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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance test plan Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acceptance test plan Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Using Plan Reasoning in the Generation of Plan...

3

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Cone penetrometer acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

Boechler, G.N.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Honeywell modular automation system acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the results of the Acceptance Test Procedure for the Honeywell Modular Automation System.

Cunningham, L.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

MITG Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The plan presented is for the testing of a prototypical slice of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG). Cross Reference T48-1.

Eck, Marshall B.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Diesel generator trailer acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0252 Rev. 1 and ECNs 609271, and 609272. The equipment being tested is a 150KW Diesel Generator mounted on a trailer with switchgear. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller`s location.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Honeywell Modular Automation System Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the operability of the three new furnaces as controlled by the new Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS). The Honeywell MAS is being installed in PFP to control the three thermal stabilization furnaces in glovebox HA-211. The ATP provides instructions for testing the configuration of the Honeywell MAS at the Plutonium Finishing Plant(PFP). The test will be a field test of the analog inputs, analog outputs, and software interlocks. The interlock test will check the digital input and outputs. Field equipment will not be connected forth is test. Simulated signals will be used to test thermocouple, limit switch, and vacuum pump inputs to the PLUMAS.

STUBBS, A.M.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN 2009 MISSION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services provides proctored testing services administered in a secure and appropriate standardized testing environment. VISION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services will provide quality services that are integral to recruitment

Rock, Chris

12

Acceptance test report for the mobile color camera system  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present test data recorded during acceptance testing of the Mobile Color Camera System (MCCS).

Castleberry, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer  

SciTech Connect

This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

Aftanas, B.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.  

SciTech Connect

To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance test procedures Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

procedures Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acceptance test procedures...

20

Project W-049H instrument and control Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the instrument and control systems have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. The instrument and control system includes three operator control stations, modems, and general purpose LAN interface cabinets in the Effluent Treatment Facility control room; two pump stations; disposal station pumping building; and all local control units installed in the fold. Testing will be performed using actual signals when available and simulated signals when actual signals are unavailable.

Carrigan, M.C.

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

None

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Academic Testing Services Strategic Plan 2010 -2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic Testing Services Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015 Contribute to increasing enrollment and promoting student success: Provide test assessments which are integral to higher education participation and progression Provide a quality test environment conducive to optimal performance and success Provide quality

Rock, Chris

23

Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

Glasscock, J.A.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

2005-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Emergency Response Planning at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Emergency Response Planning at the Nevada Test Site D. Randerson A robust emergency response plan was...underground testing of nuclear weapons at the United States Nevada Test Site (NTS). This plan was designed to help protect the......

D. Randerson

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was issued that recommended that the mixed acid method be replaced by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method for the measurement of magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zirconium (Zr) with additional testing of the method by DWPF Laboratory being needed before further implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method at that laboratory. While the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok does not address any of the open issues remaining after the publication of the recommendation for the replacement of the mixed acid method by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method (since those issues are to be addressed by the DWPF Laboratory), the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} testing associated with the Isolok testing does provide additional insight into the performance of the method as conducted by SRNL. The performance is to be investigated by looking to the composition measurement data generated by the samples of a standard glass, the Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1), that were prepared by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method and included in the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. The measurements of these samples were presented as part of the study results, but no statistical analysis of these measurements was conducted as part of those results. It is the purpose of this report to provide that analysis, which was supported using JMP Version 7.0.2.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

OUTLINE OF DETAILED TEST PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0/ 177 0/ 177 Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program September 30, 2010 Prepared by Weiju Ren and Dan Naus Oak Ridge National Laboratory Barry Oland XCEL Engineering DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.gov

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance test limit Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acceptance test limit Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 F-12001SITEENVIRONMENTALREPORT APPENDIXF:QUALITYCONTR...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance test summary Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acceptance test summary Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Figures xiii Preface xix Summary: Analysis Models...

33

Systems acceptance and operability testing for rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document provides instructions for the system acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling system, modified for use in flammable gas tanks.

Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

MO. IU~Y."U. : : I ~ Test Plans for Aceeptanc e I-..;A;.;;.;T;.;M~-,.;;5;.;4;.;;8;.......___....;;A-..___  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of A the experiment at BxA and ·integration into ALSEP. This document covers the Engineering Model and prototype tests are applicable to this test plan to the extent referenced h.erein. l. Interface Control Specification prepared to document test plans for acceptance tests on the SIDE/CCGE Engineering Model. These plans cover

Rathbun, Julie A.

35

DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases May 2, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has rejected all offers received from the second solicitation issued this spring that sought to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the United States' crude oil reserve. Both solicitations resulted in no awards because the Department determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. The solicitations for the purchase of crude oil were meant to replace oil sold on an emergency basis after Hurricane Katrina caused significant damage to the production, distribution, and refining capabilities of the

36

Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project  

SciTech Connect

This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years.

Kan, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

John T. Maki

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)  

SciTech Connect

Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

BARNES, D.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

Pedersen, L.T.

1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115.

Bevins, R.R.

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant. Collector subsystem functional test plan  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II Collector Subsystem Functional Test Plan presents the functional testing to be performed to demonstrate the readiness of the Collector Subsystem for the Integrated Acceptance Tests. The functional testing will be performed with the collector subsystem as a stand-alone subsystem. In this context, all heliostat operational commands will be issued from the Heliostat Array Controller (HAC) and heliostat responses will be verified by visual means and from the HAC status displays.

Not Available

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Acceptance Test Procedure: SY101 air pallet system  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this test procedure is to verify that the system(s) procured to load the SY-101 Mitigation Test Pump package fulfills its functional requirements. It will also help determine the man dose expected due to handling of the package during the actual event. The scope of this procedure focuses on the ability of the air pallets and container saddles to carry the container package from the new 100 foot concrete pad into 2403-WD where it will be stored awaiting final disposition. This test attempts to simulate the actual event of depositing the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test pump into the 2403-WD building. However, at the time of testing road modifications required to drive the 100 ton trailer into CWC were not performed. Therefore a flatbed trailer will be use to transport the container to CWC. The time required to off load the container from the 100 ton trailer will be recorded for man dose evaluation on location. The cranes used for this test will also be different than the actual event. This is not considered to be an issue due to minimal effects on man dose.

Koons, B.M.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

McAtee, R.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests  

SciTech Connect

This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Molecke, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan RM | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan RM Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan RM The CP RM Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the...

49

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) Under the guidance and sponsorship of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery...

50

Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation P1 an (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities, etc), Factory Tests and Inspections (FTIs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Tests and Inspections (CTIs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) test phase plan: Performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing the disposition of transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from nuclear weapons production activities of the United States. These wastes are currently stored nationwide at several of the DOE's waste generating/storage sites. The goal is to eliminate interim waste storage and achieve environmentally and institutionally acceptable permanent disposal of these TRU wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being considered as a disposal facility for these TRU wastes. This document describes the first of the following two major programs planned for the Test Phase of WIPP: Performance Assessment -- determination of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system in accordance with the requirements of the EPA Standard; and Operations Demonstration -- evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP underground facility. 120 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

100 area excavation treatability test plan  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report  

SciTech Connect

This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

WERRY, S.M.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Utility-scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass performance acceptance tests conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the NREL undertook the development of interim Guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here follow the general approach of the earlier NREL report on parabolic trough collector fields, but in this case are specifically written for power tower solar systems composed of a heliostat (reflector) field directing the sun's rays to a receiver (heat exchanger) on a high central tower. The working fluid in the tower receiver can be molten salt, water/steam, air, CO2, or other suitable fluids, each with its own particular attributes. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the inherently transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to use a performance projection model in the acceptance process. Two primary types of test runs are to be conducted. The first the Short-Duration Steady-State Thermal Power Test (Power Test) measures the thermal power output of the solar system under clear-sky conditions over a short period, during which thermal equilibrium and stable steady-state conditions exist, and compares the measured results to performance model projections for those conditions. The second test type the Long-Duration Production (or Reliability) Test (Production Test) is a continuous multi-day energy test that gathers multiple detailed daily thermal energy outputs and compares the results to projections from a performance model. Both clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions are acceptable. Additionally, the functionality of the solar system should be observed with regard to such items as daily startup, normal operation, standby and shutdown.

D. Kearney

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Acceptance Test Report for the Modular Automation System (MAS) Manufactured by Honeywell Inc.  

SciTech Connect

This document details the performance of the acceptance test of the Honeywell MAS Control System for equipment to be installed in gloveboxes HA-20MB and HA-211 at a later date. Equipment that was anticipated included 6 stabilization furnaces, only three and their associated equipment were installed.

ANDERSON, D.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

LSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. 2 5. 3 5.4 5.5 5. 6 5.7 Nodal Description Thermal Resistances Solar Heating Lunar SurfaceLSPE Qualification and Flight Acceptance T /V Test Su.m..mary and Thermal Design Final Report NO Thermal Control Systems. The report is divided into three sections. The first section introduces

Rathbun, Julie A.

59

W-026, acceptance test report TRU empty drum compactor (submittal{number_sign}634)  

SciTech Connect

On 10/19/96 and 10/21/96, the 06/04/96 version of the Empty Drum Compactor Acceptance Test Procedure was used to perform tests by INET Corporation at the Hanford WRAP facility. The INET compaction components were installed in the Diversified glovebox. The Diversified glovebox and cart and the INET compaction components, EDC HPU and drum centering device constitute the Empty Drum Compactor.

Watson, T.L.

1997-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fast flux test facility, transition project plan  

SciTech Connect

The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Guttenberg, S.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

NONE

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier  

SciTech Connect

This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 20 mass % Na{sub 2}O, 10 mass % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 8 mass % B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1.5 mass % K{sub 2}O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired.

Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan  

SciTech Connect

The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

Hulvey, R.K.

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

66

Long-term corrosion testing plan.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

New Developments in Planning Accelerated Life Tests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Accelerated life tests (ALTs) are often used to make timely assessments of the life time distribution of materials and components. The goal of many ALTs (more)

Ma, Haiming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Simulation Test for Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Mike Kennedy Mike D. Kennedy, Inc. Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (3.9 MB) This document is intended for use with the following documents: Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), NREL/TP-550-47427 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX, NREL/TP-550-47502 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52414 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy

69

Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada`s input. The options and schedules reflect a ``bottoms-up`` approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sludge stabilization boat material test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides instructions for testing different types of potential boat materials in the HC-21C muffle furnace process. The boats must withstand corrosive environments at up to 1000 degrees C.

De Vries, M.L.

1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Our aim is to provide details of the experimental test plan for scaled model studies in St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Main Channel at the University of Minnesota, including a review of study objectives, descriptions of the turbine models, the experimental set-up, instrumentation details, instrument measurement uncertainty, anticipated experimental test cases, post-processing methods, and data archiving for model developers.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier  

SciTech Connect

This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Annual update for the Nevada Test Site site treatment plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the purpose and scope of the Draft Annual Update for the Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan, the framework for developing the Annual Update, and the current inventory of mixed waste covered under the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Compliance Act Consent Order and stored at the Nevada Test Site. No Site Treatment Plan milestones or Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order deadlines have been missed for fiscal year 1996. The Shipping Cask, a portion of the solvent sludge waste stream, and eight B-25 boxes from the lead-contaminated soil waste stream have been deleted from the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order, in accordance with Part XI of the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As ITER serves as a fusion testing facility for magnetic fusion energy (MFE) nuclear technology componentIFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation

Abdou, Mohamed

76

Tips for Planning, Building, and Testing a Model Car  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tips for Planning, Building, and Testing Your Lithium- Ion Battery Powered Car CONTENTS:  Teacher Overview  What Teachers Can Do To Help  Student Design Plan  Brainstorming  Materials  Chassis Design  Transmission  Gear Ratio  Wheels and Bearings  Battery  Testing  Trouble Shooting TEACHER OVERVIEW  The Lithium-ion battery powered car competition is designed to be an engineering challenge for middle school students.  Students will be exploring the following concepts while planning, building and testing their cars:  Alternative energy sources  Engineering design  Aerodynamics  Force and motion  Teamwork  Problem solving  Teams who do not have a completed car at the

77

Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Test Methods Standing Technical Committee 2011 Strategic Plan V1.1 - Draft 2/24/2012 Committee Chair: 2011-2012 Dane Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Prioritization of Gaps, Barriers and Needs The following table prioritizes the Gaps, Barriers and Needs described in this document. Rank Description Estimated Priority Effort 1 Heat Pump Water Heater Field Test Protocol H M 2a Method for infinitely variable fan airflow measurement H H 2b Non-Intrusive Natural Gas Flow Measurement H H 3 Data Logger with Increased Data Capabilities M M 4 Room Air Mixing Analysis M H Contents Summary of Test Methods STC Strategic Plan .......................................................................................................... 3

78

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.  

SciTech Connect

With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A data base and a standard material for use in acceptance testing of low-activity waste products  

SciTech Connect

The authors have conducted replicate dissolution tests following the product consistency test (PCT) procedure to measure the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si at various combinations of temperature, duration, and glass/water mass ratio. Tests were conducted with a glass formulated to be compositionally similar to low-activity waste products anticipated for Hanford to evaluate the adequacy of test methods that have been designated in privatization contracts for use in product acceptance. An important finding from this set of tests is that the solution concentrations generated in tests at 20 C will likely be too low to measure the dissolution rates of waste products reliably. Based on these results, the authors recommend that the acceptance test be conducted at 40 C. Tests at 40 C generated higher solution concentrations, were more easily conducted, and the measured rates were easily related to those at 20 C. Replicate measurements of other glass properties were made to evaluate the possible use of LRM-1 as a standard material. These include its composition, homogeneity, density, compressive strength, the Na leachability index with the ANSI/ANS 16.1 leach test, and if the glass is characteristically hazardous with the toxicity characteristic leach procedure. The values of these properties were within the acceptable limits identified for Hanford low-activity waste products. The reproducibility of replicate tests and analyses indicates that the glass would be a suitable standard material.

Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Strachan, D.M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for transfer line SN-633 (241-AX-B to 241-AY-02A)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-633 transfer line by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the addition of transfer line SN-633. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Hanford Company has undertaken the task to develop and demonstrate a method of retrieval for double-shell tank (DST)waste. Mixer pumps were chosen as the planned method of retrieval for the DSTs, based on engineering technology studies,past experience with hydraulic sluicing at the Hanford Site, and experience with mixer pumps at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. This document outlines a test plan to demonstrate the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps installed in the AZ-101 tank to mobilize waste.

Symons, G.A.; Staehr, T.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Test plan : reducing soft costs of rooftop solar installations attributed to structural considerations.  

SciTech Connect

This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

Dwyer, Stephen F.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INEL test plan for evaluating waste assay systems  

SciTech Connect

A test bed is being established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These tests are currently focused on mobile or portable radioassay systems. Prior to disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), radioassay measurements must meet the quality assurance objectives of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. This test plan provides technology holders with the opportunity to assess radioassay system performance through a three-tiered test program that consists of: (a) evaluations using non-interfering matrices, (b) surrogate drums with contents that resemble the attributes of INEL-specific waste forms, and (c) real waste tests. Qualified sources containing a known mixture and range of radionuclides will be used for the non-interfering and surrogate waste tests. The results of these tests will provide technology holders with information concerning radioassay system performance and provide the INEL with data useful for making decisions concerning alternative or improved radioassay systems that could support disposal of waste at WIPP.

Mandler, J.W.; Becker, G.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Menkhaus, D.E.; Clements, T.L. Jr.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan H. Link, J. Keller, and Y. Guo National Renewable Energy Laboratory B. McNiff McNiff Light Industry Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-58190 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan H. Link, J. Keller, and Y. Guo National Renewable Energy Laboratory B. McNiff McNiff Light Industry Prepared under Task No. WE11.0301 Technical Report

88

Acid rain program: CEMS submission instructions for monitoring plans, certification test notifications, and quarterly reports  

SciTech Connect

The Acid Rain Program regulations require all affected utility units to continuously measure, record and report SO2, NOx, volumetric flow data and CO2 emissions. All affected units also must continuously measure and record opacity, and must report opacity exceedances to the appropriate State or Local Agency. To ensure that your CEMS and fuel flowmeters are performing at an acceptable level, and providing quality assured data, you are required under 40 CFR 75.53, 75.62 (a) to submit a monitoring plan and certification test data for acid rain CEM certificaton. The purpose of this handbook is to help you fulfill your requirements under the Acid Rain Program. This handbook will walk you through the necessary steps for gaining CEMS certification, including filling out and mailing the proper forms, administering the required tests, and applying for certification and sending in electronic data to EPA.

NONE

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Abstract A19: Acceptability of the Pap test versus an HPV self-sampler for cervical cancer screening among women of Haitian descent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract A19: Acceptability of the Pap test versus an HPV self-sampler for cervical...Lakay (Haitian Creole for at home Pap test). Implementing this intervention may...Human papillomavirus versus Papanicolaou test) among program participants. Methods...

Francesca Damus; Selina A. Smith; Ernest Alema-Mensah; Erin N. Kobetz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan DOEOE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan This document is designed to help guide and strengthen the DOEOE...

91

Microsoft Word - acceptance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptance Checklist Acceptance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and planning information system acceptance activities. The checklist reflects recognized acceptance management activities to be performed throughout the information systems project lifecycle. Information systems acceptance is generally characterized as a process to officially accept new or modified software components, which, when integrated, form an information system. Within this context, the objectives of software acceptance are summarized as the following: C Verify that the software product meets users= requirements and is fully operational.

92

100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

OTEC-1 Power System Test Program: test plan for first deployment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes in detail all tests planned for the first eight-month deployment of OTEC-1, a test facility constructed by the US Department of Energy in order to test heat exchangers for closed-cycle power plants using ocean thermal energy. Tests to be performed during the first-deployment period are aimed primarily at determining (1) the effectiveness of countermeasures in preventing biofouling of the heat exchanters, (2) the extent of environmental impacts associated with operation of an OTEC facility, and (3) the performance of a 1-MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser pair. The condenser to be tested has plain tubes, and the evaporator employs the Linde High Flux surface on the working-fluid (ammonia) side to enhance the heat-transfer rate. This plan provides a statement of the objectives and priorities of the test program, describes the test equipment, gives a detailed account of all tests to be performed and the test schedule, and discusses provisions for management of the test program.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan This document presents the National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan, a coherent strategy for improving the cyber security of control systems in the energy sector. The NSTB Program is conducted within DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), which leads national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance the security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. The Plan covers the planning period of fiscal year 2008 to 2013. DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan More Documents & Publications DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan

95

TEST PLAN FOR MONITORING COOLING COILS IN A LABORATORY SETTING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to understand and quantify the moisture removal performance of cooling coils at part-load conditions. The project will include a comprehensive literature review, detailed measurement of cooling coil performance in a laboratory facility, monitoring cooling systems at several field test sites, and development/validation of engineering models that can be used in energy calculations and building simulations. This document contains the detailed test plan for monitoring cooling coil performance in a laboratory setting. Detailed measurements will be taken on up to 10 direct expansion (DX) and chilled water cooling coils in various configurations to understand the impact of coil geometry and operating conditions on transient moisture condensation and evaporation.

Don B. Shirey, III

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Test plan: Gas-threshold-pressure testing of the Salado Formation in the WIPP underground facility  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste from the United States defense program in the WIPP underground facility must assess the role of post-closure was generation by waste degradation and the subsequent pressurization of the facility. be assimilated by the host formation will Whether or not the generated gas can be assimilated by the host formation will determine the ability of the gas to reach or exceed lithostatic pressure within the repository. The purpose of this test plan is (1) to present a test design to obtain realistic estimates of gas-threshold pressure for the Salado Formation WIPP underground facility including parts of the formation disturbed by the underground of the Salado, and (2) to provide a excavations and in the far-field or undisturbed part framework for changes and amendments to test objectives, practices, and procedures. Because in situ determinations of gas-threshold pressure in low-permeability media are not standard practice, the methods recommended in this testplan are adapted from permeability-testing and hydrofracture procedures. Therefore, as the gas-threshold-pressure testing program progresses, personnel assigned to the program and outside observers and reviewers will be asked for comments regarding the testing procedures. New and/or improved test procedures will be documented as amendments to this test plan, and subject to similar review procedures.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Test plan for Enraf Series 854 level gauge testing in Tank 241-S-106  

SciTech Connect

An Enraf Series 854 level gauge was installed on Tank 241-S-106 (S-106) during the first week of June 1994. On August 11, 1994, the gauge`s measuring wire broke. An investigation has been started to determine how the wire broke. This test plan identifies a qualification test that is part of this investigation. This test will also provide evidence as to the location and extent of potential corrosion on the measuring wire due to tank environment. The results from this testing will provide data for better material selections. This test will involve placing the existing Enraf Series 854 level gauge back into service with the same type of measuring wire (316 stainless steel) that originally broke on August 11, 1994. The gauge will be operated for 14 days. At the end of the 14-day test, the wire shall be sent to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for analysis.

Barnes, G.A.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Letter Notice of acceptance issued by NNSANV following evaluation of customer's Test Plan, Safety Assessment Document and Test Management summary. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23...

99

Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan  

SciTech Connect

In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Developing a Proficiency Testing Plan for your Laboratory Author and Presenter: Jeff C. Gust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the participating laboratory. Why does my laboratory need a Proficiency Testing Plan? Regardless of the standard. The laboratory is required to plan and review the monitoring process. This section goes on to suggest severalDeveloping a Proficiency Testing Plan for your Laboratory Author and Presenter: Jeff C. Gust Vice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fire Alarm Testing and Inspection Planning and Vendor Check In/Check Out Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Alarm Testing and Inspection Planning and Vendor Check In/Check Out Process DOCUMENT PURPOSE This process is used for fire alarm testing and inspection pre-work planning and vendor check in and check out ____________________________________________________ CHECK IN PRIOR TO TESTING NOTES _____ Central Monitoring (BSAC) notified of daily testing start time

Webb, Peter

102

Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Test plan: Hydraulic fracturing and hydrologic tests in Marker Beds 139 and 140  

SciTech Connect

Combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements in this test plan are designed to evaluate the potential influence of fracture formation in anhydrite Marker Beds 139 and 140 on gas pressure in and gas flow from the disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with time. The tests have the further purpose of providing comparisons of permeabilities of anhydrite interbeds in an undisturbed (virgin) state and after fracture development and/or opening and dilation of preexisting partially healed fractures. Three sets of combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements are planned. A set of trial measurements is expected to last four to six weeks. The duration of each subsequent experiment is anticipated to be six to eight weeks.

Wawersik, W.R.; Beauheim, R.L.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier.

Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Downs, J.L.; Rossi, R.E.; Gee, G.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

CENRTC Project No. 2F3EOA, OCB A-372, acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure provides the steps necessary to verify correct functional operation of controls, annunciators, alarms, protective relays and related systems impacted by CENRTC No. 2F3EOA, Microwave Transfer Trip Project, modification work performed under work package 6B-93-00038/M (CENRTC 2F3EOA MWTT OCB A-372 PACKAGE).

Akerson, A.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Acceptance test procedure for removal of CS1K circuit switcher block and trip schemes  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document provides a detailed process to test the functions of the circuit switcher, protective relays, alarms, SCADA and 125VDC control logic of 115kV and 13.8kV systems at B3S4 substation following the removal of trip and blocking schemes to Transformer No.1 Circuit Switcher B594.

HACHE, J.M.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Microsoft Word - 911133_0 SSC-1 Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for Reactor Control Equipment Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy...

110

Microsoft Word - 911141_0_SSC-9 RCCS Test Plan.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for the Reactor Cavity Cooling System Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle...

111

Microsoft Word - 911147_0_SSC-16 RPS IPS and PCDIS Test Plan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for RPS, IPS and PCDIS Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy...

112

Microsoft Word - 911140_0_SCHE Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Shutdown Cooling Heat Exchanger Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle...

113

Microsoft Word - 911135_0 SSC-4a Reactor Core Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for the Reactor Core Assembly Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy...

114

Microsoft Word - 911134_0 SSC-2 Control Rod Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Control Rods Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC...

115

Microsoft Word - 911143_0_SSC-11 PCS Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Power Conversion System Equipment for a Direct Combined Cycle Prepared by...

116

Microsoft Word - 911137_0 SSC-5 RPV Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Reactor Pressure Vessel Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle Energy...

117

Microsoft Word - 911136_0 SSC-4b Reactor Graphite Test Plan_rel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with Hydrogen Production Test Plan for Reactor Graphite Elements Prepared by General Atomics for the Battelle Energy...

118

Microsoft Word - 911138_0_SSC-6 Helium Circulator Test Plan_rel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for Helium Circulators (PHTS, SCS, SHTS) Prepared by General Atomics For the...

119

Microsoft Word - 911145_0_SSC-14 FHSS Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Fuel Handling and Storage System Prepared by General Atomics For the Battelle...

120

Microsoft Word - 911144_0_SSC-13 S-I HPS Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for S-I Hydrogen Production System (HPS) Prepared by General Atomics For the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microsoft Word - 911139_0_SSC-7 IHX Test Plan_rel.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan - Intermediate Heat Exchanger PCHE Type Prepared by General Atomics For the...

122

Acceptance Test Procedure for Project 251W, WBS 3, Substation A-8, Building 251-W, Bus {number_sign}2 switchgear replacement  

SciTech Connect

This document records the steps taken and results of the acceptance testing of the new 13.8kV switchgear installed at 251W. This gear is under the administrative control of Electrical Utilities.

VanBaalen, R.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microsoft Word - S05979_DOE-LM_Executable Plan2009-Final_Rev 2changes accepted_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order 430.2B Order 430.2B Executable Plan for LM (DOE FEMP Final) December 2009 LMS/S05979 This page intentionally left blank Signature for Site DOE Order 430.2B Executable Plan for LM (DOE FEMP Final) Office Concurrence This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DOE Order 430.2B Executable Plan for LM (DOE FEMP Draft) December 2009 Doc. No. S05979 Page i Contents 1.0 Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ 1 2.0 DOE Order 430.2B Goal Summary Progress ..................................................................... 2 3.0 Energy Intensity ..................................................................................................................

124

Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the information and guidelines necessary to conduct all the required testing of the Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) system. The strategy and essential components for testing the WinCal System Project are described in this test plan. The purpose of this test plan is to provide the customer and performing organizations with specific procedures for testing the specified system's functions.

Pertzborn, N.F.

1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acceptability of risk is a complex subject. Judgments of acceptability ... and by the society at large. A risk may be acceptable to the consumer of a product or ... but those who receive no benefit but some risk

Chris Whipple

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Power-Aware SoC Test Planning for Effective Utilization of Port-Scalable Testers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circuits contain embedded cores with different scan frequen- cies. To better meet the test requirements if the resulting test access architecture reduces the bit-width used to access it. We present a scalable test planning technique that exploits port scalability of testers to reduce SoC test time. We compare

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

129

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Old Solvent Tanks S1-S22 to Address Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) assumed custody of the Old Solvent Tanks (Tanks S1-S22) in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG, 643-E) from Waste Management in January 1991. The purpose of this Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to collect and analyze samples of the sludge solids, organic and aqueous phases to determine the level of radioactivity, the isotopic constituents, the specific gravity, and other physical parameters. These data must be obtained to evaluate the process safety of remediating the tanks, to determine the disposal path for the material in the tanks, and to determine the most viable closure technology for the tanks.

Filpus-Luyckx, P.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Testing operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Testing operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) was drilled to investigate the potential of the Coso Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in southeastern California. Detailed background information is contained in the drilling plan, Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), NVO-184, dated June 1977. The purpose of this supplement to NVO-184 is to establish a plan of operations for testing the resource after completion of well drilling activities. Major elements of this plan include

131

High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

none,

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan- February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document outlines gaps, needs, and opportunities identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee on Test Methods.

133

Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M. [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA; Joslyn, C. C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA; Venetz, T. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Microsoft Word - AGA12 TestPlan 2-6-07.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA 12, Part 2 AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector NSTB Mark Hadley, Kristy Huston Pacific Northwest National Laboratories November 2006 Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank Bill Rush and Aakash Shah of the Gas Technology Institute as well as the members of the NERC Control Systems Security Working Group and Sandia National Laboratory for their contributions towards the development of this test plan. NSTB AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Under the guidance and sponsorship of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed a test plan for AGA 12, Part 2 compliant

135

High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Test Plan for the High Burnup Dry Storage Research Project (HDRP) outlines the data to be collected, the high burnup fuel to be included, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary for implementation.

136

Underground test area subproject waste management plan. Revision No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was the site of 928 underground nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. The tests were performed as part of the Atomic Energy Commission and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons testing program. The NTS is managed by the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Of the 928 tests conducted below ground surface at the NTS, approximately 200 were detonated below the water table. As an unavoidable consequence of these testing activities, radionuclides have been introduced into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. In the few instances of groundwater sampling, radionuclides have been detected in the groundwater; however, only a very limited investigation of the underground test sites and associated shot cavities has been conducted to date. The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject was established to fill this void and to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the NTS. One of its primary objectives is to gather data to characterize the deep aquifer underlying the NTS.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CRAD, Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment Plan | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly...

138

Test plan for the Parallex CANDU-MOX irradiation  

SciTech Connect

One of several options being considered by the United States and the Russian Federation for the disposition of excess plutonium from dismantled weapons is to convert it to mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for use in Canadian uranium-deuterium (CANDU) reactors. This report describes an irradiation test demonstrating the feasibility of this concept with laboratory quantities of MOX fuel placed in the pressurized loops of the National Research Universal test reactor at the Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories. The objective of the Parallex (for parallel experiment) test is to simultaneously test laboratory-produced quantities of US and R.F. MOX fuel in a test reactor under heat generation rates representing those expected in the CANDU reactors. The MOX fuel will be produced with plutonium from disassembled weapons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and at the Bochvar Institute in the Russian Federation. Thus, the test will serve to demonstrate the accomplishment of many parts of the disposition mission: disassembly of weapons, conversion of the plutonium to oxide, fabrication of MOX fuel, assembly of fuel elements and bundles, shipment to a reactor, irradiation, and finally, storage of the spent fuel elements awaiting eventual disposition in a geologic repository in Canada.

Copeland, G.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update  

SciTech Connect

A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

R&D ERL: G5 test and commissioning plan  

SciTech Connect

Gun-to-5-cell cavity (G5) setup (Fig 1-2) can be considered as the first stage of the final BNL ERL design. The goal of the G5 setup is to test critical ERL components with the beam and characterize the beam produced by the gun. Also, this test will be used to assess effectiveness of the zigzag merger, which will be installed later in the ERL setup. The major components under the test will include the SRF gun, the five-cell SRF cavity, vacuum components, parts of the control and diagnostic systems. G5 is designed to measure the following beam parameters: (1) projected bunch emittance (?) and Twiss parameters ({alpha}, {beta}); (2) slice emittance; (3) bunch length; and (4) longitudinal and transverse halo.

Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of test acceptance standards for qualification of the glass-bonded zeolite waste form. Interim annual report, October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

Glass-bonded zeolite is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the Electrometallurgical Treatment Program as a potential ceramic waste form for the disposition of radionuclides associated with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. The utility of standard durability tests [e.g. Materials Characterization Center Test No. 1 (MCC-1), Product Consistency Test (PCT), and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT)] are being evaluated as an initial step in developing test methods that can be used in the process of qualifying this material for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. A broad range of potential repository conditions are being evaluated to determine the bounding parameters appropriate for the corrosion testing of the ceramic waste form, and its behavior under accelerated testing conditions. In this report we provide specific characterization information and discuss how the durability test results are affected by changes in pH, leachant composition, and sample surface area to leachant volume ratios. We investigate the release mechanisms and other physical and chemical parameters that are important for establishing acceptance parameters, including the development of appropriate test methodologies required to measure product consistency.

Simpson, L.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Fortner, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

Keller, J.; Halse, C.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Status and plans for a SRF accelerator test faciliy at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. Expansion plans of the facility are underway that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power equipment, instrumentation, LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Leibfritz, J; Carlson, K; Chase, B; Church, M; Harms, E; Klebaner, A; Kucera, M; Lackey, S; Martinez, A; Nagaitsev, S; Nobrega, L; Piot, P; Reid, J; Wendt, M; Wesseln, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack  

SciTech Connect

This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Built by the Russian State Rocket Center under Berkeley Lab auspices Speaker(s): Anthony Radspieler Jr. Glen Dahlbacka Joseph Rasson Date: March 4, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Berkeley Lab Engineering Division teamed with Empire Magnetics, Rohnert Park and the Makeyev State Rocket Center under a DOE NNSA non-proliferation project to develop and test a series of small wind turbines of vertical axis design. Over the years, about 100 Russian scientists and engineers worked on the project and the hydrodynamic, aerodynamic and mechanical test facilities of the SRC were used. The objective was to create a highly manufacturable Darieus unit with a modest Tip Speed Ratio (quiet and low

148

Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT) The Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT), currently planned for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advanced overhead power line conductors and superconducting cables into an operational high-voltage (HV) transmission system for long-term testing and evaluation. The HV transmission test network within PCOT, Tennessee, 500-kV Substation. In addition to testing advanced conductors and cables, PCOT provides

149

105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica  

SciTech Connect

Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities.

NONE

1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Salt spray testing of sacrificial and barrier type coatings for the purpose of finding a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate  

SciTech Connect

Cadmium plate is used to protect various components of offshore oil and gas production equipment from surface marine environments such as salt spray. This research project was performed to find an environmentally acceptable coating which provides equivalent or superior resistance to surface marine corrosion when compared to cadmium plate. In order to find a replacement for cadmium plate, a large number of sacrificial and barrier type coatings were exposed to an accelerated salt spray test in accordance with ASTM B117-94. The only sacrificial coating which resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without any indication of failure was the 0.0006-in. thick zinc-nickel plate with an olive drab chromate treatment. Based on these test results, zinc-nickel plate is recommended as a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate for use in surface marine environments. Electroless nickel coatings with a minimum applied thickness of 0.002-in. also resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without indication of failure. Electroless nickel is not recommended for corrosion resistance in salt spray environments for two reasons. Electroless nickel is susceptible to microcracking when heat treated at moderate to high temperatures. Heat treatment improves the hardness and resultant wear resistance of the coating. Microcracking will compromise the integrity of the coating resulting in pitting, cracking or crevice corrosion of the substrate in corrosive environments. Secondly, any significant mechanical damage to the coating or disbonding of the coating substrate interface will also result in corrosive attack of the substrate.

Schultz, E.J.; Haeberle, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

AFCI Fuel Irradiation Test Plan, Test Specimens AFC-1 and AFC-1F  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository (DOE, 2003). One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. There are little irradiation performance data available on non-fertile fuel forms, which would maximize the destruction rate of plutonium, and low-fertile (i.e., uranium-bearing) fuel forms, which would support a sustainable nuclear energy option. Initial scoping level irradiation tests on a variety of candidate fuel forms are needed to establish a transmutation fuel form design and evaluate deployment of transmutation fuels.

D. C. Crawford; S. L. Hayes; B. A. Hilton; M. K. Meyer; R. G. Ambrosek; G. S. Chang; D. J. Utterbeck

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE/NETL's Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing Air Quality III September 12, 2002 Arlington, Va Scott Renninger, Project Manager for Mercury Control Technology Enviromental Projects Division Presentation Outline * Hg Program goals & objectives * Focus on Future Hg control R&D * Q&As President Bush's Clear Skies Initiative Current Mid-Term 2008-2010 2018 SO 2 11 million tons 4.5 million tons 3 million tons NOx 5 million tons 2.1 million tons 1.7 million tons Mercury 48 tons 26 tons 15 tons Annual U.S. Power Plant Emissions Mercury Control * Developing technologies ready for commercial demonstration: - By 2005, reduce emissions 50-70% - By 2010, reduce emissions by 90% - Cost 25-50% less than current estimates 2000 Year 48 Tons $2 - 5 Billion @ 90% Removal w/Activated

159

RERTR Program: goals, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the nearly null value of 1982 to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in early 1989. The technical needs of research reactors for HEU exports are also estimated to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect

This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

162

Measuring and Testing Equipment Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measuring and Test Equipment Measuring and Test Equipment Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a program is in place which assures that Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) used in activities affecting quality and safety are properly controlled, calibrated, and adjusted at specified times to maintain accuracy within necessary limits. Criteria: All M&TE is uniquely identified, calibrated, controlled, and provides accuracy traceability. A recall program maintains the total inventory and status of all M&TE. Out-of-tolerance M&TE is removed from service. Plant equipment calibrated with out-of-tolerance M&TE is evaluated in a timely manner for impact on previous output, current operability and is re-

163

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relatively undisturbed portions of the Salado formation. The WIPP is a U. S. Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes resulting from the United States`s defense programs. The testing described in this FOP will be conducted by INTERA Technologies, Inc., under contract to the Earth Sciences Division of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The testing program is part of the WIPP-site Hydrogeologic Characterization and Plugging and Sealing programs being conducted by SNL`s Earth Sciences and Experimental Programs Divisions, respectively.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. [Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

164

Field operations plan for permeability testing in the WIPP-site underground facility  

SciTech Connect

This Field Operations Plan (FOP) describes the objectives, design, equipment, and methodology for permeability tests to be conducted in boreholes drilled from the underground facility currently under construction at the 655-meter depth level at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico into relatively undisturbed portions of the Salado formation. The WIPP is a U. S. Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes resulting from the United States's defense programs. The testing described in this FOP will be conducted by INTERA Technologies, Inc., under contract to the Earth Sciences Division of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The testing program is part of the WIPP-site Hydrogeologic Characterization and Plugging and Sealing programs being conducted by SNL's Earth Sciences and Experimental Programs Divisions, respectively.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

165

Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Church, M; Nagaitsev, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

warned that the world was asleep at the wheel. Back then, only two countries had plans to test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warned that the world was asleep at the wheel. Back then, only two countries had plans to test in a hospital examin- ing room in Rochester, New York. Pressing a ball of cotton into the crook of her elbow

Cai, Long

168

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake. CAU 496 consists of one site located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Record of Technical Change - Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Record of Technical Change, Technical Change No. CAP-1, dated April 13, 2005 for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, September 2004, DOE/NV--1003.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Treatability study operational testing program and implementation plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Treatability Study (TS) Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan identifies operational testing to be performed to: (1) Demonstrate the technical feasibility of methods proposed for the removal of radiochemical sludge heels from the underground storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), known as the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU). (The bulk of the radiochemical waste, which was previously stored in the tanks, was removed during the 1980s, and only a sludge heel remains.) (2) Reduce the uncertainty in meeting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the GAAT OU. (3) Minimize the overall costs to accomplish the first two objectives. An initial Feasibility Study (FS) effort identified uncertainties in the evaluation of various alternatives for addressing the remediation of the GAAT OU. To support future decision making, the US. Department of Energy is performing a TS to identify cost-effective remediation approaches for the GAAT OU by providing information to reduce cost and technical uncertainty and better define acceptable remediation strategies. The testing activities will be initially conducted in a nonradioactive environment at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF) at ORNL. This will permit the design and initial performance testing and training activities to be completed while minimizing the risk, employee exposure, and costs associated with the testing effort. The component design and functional testing and initial system performance testing will be completed in the TTCTF. After the component and initial system performance testing have been completed, the operations testing will continue in the North Tank Farm (NTF). This testing has an associated higher cost and risk, but is necessary to provide results for actual waste heel removal.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Addendum to environmental monitoring plan Nevada Test Site and support facilities  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/1 0630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1992 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

NONE

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

TEMPLETON, A.M.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Supplemental Investigation Plan for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is part of an effort to re-evaluate all FFACO URs against the current RBCA criteria (referred to in this document as the Industrial Sites [IS] RBCA process) as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). After reviewing all of the existing FFACO URs, the 12 URs addressed in this Supplemental Investigation Plan (SIP) could not be evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as sufficient information about the contamination at each site was not available. This document presents the plan for conducting field investigations to obtain the needed information. This SIP includes URs from Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 326, 339, 358, 452, 454, 464, and 1010, located in Areas 2, 6, 12, 19, 25, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada; and CAU 403, located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 165 miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Lynn Kidman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001  

SciTech Connect

This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found.

JENSEN, C.E.

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

Kent Norris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experimental plan and construction guidance for Hanford Protective Barrier Test at Hill AFB, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Permanent isolation surface barriers are needed to fully isolate buried waste materials for long periods of time from the general environment. Multi-layer surface barriers that use natural earthen materials overlying bio-intrusion layers of rock and/or asphalt are expected to reduce infiltration or deep percolation to less than 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) of water. The layering also reduces root penetration, preventing uptake and translocation of hazardous materials to the surface vegetation. The opportunity exists to test the Hanford Barrier in a wetter, colder climate at an existing lysimeter facility located at Hill Air Force Base near Salt Lake, Utah. The use of an existing lysimeter facility simplifies the construction effort and allows comparison of the Hanford Protective Barrier with an existing US Environmental Protection Agency-Resource Conservation and Recovery Act clay cap already undergoing tests at the lysimeter site. This document presents the experimental plan for testing the Hanford Protective Barrier in a wetter, colder climate.

Kirkham, R.R.; Gee, G.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DOE-STD-3026-99; DOE Standard Filter Test Facility Quality Program Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-99 6-99 February 1999 Superseding DOE NE F 3-44 July 1986 DOE STANDARD FILTER TEST FACILITY QUALITY PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3026-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy standard supercedes DOE NE F 3-44 and is approved for use by all DOE components and their contractors.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Continuing the Validation of CCIM Processability for Glass Ceramic HLLW Forms: Plan for Test AFY14CCIM-GC1  

SciTech Connect

This test plan covers test AFY14CCIM-GC1which is the first of two scheduled FY-2014 test runs involving glass ceramic waste forms in the Idaho National Laboratorys Cold Crucible Induction Melter Pilot Plant. The test plan is based on the successes and challenges of previous tests performed in FY-2012 and FY-2013. The purpose of this test is to continue to collect data for validating the glass ceramic High Level Liquid Waste form processability advantages using Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology. The major objective of AFYCCIM-GC1 is to complete additional proposed crucible pouring and post tapping controlled cooling experiments not completed during previous tests due to crucible drain failure. This is necessary to qualify that no heat treatments in standard waste disposal canisters are necessary for the operational scale production of glass ceramic waste forms. Other objectives include the production and post-test analysis of surrogate waste forms made from separate pours into the same graphite mold canister, testing the robustness of an upgraded crucible bottom drain and drain heater assembly, testing the effectiveness of inductive melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a square wave configuration, and observing the tapped molten flow behavior in pans with areas identical to standard High Level Waste disposal canisters. Testing conditions, the surrogate waste composition, key testing steps, testing parameters, and sampling and analysis requirements are defined.

Vince Maio

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect

This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

DOE/NV

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

183

Test plan for high-burnup fuel cladding behavior under loss-of- coolant accident conditions  

SciTech Connect

Excessive oxidation, hydriding, and extensive irradiation damage occur in high-burnup fuel cladding, and as result, mechanical properties of high-burnup fuels are degraded significantly. This may influence the current fuel cladding failure limits for loss-of- coolant-accident (LOCA) situations, which are based on fuel cladding behavior for zero burnup. To avoid cladding fragmentation and fuel dispersal during a LOCA, 10 CFR 50.46 requires that peak cladding temperature shall not exceed 1204 degrees C (2200 degrees F) and that total oxidation of the fuel cladding nowhere exceeds 0.17 times total cladding thickness before oxidation. Because of the concern, a new experimental program to investigate high-burnup fuel cladding behavior under LOCA situations has been initiated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A hot-cell test plan to investigate single-rod behavior under simulated LOCA conditions is described in this paper. In the meantime, industry fuel design and operating conditions are expected to undergo further changes as more advanced cladding materials are developed. Under these circumstances, mechanical properties of high-burnup fuel cladding require further investigation so that results from studies on LOCA, reactivity- initiated-accident (RIA), operational transient, and power-ramping situations, can be extrapolated to modified or advanced cladding materials and altered irradiation conditions without repeating major integral experiments in test reactors. To provide the applicable data base and mechanistic understanding, tests will be conducted to determine dynamic and static fracture toughness and tensile properties. Background and rationale for selecting the specific mechanical properties tests are also described.

Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A.; Kassner, T.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Status of the RERTR program: overview, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrighment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a summary of the accomplishments which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1984 with its many international partners, emphasis is placed on the progress achieved during 1985 and on current plans and schedules. A new miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was fabricated and is well into irradiation. The whole-core ORR demonstration is scheduled to begin in November 1985, with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/. Altogether, 921 full-size test and prototype elements have been ordered for fabrication with reduced enrichment and the new technologies. Qualification of U/sub 3/Si-Al fuel with approx.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ is still projected for 1989. This progress could not have been achieved without the close international cooperation which has existed since the beginning, and whose continuation and intensification will be essential to the achievement of the long-term RERTR goals.

Travelli, A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

D-Site PRINCETON PLASMA TEST PLAN ISTP-NSTX-001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning Form #_______(ENG-032) Lockout/Tagout (ESH-016) Confined Space Permit (5008, Sec. 8, Chap 5) Lift

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

187

Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt  

SciTech Connect

The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

SciTech Connect

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ERRATA SHEET for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.1.1.3 of the Table of Contents reference on Page v and on Page 12 of the Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada erroneously refers to the Nevada Environmental Policy Act Determination. The correct title of the referenced document is the National Environmental Policy Act Determination.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Long-term Monitoring Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) was accepted by the state regulator and the environmental remediation efforts at the site have progressed to the stages of model validation and long-term monitoring design. This report discusses the long-term monitoring strategy developed for CNTA. Subsurface monitoring is an expensive and time-consuming process, and the design approach should be based on a solid foundation. As such, a thorough literature review of monitoring network design is first presented. Monitoring well networks can be designed for a number of objectives including aquifer characterization, parameter estimation, compliance monitoring, detection monitoring, ambient monitoring, and research monitoring, to name a few. Design methodologies also range from simple hydrogeologic intuition-based tools to sophisticated statistical- and optimization-based tools. When designing the long-term monitoring well network for CNTA, a number of issues are carefully considered. These are the uncertainty associated with the subsurface environment and its implication for monitoring design, the cost associated with monitoring well installation and operation, the design criteria that should be used to select well locations, and the potential conflict between different objectives such as early detection versus impracticality of placing wells in the vicinity of the test cavity. Given these considerations and the literature review of monitoring design studies, a multi-staged approach for development of the long-term monitoring well network for CNTA is proposed. This multi-staged approach will proceed in parallel with the validation efforts for the groundwater flow and transport model of CNTA. Two main stages are identified as necessary for the development of the final long-term monitoring well network for the site. The first stage is to use hydrogeologic expertise combined with model simulations and probability based approaches to select the first set of monitoring wells that will serve two purposes. The first is to place the wells in areas likely to encounter migration pathways thereby enhancing the probability of detecting radionuclide migration in the long run. The second objective is crucial in the short run and is aimed at using this set of wells to collect validation data for the model. The selection criteria should thus balance these two objectives. Based on the results of the validation process that progresses concurrently with the first monitoring stage, either more wells will be needed in this first stage or the second stage will be initiated. The second monitoring design stage will be based on an optimum design methodology that uses a suitable statistical approach, combined with an optimization approach, to augment the initial set of wells and develop the final long-term monitoring network. The first-stage probabilistic analysis conducted using the CNTA model indicates that the likelihood of migration away from the test cavity is very low and the probability of detecting radionuclides in the next 100 years is extremely low. Therefore, it is recommended to place one well in the downstream direction along the model longitudinal centerline (i.e., directly north of the working point), which is the location with the highest probability of encountering the plume. Lack of significant plume spreading, coupled with the extremely low velocities, suggests that this one well is sufficient for the first stage. Data from this well, and from additional wells located with validation as the prime objective, will benefit the model validation process. In the long run, this first monitoring well is going to be crucial for the long-term monitoring of the site (assuming that the flow model is validated), as it will be the most likely place to detect any plume migration away from the cavity.

A. Hassan

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units is listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) which was agreed to by the state of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). CAU 543 sites are located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad; CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank; CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. All Area 15 CASs are located at the former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, which operated from 1963 to 1981 and was used to support animal experiments involving the uptake of radionuclides. Each of the Area 15 CASs, except CAS 15-23-01, is associated with the disposal of waste effluent from Building 15-06, which was the primary location of the various tests and experiments conducted onsite. Waste effluent disposal from Building 15-06 involved piping, sumps, outfalls, a septic tank with leachfield, underground storage tanks, and an aboveground storage tank (AST). CAS 15-23-01 was associated with decontamination activities of farm equipment potentially contaminated with radiological constituents, pesticides, and herbicides. While the building structures were removed before the investigation took place, all the original tanks, sumps, piping, and concrete building pads remain in place. The Area 6 CAS is located at the Decontamination Facility in Area 6, a facility which operated from 1971 to 2001 and was used to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, clothing, and other materials that had become contaminated during nuclear testing activities. The CAS includes the effluent collection and distribution systems for Buildings 6-605, 6-606, and 6-607, which consists of septic tanks, sumps, piping, floor drains, drain trenches, cleanouts, and a concrete foundation. Additional details of the site history are provided in the CAU 543 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2004a), and the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2005).

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D`Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Gass, W.R.; D`Amico, N. [ed.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Safer Work Plan for CAUs 452, 454, 456, and 464 Closure of Historical UST Release Sites Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This plan addresses characterization and closure of nine underground storage tank petroleum hydrocarbon release sites. The sites are located at the Nevada Test Site in Areas 2, 9, 12, 23, and 25. The underground storage tanks associated with the release sites and addressed by this plan were closed between 1990 and 1996 by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. One underground storage tank was closed in place (23-111-1) while the remaining eight were closed by removal. Hydrocarbon releases were identified at each of the sites based upon laboratory analytical data samples collected below the tank bottoms. The objective of this plan is to provide a method for implementing characterization and closure of historical underground storage tank hydrocarbon release sites.

Jerry Bonn

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development FY95-96 program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the United States Government`s (USG) research and development (R&D) functions for monitoring nuclear explosions in the context of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This responsibility includes the November 1993 transfer of the Department of Defense`s (DoD) CTBT R&D responsibility to DOE. The DOE research program builds on the broad base of USG expertise developed historically and includes R&D for detecting, locating, identifying, and characterizing nuclear explosions in all environments. The Office of Research and Development (NN-20), within the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, formulates and executes the efforts necessary to meet the Department`s responsibilities. The following DOE laboratories as a team will support NN-20 in implementing the program plan: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. DOE has committed to a cooperative program that draws upon the core competencies of the national laboratories and upon the strengths of other government agencies and the private sector (academia and industry). The integration of resources under a common direction will allow the program to be flexible and responsive to changing technical and policy requirements while maximizing the effectiveness of funding appropriations. DOE will develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, algorithms, procedures, and integrated systems in a cost-effective and timely manner. The program comprises seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound monitoring; on-site inspection; space-based monitoring; and automated data processing elements.

None

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

SciTech Connect

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Safety Planning Guidance Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk Reduction Plan Appendix I ­ Acceptable ISV Methods............................................................................ 10 Appendix II ­ Risk Binning Matrix

202

Study plan for water movement test: Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.2.2.2  

SciTech Connect

The water movement tracer test is designed to produce information derived from isotopic measurements of soil and tuff samples collected from Yucca Mountain that is pertinent for assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository. Measurements of chlorine isotropic distributions will help characterize the percolation of precipitation into the unsaturated zone. The {sup 36}Cl in the unsaturated zone occurs from atmospheric fallout of {sup 36}Cl produced by cosmic-ray secondaries reacting with {sup 40}Ar and, to a lesser extent, with {sup 36}Ar. It also occurs as global fallout from high-yield nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1952 and 1962. When chloride ions at the surface are washed underground by precipitation, the radioactive decay of the {sup 36}Cl in the chloride can be used to time the rate of water movement. The {sup 36}l half-life of 301,000 yr permits the detection of water movement in the range of approximately 50,000 to 2 million years. These data are part of the input for developing numerical models of ground water flow at this site. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Norris, A.E.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 461: Joint Test Assembly Sites and Corrective Action Unit 495: Unconfirmed Joint Test Assembly Sites Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan addresses the action necessary for the clean closure of Corrective Action Unit 461 (Test Area Joint Test Assembly Sites) and Corrective Action Unit 495 (Unconfirmed Joint Test Assembly Sites). The Corrective Action Units are located at the Tonopah Test Range in south central Nevada. Closure for these sites will be completed by excavating and evaluating the condition of each artillery round (if found); detonating the rounds (if necessary); excavating the impacted soil and debris; collecting verification samples; backfilling the excavations; disposing of the impacted soil and debris at an approved low-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site

Jeff Smith

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Appendix C: DOE Super-ESPC Project Acceptance Guidelines and Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of DOE Super-ESPC Projects  ECM Installation: All ECMs are installed in accordance with plans, specifications, standards, and other contract documents (sometimes by the Contractor, often by a subcontractor and always over a period of months).  Inspection, start-up, testing and commissioning. All ECMs are inspected, brought on line, tested, and commissioned interactively with all related Government-owned or Contractor-installed ECMs. Again, the ECMs should be operating in accordance with the design, plans, specifications, standards and other contract documents and manufacturer's recommendations. Individual ECMs may go through start-up and testing, but all interrelated

205

An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems  

SciTech Connect

Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the same project [1]. However, this work focuses on two materials: the LiF-BeF2 eutectic (67 and 33 mol%, respectively, also known as flibe) as primary coolant and the LiF-NaF-KF eutectic (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, respectively, also known as flinak) as secondary heat transport fluid. At first common issues are identified, involving the preparation and purification of the materials as well as the development of suitable diagnostics. Than issues specific to each material and its application are considered, with focus on the compatibility with structural materials and the extension of the existing properties database.

Pattrick Calderoni

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center . The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing...

207

Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, March 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263, the Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the US Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 263 is comprised of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-04 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at Leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 263. Corrective Action Unit 263 is located southwest of Building 4839, in the Central Propellant Storage Area. Operations in Building 4839 from 1968 to 1996 resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. In general, effluent released to the leachfield consisted of sanitary wastewater from a toilet, urinal, lavatory, and drinking fountain located within Building 4839. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with the Building 4839 operations.

ITLV

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Towards an Acceptable Criterion of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The determination by federal risk managers of an acceptable level of carcinogenic risk depends upon many factors. Several of the ... The size of the population that is at risk influences our perception and analys...

Paul Milvy

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

Closure of the Fast Flux Test Facility: Current Status and Future Plans  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium cooled fast reactor designed and constructed in the 1970's. The original purpose of the facility was to develop and test advanced fuels and materials for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor program. The facility operated very successfully from 1982 through 1992, fulfilling its original mission as well as other identified missions. However, in 1993 the Department of Energy concluded that there was no longer a need for the FFTF and thus ordered that it be shut down. Following eight years of additional study of potential new missions, the final decision to shut down the facility was made in 2001. (During this eight year period the plant was maintained in a condition to allow safe and efficient shut down or restart). The complete closure of the FFTF consists of the following phases: - Deactivation - removal/stabilization of hazards to allow long-term storage (2001-2009); - Surveillance and maintenance - minimum cost compliant storage (2010-2015); - Decontamination and decommissioning (2016-2024). All of the FFTF fuel has been removed from the site except the sodium-bonded fuel that is destined for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory for final disposition. The sodium-bonded fuel had metallic sodium inside of the fuel pin to increase the heat transfer from the fuel pellet to the clad in order to reduce pellet centerline temperature. Three hundred and seventy-six (376) fuel assemblies have been washed (sodium removed) and transferred to storage at other Hanford locations. The majority of the spent fuel is stored in interim storage casks designed for a 50 year storage life, holding seven assemblies each. All sodium systems have been drained and the sodium stored under an inert gas blanket at ambient temperature in a Sodium Storage Facility at the FFTF site. This facility consists of four large tanks and associated piping. The main contaminants are sodium-22, cesium-137 and tritium. The sodium-potassium (NaK) that was used as an intermediate cooling fluid in several FFTF systems has been drained and removed or flushed to sodium systems where it became mixed with the sodium. The in-containment hot cell has minimal sodium contamination, is currently inerted with argon and is being used for loading of the T-3 transportation cask with the sodium-bonded fuel for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory. The majority of the fuel handling machines are still operational and being used for loading the sodium-bonded fuel into the T-3 casks. This equipment will be shut down immediately following completion of shipment of the sodium-bonded fuel. The majority of hotel systems are still operating. Four of the eight 400-ton chillers have been shut down and four of the cooling towers have been shut down. The argon system is operational and supplying gas for sodium systems cover gas, in-containment hot cell atmosphere and fuel handling systems. The nitrogen system remains in service supplying cover gas to the demineralized water system and fire suppression systems. Eleven of the facilities nineteen transformers containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed and significant re-routing of power has been performed to support the long term minimum cost surveillance mode. Future plans include the complete deactivation, the long-term surveillance and maintenance, the sodium disposition and the decontamination and decommissioning The most complex and costly activity during the decontamination and decommissioning phase will be the removal of the 'residual sodium' in the sodium systems. It was impractical to remove the residual sodium during the systems draining evolution. It is estimated that approximately 24,000 liters (6,400 gallons) remain within the systems. The complexity of design of the FFTF exceeds any sodium facility in the United States in which sodium removal has occurred. There are a total of 21 miles of sodium piping in the FFTF as well as three large vessels (the reactor vessel and two spent fuel pool vessels) that will require partial disassembly and drilli

Farabee, O.A. [US Department of Energy, PO Box 550, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Witherspoon, W.V. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000 N2-51, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is delayed until the wind speeds are within the appropriate limits. Storm Systems The UAV only operates in Visual Flight Rules conditions. Flights are delayed until such conditions are present. 3.2 Phase II: Line-of-Sight Autonomous Flight Test....1.5 Emergency Procedures ........................................................................... 22 3.2 Phase II: Line-of-Sight Autonomous Flight Test .............................................. 24 3.2.1 Flight Test Objectives...

Tom, Jonathan

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

C:\WINNT\Profiles\caseys\DESKTOP\L T R C\PICs Program\Permanent Markers\PM Test Plan.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-3175 0-3175 Permanent Markers Testing Program Plan September 28, 2000 United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Permanent Markers Testing Program Plan Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad, New Mexico DOE/WIPP 00-3175 September 28, 2000 DOE/WIPP 00-3175 -i- Table of Contents List of Abbreviations and Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 Markers Testing Program Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.0 Markers Systems Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.1 Screening Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.1.1 Large Surface Markers . . . . . . . . . . . .

214

Reseach and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Final report. Volume III: development and field test plan  

SciTech Connect

By means of a program of theoretical analysis, development, and testing of samples, it was found that significant improvements could be made in the energy efficiency ratio (EER) of hermetic motor-compressor assemblies. The high efficiency designs resulting from the development program are believed to be suitable for quantity production without excessive facilities cost, to have acceptable levels of performance and reliability, and to be producible at costs which will make them commercially attractive. The steps involved in the development of the improved compressor design are described in detail. The major purpose of Phase II of the project is to verify the reliability of the high-efficiency designs by means of a field demonstration program.

Nelson, R.T.; MacCarthy, P.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

Guettler, D.A.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Extractors manual for Fluidized-Bed Combustion Data Base System: Test Data Data Base. [FBC; planning  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology is rapidly emerging as an acceptable alternative to conventional coal-fired boiler technology. To satisfy the engineering public's need for experimental data and to assist in the study of technical uncertainties in FBC technology, the Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated the development of a data system to store the results of Government-sponsored research. To capture the results of Government-sponsored FBC research programs, documents have been written for the TDDB and MPDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The FBC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for FBC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the FBC data system. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the TDDB for FBC. The level of detail needed to satisfy the wide variety of potential users' needs is the primary consideration in determining the types and amounts of data to be stored. The TDDB was designed so that data could be stored at any level of detail. 3 figs., 26 tabs.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nevada Test Site site treatment plan, final annual update. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFCAct Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996. The FFCAct CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Second Line of Defense, Megaports Initiative, Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phases of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports System supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)located at the Export Lanes of the Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexicoto the Government of Mexico (GOM).

Hughes, Jamie D.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Plan for integrated testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] non EQ3/6 data base portion  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the Integrated Testing Task are to develop laboratory data on thermodynamic properties for actinide and fission product elements for use in the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling code; to determine the transport properties of radionuclides in the near-field environment; and develop and validate a model to describe the rate of release of radionuclides from the near-field environment. Activities to achieve the firs item have been described in the Scientific Investigation Plan for EQ3/6, where quality assurance levels were assigned to the acitivities. This Scientific Investigation Plan describes activities to achieve the second and third purposes. The information gathered in these activities will be used to assess compliance with the performance objective for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) to control the rate of release of radionuclides if the repository license application includes part of the host rock; to provide a source term for release of radionuclides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in showing compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and to provide a source term for release of radionculides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in doing calculations of cumulative releases of radionuclides from the repository over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process. 5 refs.

Oversby, V.M.

1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area. CAU 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. One Corrective Action Site (CAS) is included in CAU 408: {lg_bullet} CAS TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, process knowledge, site visits, aerial photography, multispectral data, preliminary geophysical surveys, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), clean closure will be implemented for CAU 408. CAU 408 closure activities will consist of identification and clearance of bomblet target areas, identification and removal of depleted uranium (DU) fragments on South Antelope Lake, and collection of verification samples. Any soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels will be excavated and transported to an appropriate disposal facility. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include explosives. In addition, at South Antelope Lake, bomblets containing DU were tested. None of these contaminants is expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results. The corrective action investigation and closure activities have been planned to include data collection and hold points throughout the process. Hold points are designed to allow decision makers to review the existing data and decide which of the available options are most suitable. Hold points include the review of radiological, geophysical, and analytical data and field observations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range  

SciTech Connect

This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 252 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 252 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-07-02, Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) Decontamination Pad. Located in Area 25 at the intersection of Road H and Road K at the Nevada Test Site, ETS-1 was designed for use as a mobile radiation checkpoint and for vehicle decontamination. The CAS consists of a concrete decontamination pad with a drain, a gravel-filled sump, two concrete trailer pads, and utility boxes. Constructed in 1966, the ETS-1 facility was part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) complex and used to test nuclear rockets. The ETS-1 Decontamination Pad and mobile radiation check point was built in 1968. The NRDS complex ceased primary operations in 1973. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to determine if any primary contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) (including radionuclides, total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls) are present at this site. Vertical extent of migration of suspected vehicle decontamination effluent COPCs is expected to be less than 12 feet below ground surface. Lateral extent of migration of COPCs is expected to be limited to the sump area or near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. Using a biased sampling approach, near-surface and subsurface sampling will be conducted at the suspected worst-case areas including the sump and soil near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible e valuation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) HISTORY & STATUS & FUTURE PLANS  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to shut down the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) due to lack of national missions that justified the annual operating budget of approximately $88M/year. The initial vision was to ''deactive'' the facility to an industrially and radiologically safe condition to allow long-term, minimal surveillance storage until approximately 2045. This approach would minimize near term cash flow and allow the radioactive decay of activated components. The final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) would then be performed using then-current methodology in a safe and efficient manner. the philosophy has now changed to close coupling the initial deactivation with final D and D. This paper presents the status of the facility and focuses on the future challenge of sodium removal.

FARABEE, O.A.

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama  

SciTech Connect

Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

Newhouse, Robert N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Test Plan to Demonstrate Removal of Iodine and Tritium from Simulated Nuclear Fuel Recycle Plant Off-gas Streams using Adsorption Processes  

SciTech Connect

This letter documents the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team Off-Gas - ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), Co-absorption studies - Design system complete/test plan complete (M4FT-14OR0312022), due November 15, 2013. The objective of this test plan is to describe research that will determine the effectiveness of silver mordenite and molecular sieve beds to remove iodine and water (tritium) from off-gas streams arising from used nuclear fuel recycling processes, and to demonstrate that the iodine and water can be recovered separately from one another.

Bruffey, Stephanie H. [ORNL] [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B. [ORNL] [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Test 2  

SciTech Connect

A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects on pressurized water reactor (PWR) test fuel bundles. This Experiment Operation Plan (EOP) Addendum 2, together with the referenced EOP, describes the desired operating conditions and additional hazards review associated with the four-part MT-2 experiment. The primary portions of the experiment, MT-2.2 and MT-2.3, will evaluate the following: 1) the mechanical deformation of pressurized fuel rods subjected to a slow LOCA, using reflood water for temperature control, that is designed to produce cladding temperatures in the range from 1033 to 1089K (1400 to 1500F) for an extended time, and 2) the effects of the deformed and possibly failed cladding on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the test assembly during simulated LOCA heating and reflooding. The secondary portions of the experiment, MT-2.1 and MT-2.4, are intended to provide thermal-hydraulic calibration information during two-stage reflood conditions for 1) relatively low cladding temperatures, <839K (1050F), on nondeformed rods, and 2) moderately high cladding temperatures, <1089K (1500F), on deformed rods.

Russcher, G. E.; Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; Wilson, C. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Cunningham, M. E.; Marshall, R. K.; Mohr, C. L.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 487: Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, January 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 487, Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 487 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS), RG 26-001-RGRV, Thunderwell Site. The site is located in the northwest portion of the TTR, Nevada, approximately five miles northwest of the Area 3 Control Point and closest to the Cactus Flats broad basin. Historically, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico used CAU 487 in the early to mid-1960s for a series of high explosive tests detonated at the bottom of large cylindrical steel tubes. Historical photographs indicate that debris from these tests and subsequent operations may have been scattered and buried throughout the site. A March 2000 walk-over survey and a July 2000 geophysical survey indicated evidence of buried and surface debris in dirt mounds and areas throughout the site; however, a radiological drive-over survey also performed in July 2000 indicated that no radiological hazards were identified at this site. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that detonation activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern into the surface/subsurface soil including total volatile and total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and high explosives. Therefore, the scope of corrective action field investigation will involve excavation, drilling, and extensive soil sampling and analysis activities to determine the extent (if any) of both the lateral and vertical contamination and whether or not any such contamination extends beyond the historical boundaries of the site. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 02-26-11, Lead Shot 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain 02-59-01, Septic System 02-60-01, Concrete Drain 02-60-02, French Drain 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain 02-60-04, French Drain 02-60-05, French Drain 02-60-06, French Drain 02-60-07, French Drain 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall 23-99-06, Grease Trap 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Alfred Wickline

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

D. Vandel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance July 12, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis The Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site's groundwater compliance action plan (GCAP) received U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concurrence last month. This makes Lakeview the first Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, Title I site where a finalized GCAP has selected a "no remediation" compliance strategy because concentration limits for regulated constituents have been met. Lakeview, Oregon, location map. The Lakeview processing site, located in south-central Oregon, was once a privately owned and operated facility that processed uranium ore from the nearby Lucky Lass and White King mines from 1958 through 1960. The 258-acre site, including the areas formerly occupied

242

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Such is the case for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The current scope of the Frenchman Flat CAI includes the development and use of a three-dimensional (3-D), numerical, CAU-scale groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The CAU model will be developed and used to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The scope of this CAI does not currently include any characterization activities; however, such activities will be conducted if the CAU model results indicate that further characterization information is needed to develop a sufficiently reliable CAU model. Two areas of importance to the CAU model are the model area and the investigation area. The CAU-model area will be selected to encompass the Frenchman Flat CAU and the region located immediately downgradient where contamination may migrate. The extent of the CAU-model area is dependent on the extent of contamination and is uncertain at this point. The extent of the investigation area is not expected to increase during the CAI.

USDOE/NV

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

David A. Strand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 240, Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

DOE/NV

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

WATER CONSERVATION PLAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

i WATER CONSERVATION PLAN TONOPAH TEST RANGE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY January 10, 2011 Prepared for: Tonopah Test Range Post Office Box 871 Tonopah, Nevada 89049 (702)...

248

Responsible technology acceptance: Model development and application to consumer acceptance of Smart Grid technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a response to climate change and the desire to gain independence from imported fossil fuels, there is a pressure to increase the proportion of electricity from renewable sources which is one of the reasons why electricity grids are currently being turned into Smart Grids. In this paper, we focus on private consumers acceptance of having Smart Grid technology installed in their home. We analyse acceptance in a combined framework of the Technology Acceptance Model and the Norm Activation Model. We propose that individuals are only likely to accept Smart Grid technology if they assess usefulness in terms of a positive impact for society and the environment. Therefore, we expect that Smart Grid technology acceptance can be better explained when the well-known technology acceptance parameters included in the Technology Acceptance Model are supplemented by moral norms as suggested by the Norm Activation Model. We tested this proposition by means of an online survey of Danish (N=323), Norwegian (N=303) and Swiss (N=324) private consumers. The study confirms that adding personal norms to the independent variables of the Technology Acceptance Model leads to a significant increase in the explained variance in consumer acceptance of Smart Grid technology in all three countries.

Madeleine Broman Toft; Geertje Schuitema; John Thgersen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (one site is in Area 3 and the other is in Area 5) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV). The current DOE Order governing management of radioactive waste is 435.1. Associated with DOE Order 435.1 is a Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) and Guidance (DOE G 435.1-1). The Manual and Guidance specify that preliminary closure and monitoring plans for a low-level waste (LLW) management facility be developed and initially submitted with the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for that facility. The Manual and Guidance, and the Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued for the Area 3 RWMS further specify that the preliminary closure and monitoring plans be updated within one year following issuance of a DAS. This Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) fulfills both requirements. Additional updates will be conducted every third year hereafter. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring both RWMSs, and is based on guidance issued in 1999 by the DOE for developing closure plans. The plan does not follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance in order to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. The closure and monitoring plans were integrated because much of the information that would be included in individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation and program management. The ICMP identifies the regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment where they are located, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the sites.

S. E. Rawlinson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

252

Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 342, the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (FTP), which is located in Area 23 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 88 km (55 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of CAS 23-56-01. The FTP is an area approximately 100 m by 140 m (350 ft by 450 ft) located west of the town of Mercury, Nevada, which was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to train fire-fighting personnel (REECo, 1991; Jacobson, 1991). The surface and subsurface soils in the FTP have likely been impacted by hydrocarbons and other contaminants of potential concern (COPC) associated with burn activities and training exercises in the area.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill associated with the historical operations of a vacuum pump oil recovery system at the E-MAD facility.

K. B. Campbell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Complete Phase I Tests As Described in the Multi-lab Test Plan for the Evaluation of CH3I Adsorption on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified as a potential sorbent for iodine present in the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In such a facility, both elemental and organic forms of iodine are released from the dissolver in gaseous form. These species of iodine must be captured with high efficiency for a facility to avoid radioactive iodine release above regulatory limits in the gaseous effluent of the plant. Studies completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) examined the adsorption of organic iodine in the form of CH3I by AgZ. Upon breakthrough of the feed gas through the sorbent bed, elemental iodine was observed in the effluent stream, despite the fact that the only source of iodine in the system was the CH3I in the feed gas.1 This behavior does not appear to have been reported previously nor has it been independently confirmed. Thus, as a result of these prior studies, multiple knowledge gaps relating to the adsorption of CH3I by AgZ were identified, and a multi-lab test plan, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), INL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories, was formulated to address each in a systematic way.2 For this report, the scope of work for ORNL was further narrowed to three thin-bed experiments that would characterize CH3I adsorption onto AgZ in the presence of water, NO, and NO2. Completion of these three-thin bed experiments demonstrated that organic iodine in the form of CH3I was adsorbed by reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) to a 50% higher loading than that of I2 when adsorbed from a dry air stream. Adsorption curves suggest different adsorption mechanisms for I2 and CH3I. In the presence of NO and NO2 gas, the loading of CH3I onto Ag0Z is suppressed and may be reversible. Further, the presence of NO and NO2 gas appears to oxidize CH3I to I2; this is indicated by an adsorption curve similar to that of I2 on Ag0Z. Finally, the loss of organic iodine loading capacity by Ag0Z in the presence of NOx is unaffected by the addition of water vapor to the gas stream; no marked additional loss in capacity or retention was observed.

Bruffey, S. H. [ORNL; Jubin, R. T. [ORNL

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Plan science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Strategic Plan x Strategic Plan Los Alamos National Laboratory Strategic Plan - 2014 (pdf) Our Strategic Plan...

259

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130, Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 130 consists of the seven following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site: 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank 20-99-05, Tar Residue 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 130 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) finalized on April 3, 2008, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 130. The DQO process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels, leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 130: Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, geophysical surveys). Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. Obtain consensus from NDEP that the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. Close the underground storage tank(s) and their contents, if any, in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code regulations. Remove the lead brick(s) found at any CAS in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The acceptable daily intake (ADI) is commonly defined as the maximum amount of a chemical to which a person can be exposed, on a daily basis over an extended period of time, usually without suffering a deleterious effect. It represents a daily intake level of a chemical in humans that is associated with minimal or no risk of adverse effects, and if the ingestion exceeds, this amount may cause toxic effects. It is a numerical estimate of daily oral exposure to the human population, including sensitive subgroups such as children, that is not likely to cause harmful effects during a lifetime. The ADI is expressed in milligrams of the chemical, as it appears in the food, per kilogram of body weight per day (mgkg?1day?1).

J. Chilakapati; H.M. Mehendale

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

Weidert, R.S.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the following three corrective action sites (CASs) in Area 12 of the NTS: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Site 12-06-09 consists of a muckpile and debris located on the hillside in front of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels on the eastern slopes of Rainier Mesa in Area 12. The muckpile includes mining debris (muck) and debris generated during the excavation and construction of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-08-02, CWD, consists of a muckpile and debris and is located on the hillside in front of the re-entry tunnel for K-Tunnel. For the purpose of this investigation CAS 12-28-01 is defined as debris ejected by containment failures during the Des Moines and Platte Tests and the associated contamination that is not covered in the two muckpile CASs. This site consists of debris scattered south of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnel muckpiles and extends down the hillside, across the valley, and onto the adjacent hillside to the south. In addition, the site will cover the potential contamination associated with ''ventings'' along the fault, fractures, and various boreholes on the mesa top and face. One conceptual site model was developed for all three CASs to address possible contamination migration pathways associated with CAU 309. The data quality objective (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQO process addresses the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CAU. Due to the practical constraints posed by steep slopes on and around the CAU 309 muckpiles, a conservative, simplifying strategy was developed to resolve the presence and nature of contaminants. This strategy includes the use of historical data from similar sites (i.e., previously investigated NTS muckpiles) and the collection of samples from accessible areas of the muckpiles. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous investigations of similar sites, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 309 collectively include radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel range only), polychlorinated biphenyls, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' metals, volatile organic compounds, and semivolatile organic compounds.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The road to renewables : a case study of wind energy, local ownership and social acceptance at Sams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to investigate how local participation and local ownership enhances social acceptance of wind energy. In Norway many planned wind (more)

Jakobsen, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

SUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION Plan Name: MCWAH Vision Plan [Plan # 505  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to pay for such coverage. Review this summary plan description and the documents governing the planSUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION Plan Name: MCWAH Vision Plan [Plan # 505] Plan Type: Group Vision Insurance Plan Year: July 1 ­ June 30 Employer\\Policyholder\\Plan Administrator\\Plan Sponsor: Medical College

269

Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Small-scale seal performance test-series F  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment.

Ahrens, E.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134, Aboveground Storage Tanks. CAU 134 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (2) CAS 03-01-04, Tank; (3) CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (4) CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain. CAS 03-01-03 consists of a mud tank that is located at the intersection of the 3-07 and the 3-12 Roads in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank and its contents are uncontaminated and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. This CAS will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 03-01-04 consists of a potable water tank that is located at the Core Complex in Area 3 of the NTS. The tank will be closed by taking no further action. CAS 15-01-05 consists of an aboveground storage tank (AST) and associated impacted soil, if any. This CAS is located on a steep slope near the Climax Mine in Area 15 of the NTS. The AST is empty and will be dispositioned in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Soil below the AST will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by chemicals at concentrations exceeding the action levels. It appears that the tank is not at its original location. Soil will also be sampled at the original tank location, if it can be found. If soil at either location has been impacted at concentrations that exceed the action levels, then the extent of contamination will be identified and a use restriction (UR) will be implemented. The site may be clean closed if contamination is less than one cubic yard in extent and can be readily excavated. If action levels are not exceeded, then no further action is required. CAS 29-01-01 consists of soil that has been impacted by a release or operations from an active diesel AST that fuels the generator at the Shoshone Receiver Site in Area 29 of the NTS. Soil below the AST will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted at concentrations exceeding the action levels. If it is, then the extent of contamination will be identified and a UR will be implemented. The site may be clean closed if contamination is less than one cubic yard in extent, can be readily excavated, and it is determined that clean closure is feasible based upon site conditions. If action levels are not exceeded, then no further action is required. Based on review of the preliminary assessment information for CAU 134 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 134 using the SAFER process.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Areas 8, 15, and 16 Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 124 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 15, and 16 of the Nevada Test Site as follows: 08-02-01, Underground Storage Tank 15-02-01, Irrigation Piping 16-02-03, Underground Storage Tank 16-02-04, Fuel Oil Piping 16-99-04, Fuel Line (Buried) and UST This plan provides the methodology of field activities necessary to gather information to close each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 124 using the SAFER process.

Alfred Wickline

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

S. Wasterlain, D. Candusso, F. Harel, X. Franois, D. Hissel. Development of test instruments and protocols for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks. Accept dans Journal of Power Sources suite 12th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the integration of fuel cell systems into real applications such as vehicles or stationary gensets and protocols for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks. Accepté dans Journal of Power Sources suite à 12th Ulm for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks Sébastien Wasterlain 1,2 , Denis Candusso 1,3,* , Fabien Harel 1,3 , Daniel

Boyer, Edmond

275

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites''. The seven-step data quality objectives (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQOs address the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CASs. Corrective action closure alternatives (i.e., no further action, close in place, or clean closure) will be recommended for CAU 511 based on an evaluation of all the DQO required data. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Summary description of the Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document has been compiled and issued to provide an illustrated engineering summary description of the FFTF. The document is limited to a description of the plant and its functions, and does not cover the extensive associated programs that have been carried out in the fields of design, design analysis, safety analysis, fuels development, equipment development and testing, quality assurance, equipment fabrication, plant construction, acceptance testing, operations planning and training, and the like.

Cabell, C.P. (comp.)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Test plan/procedure for the shock limiting device of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator package mounting subsystem 145. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the procedure to be used in the 18 inch drop test to be used for design verification of the RTG Transportation System Package Mounting.

Satoh, J.A.

1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266: Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1, February 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266, Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 266 consists of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-09 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 266. Corrective Action Unit 266 is located southwest of Building 3124 which is located southwest and adjacent to Test Cell A. Test Cell A was operational during the 1960s to test nuclear rocket reactors in support of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Operations within Building 3124 from 1962 through the early 1990s resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with Test Cell A reactor testing operations, various laboratories including a high-level radioactivity environmental sample handling laboratory, and possibly the Treatability Test Facility. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include radionuclides, oil/diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. Samples will also be analyzed for radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls not considered during the DQO process. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform a radiological walkover survey. (2) Perform video and radiation surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (3) Collect samples from within the septic tank. (4) Mark approximate locations of leachfield distribution lines on the ground surface. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tank and outfall end of the diversion chamber. (6) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze soil samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/diesel-range organics), and polychlorinated biphenyls. (1) Analyze a minimum of 25 percent of the soil samples for gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, isotopic americium, and strontium-90 if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (2) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters. (3) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at Site Supervisors discretion if volatile organic compounds exceed field-screening levels. Additional sampling and analytical details are presented.

U.S. Department Of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This CAIP presents a plan to investigate the nature and extent of the contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at CAU 135. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COPCs; (2) Determine the location of radiological contamination within the vault and determine the extent of COPCs in the sump area and on the floor; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-02-01. This CAIP was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) (EPA, 1994) process to clearly define the goals for collecting environmental data, to determine data uses, and to design a data collection program that will satisfy these uses. A DQO scoping meeting was held prior to preparation of this plan; a brief summary of the DQOs is presented in Section 3.4. A more detailed summary of the DQO process and results is included in Appendix A.

DOE/NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet D4L102  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Date of this summary: September 2, 2004 This document contains a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets within the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance status: The BNL Acceptance Committee met on September 2, 2004 and approved the magnet for shipment to CERN. On July 28, R. Ostojic reported that CERN accepted the waiver on QQS locations (M0324). The survey data were sent to D. Missiaen on July 28, 2004. The field quality data have been loaded into the CERN data base. It is planned that the ID card will be sent by Sept. 15. MINUTES OF ACCEPTANCE MEETING Date of acceptance meeting: September 2, 2004

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Beyond acceptable risk: On the social acceptability of technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The social acceptability of large-scale technologies depends upon a wide range of things, some related to safety and economics, but also some factors of cultural, social and psychological significance. However, m...

Harry J. Otway; Detlof Von Winterfeldt

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

IGT Stack No. 6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) Test Plan and Component Specification Document: Topical report, March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Stack-6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) is to scale up and demonstrate the long term performance and endurance characteristics of the IMHEX stack design and the Generation No. 2 cell components (improved pore matching electrodes) in a 20 cell subscale stack test.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 151 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

STATE OF CALIFORNIA FENESTRATION ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daylighting Device (TDD) Skylight Dynamic Glazing Window Film Block Glass B. STATEMENT Certificate of NRCCENV05E FC1 matches the building plans window schedule of efficiencies. Cross

286

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Pat Matthews

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, consists of seven inactive sites located in the Yucca Flat area and one inactive site in the Pahute Mesa area. The eight CAU 545 sites consist of craters used for mud disposal, surface or buried waste disposed within craters or potential crater areas, and sites where surface or buried waste was disposed. The CAU 545 sites were used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat area during the 1950s through the early 1990s, and in Area 20 in the mid-1970s. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval.

Alfred Wickline

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Strategy to develop and test a multi-function scarifier end effector with an integral conveyance system for waste tank remediation. Strategy plan  

SciTech Connect

This strategy plan describes a coupled analytical/experimental approach to develop a multi-functional scarifier end effector coupled with a pneumatic conveyance system to retrieve wastes from underground storage tanks. The scarifier uses ultra-high-pressure water jets to rubblize and entrain waste forms such as salt cake, sludge, and viscous liquid that can be transported pneumatically. The three waste types (hard, brittle, salt cake, viscous liquid, and deformable sludge) present increasingly complex challenges for scarification and pneumatic conveyance. Salt cake is anticipated to be the easiest to retrieve because (1) a theoretical model of hydraulic rock fracture can be applied to estimate jet performance to fracture salt cake, and (2) gas-solids transport correlations can be used to predict pneumatic transport. Deformable sludge is anticipated to be the most difficult to retrieve: no theories, correlations, or data exist to predict this performance. However order-of-magnitude gas-solid correlations indicate particulate wastes of prototypic density can be transported to a height of 20 m within allowable pressure limits provided that the volume fraction of the gaseous phase is kept above 95%. Viscous liquid is anticipated to be of intermediate complexity to retrieve. Phenomena that are expected to affect system performance are ranked. Experiments and analyses necessary to evaluate the effects of these phenomena are proposed. Subsequent strategies for experiment test plans, system deployment, and operation and control will need to be developed.

Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Keska, J.K.; Elmore, M.R.; Lombardo, N.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Three-Class Sampling Plans: A Review with Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acceptance sampling plans have been widely used in statistical quality ... this period has focused on two-class sampling plans that involve classifying product characteristics as either ... has occurred with resp...

Frank A. Palcat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Retail Planning Problem under Demand Uncertainty.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Rajaram K. , (2000), Accurate Retail Testing of FashionThe Retail Planning Problem Under Demand Uncertainty GeorgeAbstract We consider the Retail Planning Problem in which

Georgiadis, G.; Rajaram, K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement  

SciTech Connect

This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

Conley, T.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina  

SciTech Connect

The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

Roberts, Bryan W.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area 09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

Alfred Wickline

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Electricity Advisory Committee June 6, 2013 Thanks To * Sonny Popowsky * Sue Kelly * Phyllis Reha * Bob Curry * Paul Centolella * Chris Peters * David Till * Paul Hudson * Tom Sloan * Wanda Reder Paper Objective * End-Use Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Critical To Infrastructure Investments Being Fully Realized * While Utilities & Regulators Have Prime Role In Shaping SG, There Is Role For DOE As Facilitator & Educator * Focus Of This Paper Is On Systems Installed Inside Homes & Businesses Issues Experienced In Early Smart Grid Roll-Outs * Initial Resistance By Some End-Use Consumer Groups To Smart Grid Installation * Early Technology Roll-Outs Were Not Prepared For This Pushback * Since These Initial Efforts, Lessons-Learned

298

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Alfred Wickline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines November...

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301

EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Introduction Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and...

302

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

Grant Evenson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

Wickline, Alfred

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. Identifying and remediating disposal pits. Collecting verification samples. Performing radiological screening of soil. Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

Mark Krauss

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 18-22-05, Drum 18-22-06, Drums (20) 18-22-08, Drum 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

Patrick Matthews

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

Nacht, S.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 03-51-01, Leach Pit 06-04-02, Septic Tank 06-05-03, Leach Pit 06-05-04, Leach Bed 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

End Point Closeout Examples Example 77 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

311

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 01-25-02, Fuel Spill 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST 06-99-10, Tar Spills 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

Pastor, Laura

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total dose rates exceed final action levels (FALs). Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether chemical contaminants are present at concentrations exceeding FALs. If contamination exceeds FALs, define the extent of the contamination exceeding FALs. Investigate waste to determine whether potential source material is present. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy; and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Patrick Matthews

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Closure Plan Examples System Closure Plan Examples Example 61 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

316

Commissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Checkout, Testing, and Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ch 0 OFFICE OF heckout, T C CD-1 F ENVIRON Standard R Testing, a Revi Critical Decis CD-2 Ma NMENTAL Review Plan and Com iew Module sion (CD) Ap CD arch 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) mmissioni e pplicability D-3 EMENT ing Plan CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

317

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

318

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR ECONOMIZER CONTROLS ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR ECONOMIZER CONTROLS ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-5A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-5A NA7.5.4 Air Economizer Controls Acceptance (Page 1 AIR ECONOMIZER CONTROLS ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-5A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

319

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 34: Area 3 Contaminated Waste Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, March 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 34 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 34 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located within the Area 3 Compound at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the vicinity of the Mud Plant Facility in Yucca Valley. Historically, CAS 03-09-07, Mud Pit, was used for disposal of excess mud from washing drilling equipment from 1968 to 1974, at which time it began to be used for excess mud disposal (currently inactive); CAS 03-44-01, Chromium Contamination Spill, was used to store additives used in the formulation of drilling mud from the early 1960s to the mid-1990s; CAS 03-47-02, Area 3 Mud Plant Pond, was used as a freshwater storage reservoir for the mud plant as well as supplied water for a number of activities including the mixing of mud, the rinsing and cleaning of tanks, and various washdowns from the 1960s through 1990s; and CAS 03-09-06, Mud Disposal Crater, was created in 1962 by an underground nuclear detonation (i.e., Chinchilla test) and was used to mix and store mud, dispose of receiving waste from the mud plant floor drains and excess drilling mud, and clean/flush mix tanks through the mid-1990s. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to identify potentially contaminated ground soil at each of the four CASs and determine the quantity, nature, and extent of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs). The investigation will include systematic and biased surface and subsurface soil and mud sampling using hand-auguring and direct-push techniques; visual, video, and/or electromagnetic surveys of pipes; field screening for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alpha/beta-emitting radionuclides; and laboratory analysis to characterize any investigation-derived waste for disposal both on site at NTS and at off-site locations. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that COPCs include VOCs, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Now Accepting 2010 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications April 20, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and visits to a power plant and coal mine. Topics cover the range of CCS

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321

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, April 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 271 consists of 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) including: thirteen Septic Systems (25-04-01, 25-04-03, 25-04-04, 25-04-08, 25-04-09, 25-04-10, 25-04-11, 26-04-01, 26-04-02, 26-05-03, 26-05-04, 26-05-05, and 27-05-02), one Contaminated Water Reservoir (26-03-01), and one Radioactive Leachfield (26-05-01). The CASs addressed by CAU 271 are located at Guard Station 500, the Reactor Control Point (RCP), Bare Reactor Experiment - Nevada Tower, and Engine Test State-1 (ETS-1) facilities in Area 25; the Port Gaston and Project Pluto facilities in Area 26; and the Baker Site in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1 958 and 1973, the RCP and ETS-1 facilities supported the development and testing of nuclear reactors for space propulsion as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The Project Pluto facilities supported nuclear reactor testing for use as a ramjet propulsion system between 1961 and 1964, followed by similar use for other projects through the early 1980s. The Baker Site facilities were constructed in the 1960s to serve as the staging point where the manufactured components of nuclear devices were assembled, disassembled, and modified. The scope of the investigation strategy at these sites will involve biased and random soil sampling in leachfields using excavation (with drilling as a contingency), collection of soil samples underlying the base of proximal and distal ends of septic tanks and distal ends of distribution structures, defining the lateral and vertical extent of contamination through discrete field and possible stepout location sampling, collection system line inspection, and geotechnical/ hydrological laboratory analyses. Based on site history and existing characterization data gathered to support the Data Quality Objectives process, it is believed that the contaminants of potential concern at these CASs may include: volatile organic compounds, fecal coliform bacteria, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, strontium-90, tritium, beryllium, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and herbicides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

Addendum to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Addendum Revision No. 1)  

SciTech Connect

This document is submitted as an addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The addendum was prepared to propose work activities in response to comments resulting from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the draft Frenchman Flat CAU model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport completed in April 1999. The reviewers included an external panel of experts and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. As a result of the review, additional work scope, including new data-collection and modeling activities, has been identified for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The proposed work scope described in this addendum will be conducted in accordance with the revised Underground Test Area strategy contained in the December 2000 amendment to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The Frenchman Flat CAU model is a group of interdependent models designed to predict the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear tests conducted within this CAU. At the time of the DOE review, the CAU model consisted of a CAU groundwater flow and transport model comprised of two major components: a groundwater flow model and a recharge model. The CAU groundwater flow model is supported by a hydrostratigraphic model and a recharge model, whereas the CAU transport model is supported by a source-term model. As part of the modeling activities proposed in this addendum, two new major components may be added to the Frenchman Flat CAU model: a total-system model and two local groundwater flow and transport models. The reviewers identified several issues relating to insufficiency of data and inadequacy of the modeling process that should be addressed to provide additional confidence in the modeling results with respect to the potential for contaminant migration to the Lower Carbonate Aquifer. The proposed additional work scope includes new data-collection activities, development and use of local-scale models of the two underground nuclear testing areas, and potential revisions of draft CAU groundwater flow and transport models. Upon completion of this work, an evaluation will be made by DOE to ensure that all issues have been resolved.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Validating the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology in Kuwaiti ministries: a structural equation modelling approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to describe a test of the validity of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model by applying it to Kuwaiti ministries. Structural equation modelling methods were used to test the relationships ... Keywords: ISU acceptance, Kuwait, UTAUT, developing countries, information systems usage, structural equation modelling, technology acceptance, technology use, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology

Helaiel Almutairi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Engine ground demonstration test approach  

SciTech Connect

The hardware portion of the current phase of the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program culminates in a system ground demonstration test. The potential application of ISUS technology to a wide array of future missions complicates the process of selecting from among demonstration system design options and test approaches. The approach to this system demonstration has been to maximize system technology readiness level for the entire array of potential missions within the constraints of the program. To this end, system design and test operations planning has been carried out with a premium on demonstrating those elements of the system common to all missions. In addition, test planning has been managed to allow margin for testing those portions of the system envelope needed to confirm acceptable operation for scenarios within the mission set that are specific to a given mission or mission type. Examples drawn from the specific Engine Ground Demonstration (EGD) design selections are used to illuminate this approach, with the result that the EGD system design is not only described, but the reasons for its particular characteristics are made evident.

Kudija, C.T. [Rockwell Aerospace, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PLANNING Guiding Principles Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is conducted in a timely manner, in accordance with statutory, regulatory,...

329

STRATEGIC PLAN  

Energy Savers (EERE)

STRATEGIC PLAN 2015 - 2018 Message from the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security I am proud to introduce this strategic plan for the Office of...

330

MINUTES - ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet: D1L101 Date of meeting: 29 January 2004 Date of these minutes: 30 January 2004 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Durnan, J. Escallier, H. Hocker, A. Jain, J. Muratore, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The acceptance committee previously reviewed this magnet in March 2003 and May 2003. Since the last review, the magnet has been cold-tested to check whether the high- resistance short between one of the two strip heaters and the magnet coil affected the magnet operation (including quench performance). It was concluded that the heater-to- coil short did not affect the magnet operation during the cold test. The committee also reviewed the field quality data, which indicated that the yoke keys were stainless steel,

331

Reagan Plans Test Ban Revisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...historically constructed high-yield warheads in an attempt to compensate for the inaccuracy...depends on an assumption that the Soviets' warhead designs are simpler and more reliable...matters, support for keeping the treaty intact has grown considerably on Capitol Hill...

R. JEFFREY SMITH

1983-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

David Strand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Acceptance of ERP Solutions in Maturity Use Phase: Key Influence Factors for SAP and Microsoft Dynamics NAV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enterprise resource planning ERP solutions have been implemented in a lot of organizations in the past few years. Notwithstanding the fact that ERP solutions benefit organizations only to the extent that users accept and use them, most studies regarding ... Keywords: Enterprise Resource Planning ERP, Lifecycle, Microsoft Dynamics Nest Asset Value NAV, Partial Least Squares PLS, Structural Equation Modeling SEM, Systems Applications and Products in Data Processing SAP, Technology Acceptance Model TAM

Simona Sternad; Samo Bobek

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Residential Proximity, Perceived and Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The perception of risk and the acceptance of it are partially ... experiences, and the perception and acceptability of risk rests firmly upon that data bank ... life-experience is inherently related to perceive...

George O. Rogers

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

SciTech Connect

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

Moiseenko, Vitali, E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Harrow, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Thompson, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of contamination, as necessary. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NSO

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Plan has been prepared for the Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit Corrective Action Unit 110 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). The U-3ax/bl is a historic disposal unit within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit, which was formed by excavating the area between two subsidence craters (U-3ax and U-3bl), was operationally closed in 1987. The U-3ax/bl disposal unit is scheduled for permanent closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as a hazardous waste landfill. Existing records indicate that, from July 1968 to December 1987, U-3ax/bl received 2.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meters (8.12 x 10{sup 6} cubic feet) of waste. NTS nuclear device testing generated approximately 95 percent of the total volume disposed of in U-3ax/bl, the majority of which came from the Waste Consolidation Project (80 percent of the total volume) (Elletson and Johnejack, 1995). Area 3 is located in Yucca Flat, within the northeast quadrant of the NTS. The Yucca Flat watershed is a structurally closed basin encompassing an area of approximately 780 square kilometers (300 square miles). The structural geomorphology of Yucca Flat is typical of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. Yucca Flat lies in one of the most arid regions of the country. Water balance calculations for Area 3 indicate that it is continuously in a state of moisture deficit. The U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit will be closed in place by installing a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act equivalent cover. Following cover construction a fence will be installed around the cover to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover and cover performance monitoring using Time-Domain Reflectometry arrays to monitor moisture migration in the cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 60 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP. Soil moisture will be monitored within the cover for a period of at least two years prior to establishing performance criteria for NDEP regulatory purposes.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 543 is located in Area 6 and Area 15 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Seven corrective action sites (CASs) comprise CAU 543 and are listed below: (1) 06-07-01, Decon Pad; (2) 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (3) 15-04-01, Septic Tank; (4) 15-05-01, Leachfield; (5) 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; (6) 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and (7) 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. Corrective Action Site 06-07-01, Decon Pad, is located in Area 6 and consists of the Area 6 Decontamination Facility and its components that are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the EPA Farm. The EPA Farm was a fully-functional dairy associated with animal experiments conducted at the on-site laboratory. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, video-mole surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs within CAU 543 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The seven CASs in CAU 543 primarily consist of sanitary and process waste collection, storage, and distribution systems (e.g., storage tanks, sumps, and piping). Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

NONE

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Mobile systems capability plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ANU ADMINISTRATION REVIEWS Guide to development of Implementation Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANU ADMINISTRATION REVIEWS Guide to development of Implementation Plans Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide advice on the preparation of the post-review implementation plan (Administration & Planning) immediately upon acceptance of the review report and will commence preparation

Botea, Adi

348

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer review process and has been accepted for publication. Accepted Manuscripts are published online shortly after acceptance, which is prior to technical editing, formatting and proof reading. This free service from RSC Publishing allows authors to make their results available to the community, in citable form, before publication of the edited article. This Accepted Manuscript will be replaced by the edited and formatted Advance Article as soon as this is available. To cite this manuscript please use its permanent Digital Object Identifier (DOI®), which is identical for all formats of publication. More information about Accepted Manuscripts can be found in the Information for Authors.

349

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

Alfred Wickline

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: 25-41-03, EMAD Facility 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

Mark Burmeister

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Date of meeting: 2 May 2003 Date of these minutes: 6 May 2003 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Escallier, M. Gaffney, G. Ganetis, H. Hocker, A. Jain, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The meeting was called to review the results of the electrical tests and options for use for this magnet. This information will be transmitted to LHC staff. The magnet has a failed temperature sensor that must be replaced if the magnet is to be the spare. (Other acceptance issues for this magnet were considered at a previous meeting of the acceptance committee.) Electrical test results. J. Escallier summarized the electrical tests of the quench protection heaters. The results are formally documented in deviation waiver M0303.

353

Annual Planning Summaries: 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Annual Planning Summaries: 2013 March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Thomas Jefferson Site Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Thomas Jefferson Site Office March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Pacific Northwest Site Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Pacific Northwest Site Office March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the New Brunswick Laboratory 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the New Brunswick Laboratory March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

354

Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. [Cementitious grout into fractured WIPP rock  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment.

Ahrens, E.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfields, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0, DOE/NV--535 UPDATED WITH RECORD OF TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263, the Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the US Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 263 is comprised of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-04 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at Leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 263. Corrective Action Unit 263 is located southwest of Building 4839, in the Central Propellant Storage Area. Operations in Building 4839 from 1968 to 1996 resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. In general, effluent released to the leachfield consisted of sanitary wastewater from a toilet, urinal, lavatory, and drinking fountain located within Building 4839. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with the Building 4839 operations.

US DOE Nevada Operations Office

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

Mathews, S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Understanding roi metrics for software test automation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Software test automation is widely accepted as an efficient software testing technique. However, automation has failed to deliver the expected productivity more often than not. (more)

Jayachandran, Naveen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

This is an Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the Royal Society of Chemistry peer review process and has been accepted for publication. Accepted Manuscripts are published online...

360

NETL Center Completes Site Acceptance Test for IGCC Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Injector 9 Review Published of In-Situ Electromagnetic Techniques for Oil Shale Processing 10 New Book Published on Computational...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document is used to validate Revision 13.0 of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify it functions as intended by design.

BARNES, D.A.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and meals. Gifts from outside sources. Generally, as a Federal employee, you may not solicit or accept a gift (1) from a "prohibited source" or (2) if given because of your official position. A "prohibited

364

Wind Power : Basic Challenge Concerning Social Acceptance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful implementation of new technologies requires social acceptance. Historically, for the implementation of wind energy this was considered a relatively simple issue ... strategies. Without much study, soci...

Dr. Maarten Wolsink

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Wind Power : Basic Challenge Concerning Social Acceptance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful implementation of new technologies requires social acceptance. Historically, for the implementation of wind energy this was considered a relatively simple issue ... strategies. Without much study, soci...

Dr. Maarten Wolsink

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ten Years of Public Acceptance in Transports  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses ten years of public acceptance experience in transports for Europe and coastal states between France and Japan and examples of Central and South America.

Guais, J.C.; Neau, H.J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance criteria ntswac Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bit noise must be 0 +- 4 bitsOK 1.9.2 ADC Noise at zero... conditions as test 1.9.2). Acceptance criteria: Check for a continuous response, no discontinuity...

368

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

Performance Confirmation Plan  

SciTech Connect

As described, the purpose of the Performance Confirmation Plan is to specify monitoring, testing, and analysis activities for evaluating the accuracy and adequacy of the information used to determine that performance objectives for postclosure will be met. This plan defines a number of specific performance confirmation activities and associated test concepts in support of the MGR that will be implemented to fulfill this purpose. In doing so, the plan defines an approach to identify key factors and processes, predict performance, establish tolerances and test criteria, collect data (through monitoring, testing, and experiments), analyze these data, and recommend appropriate action. The process of defining which factors to address under performance confirmation incorporates input from several areas. In all cases, key performance confirmation factors are those factors which are: (1) important to safety, (2) measurable and predictable, and (3) relevant to the program (i.e., a factor that i s affected by construction, emplacement, or is a time-dependent variable). For the present version of the plan, performance confirmation factors important to safety are identified using the principal factors from the RSS (CRWMS M and O 2000a) (which is derived from TSPA analyses) together with other available performance assessment analyses. With this basis, key performance confirmation factors have been identified, and test concepts and test descriptions have been developed in the plan. Other activities are also incorporated into the performance confirmation program outside of these key factors. Additional activities and tests have been incorporated when they are prescribed by requirements and regulations or are necessary to address data needs and model validation requirements relevant to postclosure safety. These other activities have been included with identified factors to construct the overall performance confirmation program.

Lindner, E.N.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014  

SciTech Connect

The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

Alan Giesbrecht

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Task Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task Plans Task Plans This page contains links to a tentative listing of active and closed TEC Task Plans. Final status of these task plans will be determined after the July 2000 TEC meeting. Task Plan Number/Title DOE Lead Staff Last Update Comment Status/ New No. After 7/27/00 GP-1, Section 180(c) Coordination (begun 1/96) C. Macaluso 7/98 DOE published a Revised Proposed Policy and Procedures in April 1998; no final policy will be issued until a definitive date for NWPA shipments is determined, based on site suitability or other legislative direction. To the extent that any issues related to Section 180(c) arise in TEC meetings, they are being discussed in the context of the consolidated grant topic group which is covered by another task plan. Closed

372

Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

Katich, Kristina Noel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Repository sealing plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, fiscal years 1984 through 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a plan to develop acceptable sealing methods for a prospective nuclear waste repository in unsaturated tuff in Yucca Mountain, which is on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Sealing is the permanent closure of the underground facility, shafts, ramps, and boreholes. Questiona associated with the performance of the sealing system form the basis for this plan. Tasks that contribute to the resolution of these questions and support the documentation required for the construction authorization application are proposed. The approach to answering the performance-related questions is divided into six steps: (1) assess the need for sealing, (2) define the design requirements, (3) measure the material properties, (4) assess the performance of sealing designs, (5) perform laboratory analyses and field testing, and (6) reassess the performance of sealing designs. Organization of the tasks supporting each step is illustrated by detailed work-flow diagrams.

Fernandez, J.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy - Consumer Acceptance Group B Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'B' 'B' Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Consumer Education/Emotion * Vehicle Exposure - butts in seats (ride & drive, car sharing, IT/phones, rental fleets) * Consumers understanding their needs * Range anxiety/opportunity * Customer Personal Value Proposition * Charging Exposure * Start small (battery size and charging level), move complicated * Marketing * Got Milk? * Patriotism, etc., in place of only green focus * Creating Demand * Emphasize fun/cool/patriotism (again) * Make & model availability * Workplace/public Charging * Multi-unit * V2G * Signage * Financial Incentives Consumer Acceptance 'B' July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure

375

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wind Energy Community Acceptance Jump to: navigation, search In 2012 in Lamar, Colorado, Bob Emick (center, back to camera and Greg Emich (right in cowboy hat) talk about the 98 1.5-megawatt wind turbines on their ranch. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 21768 The following resources address community acceptance topics. Baring-Gould, I. (June 5, 2012). Social Acceptance of Wind Energy: Managing and Evaluating Its Market Impacts. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Accessed August 14, 2013. This presentation offers background information on social acceptance issues, results of surveys conducted by the New England Wind Forum at a

377

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced...

378

Design for acceptable risk in transportation pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the probabilistic methods have been used to produce a methodology capable to estimate the acceptable level of risk in a cost-benefit framework. The benefits and the costs are weighed against associated risks to aid the decision making process on risk acceptance, from both the individual and societal perspective. Thereafter, acceptable individual and societal risk levels are defined based on historical trend of non-voluntary deaths and overall national fatalities. An example is used to explore the practical application of the method to critical infrastructures such as petroleum pipelines. The results show that the cost-benefit risk framework provides a safety standard that is acceptable from both individual and societal perspectives.

Alex W. Dawotola; P.H.A.J.M. Van Gelder; J.K. Vrijling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Documentation of acceptable knowledge for Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility TRU waste stream  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the TRU waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Foxx, C.L.; Rogers, P.Z.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Documentation of acceptable knowledge for LANL Plutonium Facility transuranic waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site-specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the transuranic waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Foxx, C.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Office of Evaluation and Testing General Testing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Evaluation and Testing General Testing Rules Identification: You must present to the test center or your scores may be withheld or canceled if you can't present acceptable ID on the testing surface and must be placed in an area designated by the testing staff. Electronic Devices: Cell

Brinkmann, Peter

383

Hydrogen Student Design Contest - Now accepting applications...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

will demonstrate their talents in business, finance, engineering, public planning, architecture, marketing, and entrepreneurship. The top teams will be invited to present their...

384

CORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................33 Staffing & workforce planningCORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook Humanities, Law & Social Studies Outcomes from 2008/09 Confirmation of progress during 2009/10 Faculty planning for 2010/11 ­ 2012/13 #12

385

Pu Glass Fabrication and Product Consistency Testing  

SciTech Connect

The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers testing to support a near term data need regarding glass dissolution performance. Separate task plans will be developed for testing to address the degree of macroscopic cracking and the development of alternative frit formulations. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was identified as a means to provide some of the near term performance data. The PCT is a static test method in which known masses of crushed glass and demineralized water are reacted for a desired duration [1]. There are two reasons to perform the PCT. The first is that the results are used as a measure of acceptance in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications Document (WAPS) [2]. The second is the need for long-term static test results that can be used to verify the applicability of the degradation model. Thus, the primary focus will be on the use of the PCT Method B (PCT-B) to study the formation and stability of colloids and to study alteration phases formed on the glass surface. The standard 7-day PCT in demineralized water (PCT-A) will be included to demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criterion and determine the value of the k{sub E} rate parameter for comparison with the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model [3].

Marra, James

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy Planning Systems: Current Status and Remaining Challenges  

SciTech Connect

Computerized radiation therapy planning systems (RTPSs) are pivotal for treatment planning. The acceptance, commissioning, and quality control of RTPSs are uniquely complex and are described in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report 53 (1998) and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 430 (2004). The International Atomic Energy Agency also developed a document and data package for use by vendors and purchasers to aid with acceptance testing of RTPSs. This document is based on International Electrotechnical Commission standard 62083 (2000) and describes both 'type' tests to be performed in the factory and 'site' tests to be performed in the clinic. The American Association of Physicists Task Group Report 67 described benchmark tests for the validation of dose calculation algorithms. Test data are being produced with the backing of the U.S. National Cancer Institute. However, significant challenges remain. Technology keeps evolving rapidly, thus requiring new quality assurance (QA) procedures. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with its use of inverse optimization has added a new dimension to QA, because the results are not intuitively obvious. New technologies such as real-time ultrasound guidance for brachytherapy, TomoTherapy, and Cyberknife, require their own specialized RTPSs with unique QA requirements. On-line imaging allows for the generation of dose reconstructions using image warping techniques to determine the daily dose delivered to the patient. With increasing computer speeds, real-time reoptimization of treatment plans will become a reality. Gating technologies will require four-dimensional dose calculations to determine the actual dose delivered to tissue voxels. With these rapidly changing technologies, it is essential that a strong QA culture is invoked in every institution implementing these procedures and that new protocols are developed as a part of the clinical implementation process.

Van Dyk, Jacob [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program/London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Departments of Oncology, Medical Biophysics, Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, and Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jake.vandyk@lhsc.on.ca

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Proactive Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, rainwater harvesting, stream bank stabilization, and educational programs to prevent urban and agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Project leaders plan to have the Cedar Creek Watershed Protection Plan finalized by the summer of 2008. ?We... on watershed management, stream restoration practices, agricultural best man- agement practices, rainwater harvesting, non- point source pollution control, on-site septic system maintenance, and other water quality issues facing urban and rural...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

390

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

Keyser, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CFN Ops Plan | Work Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Plan Operations Plan Work Planning & Control for Experiments and Operations All experimental work will be conducted in accordance with Work Planning and Control for Experiments and Operations, which ensures proper design and operation of all experiments prior to their commencement. CFN will use the SBMS provided standard form for the formal documentation. The Lead Experimenter/Responsible person will notify the Experimental Safety Review Committee of any new experiments or modifications to existing experiments. CFN will appoint an Experimental Safety Review Committee. This committee will consist of the Experiment Review Coordinator, CFN personnel, Facility Support Representative (FSR), Environmental Compliance Representative (ECR). Additional subject matter experts may be appointed on an ad-hoc

393

Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium Presentations Atav and Deficits #12;Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors Affiliation Podium & Symposium Presentations-up to a Quantitative Study on Cessation in a Rural Population #12;Accepted Peer Reviewed Presentations Authors

Suzuki, Masatsugu

394

Work Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the DOE regarding the following subjects: soil contamination from historic atmospheric nuclear testing, remediation of contaminated facilities used to support historic testing,...

395

Test Anxiety What is Test Anxiety?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Physical Characteris cs Sweaty palms, faster heart rate, shallow breathing, upset stomach, vomi ng, bu a plan. Expect the ini al panic at the begin ning of the test. Take a deep breath and let it pass

Barrash, Warren

396

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 -...

398

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6,...

399

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, consists of 12 inactive sites located in the north and northeast section of the NTS. The 12 CAU 234 sites consist of mud pits, mud spills, mud sumps, and an open post-test cellar. The CAU 234 sites were all used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat and Rainier Mesa areas during the 1950s through the 1970s. The CASs in CAU 234 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting appropriate corrective action alternatives.

Grant Evenson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptance test plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization.

RIECK, C.A.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET Prepared by: David Bau - Regional Extension Educator, Agricultural Business Management (August 2012) CROP INCOME EXAMPLE YOUR FARM EXAMPLE YOUR FARM (A) Crop Acres 400 400 176 46 (C) Price

Netoff, Theoden

403

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

404

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) -Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

405

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2011) January 2011) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

406

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCTOBER 2010) OCTOBER 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

407

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PLANNING PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 6 Competition Requirements 4. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 5. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 6. FAR Part 9 Contractor Qualifications 7. FAR Part 10 Market Research 8. FAR Part 11 Describing Agency Needs 9. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 10. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 11. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 12. FAR 17 Special Contracting Methods 13. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 14. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 15. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy

408

RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) processa set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

Smith, Curtis L [Idaho National Laboratory; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buffer Tank Design for Acceptable Control Performance Audun Faanes and Sigurd Skogestad for the design of buffer tanks. We consider mainly the case where the objective of the buffer tank is to dampen- trol system. We consider separately design procedures for (I) mixing tanks to dampen quality

Skogestad, Sigurd

410

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Food allergy: Stakeholder perspectives on acceptable risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have reached a point where it is difficult to improve food allergy risk management without an agreement on levels of acceptable risk. This paper presents and discusses the perspectives of the different stakeholders (allergic consumers, health professionals, public authorities and the food industry) on acceptable risk in food allergy. Understanding where these perspectives diverge and even conflict may help develop an approach to define what is acceptable. Uncertainty about food allergy, its consequences and how to manage them is the common denominator of the stakeholders views. In patients, uncertainty is caused by the unpredictability of reactions and the concern about whether avoidance strategies will be effective enough. Variability of symptoms and the lack of markers do not allow stratification of patients according to their reactivity, and force health professionals to give the same advice to all patients despite the fact that the risk to each is not identical. Regulators and the food industry struggle with the fact that the lack of management thresholds forces them to make case-by-case decisions in an area of uncertainty with penalties for under- or over-prediction. As zero risk is not a realistic possibility, consensus on acceptable risk will be needed.

Charlotte B. Madsen; Ren Crevel; Chun-Han Chan; Anthony E.J. Dubois; Audrey DunnGalvin; Bertine M.J. Flokstra-de Blok; M. Hazel Gowland; Sue Hattersley; Jonathan OB Hourihane; Pia Nrhede; Sylvia Pfaff; Gene Rowe; Sabine Schnadt; Berber J. Vlieg-Boerstra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO's). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the drummed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Drum PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage. Using removable PDP radioactive standards, isotopic activities in the simulated waste containers are varied to the extent possible over the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization situations. Manufactured matrices simulate expected waste matrix conditions and provide acceptable consistency in the sample preparation process at each measurement facility. Analyses that are required by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and that are included in the PDP may only be performed by measurement facilities that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the wastes on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP wastes in this document.

DOE Carlsbad Field Office

2001-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

An economic approach to acceptance sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...

Ruth, Robert Justin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU)106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS05-23-05), equation of state experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. AppendixA provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to eachCAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal doserates and the presence of contaminants of concern. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of thecontamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Treatability Study Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

To support future decision making of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU) remedy selection, the Department of Energy (DOE) is performing a Treatability Study (TS), consistent with the EPA guidance for Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability studies. The study will inform stakeholders about various waste removal technologies and the cost of potential remediation approaches, particularly the cost associated with sluicing and the reduction in risk to human health and the environment from tank content removal. As part of the GAAT OU remedy, a series of studies and technology tests will be preformed. These may address one or more of the following areas, characterization, removal, treatment, and transfer of wastes stored in the GAAT OU.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 367 is located in Area 10 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The CASs in CAU 367 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive contaminants may be present in concentrations that exceed risk-based corrective action (RBCA) levels. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting CAAs. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 367 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the area where TED at the site exceeds FALs (i.e., corrective action boundary). Evaluate TED to potential receptors in areas along Mercury Highway that have been impacted by a release of radionuclides from the Sedan test. Collect and submit environment