representatives g y p * Allow civilian emergency services agencies the opportunity to evaluate their response to a pp y p simulated accident * Gain understanding of how the communications links that would be activated in an accident involving a Naval spent fuel shipment would work 1 NTSF May 11 ACCIDENT EXERCISE TYPICAL TIMELINE * Conceptual/Organizational Meeting - April 6 E R T i d it t t d TYPICAL TIMELINE

70

Birds prefer to breed in sites with low radioactivity in Chernobyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Birds prefer to breed in sites with low radioactivity in Chernobyl A. P. M酶ller1,* and T. A. 1988). Likewise, a recent report on the biological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl predicted after the accident (Chernobyl Forum 2005). However, the main conclusion remaining after 20 years

Mousseau, Timothy A.

71

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

72

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

73

Alcohol and Motor Accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... averaged 18 a day and the injuries more than 600. Half the deaths were among pedestrians and a fifth among pedal cyclists, while drivers of motor vehicles and their passengers ... vehicles and their passengers had only a third to a fourth as many accidents as pedestrians. Although the data of the Ministry of Transport indicate that only 1 in 80 ...

1937-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Road Accidents and Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of speed); later still to lack of care in all road users without exception (pedestrians, cyclists and drivers), that is, the whole community. Before blaming the 'human ... to probe into such other accident causes as the varying number of traffic units including pedestrians brought on to the roads by more hours of sunshine. Two drought years increased ...

MERVYN O'GORMAN

1944-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chernobyl nuclear accident: Effects on food. (Latest citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radioactive contamination by the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident of food and the food chain. The studies cover meat and dairy products, vegetables, fish, food chains, and radioactive contamination of agricultural farms and lands. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

Chester, C.V.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M. [Institute of Physics, Tbilisi, Georgia (Russian Federation)] [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Storage depot for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

87

The lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder as described by motor vehicle accident victims in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aim: To explore the lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as described by individuals who have been involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) (more)

Al-Kofahy, Lilibeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Electrical shock accident investigation  

SciTech Connect

This report documents results of the accident investigation of an electrical shock received by two subcontractor employees on May 13, 1994, at the Pinellas Plant. The direct cause of the electrical shock was worker contact with a cut ``hot`` wire and a grounded panelboard (PPA) enclosure. Workers presumed that all wires in the enclosure were dead at the time of the accident and did not perform thorough Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO). Three contributing causes were identified. First, lack of guidance in the drawing for the modification performed in 1987 allowed the PPA panel to be used as a junction box. The second contributing cause is that Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) procedures do not address multiple electrical sources in an enclosure. Finally, the workers did not consider the possibility of multiple electrical sources. The root cause of the electrical shock was the inadequacy of administrative controls, including construction requirement and LO/TO requirements, and subcontractor awareness regarding multiple electrical sources. Recommendations to prevent further reoccurrence of this type of accident include revision of ES&H Standard 2.00, Electrical Safety Program Manual, to document requirements for multiple electrical sources in a single enclosure to specify a thorough visual inspection as part of the voltage check process. In addition, the formality of LO/TO awareness training for subcontractor electricians should be increased.

Not Available

1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Piercing tool, Transportation Accident Resistant Container (TARC)  

SciTech Connect

Transportation Accident Resistant Containers (TARC)s are used for enhanced safety during movement of nuclear weapons. Its design features a tough stainless steel outer skin, redwood for impact mitigation and fire protection and a rugged aluminum inner container. Redwood absorbs impact energy by crushing, similar to the way foam crushes in other containers. Redwood also functions to insulate the weapon from heat and fire. When a TARC is involved in a fire, the redwood will slowly burn forming a good insulating char. The redwood can continue to smolder once the fire is out. To ensure the smolder is extinguished, water can be directed into any accident caused hole in the skin. If no hole exists, it may be necessary to create one. This document discusses tool selection, testing, and a simple but effective method of creating an access hole in the outer skin large enough to apply fire fighting techniques.

Lari, P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

5 - Fukushima Radioactivity Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Huge amounts of radioactivity have been released to the environment because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. In order to implement adequate protective actions and to assess the impact of the Fukushima radioactivity on the environment, an environmental monitoring has been conducted by national and local governments, research institutes and universities in Japan and over the world. The environmental monitoring revealed that heavy radioactivity-contaminated areas appeared within about 50 km of the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, controlled by land topography as do meteorological factors. The Fukushima-derived radionuclides, in which dominant nuclides were 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, contaminated food stuffs. The radionuclide levels exceeded the regulation values in a part of food stuffs produced within about 500 km off Fukushima. Based on the comprehensive monitoring data, we describe here levels of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments and in food products in Japan and over the globe. Temporal and spatial distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in aerosols revealed the presence of two dominant radionuclide maxima which were observed throughout the Europe with decreasing amplitudes from the North to the South, which were associated with different air masses present in the European air. Modeled forward and backward trajectories indicated a preferential transport of air masses between Fukushima and Europe at 500 hPa (5000 m a. s. l.) air heights. The Lagrangian dispersion modeling showed that the horizontal dispersion in the Europe reached about 4000-km-wide belt, however, the entire world has been labeled with the Fukushima radionuclides, although at very low levels. A typical travel time between Fukushima and Europe has been estimated to be of 1015 days, with an average speed of the plume of 5070 km/h. An average 131I concentration, which was measured over the Europe (?1 mBq/m3), would result in the total amount of dispersed 131I of about 1 PBq. Although this represents a high release rate (almost 1% of the total amount of 131I released from the Fukushima NPP), as it was distributed over a huge area, it has not been of any radiological significance for European citizens. 134Cs and 137Cs were released to the North Pacific Ocean by two major likely pathways, direct discharge from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP site and atmospheric deposition off Honshu Islands of Japan, east and northeast of the site. High-density observations of 134Cs and 137Cs in the surface water were carried out by 17 cruises of cargo ships and several research-vessel cruises since March 2011 till March 2012. Main body of radioactive surface plume whose activity exceeded 10 Bq/m3 had been traveling along 40 N, and reached International Date Line on March 2012, 1 year after the accident. A zonal speed of the radioactive plume was estimated to be about 8 cm/s which was consistent with the zonal speed derived by Argo floats and satellite observations at the region. The dispersion of Fukushima-derived 137Cs in surface seawater of the North Pacific Ocean was carried out using an ocean global circulation model. The traveling time from the Fukushima coast to the US west coast was estimated to be 45 years, and the predicted 137Cs levels will reach ?3 Bq/m3, which are by about a factor of three higher than the present global fallout background levels. After 10 years, the 137Cs in the North Pacific Ocean will not be distinguishable over the global fallout background of 1 Bq/m3. The maximum predicted 137Cs activity concentrations in 2012 in the open western North Pacific Ocean will be around 20 Bq/m3, which will be comparable to that observed during the early 1960s after atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. However, after 10 years this concentration will be similar to that from global fallout. The open Pacific Ocean radionuclide concentrations will not pose therefore any radiation risk to the world population from consumption of seafood collected in this region.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Chernobyl Nuclear Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...often repeated belief of the opponents of nuclear power that the risks, whatever they are, outweigh the need for and the known value of nuclear energy in developing electric power in the world. We are some 44 years away from the first development of nuclear energy, and yet the authors of this editorial... To the Editor: Cassel and Leaning began their editorial (July 27 issue)1 with a review of the report on the Chernobyl nuclear accident by Baranov et al.2 in the same issue, but they very quickly shifted to a barrage of warning shots across the bow of the ...

1990-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

95

Examination of radioactive decay methodology in the HASCAL code  

SciTech Connect

The HASCAL 2.0 code provides dose estimates for nuclear, chemical, and biological facility accident and terrorist weapon strike scenarios. In the analysis of accidents involving radioactive material, an approximate method is used to account for decay during transport. Rather than perform the nuclide decay during the atmospheric transport calculation, the decay is performed a priori and a table look up method is used during the transport of a depositing tracer particle and non depositing (gaseous) tracer particle. In order to investigate the accuracy of this decay methodology two decay models were created using the ORIGEN2 computer program. The first is a HASCAL like model that treats decay and growth of all nuclide explicitly over the time interval specified for atmospheric transport, but does not change the relative mix of depositing and non-depositing nuclides due to deposition to the ground, nor does it treat resuspension. The second model explicitly includes resuspension as well as separate decay of the nuclides in the atmosphere and on the ground at each deposition time step. For simplicity, both of these models uses a one-dimensional layer model for the atmospheric transport. An additional investigation was performed to determine the accuracy of the HASCAL like model in separately following Cs-137 and I-131. The results from this study show that the HASCAL decay model compares closely with the more rigorous model with the computed doses are generally within one percent (maximum error of 7 percent) over 48 hours following the release. The models showed no difference for Cs-137 and a maximum error of 2.5 percent for I-131 over the 96 hours following release.

Steffler, R.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ryman, J.C.; Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075  

SciTech Connect

The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8) government policies, among others. This paper offers a perspective on this likely long and arduous journey toward establishing a 'new normal' that will ultimately take shape. Toward this end, it is important to evaluate the 'optimization' process advocated by the international community in achieving long-term recovery from this particularly fateful event in Fukushima. In the process, experience and lessons learned from past events will be fully evaluated and considered. (author)

Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991  

SciTech Connect

On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ``lessons learned`` from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991  

SciTech Connect

On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

100

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000掳C (3600掳F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief # 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout / tagout programs

102

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

103

Radioactive ''hot spots'' from nuclear weapons test fallout  

SciTech Connect

In a paper presented on January 8, 1985, at the Health Physics Society Midyear Symposium, Franke and Alvarez claimed that radioactivity observed on the Savannah River Plant site on March 14, 1955, was the result of a reactor accident. The source of the observed radioactivity was, in fact, rainwater containing radioactive products from a nuclear weapon test made two days earlier in Nevada. The weapon test TEAPOT HORNET was shown to be the source of the contamination at the time, and this has been corroborated in two recent papers. The aim of this review is to show that the highly-localized radioactive fallout on the Savannah River Plant site was not unique but part of a widespread phenomenon occurring all over the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, S.M.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Source terms for plutonium aerosolization from nuclear weapon accidents  

SciTech Connect

The source term literature was reviewed to estimate aerosolized and respirable release fractions for accidents involving plutonium in high-explosive (HE) detonation and in fuel fires. For HE detonation, all estimates are based on the total amount of Pu. For fuel fires, all estimates are based on the amount of Pu oxidized. I based my estimates for HE detonation primarily upon the results from the Roller Coaster experiment. For hydrocarbon fuel fire oxidation of plutonium, I based lower bound values on laboratory experiments which represent accident scenarios with very little turbulence and updraft of a fire. Expected values for aerosolization were obtained from the Vixen A field tests, which represent a realistic case for modest turbulence and updraft, and for respirable fractions from some laboratory experiments involving large samples of Pu. Upper bound estimates for credible accidents are based on experiments involving combustion of molten plutonium droplets. In May of 1991 the DOE Pilot Safety Study Program established a group of experts to estimate the fractions of plutonium which would be aerosolized and respirable for certain nuclear weapon accident scenarios.

Stephens, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Down syndrome clusters in Germany after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

In two independent studies using different approaches and covering West Berlin and Bavaria, respectively, highly significant temporal clusters of Down syndrome were found. Both sharp increases occurred in areas receiving relatively low Chernobyl fallout and concomitant radiation exposures. Only for the Berlin cluster was fallout present at the time of the affected meiosis, whereas the Nuremberg cluster preceded the radioactive contamination by 1 month. Hypotheses on possible causal relationships are compared. Radiation from the Chernobyl accident is an unlikely factor, because the associated cumulative dose was so low in comparison with natural background. Microdosimetric considerations would indicate that fewer than 1 in 200 oocyte nuclei would have experienced an ionizing event from Chernobyl radioactivity. Given the lack of understanding of what causes Down syndrome, other than factors associated with increased maternal age, additional research into environmental and infectious risk factors is warranted. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Burkart, W.; Grosche, B.; Schoetzau, A. [Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J. [WorleyParsons, Reading, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

108

Digital Radiography of a Drop Tested 9975 Radioactive Materials Packaging  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the use of radiography as a tool for evaluating damage to radioactive material packaging subjected to regulatory accident conditions. The Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 71, presents the performance based requirements that must be used in the development (design, fabrication and testing) of a radioactive material packaging. The use of various non-destructive examination techniques in the fabrication of packages is common. One such technique is the use of conventional radiography in the examination of welds. Radiography is conventional in the sense that images are caught one at a time on film stock. Most recently, digital radiography has been used to characterize internal damage to a package subjected to the 30-foot hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) drop. Digital radiography allows for real time evaluation of the item being inspected. This paper presents a summary discussion of the digital radiographic technique and an example of radiographic results of a 9975 package following the HAC 30-foot drop.

Blanton, P.S.

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 On Monday, February 12, 2013, a principal investigator at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Engineering Demonstration Facility (IEDF) was testing the system configuration of experimental process involving liquid sodium carbonate. An unanticipated event occurred that resulted in the ejection of the 900掳 C liquid sodium carbonate from the system. The ejected liquid came into contact with the principal investigator and caused multiple second and third degree burn injuries to approximately 10 percent of his body. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Site Lead for

110

Issues of natural radioactivity in phosphates  

SciTech Connect

The fertilization of phosphorus (P) fertilizers is essential in agricultural production, but phosphates contain in dependence on their origin different amounts of trace elements. The problem of cadmium (Cd) loads and other heavy metals is well known. However, only a limited number of investigations examined the contamination of phosphates with the two heaviest metals, uranium (U) and thorium (Th), which are radioactive. Also potassium (K) is lightly radioactive. Measurements are done n the radioactivity content of phosphates, P fertilizers and soils. The radiation doses to workers and public as well as possible contamination of soils from phosphate rock or fertilizer caused by these elements or their daughter products is of interest with regard to radiation protection. The use of P fertilizers is necessary for a sustainable agriculture, but it involves radioactive contamination of soils. The consequences of the use of P fertilizers is discussed, also with regard to existing and proposed legislation. 11 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Schnug, E.; Haneklaus, S. [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Braunschweig (Germany); Schnier, C. [GKSS-Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Scholten, L.C. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Offshore blow-out accidents : an analysis of causes of vulnerability exposing technological systems to accidents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about understanding causes of vulnerabilities leading to specific type of accidents on offshore oil and gas installations. Blow-out accidents have disastrous potential (more)

S鎡ren, Thomas G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

113

A CANDU Severe Accident Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As interest in severe accident studies has increased in the last years, we have developed a set of simple models to analyze severe accidents for CANDU reactors that should be integrated in the EU codes. The CANDU600 reactor uses natural uranium fuel and heavy water (D2O) as both moderator and coolant, with the moderator and coolant in separate systems. We chose to analyze accident development for a LOCA with simultaneous loss of moderator cooling and the loss of emergency core cooling system (ECCS). This type of accident is likely to modify the reactor geometry and will lead to a severe accident development. When the coolant temperatures inside a pressure tube reaches 10000 deg C, a contact between pressure tube and calandria tube occurs and the residual heat is transferred to the moderator. Due to the lack of cooling, the moderator eventually begins to boil and is expelled, through the calandria vessel relief ducts, into the containment. Therefore the calandria tubes (fuel channels) will be uncovered, then will disintegrate and fall down to the calandria vessel bottom. After all the quantity of moderator is vaporized and expelled, the debris will heat up and eventually boil. The heat accumulated in the molten debris will be transferred through the calandria vessel wall to the shield tank water, which normally surrounds the calandria vessel. The phenomena described above are modelled, analyzed and compared with the existing data. The results are encouraging. (authors)

Negut, Gheorghe; Catana, Alexandru [Institute for Nuclear Research, 1, Compului Str., Mioveni, PO Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Prisecaru, Ilie [University Politehnica Bucharest (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A review of the Melcor Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS): Capabilities and applications  

SciTech Connect

MACCS was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship to estimate the offsite consequences of potential severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs). MACCS was publicly released in 1990. MACCS was developed to support the NRC`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) efforts. PSA techniques can provide a measure of the risk of reactor operation. PSAs are generally divided into three levels. Level one efforts identify potential plant damage states that lead to core damage and the associated probabilities, level two models damage progression and containment strength for establishing fission-product release categories, and level three efforts evaluate potential off-site consequences of radiological releases and the probabilities associated with the consequences. MACCS was designed as a tool for level three PSA analysis. MACCS performs probabilistic health and economic consequence assessments of hypothetical accidental releases of radioactive material from NPPs. MACCS includes models for atmospheric dispersion and transport, wet and dry deposition, the probabilistic treatment of meteorology, environmental transfer, countermeasure strategies, dosimetry, health effects, and economic impacts. The computer systems MACCS is designed to run on are the 386/486 PC, VAX/VMS, E3M RISC S/6000, Sun SPARC, and Cray UNICOS. This paper provides an overview of MACCS, reviews some of the applications of MACCS, international collaborations which have involved MACCS, current developmental efforts, and future directions.

Young, M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives...

116

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 8,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...

117

Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic...

118

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect

Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C.F. [Martin Marietta Utility Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Analysis of accidents during flashing operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred at intersections under flashing operation compared to those operating in the normal mode. A statistical analysis was conducted to determine the safety of flashing signal operation. No significant increases in accidents or accident severity were...

Obermeyer, Michael Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

122

Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences Using Inherent Safety Principles  

SciTech Connect

Sodium-cooled fast reactors are designed to have a high level of safety. Events of high probability of occurrence are typically handled without consequence through reliable engineering systems and good design practices. For accidents of lower probability, the initiating events are characterized by larger and more numerous challenges to the reactor system, such as failure of one or more major engineered systems and can also include a failure to scram the reactor in response. As the initiating conditions become more severe, they have the potential for creating serious consequences of potential safety significance, including fuel melting, fuel pin disruption and recriticality. If the progression of such accidents is not mitigated by design features of the reactor, energetic events and dispersal of radioactive materials may result. For severe accidents, there are several approaches that can be used to mitigate the consequences of such severe accident initiators, which typically include fuel pin failures and core disruption. One approach is to increase the reliability of the reactor protection system so that the probability of an ATWS event is reduced to less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year, where larger accident consequences are allowed, meeting the U.S. NRC goal of relegating such accident consequences as core disruption to these extremely low probabilities. The main difficulty with this approach is to convincingly test and guarantee such increased reliability. Another approach is to increase the redundancy of the reactor scram system, which can also reduce the probability of an ATWS event to a frequency of less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year or lower. The issues with this approach are more related to reactor core design, with the need for a greater number of control rod positions in the reactor core and the associated increase in complexity of the reactor protection system. A third approach is to use the inherent reactivity feedback that occurs in a fast reactor to automatically respond to the change in reactor conditions and to result in a benign response to these events. This approach has the advantage of being relatively simple to implement, and does not face the issue of reliability since only fundamental physical phenomena are used in a passive manner, not active engineered systems. However, the challenge is to present a convincing case that such passive means can be implemented and used. The purpose of this paper is to describe this third approach in detail, the technical basis and experimental validation for the approach, and the resulting reactor performance that can be achieved for ATWS events.

R. A. Wigeland; J. E. Cahalan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Accident Generated Particulate Materials and Their Characteristics -- A Review of Background Information  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of the amount of radioactive particulate material initially airborne (source term) during accidents. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has surveyed the literature, gathering information on the amount and size of these particles that has been developed from limited experimental work, measurements made from operational accidents, and known aerosol behavior. Information useful for calculating both liquid and powder source terms is compiled in this report. Potential aerosol generating events discussed are spills, resuspension, aerodynamic entrainment, explosions and pressurized releases, comminution, and airborne chemical reactions. A discussion of liquid behavior in sprays, sparging, evaporation, and condensation as applied to accident situations is also included.

Sutter, S. L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ORISE: University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNIRIB UNIRIB Research Overview Physics Topics Equipment Development Education and Training People Publications Overview 2009 Bibliography 2008 Bibliography 2007 Bibliography 2006 Bibliography How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium The University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is a division of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) focused on cutting-edge nuclear physics research. UNIRIB is a collaborative partnership involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and nine member universities that leverages national laboratory and university resources to effectively accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) strategic goals in the fundamental structure of nuclei.

125

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fusion reactions involving radioactive beams at GANIL. Gilles de France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the first case, the high energy beam from the second cyclotron is fragmented onto a target (the production efficiently refocus the species after their production by the fragmentation mechanism, and to optimise energy reaction mechanism) at the Coulomb barrier are possible with that kind of beams. RIBs like 76 Kr

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

127

Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident  

SciTech Connect

The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition mechanisms of fuel particles and fission fragments during the initial phase of the Chernobyl accident. Through this study, it is now possible to generally reconstruct the radiological consequences by using a dispersion calculation technique, combined with the meteorological data at the time of the accident and land contamination densities of {sup 137}Cs measured and reported around the Chernobyl area. Although it is challenging to incorporate lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident into the source term issues, the author has already developed an example of safety goals by incorporating the radiological consequences of the accident. The example provides safety goals by specifying source term releases in a graded approach in combination with probabilities, i.e. risks. The author believes that the future source term specification should be directly linked with safety goals. (author)

Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiological consequences of a propagated fire accident in a radiochemical separations facility  

SciTech Connect

A radiological consequence analysis of a propagated fire accident in a Savannah River Site (SRS) radiochemical separations facility has been performed. This analysis supports the safety documentation for the SRS plutonium reprocessing facility. Included are the evaluation of the doses resulting from the exposure to the radioactive airborne release for co-located facility worker and the off-site individual receptors. Atmospheric dispersion calculations using qualified five-year (1987-1991) meteorological data were performed with the computer code AXAIR89Q, a validated computer code for radiological dose calculations. Radioactive source term estimates and assumptions of material composition and isotope distribution were based on existing permissible storage levels as defined in approved safety documentation. The fire accident scenario assumes that the fire propagates in the entire facility on four structural levels. Approximately 97% of the radioactive materials released occurs from levels three and four of the facility, which are not included in the ventilation pathway to the sand trap filter. Radiological analysis results indicate that the doses to co-located worker and off-site individual receptors are equal to 4.4 rem and 3.3 rem, respectively. Accident mitigators that were identified include provision for filtration capacity from levels three and four of the facility, and relocation of stored radioactive materials. Provision for filtration capacity would reduce the source term from an unfiltered activity of 53.6 Ci to a filtered activity of 2.0 Ci. Relocation of stored radioactive materials would result in a source term reduction from 53.6 Ci to 20 Ci. Limitations exist, however, that may make implementation of the identified mitigators difficult or prohibitive.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

130

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Radioactive Dust from Nuclear Detonations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than the dose received from natural radioactivity in a period of...radioactive particles. The natural radioactivity of the atmosphere...curies/liter. This radioactive gas is present in equilibrium with...With an approximation of the natural radiation dose to the lung as...

Merril Eisenbud; John H. Harley

1953-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Projecting Fatalities in Crashes involving Older Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crashes Crashes Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers Involving Older Drivers Oak Oak Ridge Ridge National Laboratory National Laboratory, USA USA Presented at Presented at the the 17th 17th World Congress of the International World Congress of the International Association Association for Accident and Traffic Medicine for Accident and Traffic Medicine May May 30, 30, 2000, 2000, Stockholm, Sweden Stockholm, Sweden ORNL ORNL P. P. Hu Hu D. D. Jones Jones T. T. Reuscher Reuscher R. R. Schmoyer Schmoyer T. T. Truett Truett General General Motors Motors Annette Annette Irwin Irwin U.S. U.S. DOTransportation DOTransportation Jesse Jesse Blatt Blatt Acknowledgements Acknowledgements Objective Objective This This research research is is funded funded by by a a Cooperative Cooperative Research

133

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

135

The Skikda LNG accident: losses, lessons learned and safety climate assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Skikda LNG accident was the worst petrochemical plant fire in Algeria, in which 27 employees died, 56 injured and cost $900 million. The accident was caused by several reasons: poor maintenance and poor general condition of unit 40, the site distribution of different units which caused domino effect and there is no perfect prevention, communication system on safety. The paper summarised the lessons from the Skikda LNG accident and assessed the health and safety management made following the accident. Also, a safety climate assessment is used to assess employees' perceptions at the new safety policy. The results showed that there is divergence between operators and executives because operators are not involved in the safety setting.

Roukia Ouddai; Hassane Chabane; Assia Boughaba; Mohamed Frah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Accident Prevention and Investigation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) Accident Prevention and Investigation Program serves as a key DOE corporate safety resource for promoting accident PREVENTION through exchange of lessons learned and information for improvement of our integrated safety management system. The techniques and tools utilized in the investigation of "accidents" can be valuable in looking at leading indicators associated with our safety program, to determine the embedded precursors to accidents, and prevent them from occurring. The information obtained through application of these techniques and tools serve as benchmarks for others to utilize in evaluating their safety management systems.

137

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the...

138

Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective...

139

DOE Accident Prevention and Investigation Program | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

The Corporate Safety Programs maintains the Accident Investigation and Prevention Handbook (DOE-HDBK-1208-2012) as part of a continuing effort to enhance quality and achieve...

140

Retrospection of Chernobyl nuclear accident for decision analysis concerning remedial actions in Ukraine  

SciTech Connect

It is considered the efficacy of decisions concerning remedial actions when of-site radiological monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases was absent or was not informative. There are examples of such situations in the former Soviet Union where many people have been exposed: releases of radioactive materials from 'Krasnoyarsk-26' into Enisey River, releases of radioactive materials from 'Chelabinsk-65' (the Kishtim accident), nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, the Chernobyl nuclear accident etc. If monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases is absent the decisions concerning remedial actions are usually developed on the base of permanent monitoring. However decisions of this kind may be essentially erroneous. For these cases it is proposed to make retrospection of radiological data of the early and intermediate phases of nuclear accident and to project decisions concerning remedial actions on the base of both retrospective data and permanent monitoring data. In this Report the indicated problem is considered by the example of the Chernobyl accident for Ukraine. Their of-site radiological monitoring in the early and intermediate phases was unsatisfactory. In particular, the pasture-cow-milk monitoring had not been made. All official decisions concerning dose estimations had been made on the base of measurements of {sup 137}Cs in body (40 measurements in 135 days and 55 measurements in 229 days after the Chernobyl accident). For the retrospection of radiological data of the Chernobyl accident dynamic model has been developed. This model has structure similar to the structure of Pathway model and Farmland model. Parameters of the developed model have been identified for agricultural conditions of Russia and Ukraine. By means of this model dynamics of 20 radionuclides in pathways and dynamics of doses have been estimated for the early, intermediate and late phases of the Chernobyl accident. The main results are following: - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 75-93% of Commitment Effective Dose had been formed; - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 85-90% of damage from radiation exposure had been formed. During the next 50 years (the late phase of accident) only 10-15% of damage from radiation exposure will have been formed; - Remedial actions (agricultural remedial actions as most effective) in Ukraine are intended for reduction of the damage from consumption of production which is contaminated in the late phase of accident. I.e. agricultural remedial actions have been intended for minimization only 10 % of the total damage from radiation exposure; - Medical countermeasures can minimize radiation exposure damage by an order of magnitude greater than agricultural countermeasures. - Thus, retrospection of nuclear accident has essentially changed type of remedial actions and has given a chance to increase effectiveness of spending by an order of magnitude. This example illustrates that in order to optimize remedial actions it is required to use data of retrospection of nuclear accidents in all cases when monitoring in the early and (or) intermediate phases is unsatisfactory. (author)

Georgievskiy, Vladimir [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Insitute', Kurchatov Sq., 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

Sarrack, A.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radioactive Waste Management in Non-Nuclear Countries - 13070  

SciTech Connect

This paper challenges internationally accepted concepts of dissemination of responsibilities between all stakeholders involved in national radioactive waste management infrastructure in the countries without nuclear power program. Mainly it concerns countries classified as class A and potentially B countries according to International Atomic Energy Agency. It will be shown that in such countries long term sustainability of national radioactive waste management infrastructure is very sensitive issue that can be addressed by involving regulatory body in more active way in the infrastructure. In that way countries can mitigate possible consequences on the very sensitive open market of radioactive waste management services, comprised mainly of radioactive waste generators, operators of end-life management facilities and regulatory body. (authors)

Kubelka, Dragan; Trifunovic, Dejan [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Vacuuming radioactive sludge  

SciTech Connect

Vacuuming an estimated 55 cubic yards of radioactive sludge from the floor of Hanford's K East Basin was a complicated process. Workers stood on grates suspended above the 20-foot deep basin and manipulated vacuuming equipment at the end of long poles--using underwater cameras to guide their work.

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred during the nuclear accident, and probably noHEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT MILE ISLAND JacobENG-48 HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT A T THREE MILE

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NUCLEAR POWER: Extent of Soviet accident uncertain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR POWER: Extent of Soviet accident uncertain ... Detailed, official information about the Chernobyl nuclear power-plant disaster as of late last week remained wrapped in the Soviet Union's usual shroud of secrecy. ... But there seems to be no doubt that it is the worst accident in the 43-year history of nuclear power. ...

1986-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper studies the effect of changes in accident pattern due to Daylight Savings Time (DST). The extension of the DST in 2007 provides a natural experiment to determine whether the number of traffic accidents is affected by shifts in hours...

Deen, Sophia 1988-

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

A radiological incident with a radioactive lightning rod source found in a vehicle used by film crewmembers: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......due to lack of proper regulatory control. The use of...and implemented action plans to locate, dismantle...RLRs were subject to regulatory control with relatively...the past. Due to weak regulatory control and non-existence...radioactive sources. ACCIDENT REVIEW Upon receiving a request......

Olivera Ciraj-Bjelac; Milojko Kovacevic; Dusko Kosutic; Danijela Arandjic; Djordje Lazarevic

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor Lift...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Lift Accident in the West Hackberry Brine Tank-14 Resulting in Injury, Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry, LA Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor...

155

Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

operated and maintained by the site lessee, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). Type B Accident Investigation of the July 12, 2007, Forklift and Pedestrian Accident...

156

Sandia National Laboratories: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationWaste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident Investigation Analysis Support Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident Investigation Analysis...

157

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video September 20, 2013 -...

158

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1, 1999, Construction Injury at the Monticello Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Monticello, Utah Type B Accident...

159

Type A Accident Investigation of the March 16, 2000, Plutonium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the July 14, 2005, Americium Contamination Accident at the Sigma Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

160

TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident  

SciTech Connect

The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor抯 survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation process that could be implemented in upcoming Fukushima Daiichi recovery efforts.

Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Accident Investigation of the June 17, 2012, Construction Accident- Structural Steel Collapse at The Over pack Storage Expansion #2 at the Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the Naval Reactors investigation into the collapse ofa partially-erected spent fuel storage building, Overpack Storage Expansion #2 (OSE2), at the Naval Reactors Facility. The Accident Investigation Board inspected the scene, collected physical and photographic evidence, interviewed involved personnel, and reviewed relevant documents to determine the key causes of the accident. Based on the information gathered during the investigation, the Board identified several engineering and safety deficiencies that need to be addressed to prevent recurrence.

162

Traces of fission products in southeast Spain after the Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traces of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs were measured after the Fukushima nuclear accident between 23 March and 13 April 2011 in southeast Spain. The movement of the radioactive cloud toward southeast Spain was reconstructed based on the backward and forward trajectory cluster analyses. Polar maritime air masses which had originated over North America transported the radioactive plume toward the southeast Spain. Aerosols, rainwater, vegetables and cheese were analyzed to determine the radioactive risk. The highest concentrations of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs in air samples were 2.63牨0.12爉Bq/m3; 0.10牨0.03爉Bq/m3; 0.09牨0.02爉Bq/m3, respectively. After precipitation on April 3rd, the maximum concentrations of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs were detected in rainwater samples, 1.10牨0.16爉Bq/L; 0.022牨0.003爉Bq/L; 0.05牨0.03爉Bq/L, respectively. As a consequence, 131I was transferred to the human food chain, and found in chard and goat cheese, 0.97牨0.20燘q/kg and 0.52牨0.08燘q/kg, respectively. The traces of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs detected in the different samples were so low, that there is no impact on human health or the environment in Spain after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

F. Pi馿ro Garc韆; M.A. Ferro Garc韆

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Finding Aids: Radioactive Fallout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Argonne National Laboratory Bancroft Library, University of California Boeing Aircraft Company Brookhaven National Laboratory Coordination and Information Center (CIC) Eastman Kodak EG&G, Energy Measurements Holmes and Narver Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Manuscript Division, Library of Congress National Academy of Sciences Archives Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories Scripps Institution of Oceanography Archives Smithsonian Institution Archives U.S. Air Force Brooks Air Force Base Kirtland Air Force Base USAF Historical Research Center U.S. Army Chemical Corps (Aberdeen Proving Ground)

164

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

Bower, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Weeks, Donald R. (Saratoga, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

167

11 - Ukraine: experience of radioactive waste (RAW) management and contaminated site clean-up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: A succinct description of the experience of radioactive waste management in Ukraine, which accumulated when using nuclear energy and developed as a result of the accident at Chernobyl nuclear power plant, is given in this chapter. In addition, the chapter summarizes the current state of the Chernobyl area contamination and the experience of Ukraine in decontamination and clean-up of the contaminated territories.

V. Shestopalov; I. Shybetskyi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Review of models applicable to accident aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

Glissmeyer, J.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad NM The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Accident Prevention Investigation Board was appointed to investigate a fire at the...

170

Nuclear reactor accidents: Chernobyl, TMI, and windscale. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radiological consequences of nuclear reactor accidents. The citations cover specifically the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR, the Three Mile Island (TMI) reactor in the US, and the Windscale reactor in the UK. Included are detection and monitoring of the fallout; the resultant runoff into rivers, lakes, and the sea; the radiation effects on people; and the transfrontier radioactive contamination of the environment. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear reactor accidents: Chernobyl, TMI, and Windscale. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radiological consequences of nuclear reactor accidents. The citations cover specifically the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR, the Three Mile Island (TMI) reactor in the US, and the Windscale reactor in the UK. Included are detection and monitoring of the fallout; the resultant runoff into rivers, lakes, and the sea; the radiation effects on people; and the transfrontier radioactive contamination of the environment. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Three Mile Island accident and post-accident recovery: what did we learn  

SciTech Connect

A description of the accident at Three Mile Island-2 reactor is presented. Activities related to the cleanup and decontamination of the reactor are described.

Collins, E.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

174

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS  

SciTech Connect

Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Radiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quarterly 路 Radioactive waste retrieval, storage, disposal 路 Dosimetry exchange 路 Leak tests of sealedRadiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material, Chemistry, Physics, Applied Physiology 路 Radioactive Material 颅 Sealed Sources, Unsealed Sources (liquid

Sherrill, David

179

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

180

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Commitment to Public Involvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Create a Sustainable Future Commitment to Public Involvement Commitment to Public Involvement LANL is commited to our neighbors August 1, 2013 Lab Director McMillan talks with...

183

Environmental remediation following the Fukushima-Daiichi accident  

SciTech Connect

A wide area of Fukushima Prefecture was contaminated with radioactivity released by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The decontamination pilot projects conducted by JAEA aimed at demonstrating the applicability of different techniques to rehabilitate affected areas. As most radioactive cesium is concentrated at the top of the soil column and strongly bound to mineral surfaces, there are 3 options left to decrease the gamma dose rate (usually measured 1 m above the ground surface): the stripping of the contaminated topsoil (i.e. direct removal of cesium), the dilution by mixing and the soil profile inversion. The last two options do not generate waste. As the half-distance of {sup 137}Cs gammas in soil is in the order of 5-6 cm (depending on density and water content), the shielding by 50 cm of uncontaminated deep soil would theoretically reduce gamma doses by about 3 orders of magnitude. Which option is employed depends basically on the Cesium concentration in the topsoil, averaged over a 15-cm thickness. The JAEA's decontamination pilot projects focus on soil profile inversion and topsoil stripping. Two different techniques have been tested for the soil profile inversion: one is the reversal tillage by which surface soil of thickness of several tens of cm is reversed by using a tractor plough and the other is the complete interchanging of contaminated topsoil with uncontaminated subsoil by using a back-hoe. Reversal tillage with a tractor plough cost about 30 yen/m{sup 2}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of topsoil-subsoil interchange (about 300 yen/m{sup 2}). Topsoil stripping is significantly more costly (between 550 yen/m{sup 2} and 690 yen/m{sup 2} according to the equipment used)

Tagawa, A.; Miyahara, K.; Nakayama, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

185

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview September 18, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview The Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS) National Training Center (NTC) in collaboration with the HSS Accident Investigation Program (HS-24) has developed and released a course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of accident investigation. This course is intended to meet the every five year refresher training requirement for DOE Federal Accident Investigators under DOE Order 225.1B "Accident Investigations", and serves as an orientation to other DOE Federal Accident Investigation Board Members who need a basic knowledge of

187

Ecological Half-Lives of Radiocesium in 16 Species in Marine Biota after the TEPCO抯 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident of March 11, 2011 was the result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake, and the resultant tsunami, which severely damaged several reactors. ... Report of the Japanese Government to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety桾he Accident at TEPCO抯 Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations; NERH: Tokyo, Japan, 2011; http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/kan/topics/201106/iaea_houkokusho_e.html ... Results of Simulation of the Atmospheric Behavior of Radioactive Materials Released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant; NIES, Tsukuba, Japan; http://www.nies.go.jp/whatsnew/2011/20110825/20110825.html ...

Kayoko Iwata; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident investigation sites Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 6 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident excursion occurring Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Collection: Geosciences 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident location analysis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion and Utilization ; Engineering 8 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident survival time Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 3 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident experience alarm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, accident investigation, indoor air quality, bloodborne pathogens, chemical safety, lockout-tagout, hot work... Campus Fires 11 12 Accident Reporting 14 Employee Accidents 15...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident frequencies program Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management procedures Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management program Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the fatal accidents and many other accidents. Training, defined work procedures, lockout tagout programs... Accident Research Helps Save Lives of Loggers Research Brief ...

197

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document This document specifies the top-level...

198

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review The main goal of this complex-wide review was to obtain feedback from DOE sites...

199

Structural aspects of the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

On April 26, 1986 the world's worst nuclear power plant accident occurred at the Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the USSR. This paper presents a discussion of the design of the Chernobyl Power Plant, the sequence of events that led to the accident and the damage caused by the resulting explosion. The structural design features that contributed to the accident and resulting damage will be highlighted. Photographs and sketches obtained from various worldwide news agencies will be shown to try and gain a perspective of the extent of the damage. The aftermath, clean-up, and current situation will be discussed and the important lessons learned for the structural engineer will be presented. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics  

SciTech Connect

The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials  

SciTech Connect

During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect

The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Medford, G.T. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Supplementary Data to Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

610 650 (28.09.2011) 颅 颅 Qinshan 31 CANDU6 operational 650 700 19.11.2002 (31.12.2042) 20.127 Qinshan 32 CANDU6 operational 650 700 12.06.2003 (24.07.2043) 17.107 Sanmen 1 AP1000 under construction since

Meskhidze, Nicholas

207

Radioactive Kr Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radioactive isotope of 1.1-hour half-life has been produced in krypton by alpha-particle bombardment of Se74, enriched electromagnetically from 0.9 percent to 14.1 percent. Assignment of the isotope is made to Kr77. Aluminum absorption measurements indicate a positron end point of 1.7 Mev. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se74(?,n) reaction is computed as 2.6. The krypton 1.42-day isotope has been produced by an ?,n reaction on electromagnetically enriched Se76. The isotope is located as Kr79 and its half-life confirmed. A positron end point of 1.0 Mev is determined by aluminum absorption measurements. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se76(?,n) reaction is computed to be 50. The cross-section ratio for formation of Kr77 compared to Kr79 by alpha-particle bombardment of selenium is computed as 1.4. The 4.6-hour Kr85 isotope has been produced by a Se(?,n) reaction.

L. L. Woodward; D. A. Mccown; M. L. Pool

1948-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents retroperspektive individuelle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Montral Collection: Engineering 11 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident soderzhanie korotkozhivushchikh...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

210

Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland Fire on the Hanford Site, June 27-July 1, 2000 Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...

211

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview September 18, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis SAF-230DE - Web...

212

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

213

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

Gray, P. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The accident site portable integrated video system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a high bandwidth fiber-optic communication system intended for post accident recovery of weapons. The system provides bi-directional multichannel, and multi-media communications. Two smaller systems that were developed as direct spin-offs of the larger system are also briefly discussed.

Jones, D.P.; Shirey, D.L.; Amai, W.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

A neutron dosemeter for nuclear criticality accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......emulsion was rapidly depleted of all its drops. In...emulsion was rapidly depleted of all its drops. The...around an accident at a uranium fuel factory in Tokai-mura...emulsion was rapidly depleted of all its drops. A...Quality Assurance, Health Care methods Radiation......

F. d'Errico; G. Curzio; R. Ciolini; A. Del Gratta; R. Nath

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Radioactivity of the Cooling Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

Wigner, E. P.

1943-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

An analysis to determine correlations of freeway traffic accidents with specific geometric design features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurrence of accidents was cited by Gerlough (13) in the following summary of an accident analysis. The accident records of 45 equal sections of roadway which had simi- lar volumes were compared using the Poisson distribution. The number of accidents... occurrence of accidents was cited by Gerlough (13) in the following summary of an accident analysis. The accident records of 45 equal sections of roadway which had simi- lar volumes were compared using the Poisson distribution. The number of accidents...

Smith, Frank Miller

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

L'accident la centrale nuclaire de Quelques explications scientifiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L'accident 脿 la centrale nucl茅aire de Fukushima Quelques explications scientifiques G. Marleau, J麓eal, 18 mars 2011 L'accident `a la centrale nucl麓eaire de Fukushima 颅 1/29 Accident de Fukushima 1 Contenu de Fukushima. 3. La puissance r茅siduelle. 4. Perte de refroidissement et cons茅quences. 5

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

220

Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.  

SciTech Connect

The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America抯 Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The temporal effect of traffic violations and accidents on accident occurrence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the accident data analysis. Therefore, in Zylman's view the total lack of uniformity, completeness, and consistency makes data collec- ted on driver records from more than one jurisdiction highly question- able. He further notes that comparing biographical... in the accident data analysis. Therefore, in Zylman's view the total lack of uniformity, completeness, and consistency makes data collec- ted on driver records from more than one jurisdiction highly question- able. He further notes that comparing biographical...

McKemie, Martha Susan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear-reactor accidents: Chernobyl, TMI, and Windscale. January 1974-September 1988 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1974-September 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radiological consequences of nuclear-reactor accidents. The citations cover specifically the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR, the Three Mile Island (TMI) reactor in the US, and the Windscale reactor in the UK. Included are detection and monitoring of the fallout, the resultant runoff into rivers, lakes, and the sea, the radiation effects on people, and the transfrontier radioactive contamination of the environment. (Contains 105 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system  

SciTech Connect

At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Monthly Accident Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monthly Accident Statistics Monthly Accident Statistics Latest Accident Statistics Accident Statistics (through December 2013) Archived Accident Statistics 2013 Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February Through January 2012 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through February Through January 2011 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February Through January 2010 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February

225

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.628696掳, -79.319759掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.628696,"lon":-79.319759,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Carr, F. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Waste gas combustion in a Hanford radioactive waste tank  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed that a high-level radioactive waste tank generates quantities of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen that are potentially well within flammability limits. These gases are produced from chemical and nuclear decay reactions in a slurry of radioactive waste materials. Significant amounts of combustible and reactant gases accumulate in the waste over a 110- to 120-d period. The slurry becomes Taylor unstable owing to the buoyancy of the gases trapped in a matrix of sodium nitrate and nitrite salts. As the contents of the tank roll over, the generated waste gases rupture through the waste material surface, allowing the gases to be transported and mixed with air in the cover-gas space in the dome of the tank. An ignition source is postulated in the dome space where the waste gases combust in the presence of air resulting in pressure and temperature loadings on the double-walled waste tank. This analysis is conducted with hydrogen mixing studies HMS, a three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid dynamics code coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The waste tank has a ventilation system designed to maintain a slight negative gage pressure during normal operation. We modeled the ventilation system with the transient reactor analysis code (TRAC), and we coupled these two best-estimate accident analysis computer codes to model the ventilation system response to pressures and temperatures generated by the hydrogen and ammonia combustion.

Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Spore, J.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Study on release and transport of aerial radioactive materials in reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

The release and transport characteristics of radioactive materials at a boiling accident of the high active liquid waste (HALW) in a reprocessing plant have been studied for improving experimental data of source terms of the boiling accident. In the study, a heating test and a thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) test were conducted. In the heating test using a simulated HALW, it was found that ruthenium was mainly released into the air in the form of gas and that non-volatile elements were released into the air in the form of mist. In the TG-DTA test, the rate constants and reaction heat of thermal decomposition of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate were obtained from TG and DTA curves. (authors)

Amano, Y.; Tashiro, S.; Uchiyama, G.; Abe, H.; Yamane, Y.; Yoshida, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Kodama, T. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108 Okitsuke, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ASSESSING CAUSAL FACTORS IN INDIVIDUAL ROAD ACCIDENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+k 1+k1+k k 2 k 1+k1+k rhv a v v a a2 v +rv a2 v +hv #12;Data Collection System 路 Advanced detection accident report: Happened on I-94 in downtown Minneapolis Happened during the afternoon peak period Vehicle 2 rear-ended vehicle 1 Driver 1 received `possible injury' Driver 2 reported as: `Following too

Minnesota, University of

232

Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants on Marine Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants on Marine Radioactivity ... Discussion of these data has involved many of our colleagues in Japan, including M. Uematsu (Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo), M. Honda and T. Kawano (Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine Earth Science and Technology) and D. Tsumune (Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). ...

Ken Buesseler; Michio Aoyama; Masao Fukasawa

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The radioactive material must then be placed in inner packages that will prevent radioactive contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be...

234

DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Radioactive Waste DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste 1. Summary Comments on Draft Branch Technical Position on a Performance Assessment Methodology for Low-Level Radioactive...

235

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive...

236

What you find is not always what you fix桯ow other aspects than causes of accidents decide recommendations for remedial actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In accident investigation, the ideal is often to follow the principle 搘hat-you-find-is-what-you-fix, an ideal reflecting that the investigation should be a rational process of first identifying causes, and then implement remedial actions to fix them. Previous research has however identified cognitive and political biases leading away from this ideal. Somewhat surprisingly, however, the same factors that often are highlighted in modern accident models are not perceived in a recursive manner to reflect how they influence the process of accident investigation in itself. Those factors are more extensive than the cognitive and political biases that are often highlighted in theory. Our purpose in this study was to reveal constraints affecting accident investigation practices that lead the investigation towards or away from the ideal of 搘hat-you-find-is-what-you-fix. We conducted a qualitative interview study with 22 accident investigators from different domains in Sweden. We found a wide range of factors that led investigations away from the ideal, most which more resembled factors involved in organizational accidents, rather than reflecting flawed thinking. One particular limitation of investigation was that many investigations stop the analysis at the level of 損reventable causes, the level where remedies that were currently practical to implement could be found. This could potentially limit the usefulness of using investigations to get a view on the 揵ig picture of causes of accidents as a basis for further remedial actions.

Jonas Lundberg; Carl Rollenhagen; Erik Hollnagel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

{sup 129}I, {sup 131}I and {sup 127}I in animal thyroids after the Chernobyl nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

A small number of animal thyroids from Bad Hall, Austria; Ulm, Germany; and Steinkjer, Norway had {sup 131}I (half-life 8.06 d) measured between 21 and 72 d following the nuclear accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. Nine years later {sup 129}I (half-life 1.57 x 10{sup 7} y) fission product and natural {sup 127}I were measured in the same thyroids. The mass ratios, {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I were calculated to the date of the Chernobyl accident and they ranged between 13 and 71. These ratios are compared to the expected ratios within an operating nuclear reactor during 2 y of operation, where the {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I{sup -1} ratio never exceeded 30. The observed ratio of {sup 129}I to natural {sup 127}I in thyroids ranged from 5 to 200 times the ratio before the accident, except that the Norwegian thyroids had {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios which were less than the ratios of pre-Chernobyl thyroids from Ulm. These studies show the {sup 129}I and {sup 131}I from the Chernobyl accident were accumulated with natural {sup 127}I in animal thyroids but the isotope ratios, calculated to the release date, had wide ranges. The {sup 131}I radioactive exposure might be estimated from a fission product mixture by measuring {sup 129}I in thyroids long after the exposure to {sup 131}I, but the results would probably show a wide range of possibilities. The determining variables should be evaluated. We know of no previous data regarding both {sup 131}I and {sup 129}I in thyroid glands during the first 3 mo after the Chernobyl accident. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

VanMiddleworth, L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States); Handle, J. [Radiooekologie Universitaet, Hannover (Germany)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish U.S. Department of Energy requirements for inventory reporting, transaction reporting, verification of reporting, and assign responsibilities for reporting of radioactive sealed sources. DOE N 251.86 extends this notice until 5-6-11. No cancellations. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

(Revised May 25, 2012) Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Revised May 25, 2012) Radioactivity GOALS (1) To gain a better understanding of naturally-occurring. (3) To measure the amount of "background radiation" from natural sources. (4) To test whether and man-made radiation sources. (2) To use a Geiger-Mueller tube to detect both beta and gamma radiation

Collins, Gary S.

240

Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 Table 3.1: Naturally occurring radioactive isotopes [89]. The elemental abundance is the total amount words the signal to noise ratio should be greater than one, S/N > 1. Naturally, the larger S/N is to be distinguished from beta particles or gamma radiation. The big challenge for the Borexino experiment is to deal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radioactive waste at Ward Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data Base for 1992: U.S. Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections and Characteristics, publi. DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8 (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, 1989), p. 113. 2. T. Taylor, quoted by S. Salesky...

Earl Budin

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

B. B. Back

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. Draft report for comment  

SciTech Connect

Potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees were analyzed. The most potentially hazardous accident, by a large margin, was determined to be the sudden rupture of a heated multi-ton cylinder of UF/sub 6/. Acute fatalities offsite are probably not credible. Acute permanent injuries may be possible for many hundreds of meters, and clinically observable transient effects of unknown long term consequences may be possible for distances up to a few miles. These effects would be caused by the chemical toxicity of the UF/sub 6/. Radiation doses would not be significant. The most potentially hazardous accident due to radiation exposure was determined to be a large fire at certain facilities handling large quantities of alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., Po-210, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, Cm-242, Cm-244) or radioiodines (I-125 and I-131). However, acute fatalities or injuries to people offsite due to accidental releases of these materials do not seem plausible. The only other significant accident was identified as a long-term pulsating criticality at fuel cycle facilities handling high-enriched uranium or plutonium. An important feature of the most serious accidents is that releases are likely to start without prior warning. The releases would usually end within about half an hour. Thus protective actions would have to be taken quickly to be effective. There is not likely to be enough time for dose projections, complicated decisionmaking during the accident, or the participation of personnel not in the immediate vicinity of the site. The appropriate response by the facility is to immediately notify local fire, police, and other emergency personnel and give them a brief predetermined message recommending protective actions. Emergency personnel are generally well qualified to respond effectively to small accidents of these types.

McGuire, S.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On Monday, February 12, 2013, a principal investigator at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Engineering Demonstration Facility (IEDF) was testing the system configuration of experimental process involving liquid sodium carbonate. An unanticipated event occurred that resulted in the ejection of the 900 C liquid sodium carbonate from the system. The ejected liquid came into contact with the principal investigator and caused multiple second and third degree burn injuries to approximately 10 percent of his body. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Site Lead for the Idaho Site shadowed the accident investigation team assembled by the contractor in an effort to independently verify that a rigorous, thorough, and unbiased investigation was taking place, and to maintain awareness of the events surrounding the accident

246

Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target  

SciTech Connect

A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management  

SciTech Connect

The use of NUREG-1150 and similar Probabilistic Risk Assessments in NRC and industry risk management programs is discussed. Risk management'' is more comprehensive than the commonly used term accident management.'' Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

TEI Piraeus students' knowledge on the beneficial applications of nuclear physics: Nuclear energy, radioactivity - consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent nuclear accident in Japan revealed the confusion and the inadequate knowledge of the citizens about the issues of nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences In this work we present the first results of an ongoing study which aims to evaluate the knowledge and the views of Greek undergraduate students on the above issues. A web based survey was conducted and 131 students from TEI Piraeus answered a multiple choice questionnaire with questions of general interest on nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences. The survey showed that students, like the general population, have a series of faulty views on general interest nuclear issues. Furthermore, the first results indicate that our educational system is not so effective as source of information on these issues in comparison to the media and internet

Pilakouta, Mirofora

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Contamination Issues at the Chernobyl Site  

SciTech Connect

The destruction of the Unit 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in the generation of radioactive contamination and radioactive waste at the site and in the surrounding area (referred to as the Exclusion Zone). In the course of remediation activities, large volumes of radioactive waste were generated and placed in temporary near surface waste-storage and disposal facilities. Trench and landfill type facilities were created from 1986 to 1987 in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone at distances 0.5 to 15 km from the NPP site. This large number of facilities was established without proper design documentation, engineered barriers, or hydrogeological investigations and they do not meet contemporary waste-safety requirements. Immediately following the accident, a Shelter was constructed over the destroyed reactor; in addition to uncertainties in stability at the time of its construction, structural elements of the Shelter have degraded as a result of corrosion. The main potential hazard of the Shelter is a possible collapse of its top structures and release of radioactive dust into the environment. A New Safe Confinement (NSC) with a 100-years service life is planned to be built as a cover over the existing Shelter as a longer-term solution. The construction of the NSC will enable the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of highly radioactive, fuel-containing materials from Unit 4, and eventual decommissioning of the damaged reactor. More radioactive waste will be generated during NSC construction, possible Shelter dismantling, removal of fuel containing materials, and decommissioning of Unit 4. The future development of the Exclusion Zone depends on the future strategy for converting Unit 4 into an ecologically safe system, i.e., the development of the NSC, the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of fuel containing material, and eventual decommissioning of the accident site. To date, a broadly accepted strategy for radioactive waste management at the reactor site and in the Exclusion Zone, and especially for high-level and long-lived waste, has not been developed.

Napier, Bruce A.; Schmieman, Eric A.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water Sven P. Nielsen Ris酶 National Laboratory Working OF INVESTIGATION 11 3 DESCRIPTION OF INVESTIGATION 12 4 RADIOACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER 13 5 SAMPLING 15 6 27 #12;4 #12;5 Preface This project for investigation of radioactivity in drinking water shall

251

Spills of Radioactive Materials -Emergency Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to radioactive waste container. For surface decontamination, use soap and water and cleansers appropriateSpills of Radioactive Materials - Emergency Procedures Procedure: 7.53 Created: 1/16/2014 Version for injured personnel. B. Applicability/scope This policy applies to all facilities where radioactive

Jia, Songtao

252

Laboratory Surveys when Working with Radioactive Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactive materials (RAM) are used or stored, including waste areas. Negative results should be clearlyLaboratory Surveys when Working with Radioactive Materials Procedure: 7.546 Created: 9/25/14 Version: 1.0 Revised: Environmental Health & Safety Page 1 of 6 A. Purpose Radioactive contamination and

Jia, Songtao

253

Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation At Washington...

254

Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

August 21, 2012, Contamination Incident at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...

255

Type B Accident Investigation of the July 14, 2005, Americium...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination Incident at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory...

256

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report for the January 11...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Idaho Falls, Idaho February 10, 2006 An accident at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was investigated in which a technician sustained a serious injury to his right hand...

257

Accident Investigation of the October 1, 2013, Tice Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tice Electric Company Employee Fatality near Patrick's Knob Radio Station, Bonneville Power Administration Accident Investigation of the October 1, 2013, Tice Electric Company...

258

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU), Building H2 Demolition, in Niskayuna, New, York Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29, 2010,...

259

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Brookhaven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 4,...

260

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Grout Injection Operator...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

TYPE B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION BOARD REPORT GROUT INJECTION OPERATOR INJURY AT THE COLD TEST PIT SOUTH, IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, OCTOBER 15, 2001...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

on the October 15, 2001, Grout Injection Operator Injury at the Cold Test Pit South, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation Board...

262

Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Fatal Fall from the Dworshak-Taft 1 Transmission Tower, at the Bonneville Power Marketing Administration Accident Investigation of the September 20, 2012 Fatal Fall from the...

263

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mod 14 - HTGR Accident Analyses - final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical attack Slide 10 10 Modular HTGR Accident Safety Evaluations * Challenges to core heat removal - Loss of heat transport (HTS) & shutdown forced cooling systems (SCSCCS)...

264

Microsoft Word - Case Study for Enhanced Accident Tolerance Design...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2355 Case Study for Enhanced Accident Tolerance Design Changes Steven Prescott Curtis Smith Tony Koonce June 2014 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work...

265

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic Metal Reactor Event During Sodium Transfer Activities, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board...

266

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments. Volume 9. Summary status report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 to May 5, 1985. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Miller, R. L.; Scotti, K. S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on European energy policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The disaster that struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has reignited the international debate on the future of nuclear energy. Interestingly, the incident has been used to both justify nuclear power generation and reconsider past decisions made on established or planned nuclear power sites. Geographically removed from the radioactive fallout, Europe's response to the massive nuclear accident differed greatly among the member states. The UK and Germany stand out as examples of the wide spread of policy response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. In the UK, policy makers remained firm on their decision to increase nuclear power generation in the near future, whereas in Germany, the federal government decided to at least temporarily shut down the old generation of nuclear reactors and re-examine the safety of all national nuclear power facilities. Furthermore, a regional voter backlash, fuelled by resentment of the Merkel government's previous commitment to nuclear power, dealt a serious blow to the ruling coalition parties. How can national policy responses to the same event be so divergent in two European countries? This article attempts to answer this question in five arguments. I argue that in contrast to the UK, the German public faced imminent elections, stronger media reporting, increasing trust in renewable technologies, a history of nuclear resistance and a feeling of close cultural proximity to the Japanese.

Bettina B.F. Wittneben

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Drop Comparison Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Hypothetical Accident Conditions: Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 of the NRC transportation regulations were established to provide repeatable and definable conditions that encompass most real-life accidents. The real-life accidents on this page are comparisons to the environments that the regulatory hypothetical accidents protect against. The collision forces or fire temperature and duration that were present in each accident are similar to the conditions that spent fuel casks are designed to survive. Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision [DROP scenario] Mack Truck and Subaru Collision [CRUSH scenario] Freight Train and Freight Train Collision

269

Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment  

SciTech Connect

The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Type B Accident Investigation of the March 20, 2003, Stair Installation Accident at Building 752, Sandia National Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Karen L. Boardman, Manager, Sandia Site Office (SSO), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

271

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding  

Alternative cladding materials are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as >100X improvement (compared to current Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance in steam environments at ?1200癈 for short (?4 h) times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800癈 could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti2AlC that is not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200癈 in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore may be challenging to use as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475癈, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation assisted Cr-rich ? formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at >1400癈 are still being evaluated. Keywords: Accident tolerant LWR Fuel cladding, FeCrAl, Mo, Ti2AlC, Al2O3, high temperature steam oxidation resistance

none,

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident locations Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

locations Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: accidents Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident site grissom Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

site grissom Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident reports Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accident reports Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident prone locations Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 9 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of the accident...

278

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of accident investigation. The course is intended to meet the every five year refresher training requirement for DOE Federal Accident Investigators under DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations.

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions lessons Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: the lessons that are really taught by an accident or group of accidents....

280

Radiocesium in migratory bird species in northern Ireland following the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive fallout arising form the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986 reached Northern Ireland in early May and was deposited in rain. However, the subsequent contamination of food supplies in Northern Ireland were well below national and international levels at which any action would be considered necessary and presented no risks to health. In addition to the direct contamination of food supplies with radionuclides in the form of fallout following the Chernobyl incident another potential source of radioactive contamination entering the human food chain was through the arrival of migratory species of game birds. Each autumn and winter many thousands of birds migrate to Northern Ireland from Northern and Eastern Europe and some of these could have been contaminated as a result of being directly affected by the fallout from Chernobyl. The purpose of this work was to examine the extend of radionuclide contamination in such species and a number of samples were obtained for analyses during the autumn/winter periods in 1986/87 and 1987/88. The results obtained are outlined below. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

Pearce, J. [Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland, Belfast (United Kingdom)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly.

Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Aur茅lie Moskal a , Jean on the vehicle. Moped and motorcycle riders are analyzed separately, adjusting for the main characteristics of the accident. Results: for both moped and motorcycle riders, being male, not wearing a helmet, exceeding

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

283

CASE STUDY FOR ENHANCED ACCIDENT TOLERANCE DESIGN CHANGES  

SciTech Connect

The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies. The methods and tools provided by RISMC are essential to a comprehensive and integrated RIMM approach that supports effective preservation of margin for both active and passive SSCs. In this report, we discuss the methods and technologies behind RIMM for an application focused on enhanced accident tolerance design changes for a representative nuclear power plant. We look at a variety of potential plant modifications and evaluate, using the RISMC approach, the implications to safety margin for the various strategies.

Prescott, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Tony Koonce

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fukushima Daiichi Accident and Its Radiological Impact on the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is a topic of current media and public interest. It provides a means to motivate students to understand the fission process and the barriers that have been designed to prevent the release of fission products to the environment following a major nuclear powerreactor accident. The Fukushima Daiichi accident further encourages a discussion of the effect of fission products upon the environment including the resulting contamination of air water soil animals fish milk and crops. Accident-generated radiation levels that caused the evacuation of people 2030 km from the facility further serve to foster student interest and desire to understand the science associated with the Fukushima Daiichi accident.

J. J. Bevelacqua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration batch, which included 5%, 50%, and 95% dose likelihood, and the sensitivity of each assumption to the calculated doses. As one would intuitively expect, the doses from the probabilistic assessment for most scenarios were found to be much less than the deterministic assessment. The lower dose of the probabilistic assessment can be attributed to a ''smearing'' of values from the high and low end of the PDF spectrum of the various input parameters. The analysis also found a potential weakness in the deterministic analysis used in the SAR, a detail on drum loading was not taken into consideration. Waste emplacement operations thus far have handled drums from each shipment as a single unit, i.e. drums from each shipment are kept together. Shipments typically come from a single waste stream, and therefore the curie loading of each drum can be considered nearly identical to that of its neighbor. Calculations show that if there are large numbers of drums used in the accident scenario assessment, e.g. 28 drums in the waste hoist failure scenario (CH5), then the probabilistic dose assessment calculations will diverge from the deterministically determined doses. As it is currently calculated, the deterministic dose assessment assumes one drum loaded to the maximum allowable (80 PE-Ci), and the remaining are 10% of the maximum. The effective average of drum curie content is therefore less in the deterministic assessment than the probabilistic assessment for a large number of drums. EEG recommends that the WIPP SAR calculations be revisited and updated to include a probabilistic safety assessment.

Rucker, D.F.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident risks methodology Sample Search...  

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Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Engineering 6 THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: ABSTRACT Train accident rates are a...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequence analysis Sample Search...  

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, Preliminary risk analysis (PRA), risk, potential accident, feared events, Automatic Train Control. I... , dangers and potential accidents respectively. At the beginning of the...

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents graves susceptibles Sample Search...  

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BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: accidents than shorter trains. This is because longer trains are more susceptible to car... THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions vercors Sample Search...  

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de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 5 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: Incident:...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents home Sample Search Results  

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of Alaska Fairbanks AccidentIncident Report (personal injury) To report an automobile... accident, do not use this form, please go to: http:www.alaska.eduswrisk...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident diagrams Sample Search Results  

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Sciences, University of Arkansas Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT REPORT Department of Financial Services Summary: AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT REPORT...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident issues differences Sample Search...  

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Glasgow Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 4 September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS Summary: September 2003 AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS UCLA STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident declaration form Sample Search...  

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of Strathclyde Collection: Mathematics 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: of Lethbridge Campus...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident containment conditions Sample...  

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Technologies and Information Sciences 9 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: Incident:...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence uncertainty Sample...  

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a Summary: - Annex E - Consequence assessment of accident scenarios Annex F - HazOp and FMEA Tables and results 4... accident consequences (fatalities). Therefore, we suggest...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident safety issues Sample Search Results  

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, accident investigation, indoor air quality, bloodborne pathogens, chemical safety, lockout-tagout, hot work... Accidents 15 12;III. EH&S DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS 16...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents aviation Sample Search Results  

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Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident sequences simulated Sample Search...  

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Mathematics 3 A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK Summary: for an accident report...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence model Sample Search...  

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2 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident conditions key Sample Search Results  

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1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M....

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301

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequences analysis Sample Search...  

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3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident zone osobennosti Sample Search...  

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Physics 2 A Technique for Showing Causal Arguments in Accident Reports C. W. Johnson; University of Glasgow; Glasgow, Scotland, UK Summary: and the work zone accident...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation accidents findings Sample Search...  

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Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft accident investigation Sample...  

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; Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence analysis Sample Search...  

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3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

306

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1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: , accident prevention, system safety Abstract System safety professionals,...

307

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2 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: seek to learn from the results of accident investigations. We believe that...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management center Sample Search...  

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3 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M....

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequences elimination Sample...  

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1 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: accidents in general; an increased understanding of the consequences of...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management implementation Sample...  

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5. Report accident to Risk Management Passenger Name: Address... Columbia University Vehicle Accident Report Keep this ... Source: Qian, Ning - Center for Neurobiology and...

311

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(MIT) Collection: Engineering 48 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: are frequently available, contain information on the accident...

312

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Collection: Mathematics 40 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: or Bulletins d'Analyse des Accidents corporels de la Circulation...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident exposure Sample Search Results  

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Collection: Mathematics 12 Risk factors for injury accidents among moped and motorcycle riders Summary: they were responsible or not for the accident. In this way, we...

314

ASI Student Involvement Outcomes ASI Student Involvement Outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASI Student Involvement Outcomes ASI Student Involvement Outcomes A student involved in the activities, programs, and services of the Associated Students, CSUF, Inc. develops and demonstrates achievement in the following (adopted from the University of Minnesota Student Success Outcomes

de Lijser, Peter

315

Effects of spent fuel types on offsite consequences of hypothetical accidents  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts experimental work on the development of waste forms suitable for several types of spent fuel at its facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) located 48 km West of Idaho Falls, ID. The objective of this paper is to compare the offsite radiological consequences of hypothetical accidents involving the various types of spent nuclear fuel handled in nonreactor nuclear facilities. The highest offsite total effective dose equivalents (TEDEs) are estimated at a receptor located about 5 km SSE of ANL facilities. Criticality safety considerations limit the amount of enriched uranium and plutonium that could be at risk in any given scenario. Heat generated by decay of fission products and actinides does not limit the masses of spent fuel within any given operation because the minimum time elapsed since fissions occurred in any form is at least five years. At cooling times of this magnitude, fewer than ten radionuclides account for 99% of the projected TEDE at offsite receptors for any credible accident. Elimination of all but the most important nuclides allows rapid assessments of offsite doses with little loss of accuracy. Since the ARF (airborne release fraction), RF (respirable fraction), LPF (leak path fraction) and atmospheric dilution factor ({chi}/Q) can vary by orders of magnitude, it is not productive to consider nuclides that contribute less than a few percent of the total dose. Therefore, only {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba, and the actinides significantly influence the offsite radiological consequences of severe accidents. Even using highly conservative assumptions in estimating radiological consequences, they remain well below current Department of Energy guidelines for highly unlikely accidents.

Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Lehto, M. A.

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900癈 or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

Mohamed El-Genk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Accident Response Group | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

involving nuclear weapons. The ARG staff includes scientists, engineers, technicians, health physics and safety specialist from NNSA's and the Department of Energy's national...

318

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management February 2006 Evaluation of technical impact on the Yucca Mountain Project technical basis resulting from issues raised by emails of former...

320

Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ANNUAL TRANSPORTATION REPORT FY 2008 Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) February 2009 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radioactive materials and global fallout as it exists in the environment (such as from testing of nuclear explosive devices.) However, any action that has been taken to separate...

322

Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2015 The International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes ( 340) Honolulu, Hawaii, USA December 15-20, 2015 Science...

323

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

324

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

325

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM number) Page 1 of 2 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DECLARATION FORM For RP use

Wechsler, Risa H.

326

Radioactive material package seal tests  

SciTech Connect

General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

Shinn, J

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

329

The Accident at Fukushima: What Happened?  

SciTech Connect

At 2:46 PM, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in eastern Japan, people were spending an ordinary afternoon. The earthquake had a magnitude of 9.0, the fourth largest ever recorded in the world. Avery large number of aftershocks were felt after the initial earthquake. More than 100 of them had a magnitude of over 6.0. There were very few injured or dead at this point. The large earthquake caused by this enormous crustal deformation spawned a rare and enormous tsunami that crashed down 30-40 minutes later. It easily cleared the high levees, washing away cars and houses and swallowing buildings of up to three stories in height. The largest tsunami reading taken from all regions was 40 meters in height. This tsunami reached the West Coast of the United States and the Pacific coast of South America, with wave heights of over two meters. It was due to this tsunami that the disaster became one of a not imaginable scale, which saw the number of dead or missing reach about 20,000 persons. The enormous tsunami headed for 15 nuclear power plants on the Pacific coast, but 11 power plants withstood the tsunami and attained cold shutdown. The flood height of the tsunami that struck each power station ranged to a maximum of 15 meters. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units experienced the largest and the cores of three reactors suffered meltdown. As a result, more than 160,000 residents were forced to evacuate, and are still living in temporary accommodation. The main focus of this presentation is on what happened at the Fukushima Daiichi, and how station personnel responded to the accident, with considerable international support. A year after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, Japan is in the process of leveraging the lessons learned from the accident to further improve the safety of nuclear power facilities and regain the trust of society. In this connection, not only international organizations, including IAEA, and WANO, but also governmental organizations and nuclear industry representatives from various countries, have been evaluating what happened at Fukushima Daiichi. Support from many countries has contributed to successfully stabilizing the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. International cooperation is required as Japan started along the long road to decommissioning the reactors. Such cooperation with the international community would achieve the decommissioning of the damaged reactors. Finally, recovery plans by the Japanese government to decontaminate surrounding regions have been started in order to get residents back to their homes as early as possible. Looking at the world's nuclear power industry, there are currently approximately 440 reactors in operation and 60 under construction. Despite the dramatic consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe it is expected that the importance of nuclear power generation will not change in the years to come. Newly accumulated knowledge and capabilities must be passed on to the next generation. This is the duty put upon us and which is one that we must embrace.

Fujie, Takao [Japan Nuclear Technology Institute - JANTI (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

WreckWatch: Automatic Traffic Accident Detection and Notification with Smartphones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traffic accidents are one of the leading causes of fatalities in the US. An important indicator of survival rates after an accident is the time between the accident and when emergency medical personnel are dispatched to the scene. Eliminating the time ... Keywords: cyber-physical systems, mobile cyber-physical systems, smartphones, traffic accident detection

Jules White; Chris Thompson; Hamilton Turner; Brian Dougherty; Douglas C. Schmidt

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Tritium Precipitation in European Cities and in Osaka, Japan Owing to the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Japan Owing to the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Taeko Koga Hiroshige...Takeo Niwa Hiroshi Kawai Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kinki...before and after the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident by the time...after the accident. Chernobyl nuclear plant accident|Tritium precipitation......

Taeko Koga; Hiroshige Morishima; Takeo Niwa; Hiroshi Kawai

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Radiological Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis An Update (1990)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Reactor Accident Consequence Assessment / Radiation Biology and Environment

John S. Evans

334

Radioactive Thulium for X-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive power from thulium makes Argonne x-ray unit a potential for medical and industrial use ... Active component of the instrument is a tiny particle (one-fifth gram) of thulium-170 which has been made radioactive in a heavy water nuclear reactor at Arco, Idaho. ...

1954-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Cyclotrons for the production of radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the characteristics and design choices for modern cyclotrons. Cyclotrons can be used in 3 areas in the radioactive beam field: the production of high energy heavy ion beams for use in fragmentation, the spallation of targets with high energy protons, and the acceleration of radioactive beams from low energy to the MeV/u range. 16 refs., 6 figs.

Clark, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Radioactive Fallout in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiopotassium, radium, and other natural sources of radioactivity...Tex. Amarillo, Tex. *Corpus Christi, Tex. *Dallas, Tex...Kr90, which is an inert gas having a half-life of...dispersion of the radioactive gas radon and its daughter...

Merril Eisenbud; John H. Harley

1955-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report BNFL, Inc. Employee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Park Building K-31 February 1, 2004 On December 17, 2003, at approximately 7:15 a.m., an accident occurred at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park,...

338

Type B Accident Investigation of the January 10, 2006, Flash...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

January 10, 2006, Flash Fire and Injury at the Savannah River National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the January 10, 2006, Flash Fire and Injury at the Savannah River...

339

Accident Investigation Reports - Type B | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie. February 1, 2003 Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall...

340

Accident Investigation of the July 30, 2013, Electrical Fatality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2013, Electrical Fatality on the Bandon-Rogue No. 1 115kV Line at the Bonneville Power Administration Accident Investigation of the July 30, 2013, Electrical Fatality on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor  

SciTech Connect

A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is evaluated. The waste consists of a homogenous mixture of plutonium 49, beryllium, and air contained in a 35 gallon carbon steel drum. Possible consequences are investigated.

Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1092-1998 DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 DOE-HDBK-1092-2013...

343

Modeling control room crews for accident sequence analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes a systems-based operating crew model designed to simulate the behavior of an nuclear power plant control room crew during an accident scenario. This model can lead to an improved treatment of potential ...

Huang, Y. (Yuhao)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Type B Accident Investigation Of The February 25, 2009 Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To A Passenger In An Electric Cart At The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico Type B Accident Investigation Of The February 25, 2009 Injury To A Passenger In An...

345

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

346

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within 50 miles of the nuclear power plant was estimated tothe radiation from the nuclear power plant accident. From anand the Peach Bottom nuclear power plants, like the general

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Type B Accident Investigation Report of the October 28, 2004...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004...

348

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on...

349

University Guidance for the REPORTING OF ACCIDENTS, DISEASES AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Guidance for the REPORTING OF ACCIDENTS, DISEASES AND DANGEROUS OCCURANCES HEALTH INJURY, HOSPITALISATION, DISEASE AND DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.2 Reporting Over Three Days Absence Injury.........................................2 4.3 Reporting a Dangerous

350

Type B Accident Investigation Injury Resulting From Violent Exothermic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

when the accident occurred. UT-Battelle at Grand Junction, Colorado, was the UT-Battelle satellite office responsible for the project. Field operations were being done by IT under...

351

Failsafe : living with man-made disaster and accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"There is no progress with out progress of the catastrophe." Virilio. This thesis project proposes that technological solutions in the design of our systems are not enough to prevent 'man-made' accident. Social, organisational ...

Higgins, Saoirse, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teri.ehresman@inl.gov Bill Cabage (ORNL), 865-574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer...

353

Assessment of possible consequences of a hypothetical reactivity accident associated with a {open_quotes}Topaz-2{close_quotes} spacecraft reactor entering water  

SciTech Connect

An accident analysis for a Russian Topaz-2 nuclear reactor is summarized. The accident scenario involves emergency return from orbit, severe damage to reactor structural elements, and subsequent falling of the reactor core into the ocean. The thermionic converter reactor, used in spacecraft, has a large neutron leakage which decreases when water enters the inner core cavity. Preliminary results of numerical modeling, summarized in the article, show that the possible consequences of the hypothetical accidental submersion are limited. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Glushkov, E.S.; Ermoshin, M.Yu.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi; Skorlygin, V.V.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste with High Salt Content by Colloidal Adsorbents - 13274  

SciTech Connect

Treatment processes have been fully developed for most of the liquid radioactive wastes generated during the operation of nuclear power plants. However, a process for radioactive liquid waste with high salt content, such as waste seawater generated from the unexpected accident at nuclear power station, has not been studied extensively. In this study, the adsorption efficiencies of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) in radioactive liquid waste with high salt content were investigated using several types of zeolite with different particle sizes. Synthesized and commercial zeolites were used for the treatment of simulated seawater containing Cs and Sr, and the reaction kinetics and adsorption capacities of colloidal zeolites were compared with those of bulk zeolites. The experimental results demonstrated that the colloidal adsorbents showed fast adsorption kinetic and high binding capacity for Cs and Sr. Also, the colloidal zeolites could be successfully applied to the static adsorption condition, therefore, an economical benefit might be expected in an actual processes where stirring is not achievable. (authors)

Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Restoration of water environment contaminated by radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi NPP  

SciTech Connect

In the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident, large amounts of volatile radioactive nuclides, such as {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, were released to the atmosphere and huge areas surrounding the nuclear site were contaminated by the radioactive fallout. In this study, a combined process with a hydrothermal process and a coagulation settling process was proposed for the separation of radioactive Cs from contaminated soil and sewage sludge. The coagulation settling operation uses Prussian Blue (Ferric ferrocyanide) and an inorganic coagulant. The recovery of Cs from sewage sludge sampled at Fukushima city (100.000 Bq/kg) and soil at a nearby village (55.000 Bq/kg), was tested. About 96% of Cs in the sewage sludge was removed successfully by combining simple hydrothermal decomposition and coagulation settling. However, Cs in the soil was not removed sufficiently by the combined process (Cs removal is only 56%). The hydrothermal decomposition with blasting was carried out. The Cs removal from the soil was increased to 85%. When these operations were repeated twice, the Cs recovery was over 90%. The combined process with hydrothermal blasting and coagulation settling is applicable to the removal of Cs from highly contaminated soil.

Takeshita, K.; Takahashi, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 157-8550 (Japan); Jinbo, Y. [CDM Cosulting Co.Ltd., 1-13-13 Tsukiji Chuo-ku Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Ishido, A. [Radwaste and Decommissioning Center, 1-7-6 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A regional simulation study on dispersion of nuclear pollution from the damaged Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear accident involving the leaking of radioactive pollutants occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, following an earthquake and subsequent tsunami on ... accident, this study simulates the ...

JianFang Fei; PengFei Wang; XiaoPing Cheng; XiaoGang Huang

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

358

Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs 漏 Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

360

Diverter assembly for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diverter assembly for diverting a pneumatically conveyed holder for a radioactive material between a central conveying tube and one of a plurality of radially offset conveying tubes includes an airtight container. A diverter tube having an offset end is suitably mounted in the container for rotation. A rotary seal seals one end of the diverter tube during and after rotation of the diverter tube while a spring biased seal seals the other end of the diverter tube which moves between various offset conveying tubes. An indexing device rotatably indexes the diverter tube and this indexing device is driven by a suitable drive. The indexing mechanism is preferably a geneva-type mechanism to provide a locking of the diverter tube in place. 3 figs.

Andrews, K.M.; Starenchak, R.W.

1988-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Routine and post-accident sampling in nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Review of the Three Mile Island accident by NRC has resulted in new post-accident-sampling-capability requirements for utilities that operate pressurized water reactors and/or boiling water reactors. Several vendors are offering equipment that they hope will suffice to met both the new NRC regulations and an operational deadline of January 1, 1981. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems and projected future-new-system needs for TVA reactors are being evaluated in light of TMI experience.

Armento, W.J.; Kitts, F.G.; German, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The role of NUREG-1150 in accident management  

SciTech Connect

NUREG-1150 is being prepared by the NRC and its contractors to estimate the risk from five commercial light water reactors: Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, Grand Gulf, and Zion. Level 3 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being prepared for each of these plants. These PRAs provide a framework for evaluating accident management alternatives from a risk standpoint. This paper describes the accident management benefits that NUREG-1150 is providing.

Camp, A.L.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The role of NUREG-1150 in accident management  

SciTech Connect

The NUREG-1150 report is being prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its contractors to estimate the risk from five commercial light water reactors: Surry, Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, Grand Gulf, and Zion. Level-3 probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being prepared for each of these plants. These PRAs provided a framework for evaluating accident management alternatives from a risk standpoint. This paper describes the accident management benefits that NUREG-1150 is providing.

Camp, A.L.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radioactive nuclei compiled by W. Gelletly Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams Neutron-deficient nuclei close to the proton...proton drip-line|radioactive beams| Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 颅 Radioactive Waste Page 14-1 Section 14 Radioactive Waste Contents A. Proper Collection, Disposal, and Packaging and Putrescible Animal Waste.........................14-8 a. Non-Radioactive Animal Waste

Wilcock, William

366

Characterization of Plutonium in Maxey Flats Radioactive Trench Leachates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...

JESS M. CLEVELAND; TERRY F. REES

1981-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the March 27, 1998, Rotating Shaft Accident at the Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John Kennedy, Acting Manager, Chicago Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

368

A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas...

370

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

371

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Participants should expect to...

372

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of...

373

Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New radioactive waste staging facility Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste staging facility The 4-acre complex will include multiple staging buildings...

374

Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial...

375

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

376

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety and Security Technologies for...

377

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

378

Public perceptions of a radioactively contaminated site: concerns, remediation preferences, and desired involvement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sites in 14 states. The St. Louis FUSRAP site properties areadopted for the St. Louis FUSRAP site must be publiclystatement for the St. Louis FUSRAP site. These documents

Feldman, D L; Hanahan, R A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

CLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE INVOLVING REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SUBATOMIC RADIOACTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be placed in the chamber on stage, saturated with ethanol and cooled by liquid nitrogen, which makes

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

380

Microbial effects on radioactive wastes at SLB sites  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to determine the significance of microbial degradation of organic wastes on radionuclide migration on shallow land burial for humid and arid sites, establish which mechanisms predominate and ascertain the conditions under which these mechanisms operate. Factors contolling gaseous eminations from low-level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and possibly hydrogen from the site stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or /sup 14/C into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste materials, primary emphasis of the study involved on examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Although the methane and carbon dioxide production rate indicates the degradation rate of the organic substances in the waste, it does not predict the methane evolution rate from the trench site. Methane fluxes from the soil surface are equivalent to the net synthesis minus the quantity oxidized by the microbial community as the gas passes through the soil profile. Gas studies were performed at three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (West Valley, New York; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky) during the period 1976 to 1978. The results of these studies are presented. 3 tables.

Colombo, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. These full-scale tests, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Transportation Programs, demonstrate how spent fuel casks perform in accident environments that are more similar to what may happen during actual shipments. Each of the tests included the transportation vehicle as well as the cask. The damage to the casks from these tests was less than the damage during the regulatory hypothetical accident tests, demonstrating that the regulatory tests are more severe. DESCRIPTION PHOTO DURING TEST PHOTO AFTER TEST PHOTO OF PACKAGE AFTER TEST VIDEO OF TEST CRASH TEST Cask rail car with a 74 ton Type B Package on it crashing into a 690 ton concrete block at 81 miles per hour [photo]

382

GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident  

SciTech Connect

The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena.

Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Travis, J.R. [Engineering and Scientific software, Inc. (Untied States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Removal of Radiocesium from Food by Processing: Data Collected after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident - 13167  

SciTech Connect

Removal of radiocesium from food by processing is of great concern following the accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Foods in markets are monitored and recent monitoring results have shown that almost all food materials were under the standard limit concentration levels for radiocesium (Cs-134+137), that is, 100 Bq kg{sup -1} in raw foods, 50 Bq kg{sup -1} in baby foods, and 10 Bq kg{sup -1} in drinking water; those food materials above the limit cannot be sold. However, one of the most frequently asked questions from the public is how much radiocesium in food would be removed by processing. Hence, information about radioactivity removal by processing of food crops native to Japan is actively sought by consumers. In this study, the food processing retention factor, F{sub r}, which is expressed as total activity in processed food divided by total activity in raw food, is reported for various types of corps. For white rice at a typical polishing yield of 90-92% from brown rice, the F{sub r} value range was 0.42-0.47. For leafy vegetable (indirect contamination), the average F{sub r} values were 0.92 (range: 0.27-1.2) after washing and 0.55 (range: 0.22-0.93) after washing and boiling. The data for some fruits are also reported. (authors)

Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

U.S./Belarus/Ukraine joint research on the biomedical effects of the Chernobyl Reactor Accident. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The National Cancer Institute has negotiated with the governments of Belarus and Ukraine (Ministers/Ministries of Health, institutions and scientists) to develop scientific research protocols to study the effects of radioactive iodine released by the Chernobyl accident upon thyroid anatomy and function in defined cohorts of persons under the age of 19 years at the time of the accident. These studies include prospective long term medical follow-up of the cohort and the reconstruction of the radiation dose to each cohort subject's thyroid. The protocol for the study in Belarus was signed by the US and Belorussian governments in May 1994 and the protocol for the study in Ukraine was signed by the US and Ukraine in May 1995. A second scientific research protocol also was negotiated with Ukraine to study the feasibility of a long term study to follow the development of leukemia and lymphoma among Ukrainian cleanup workers; this protocol was signed by the US and Ukraine in October 1996.

Bruce Wachholz

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Time dependence of the {sup 137}Cs resuspension factor on the Romanian territory after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of the radioactivity levels in aerosol and atmospheric deposition samples due to the Chernobyl accident, the resuspension factor of {sup 137}Cs as a four-parameter function has been inferred. The standard procedure to derive the dependence of resuspension on time assumes that the initial deposit is instantaneous. A simple method assuming a constant deposition rate over a fixed period has been proposed. Also, based on existing experimental data, an attempt was made to consider a realistic time dependence of the deposition rate to cope with the particular case of the Chernobyl accident. The differences between the two models are outlined. The Chernobyl direct deposit has been assumed to be the deposit measured between 30 April and 30 June 1986. The calculated values of the resuspension factor are consistent with the IAEA`s recommended model and depend on the rainfall that occurred in June 1986 and the site-specific disturbance conditions during the first 100 d following 1 July 1986 and only on artificial disturbance by humans and vehicles after that. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Mihaila, B. [Institute of Environmental Research and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cuculeanu, V. [National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology, Bucharest (Romania)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Measuring the impact of nuclear accidents on energy policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the effects of nuclear accidents on energy policy with the help of a panel dataset of 31 countries from 1965 to 2009, using annual data on the capacity of reactor construction starts, as well as the timing of three nuclear accidents scaled five or higher on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale. After determining the extent of the accident impact in the different countries, I find that neither the Three Mile Island (TMI) nor the Lucens accidents had a worldwide negative effect on construction starts, while Chernobyl did. Three Mile Island had a lasting impact in the United States, however. I show that the effect of Chernobyl wore off in certain geographical clusters, after ten to thirty years. An accident is likely to have a negative and long lasting impact in the country where it happened, and possibly in countries affected by the direct consequences. I find that nuclear capacity enlargement shows a significant lock-in effect, but it was also driven by primary energy consumption and energy security considerations in the past five decades.

Zsuzsanna Csereklyei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Study on Total Instantaneous Blockage Accident for CEFR  

SciTech Connect

Chinese Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) is under construction in China. It is essential to investigate core disruptive accidents (CDAs) for the evaluation of CEFR's safety characteristic. Accident of total instantaneous blockage in single assembly scale had already been modeled and analyzed. The degradation scenario had been calculated by a fluid-dynamics analysis code for liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). For further investigation of accident process and influence to the near bundles, the seven assembly scale were then simulated and calculated. Total instantaneous blockage was assumed to occur in the center assembly under normal operating conditions and consequences to neighboring assemblies were studied. The result shows that the key events such as sodium boiling, clad melting, fuel particles relocation, hexcan failure and melt discharge into neighboring six assemblies symmetrically were adequately simulated. All the key events appeared in the same sequence as the single assembly simulation, while hexcan failure occurred later than that of single assembly simulation. The reason for the different timing may be the boundary condition assumption can influence the heat removal from the blocked assembly. The seven-assembly scale model can reduce the boundary condition's uncertainties and help to give a better understanding and prediction of hypothetical accident scenario in subassembly blockage accidents for CEFR. (authors)

Zhe Wang; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

Swain, A.D.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radioactivity evaluation for the KSTAR tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Articles Radioactivity evaluation for the KSTAR tokamak Hyunduk Kim 1 Hee-Seock Lee 1 Sukmo Hong 1 Minho...reaction in the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak generates neutrons with a peak yield of 2.51016......

Hyunduk Kim; Hee-Seock Lee; Sukmo Hong; Minho Kim; Chinwha Chung; Changsuk Kim

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Argonne In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator www.phy.anl.govairis B. B. Back, C. Dickerson, C. R. Hoffman, B. P. Kay, B. Mustapha, J. A. Nolen, P. Ostroumov, R. C. Pardo, K. E. Rehm, G....

391

Accelerated Radioactive Nuclear Beams (Low Energy)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of producing and accelerating intense beams of short-lived radioactive heavy ions, both for studies of nuclides themselves and for use as projectiles in reactions of considerable interest to the f...

John M. D扐uria

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

394

INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENCE OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES WITHIN CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS  

SciTech Connect

During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles, (Stegobium paniceum (L.) Coleoptera: Anobiidae), were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. Initial indications were that the beetles were feeding on the Celotex{trademark} assemblies within the package. Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is used in numerous radioactive material packages serving as both a thermal insulator and an impact absorber for both normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-63) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex{trademark}. The Savannah River National Laboratory is conducting the investigation with entomological expertise provided by Clemson University. The two empty 9975 shipping packages were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory in the fall of 2007. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation.

Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, 陆 or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

396

An application of probabilistic safety assessment methods to model aircraft systems and accidents  

SciTech Connect

A case study modeling the thrust reverser system (TRS) in the context of the fatal accident of a Boeing 767 is presented to illustrate the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment methods. A simplified risk model consisting of an event tree with supporting fault trees was developed to represent the progression of the accident, taking into account the interaction between the TRS and the operating crew during the accident, and the findings of the accident investigation. A feasible sequence of events leading to the fatal accident was identified. Several insights about the TRS and the accident were obtained by applying PSA methods. Changes proposed for the TRS also are discussed.

Martinez-Guridi, G.; Hall, R.E.; Fullwood, R.R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

CURRENT RESEARCH FINDINGS ON RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stratosphere and then meet water droplets in a cloud...collide with the water droplets either before...of dep- osition advanced by Mr. Greenfield...efficient than occasional heavy rains. The importance...the hazard from a reactor accident, in which...collides with a water droplet and thus...

Willard F. Libby

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

399

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident | Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to ... Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident

400

Accident scenarios for marshalling yards in The Netherlands: private or public fire fighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the introduction of the Seveso and Seveso II directive (1996), many Western European countries have had the opportunity to demand that installations processing hazardous materials have a private fire brigade. In the Netherlands, based on the Dutch company fire brigade decree, certain companies can be compelled to have a private fire brigade (BZK, 1990). Hazardous materials are processed at about 40 marshalling yards (belonging to the infraprovider ProRail) and therefore a company fire brigade might be compulsory. In the Rotterdam harbour area, for several years, a (juridical) discussion has been going on between the Rotterdam municipality and ProRail concerning the marshalling yards in this area. In August 2007, this dispute was brought to the highest court for such affairs in the Netherlands, the Administrative Jurisdiction Division of the Council of State. To provide input for this juridical process, an analysis was made for six ProRail marshalling yards, each processing hazardous materials. The results indicate that accident scenarios involving toxic and flammable substances are possible. Based upon the type, development and extent of the accidents, some of these credible scenarios determine the fire fighting quality and quantity, the so-called design scenarios. The Council of State relates the fire brigade capacity to the credible scenarios and not to the design scenarios. The result is that ProRail might be responsible for organising and financing private fire brigades at about 40 marshalling yards.

Nils Rosmuller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

Kovalchuk, I.; Kovalchuk, O. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy (Ukraine)]|[Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research (Ukraine); Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atmospheric radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident observed in Vietnam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclides from the reactor accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were observed in the surface air at stations in Hanoi, Dalat, and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in Vietnam, about 4500爇m southwest of Japan, during the period from March 27 to April 22, 2011. The maximum activity concentrations in the air measured at those three sites were 193, 33, and 37?Bq爉?3 for 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs, respectively. Peaks of radionuclide concentrations in the air corresponded to arrival of the air mass from Fukushima to Vietnam after traveling for 8燿 over the Pacific Ocean. Cesium-134 was detected with the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio of about 0.85 in line with observations made elsewhere. The 131I/137Cs activity ratio was observed to decrease exponentially with time as expected from radioactive decay. The ratio at Dalat, where is 1500爉 high, was higher than those at Hanoi and HCMC in low lands, indicating the relative enrichment of the iodine in comparison to cesium at high altitudes. The time-integrated surface air concentrations of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the Southeast Asia showed exponential decrease with distance from Fukushima.

N.Q. Long; Y. Truong; P.D. Hien; N.T. Binh; L.N. Sieu; T.V. Giap; N.T. Phan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 Y in parts of Sweden with high {sup 137}Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation form {sup 137}Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from {sup 137}Cs was apparent. A some-what decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Tondel, M.; Flodin, U.; Skoeldestig, A.; Axelson, O. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Packaging and transportation of radioactive liquid at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in the 1940`s, radioactive liquid waste has been generated at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site as a result of defense material production. The liquid waste is currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks. As part of the tank remediation efforts, Type B quantity packagings for the transport of large volumes of radioactive liquids are required. There are very few Type B liquid packagings in existence because of the rarity of large-volume radioactive liquid payloads in the commercial nuclear industry. Development of aboveground transport systems for large volumes of radioactive liquids involves institutional, economic, and technical issues. Although liquid shipments have taken place under DOE-approved controlled conditions within the boundaries of the Hanford Site for many years, offsite shipment requires compliance with DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and US Department of Transportation (DOT) directives and regulations. At the present time, no domestic DOE nor NRC-certified Type B packagings with the appropriate level of shielding are available for DOT-compliant transport of radioactive liquids in bulk volumes. This paper will provide technical details regarding current methods used to transport such liquids on and off the Hanford Site, and will provide a status of packaging development programs for future liquid shipments.

Smith, R.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Applications of radioactive tracer technology in the real-time measurement of wear and corrosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive tracer technology has been used for many years as a tool to make highly sensitive real-time measurements of wear and corrosion. With this technique, the material of interest is tagged with radioactive isotopes through either direct activation of a relatively small number of atoms in the component itself, or implantation of radioactive isotopes. As the component wears or corrodes under test, radioactive atoms are transported from the surface in the form of wear particles or corrosion products. Wear or corrosion is measured in real-time through either interrogation of the buildup of radioactivity in the transport fluid, or by the reduction in activity of the labeled wear component. The process involves selection of an appropriate labeling technique, labeling of a component or components of interest, calibration, testing and data reduction and analysis. Although the majority of the work performed has been in the automotive engine and lubricant industry, Southwest Research Institute has recently extended the application into other fields, such as hydraulic pump wear, prosthetic hip joint wear, wear in marine engines and crude oil corrosivity. This paper discusses the various techniques employed to label components of interest, the advantages of the techniques, and gives several examples of current applications of this technology.

D.C. Eberle; C.M. Wall; M.B. Treuhaft

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Post-accident gas generation from radiolysis of organic materials  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology for estimating the gas generation rates resulting from radiolysis of organic materials in paints and electrical cable insulation inside a nuclear reactor containment building under design basis accident conditions. The methodology was based on absorption of the radiation energies from the post-accident fission products and the assumed gas yields of the irradiated materials. A sample calculation was made using conservative assumptions, plant-specific data of a nuclear power plant, and a radiation source term which took into account the time-dependent release and physico-chemical behavior of the fission products.

Wing, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Health Risks of Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue) discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having just returned from the region to assess mental... To the Editor: Christodouleas et al. (June 16 issue)1 discuss the health risks of nuclear accidents but do not include the psychological and social effects of such events. Such casualties in Fukushima will far exceed any cases of physical illness. Having ...

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL] [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex] [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Dynamic reliability and risk assessment of the accident localization system of the Ignalina NPP RBMK-1500 reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents reliability and risk analysis of the RBMK-1500 reactor accident localization system (ALS) (confinement), which prevents radioactive releases to the environment. Reliability of the system was estimated and compared by two methods: the conventional fault tree method and an innovative dynamic reliability model, based on stochastic differential equations. Frequency of radioactive release through ALS was also estimated. The results of the study indicate that conventional fault tree modeling techniques in this case apply high degree of conservatism in the system reliability estimates. One of the purposes of the ALS reliability study was to demonstrate advantages of the dynamic reliability analysis against the conventional fault/event tree methods. The Markovian framework to deal with dynamic aspects of system behavior is presented. Although not analyzed in detail, the framework is also capable of accounting for non-constant component failure rates. Computational methods are proposed to solve stochastic differential equations, including analytical solution, which is possible only for relatively small and simple systems. Other numerical methods, like Monte Carlo and numerical schemes of differential equations are analyzed and compared. The study is finalized with concluding remarks regarding both the studied system reliability and computational methods used.

V. Kopustinskas; J. Augutis; S. Rimkevi?ius

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a conservative estimate for the value of the protection quantity. 路 Ambient dose equivalent, H(10) (unit: sievert): The dose equivalent at a point in a radiation field that would be produced by the corresponding expanded33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION Revised

413

CHAPTER 5-RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to advance nuclear science. It was this defense application that formed the basis for the commercial nuclear power industry.

Marra, J.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: lesson to be learned  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......was transported to a safe storage at the OAEP (Figure-3...the 137Cs source to a safety storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Center, Thailand...including instructions relating to long-term storage or disposition, had been......

Nanthavan Ya-anant; Kanokrat Tiyapun; Kittiphong Saiyut

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents problemes sanitaires Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

' VISION 'Vision Problem?' DRIVEED 'Driver Education?'; FORMAT ACCIDENT DRIVEED YOUNG OLD YES... an accident is 1.1174(1+1.1174) 0.5277. Taking a similar person, except...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management measures Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: accident management measures Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 An Internet-based, Searchable Database of Air Accidents N. Storey, B.Sc., Ph.D., FBCS, MIEE,...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident risk forecasting Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Sciences ; Biology and Medicine 9 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident prone drivers Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Geosciences 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident efectele medico-biologice Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 2 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident dinamika formirovaniya Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident insurance Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Taiwan University Collection: Geosciences 2 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-terrain vehicle accidents Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 3 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident codes applications Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 7 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident issledovanie raspredeleniya Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

raspredeleniya Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident ria conditions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ria conditions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: Incident:...

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents dus aux Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dus aux Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accidents dus aux Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DCLARATION RELATIVE AUX ACCIDENTS JOINDRE AUX...

428

Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

Hall, B.W.

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

Calculation notes for surface leak resulting in pool, TWRS FSAR accident analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Surface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

Hall, B.W.

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident management guidance Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Why System Safety Professionals Should Read Accident Reports C. M. Holloway*, C. W. Johnson Summary: of regular reading of accident reports is the prospect that doing so will...

431

Nuclear Spectroscopy Using Radioactive Ion Beams from the HRIBF  

SciTech Connect

Exciting opportunities in the study of nuclei far from stability in both the neutron and proton rich side are opening with the recent availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies above the Coulomb barrier at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). These RIBs provide a unique opportunity for a whole class of measurements that could never before be realized. A recent highlight has been the acceleration of 'pure' beams of fission fragments such as 82Ge (T1/2=4.6s) and 132Sn (T1/2=40s). These semi-magic and doubly-magic nuclei are important benchmarks within the chart of nuclides, because they are constraints for the shell-model parameter sets. We are currently developing the required experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in nuclear astrophysics, reaction spectroscopy, and nuclear structure research with RIBs. I will discuss some of the challenges encountered with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved.

Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nuclear Spectroscopy Using Radioactive Ion Beams from the HRIBF  

SciTech Connect

Exciting opportunities in the study of nuclei far from stability in both the neutron and proton rich side are opening with the recent availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies above the Coulomb barrier at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). These RIBs provide a unique opportunity for a whole class of measurements that could never before be realized. A recent highlight has been the acceleration of 'pure' beams of fission fragments such as 82Ge (T1/2=4.6s) and 132Sn (T1/2=40s). These semi-magic and doubly-magic nuclei are important benchmarks within the chart of nuclides, because they are constraints for the shell-model parameter sets. We are currently developing the required experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in nuclear astrophysics, reaction spectroscopy, and nuclear structure research with RIBs. I will discuss some of the challenges encountered with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved.

Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Potential of taxonomy to preserve and disseminate Fukushima accident information implemented by JAEA library  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regarding Fukushima accident, it would be true that the relevant information has not been provided well enough for the affected people in and over Japan, for instance, as often being mixed, confused, too difficult to access or disappearing through the internet or websites. In this regard, it is necessary be to terminologically develop ways to access such affected information, like a taxonomy, composed of semantically controlled terms on the related events forming lineage-like hierarchical structures. To come up with a potential taxonomy to preserve and disseminate the affected information, this paper describes a preliminary view on the terminological aspects and availability of IAEA/INIS for the information implemented by JAEA Library. It is necessary to make new aspects and terms derived from the affected information, such as 'beyond design basis', more detailed, scrutinised and involved in the schemes, terminological aspects and IAEA/INIS, in order to improve the taxonomic potential.

Katsuhiko Kunii; Keizo Itabashi; Shun Nagaya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantification of the number of injured people due to hazardous material accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents with hazardous materials may threaten the lives of people living in the direct environment of the transportation infrastructure. In many countries, fire brigades play a major role in advising the authorities when they are dealing with issues where hazardous materials are involved. Since emergency responders have to deal with injured persons, information concerning the number of injured people and the types of injuries is relevant to them. In response to this need, we developed a method for calculating the number of injured people. This method was applied to the (re)development plans for the largest railway station in the Netherlands, Utrecht Central station. Through this intermodal transfer terminal, both passengers and substantial amounts of hazardous materials are transported. The fire brigades used the injury information to assess the spatial development plans and transportation plans for hazardous materials. Furthermore, the fire brigades used the injury information to determine their suppression tactics and equipment requirements.

Nils Rosmuller; Inge Trijssenaar; Johan Reinders; Peter Blokker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents: Preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

A method for the determination of radiation doses resulting from a hypothetical crticality accident is presented. The method is an improvement over the slide-rule method cuurently used. The improved method calculates doses for low eneriched uranium as well as highly enriched solutions.

Wilkinson, A.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hopper, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

ACCIDENT PREVENTION SIGNS, TAGS, LABELS, SIGNALS, PIPING SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANSI and/or OSHA requirements. USACE facilities shall use signs based upon the specifications opt to use signs meeting either the OSHA or ANSI standards for temporary use during the life and Tags; d. 29 CFR 1926.200; Accident Prevention Signs and Tags; e. ANSI/IEEE C95.2; f. ANSI Z136.1; g

US Army Corps of Engineers

437

Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Canada nuclear and radiological regulatory responsibilities are shared between the provinces/territories and the federal government. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates nuclear fuel cycle materials and man?made radionuclides under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (2000). The provinces and territories regulate NORM arising from industrial activities not involving the nuclear fuel cycle materials. Present guideline桟anadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)梬as published in 2000 in order to bring uniformity to the management of NORM?related procedures to provide adequate radiation protection for workers and the general public. The basic premise of these guidelines is that the NORM?related activities should not be posing any greater hazard than those activities regulated under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act; these concepts are described in this paper.

Anar S. Baweja; Bliss L. Tracy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Unexpected results in neutron-rich radioactive beams induced fusion  

SciTech Connect

The fission-fragment beams at HRIBF provide a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms of fusion involving nuclei with large neutron excess. To explore the role of transfer couplings, fusion excitation functions have been measured using neutron-rich radioactive $^{132}$Sn beams incident on $^{40}$Ca and $^{58}$Ni targets. The sub-barrier fusion enhancement for $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca is larger than that for $^{132}$Sn+$^{58}$Ni although the neutron transfer Q-values are similar for the two reactions. The fusion excitation function for $^{46}$Ti+$^{124}$Sn has been measured in an attempt to resolve the differences observed in $^{132}$Sn+$^{40}$Ca and $^{132}$Sn+$^{58}$Ni.

Liang, J Felix [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in Canada  

SciTech Connect

In Canada, nuclear and radiological regulatory responsibilities are shared between the provinces/territories and the federal government. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates nuclear fuel cycle materials and man-made radionuclides under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (2000). The provinces and territories regulate NORM arising from industrial activities, not involving the nuclear fuel cycle materials. Present guideline--Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)--was published in 2000 in order to bring uniformity to the management of NORM-related procedures to provide adequate radiation protection for workers and the general public. The basic premise of these guidelines is that the NORM-related activities should not be posing any greater hazard than those activities regulated under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act; these concepts are described in this paper.

Baweja, Anar S.; Tracy, Bliss L. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Building 251 Radioactive Waste Characterization by Process Knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Building 251 is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Elements Facility. Operations that involved heavy elements with uncontained radioisotopes including transuranic elements took place inside of glove boxes and fume hoods. These operations included process and solution chemistry, dissolutions, titrations, centrifuging, etc., and isotope separation. Operations with radioactive material which presently take place outside of glove boxes include storage, assaying, packing and unpacking and inventory verification. Wastes generated inside glove boxes will generally be considered TRU or Greater Than Class C (GTCC). Wastes generated in the RMA, outside glove boxes, is presumed to be low level waste. This process knowledge quantification method may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around B251. The method is suitable only for quantification of waste which measures below the MDA of the Blue Alpha meter (i.e. only material which measures as Non-Detect with the blue alpha is to be characterized by this method).

Dominick, J L

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

Fox, K.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Level 1 Accident Report of the March 1, 2010 Bobcat Fatality at BPA's White Bluffs Substation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On March 2, 2010 at the request of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Chief Safety Officer, a Level I Accident Investigation was convened to investigate an accident in which a supplemental labor contractor was fatally injured in a Bobcat/backhoe accident at the White Bluffs Substation near Richland, Washington on March 1, 2010.

443

Manuscript to appear in Environment, Systems and Decisions CALCULATING NUCLEAR ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manuscript to appear in Environment, Systems and Decisions CALCULATING NUCLEAR ACCIDENT there is no authoritative, comprehensive and public historical record of nuclear power plant accidents, we reconstructed a nuclear accident dataset from peer-reviewed and other literature. We found that, in a sample of five

Boyer, Edmond

444

Radioactive Nickel-63 - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Radioactive Nickel-63 Making Radioactive Nickel-63 ORNL-Supplied Nickel-63 Enables High-Sensitivity Explosives, Chemical Weapons, and Narcotics Detectors at Airports Explosives and narcotics detector. Detectors based on ion mobility spectrometry using ORNL 63Ni can now satisfy enhanced Homeland Security requirements at airports and other sensitive locations. When Transportation Security Administration (TSA) inspectors swipe a cloth over your luggage and then place it in an analyzer to check for explosives residue, they are using a device containing 63Ni, a radioactive isotope of nickel, made at ORNL. ORNL is the exclusive producer for 63Ni in North America and perhaps worldwide. "Our only competition would probably be Russia. They have high-flux research reactors and may well be supplying the material also,"

445

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

446

Completion of the Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook: Design, Operation and Maintenance, which will serve as a replacement for the Cask Designers Guide (Shappert, 1970), has now been completed and submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) electronics publishing group for layout and printing; it is scheduled to be printed in late spring 1998. The Handbook, written by experts in their particular fields, is a compilation of technical chapters that address the design aspects of a package intended for transporting radioactive material in normal commerce; it was prepared under the direction of M. E. Wangler of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is intended to provide a wealth of technical guidance that will give designers a better understanding of the regulatory approval process, preferences of regulators on specific aspects of package design, and the types of analyses that should be considered when designing a package to carry radioactive materials.

Shappert, L.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Accurate determination of package behavior for impact and puncture accidents can be obtained by testing sub-scale models. This technique is frequently used in conjunction with full-scale tests and computer analyses. Full-scale spent fuel packages can weigh 250,000 pounds (three fully loaded semi-trucks) or more, therefore the ability to determine the behavior with scale-models improves testing safety and reduces testing costs. *** 1/4 Scale Free Drop Test 1/4 Scale Component Free Drop Test 1/3 Scale Puncture Test 1/2 Scale Puncture Test 1/8 Scale Rail Crush Test [scale model DROP test] Click to view picture [scale model component test]

448

CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-33, Rev. 0) The following provides an overview of the typical activities that will be performed to collect information to evaluate the management of radioactive wastes and implementation of integrated safety management. The following Inspection Activities apply to all Inspection Criteria listed below: Review radioactive waste management and control processes and implementing procedures. Interview personnel including waste management supervision, staff, and subject matter experts. Review project policies, procedures, and corresponding documentation related to ISM core function

449

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

450

Grasshoppers' adaptation to elevated radioactivity in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The explosion of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 was categorized as the most severe nuclear accident in history, resulting in some of the (more)

Mortensen, Louise Hindborg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision Free Drop Test 3,000,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [DROP test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 1,000,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [DROP scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that are encompassed by the above test include: the package being struck by a train traveling 60 MPH the package falling off of a 30-foot high bridge onto solid rock or from a higher bridge onto a highway or railroad the package running into a bridge support or rock slope at 45 MPH. Packages are transported onboard trucks or rail cars, which absorb some of the impact energy, reducing the resulting damage to the packages from the accident. On May 2, 1995, an O&J Gordon Trucking Company truck consisting of a tractor and a lowbed semitrailer became lodged on a high-profile (hump) railroad grade crossing near Sycamore, South Carolina. About 35 minutes later, the truck was struck by southbound Amtrak train No. 81, Silver Star, en route from New York City to Tampa, Florida.

452

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Mack Truck and Subaru Collision Crush Test 200,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [CRUSH test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 60,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [CRUSH scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test* is designed to protect against include: the package being under a vehicle during a pile-up accident the package being pinned between two vehicles during a collision. The 55 gallon drum is an overpack for a smaller (6-inch diameter x 18-inch long, 1/4-inch thick stainless steel walled) package that is inside. Note*: This test is ONLY for packages weighing less than 500 kg (1100 lbs). On April 25, 1996, a Mack truck with a concrete mixer body, unable to stop, proceeded through an intersection at the bottom of an exit ramp. It collided with and overrode a Subaru passenger car near Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid liquid radioactive Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 Summary: radioactive wastes in liquid or solid forms. Oil and gas production, as an example, also results... a radioactive source, plus radioactive...

454

Appendix V Public Involvement Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V V Public Involvement Plan Revision No.: 6 February 2008 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 i FFACO Public Involvement Plan U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Defense Defense Threat Reduction Agency Detachment 1, Nevada Operations Mercury, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 ii Preface The Public Involvement Plan serves two purposes: it provides a broad public involvement strategy, and fulfills requirements contained in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) relating to public awareness and participation. Under the FFACO, agreed to by

455

Public Involvment Plan - Rifle, Colorado  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAR 4-TAR MAC-GWRIF 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New and Old Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Sites May 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Rifle UMTRA Sites Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project Public Participation Plan dated October 1997. This Public Involvement Plan applies to both the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project sites and details the activities that have been or will be carried out to meet the public participation requirements of the

456

Involving students in peer review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Involving students in peer review Case studies and practical strategies for university teaching Jon......................................................................................................................................................2 1. WHAT IS STUDENT PEER REVIEW? A CONCISE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE....................3 BENEFITS OF PEER REVIEW

Pearce, Jon

457

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the January 20, 1998, Electrical Accident at the Casa Grande Substation,South of Phoenix, Arizona  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type-B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Michael S.Cowan, Chief Program Officer, Western Area Power Administration.

458

Use of post-Chernobyl data from Norway to validate the long-term exposure pathway models in the accident consequence code MACCS  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a task performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), consisting of using post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in the NRC's program for probabilistic risk analysis, level 3, of the MELCOR accident consequence code system (MACCS), developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Because of unfortunate combinations of weather conditions, the levels of Chernobyl fallout in parts of Norway were quite high, with large areas contaminated to more than 100 kBq/m[sup 2] of radioactive cesium. Approximately 6% of the total amount of radioactive cesium released from Chernobyl is deposited on Norwegian territory, according to a countrywide survey performed by the Norwegian National Institute for Radiation Hygiene. Accordingly, a very large monitoring effort was carried out in Norway, and some of the results of this effort have provided important new insights into the ways in which radioactive cesium behaves in the environment. In addition to collection and evaluation of post-Chernobyl monitoring results, some experiments were also performed as part of the task. Some experiments performed pre-Chernobyl were also relevant, and some conclusions could be drawn from these. In most connections, the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is inadequate are, however, also pointed out in the paper.

Tveten, U. (Inst. for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

Henning, W.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying? Awards: SciCast rewards the best in scientific short films Conference: Teachers conference is big in Boston Workshop: Experts and teachers mingle in Mexico Awards: Olympiad holds lavish ceremony Cinema: Indiana Jones has a skull full of physics Conference: ESERA announces Turkish delight for 2009 Forthcoming Events

462

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

McNatt, F.G. Sr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

International Standards and Units of Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... latter could be measured and their radium contents expressed in grams. For the measurement of radon, grams (or cubic centimetres) of this gas are impracticable as units, and it ... gas are impracticable as units, and it was therefore decided to use as unit of radon the quantity which is in radioactive equilibrium with 1 gm. of radium; it was ...

1947-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident.

466

Order Module--DOE Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS Order Module--DOE Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS DOE O 225.1B prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and activities. The purpose of the accident investigation is to understand and identify the causes that contributed to the accident so those deficiencies can be addressed and corrected. This, in turn, is intended to prevent recurrence and promote improved environmental protection and safety and health of DOE employees, contractors, and the public. Moreover, accident investigations are used to promote the values and concepts of a learning organization. The department's integrated safety management (ISM) feedback and improvement

467

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Safety Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions

468

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

469

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho...

470

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Austria). EPAC. 2 International Atomic Energy Agency. Management of radioactive waste...Association, October 2008: Buenos Aires, Argentina. Argentina: SAR editor. 5 International Atomic Energy Agency. Classification of radioactive......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Depleted uranium: a contemporary controversy for the teaching of radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium has been used in recent military conflicts and the media have reported the danger from radioactivity. This context provides a good way to keep students' attention when introducing the subject of radioactivity at GCSE or advanced level.

Mark Whalley

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Application of Field-Flow Fractionation to Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Marcus N. Myers; Kathy A. Graff; J. Calvin Giddings

473

Volume II - Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

208-2012 208-2012 July 2012 DOE HANDBOOK Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Volume II: Operational Safety Analysis Techniques U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1208-2012 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Department of Energy (DOE) Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook was prepared under the sponsorship of the DOE Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Corporate Safety Programs, and the Energy Facility Contractors Operating Group (EFCOG), Industrial Hygiene and Safety Sub-group of the Environmental Health and Safety Working Group. The preparers would like to gratefully acknowledge the authors whose works are referenced in this document, and the individuals who provided valuable technical insights and/or specific

474

INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

D.A. Kalinich

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor  

SciTech Connect

A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is examined. The material being compressed in the compactor is a homogeneous mixture of beryllium and {sup 239}Pu. The point-kinetics equations with simple thermal-hydraulic feedback are used to model the transient behavior of the system. A computer code has been developed to solve the model equations. The computer code calculates the fission power history, fission yield, bulk temperature of the system, and several other thermal-hydraulic parameters of interest. Calculations have been performed for the waste supercompactor for various material misloading configurations. The peak power for the various accident scenarios varies from 1.04 {times} 10{sup 17} to 4.85 {times} 10{sup 20} fissions per second (fps). The total yield varies from 8.21 {times} 10{sup 17} to 7.73 {times} 10{sup 18} fissions, and the bulk temperature of the system varies from 412 to >912 K.

Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

NONE

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Film Badge Application Radioactive Material Package Receipt Log  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGE RECEIPT LOG DATE: DELIVERED BY: AUTHORIZED BY: Contamination Check DPM/100 cm2APPENDIX A Film Badge Application Radioactive Material Package Receipt Log Radioactive Material Package Receipt Form (Off-Campus Locations) Radiation / Contamination Survey Form #12;PERSONNEL MONITORING

Slatton, Clint

478

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

479

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy October 2009 #12 Safety (Germany) Peter De Preter: National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials

480

RADIOACTIVITY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 4 -1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a few inches. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as potassium-40 emit beta radiation. Gamma by materials such as paper and have a range in air of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive 4.3 Sources of Radiation Radioactivity and radiation are part of the earth's natural environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "accident involving radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

MARSAME Appendix B B. SOURCES OF BACKGROUND RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consideration is given to issues associated with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive reports on Exposure of the Population in the United States and Canada from Natural Background Radiation.1 Terrestrial Radioactivity The naturally occurring forms of radioactive elements incorporated into the Earth

482

Study of gel materials as radioactive 222Rn gas detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......studied as radioactive radon gas detectors. The detection...diffusion of the radioactive gas in the gel material...easy handling and low cost of the gel material...and other radioactive gases. INTRODUCTION The objective...homogeneity of the device production, dimensions, almost......

G. Espinosa; J. I. Golzarri; J. Rickards; R. B. Gammage

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Chernobyl accident and the problem of {sup 241}Am  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation and decay of {sup 241}Am formed in the reactor of the fourth block of the Chernobyl atomic energy station at the time of the accident of April 26, 1986 are analyzed. Possible pathways for {sup 241}Am uptake in man are examined. The maximum equivalent dose after 70 years is estimated for a critical population living at the edge of the exclusion zone.

Pazukhin, E.M.; Drozd, I.P.; Tokarevskii, V.V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Self-mixing phenomenology in hypothetical core-disruptive accidents  

SciTech Connect

Physical processes are investigated that lead to the thermal equilibration of a disrupted liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) core following a hypothetical core-disruptive accident (HCDA). Their impact is assessed, particularly as relating to the SIMMER code. The turbulent structure in the core region is characterized and bounding estimates are derived of thermal equilibration (''self-mixing'') times. The implication of these results for LMFBR safety research is discussed briefly.

Chapyak, E.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

486

Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF.

Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

KERENA safety concept in the context of the Fukushima accident  

SciTech Connect

Within the last three years AREVA NP and E.On KK finalized the basic design of KERENA which is a medium sized innovative boiling water reactor, based on the operational experience of German BWR nuclear power plants (NPPs). It is a generation III reactor design with a net electrical output of about 1250 MW. It combines active safety equipment of service-proven designs with new passive safety components, both safety classified. The passive systems utilize basic laws of physics, such as gravity and natural convection, enabling them to function without electric power. Even actuation of these systems is performed thanks to basic physic laws. The degree of diversity in component and system design, achieved by combining active and passive equipment, results in a very low core damage frequency. The Fukushima accident enhanced the world wide discussion about the safety of operating nuclear power plants. World wide stress tests for operating nuclear power plants are being performed embracing both natural and man made hazards. Beside the assessment of existing power plants, also new designs are analyzed regarding the system response to beyond design base accidents. KERENA's optimal combination of diversified cooling systems (active and passive) allows passing efficiently such tests, with a high level of confidence. This paper describes the passive safety components and the KERENA reactor behavior after a Fukushima like accident. (authors)

Zacharias, T.; Novotny, C.; Bielor, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Community Involvement Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Involvement Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Overview The success of EM's legacy waste cleanup mission depends largely on the support of informed and engaged stakeholders. Cleanup activities have the potential to affect the health of the public, the environment, and the future of the communities that either host or are located near EM sites. Therefore, it is critical that EM receive public input from local citizens and community organizations prior to making cleanup decisions. In December 2010, EM partnered with the New Mexico Community Foundation

492

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Student Involvement Outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Student Involvement Outcomes reflective assessment High impact practices ASSOCIATED STUDENTS, CSUF, INC. Committed TO ON-CAMPUS ENGAGEMENT 路 SUPPORTING STUDENT SUCCESS 路 UNIFYING THE STUDENT VOICE 路 FOSTERING TITAN PRIDE #12;Organizational Structure Associated Students, CSUF, Inc. (ASI

de Lijser, Peter

494

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. Computer analysis can be used for package certification by generating a

495

Evaluation of soil radioactivity data from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Since 1951, 933 nuclear tests have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and test areas on the adjacent Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR). Until the early 1960s. the majority of tests were atmospheric, involving detonation of nuclear explosive devices on the ground or on a tower, suspended from a balloon or dropped from an airplane. Since the signing of the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963, most tests have been conducted underground, although several shallow subsurface tests took place between 1962 and 1968. As a result of the aboveground and near-surface nuclear explosions, as well as ventings of underground tests, destruction of nuclear devices with conventional explosives, and nuclear-rocket engine tests, the surface soil on portions of the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides. Relatively little consideration was given to the environmental effects of nuclear testing during the first two decades of operations at the NTS. Since the early 1970s, however, increasingly strict environmental regulations have forced greater attention to be given to contamination problems at the site and how to remediate them. One key element in the current environmental restoration program at the NTS is determining the amount and extent of radioactivity in the surface soil. The general distribution of soil radioactivity on the NTS is already well known as a result of several programs carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. However, questions have been raised as to whether the data from those earlier studies are suitable for use in the current environmental assessments and risk analyses. The primary purpose of this preliminary data review is to determine to what extent the historical data collected at the NTS can be used in the characterization/remediation process.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Analysis of the 1957--1958 Soviet nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the largest radio-activity release in reactor history (87...hypothe-sized would also result in the release of large quantities of Pu...48) studies argues against release from a high-level waste facility...violent conventional explosion or fire following a nuclear criticality...

JR Trabalka; LD Eyman; SI Auerbach

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

497

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

498

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

499

1969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE 969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE bY C . Ashley A p r i l 1970 Radiological Sciences Division Savannah River Laboratory E. 1. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Aiken, South Carolina 29801 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best avaiiable original document. . . . CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Releases t o t h e Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 TNX and Building 773-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Reactor Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Releases t o E f f l u e n t Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 DArea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 R e a c t o r A r e a s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

500

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 18, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho Operations, 208-526-5709, millerdc@id.doe.gov Rick Dale, Idaho Treatment Group, 208-557-6552, rick.dale@amwtp.inl.gov Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes IDAHO FALLS, ID- Operations to retrieve the estimated 6,900 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste remaining at the Idaho site began this week at the U.S. Department of Energy锟絪 Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. Waste retrieval resumes at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The resumption of work comes after a nearly two-year stoppage of retrieval operations 锟紸 significant investment has been made in terms of time and dollars that will allow employees to safely retrieve the final radioactive waste that has been stored aboveground at the Idaho site for more than four