Sample records for acceptance test plan

  1. SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

  2. acceptance test plan: Topics by E-print Network

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  3. Acceptance Test Plan for the Sludge Pickup Adaptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan documents the acceptance testing of the sludge pickup adapter for potential use during PSI Phases 3 and 4 fuel cleanliness inspection activities. The adaptex is attached to the strainer tip of the vacuum wand and used to suction up residual sludge captured in a sludge collection tray. The material is vacuumed into a chamber of known volume in the sludge pickup adapter. The device serves as an aid in helping to determine whether the observed quantity of sludge is within allowable limits (1.4 cm{sup 3} per fuel assembly). This functionality test involves underwater testing in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility to verify that sludge can be successfully vacuumed from a collection tray. Ancillary activities in this acceptance test include demonstration that the sludge pickup adapter CM be successfully attached to and detached from the vacuum wand underwater.

  4. W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  5. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  6. W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  8. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

  9. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  10. MITG Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plan presented is for the testing of a prototypical slice of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG). Cross Reference T48-1.

  11. Acceptance test procedure for the overview video camera system (OVS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, A.F.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceptance Test Procedure for testing the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Overview Video Camera System (OVS).

  12. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller`s location.

  13. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  14. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  15. Honeywell Modular Automation System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STUBBS, A.M.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the operability of the three new furnaces as controlled by the new Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS). The Honeywell MAS is being installed in PFP to control the three thermal stabilization furnaces in glovebox HA-211. The ATP provides instructions for testing the configuration of the Honeywell MAS at the Plutonium Finishing Plant(PFP). The test will be a field test of the analog inputs, analog outputs, and software interlocks. The interlock test will check the digital input and outputs. Field equipment will not be connected forth is test. Simulated signals will be used to test thermocouple, limit switch, and vacuum pump inputs to the PLUMAS.

  16. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  17. LCLS Undulator Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents the test plan for the LCLS undulators. The undulators will be measured and tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The requirements for tuning are well established and are summarized. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented. This is followed by the detailed test plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and storage format are presented. The LCLS consists of 33 undulator segments, hereafter referred to as undulators, plus 6 spares and one reference undulator. The undulators must be tuned to meet strict requirements. They must also be fiducialized to allow alignment with other components. This note details the plan for tuning and fiducializing the LCLS undulators. The note begins with the list of tuning and fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a detailed test plan in which all the steps of tuning and fiducialization are enumerated.

  18. Acceptance test report for the mobile color camera system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castleberry, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present test data recorded during acceptance testing of the Mobile Color Camera System (MCCS).

  19. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  20. Acceptance inspection plan 105KW Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, E.J.

    1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of.work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms).

  1. Acceptance inspection plan 105KE Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, E.J.

    1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified, to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms).

  2. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  3. acceptance test limit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

  5. ASME PTC 46 -- Acceptance test code for overall plant performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.R. [Siemens-Westinghouse Power Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Yost, J.G. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASME published PTC 46 in 1996 after five years of development. PTC 46 is the first industry standard providing explicit procedures for conducting acceptance tests to determine the overall thermal performance and output of power generating units. It is applicable to any heat cycle power generating unit. This survey paper provides an overview of PTC 46 and discusses how PTC 46 can be used for acceptance testing of new combined cycle and fossil steam power generating units. Several technical papers have been previously presented that provide more detailed information and discussion on the use of PTC 46 in acceptance testing.

  6. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  7. Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

  8. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  9. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  10. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system being evaluated. This can be the system manufacturer, a system user, or a third party organization such as a government agency. b. The term Vendor (or Vendor’s) System replaces the name of the specific SCADA/EMS being tested.

  11. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  12. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  13. Acceptance test report, 241-AW air inlet filter station pressure decay test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, J.A.

    1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the acceptance test report for pressure decay tests performed on newly-installed 241-AW Tank Farm primary ventilation system air inlet filter stations.

  14. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

  15. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

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  17. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  18. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  19. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  20. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use.

  1. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  2. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  3. Experimental Test Plan for Grouting H-3 Calcine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan K. Herbst

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 4400 cubic meters of solid high-level waste called calcine are stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Under the Idaho Cleanup Project, dual disposal paths are being investigated. The first path includes calcine retrieval, package "as-is", and ship to the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The second path involves treatment of the calcine with such methods as vitrification or grouting. This test plan outlines the hot bench scale tests to grout actual calcine and verify that the waste form properties meet the waste acceptance criteria. This is a necessary sequential step in the process of qualifying a new waste form for repository acceptance. The archive H-3 calcine samples at the Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Building attached to New Waste Calcining Facility will be used in these tests at the Remote Analytical Laboratory. The tests are scheduled for the second quarter of fiscal year 2007.

  4. Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model reliabilities. An operational test procedure is considered in which only the individual modules are tested and the system is considered acceptable if, and only if, no failures are observed. The minimum number of tests

  5. Pressure tube testing test plan document production assurance program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaloudek, F.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ruff, E.S. [UNC Nuclear Industries, Richland, WA (United States)

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNC Nuclear Industries (UNC) has initiated a plan for the manufacture of zirconium alloy pressure tubes required for the future operation of N-Reactor. As part of this plan, UNC is establishing a program to qualify and develop a manufacturing process capable of fabricating these pressure tubes to the requirements of UNC specification HWS 6502, REV 4, Amendment 1. The objective of the task described in this test plan is to support the UNC program by performing physical/chemical testing on prototype tubes sections produced or procured during FY-1986, 1987 and 1988 and to test samples from production runs after 1988 as may be required. The types of tests included in this pressure tube testing task will be as follows: (1) Tensile tests; (2) Burst testing; (3) Tests to evaluate fracture properties; (4) Corrosion tests; (5) Spectrographic analysis of chemical composition; (6) Metallographic evaluation of grain size and oxide layer thickness.

  6. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  7. Phased Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. These tests are described in separate planning documents. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: (1) Define the test scope for the FRS and IWTS; (2) Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; (3) Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and (4) Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  8. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, J.L.; Enderlin, V.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Report covers the results of the execution of the Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges. The test verified the proper operation of the gauges to measure waste density and level in the 241-AN-107 tank.

  9. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification.

  10. The Modified Sudden Death Test: Planning Life Tests with a Limited Number of Test Positions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Modified Sudden Death Test: Planning Life Tests with a Limited Number of Test Positions Francis for Nondestructive Evaluation Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 ABSTRACT: We present modified sudden death test (MSDT) plans to address the problem of limited testing positions in life tests. A single MSDT involves

  11. The Modi ed Sudden Death Test: Planning Life Tests with a Limited Number of Test Positions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Modi ed Sudden Death Test: Planning Life Tests with a Limited Number of Test Positions Francis for Nondestructive Evaluation Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 ABSTRACT: We present modi ed sudden death test (MSDT) plans to address the problem of limited testing positions in life tests. A single MSDT involves

  12. Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, J.L.

    1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended.

  13. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  14. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, T.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years.

  15. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  16. 242-A MCS Logic Acceptance Test Report for Year 2000 Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. Testing was performed per test procedure HNF-3568. There were no unresolved exceptions. The system responded correctly to all testing and meets the requirements to operate the 242-A This report documents the acceptance test results for the Evaporator facility.

  17. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

  18. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  19. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  20. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

  1. acceptance test procedure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Category Rotorcraft, Amateur-Built Aircraft and (more) Bender, Jeffrey Scott 1999-01-01 77 New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for...

  2. acceptance test procedures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Category Rotorcraft, Amateur-Built Aircraft and (more) Bender, Jeffrey Scott 1999-01-01 77 New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for...

  3. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Plan - February 2012 Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 This document outlines gaps, needs, and opportunities identified by the...

  4. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  5. Parking and routing information system phase 1 evaluation -- Individual evaluation test plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parking and routing information system (PARIS) is being designed and deployed at a test site on the Mountain Home Veterans Administration campus in Johnson City, Tennessee using three sensor technologies. The purpose of the PARIS project is to demonstrate innovative integration of vehicle sensing technologies with parking management strategies to improve mobility and relieve congestion associated with a growing medical/technology complex. This technical memorandum presents the four individual evaluation test plans, System Performance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, User Acceptance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, Institutional and Business Issues Individual Evaluation Test Plan, and Transportation Systems Individual Evaluation Test Plan, which were developed to support ORNL`s responsibilities and functions during the four studies. The plans define the level of effort required to satisfy the data collection, processing, and analysis requirements for the assessment of the system performance, user acceptance, institutional and business issues, and transportation systems components of the PARIS phase 1 evaluation. Each plan is divided into three subsections: executive summary, detailed study design, and study management.

  6. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance Testing: Tanks Focus Area Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Jiricka, Antonin; Smith, Donald E.; Lorier, Troy H.; Reamer, Irene A.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Immobilizing low-activity waste (LAW) stored at Hanford site will result in approximately 200 000 m3 of waste glass. It must be demonstrated that this glass can adequately retain radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. A study is being performed to determine the effect of glass composition on its capability to withstand the conditions in the Hanford site burial scenario. To predict the long-term corrosion behavior of waste glass, it is necessary to study the composition and properties of alteration products. The vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) were selected as the methods to accelerate the corrosion process and to form alteration products. VHT and PCT was performed on 75 glasses, of which 45 were designed to systematically vary the composition. VHTs were conducted at temperatures ranging from 90?C to 300?C. Alteration rates for most glasses are being determined at 200?C. Selected glasses were tested at different temperatures to determine the effect of temperature on the assemblage of alteration products and the apparent alteration rates. PCTs were performed at a glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) of 2000 m-1 for 7 d and at a S/V of 20 000 m-1 for 10, 100, 1000, 5000, and 10000 h all at 90?C.

  7. Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically system test plan and documentation: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, E.L.

    1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the following items: the approach, resources, and sequence of the testing activities; identifies the components and features to be tested; the personnel responsible for testing; the risks associated with this plan; and test cases and procedures. This document contains all test documentation for the SHARE system. The Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically (SHARE) testing process is based upon WHC-CM-3-10, Software Practices, Section SP-3.3 REV 0, and Appendix J REV 0. These procedures and guidelines are based on IEEE Standard 829-1983. The planning in this document was further influenced through guidance in IEEE Standard 1012-1986. This document contains the System, Acceptance, Integration and Component Test Plans, Designs, Procedures, and Cases for SHARE. The Test Cases and procedures have been attached to the document.

  8. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator`s console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A.

  9. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  10. 100 Area soil washing treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general methodology for conducting a soil washing treatability study as applied to source unit contamination in the 100 Area. The objective ofthis treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The purpose of separating these fractions is to minimize the volume of soil requiring permanent disposal. It is anticipated that this treatability study will be performed in two phases of testing, a remedy screening phase and a remedy selection phase. The remedy screening phase consists of laboratory- and bench-scale studies performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) under a work order issued by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This phase will be used to provide qualitative evaluation of the potential effectiveness of the soil washing technology. The remedy selection phase, consists of pilot-scale testing performed under a separate service contract to be competitively bid under Westinghouse Hanford direction. The remedy selection phase will provide data to support evaluation of the soil washing technology in future feasibility studies for Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) or final operable unit (OU) remedies. Performance data from these tests will indicate whether applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or cleanup goals can be met at the site(s) by application of soil washing. The remedy selection tests wig also allow estimation of costs associated with implementation to the accuracy required for the Feasibility Study.

  11. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  12. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  13. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  14. Long-Term Materials-Test Program. Annual report and Qualification Test Plan, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made on the Long Term Materials Test Program during its first year is summarized and the test planning required to perform the Qualification Test is documented. The objective of the Qualification Test is to check out the proper functioning of the Test Rig and to demonstrate its capability to produce a representative PFB off-gas environment for long term candidate-material testing. During the first year of the program, the project has progressed from the concept stage to the start of construction. Ninety-five percent of the equipment has been ordered and renovations to accommodate the test rig have been initiated at the Malta Site. The initial effort focused on the test rig configuration and selection of the candidate turbine materials. The preliminary design phase was officially culminated by the presentation and acceptance of the Preliminary Operations Plan to DOE during April 1980. By mid-June, 1981, the design of the major components was substantially complete allowing a detailed external design review to be performed. The design was accepted, and purchase orders for the major components were placed. In parallel with the design effort, two materials-screening tests have been initiated. One thousand hours of testing on the oil-fired small burner rig and the first 250-h segment on the erosion/corrosion simulator has been completed.

  15. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  16. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  17. Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

  18. Acceptance Test Report for the Modular Automation System (MAS) Manufactured by Honeywell Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, D.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details the performance of the acceptance test of the Honeywell MAS Control System for equipment to be installed in gloveboxes HA-20MB and HA-211 at a later date. Equipment that was anticipated included 6 stabilization furnaces, only three and their associated equipment were installed.

  19. Acceptance test report for high pressure water jet system feed pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes results of WHC-SD-SNF-ATP-016, Rev. 0 ``Acceptance Test Procedure High Pressure Water Jet System``, conducted on December 20, 1995 and December 22, 1995. This jet supplies water at 15,000 psi @ 15 gpm to nozzles to clean surfaces of empty fuel storage canisters.

  20. Methods For Planning Accelerated Repeated Measures Degradation Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods For Planning Accelerated Repeated Measures Degradation Tests Brian P. Weaver Statistical repeated measures degradation tests can sometimes be used to assess product or component reliability when-variable accelerated repeated measures degradation test plan when the (possibly transformed) degradation is linear

  1. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  2. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  3. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  4. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  5. The CanTEST is a test of English proficiency which is accepted at many universities, including the University of Saskatchewan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CanTEST The CanTEST is a test of English proficiency which is accepted at many universities, including the University of Saskatchewan. The CanTEST is offered four times a year. Full-Time English.966.4351 for placement testing. · A non-refundable fee of $10.00 will be charged for placement testing. · Full payment

  6. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  7. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 20 mass % Na{sub 2}O, 10 mass % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 8 mass % B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1.5 mass % K{sub 2}O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired.

  8. Test plan for the 34 meter vertical axis wind turbine test bed located at Bushland, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, W.A.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan is presented for the testing and evaluation of a new 500 kw vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The plan starts with the initial measurements made during construction, proceeds through evaluation of the design, the development of control methods, and finally to the test bed phase where new concepts are evaluated and in-depth studies are performed.

  9. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  10. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  11. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s).

  12. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  13. The Worlds First Ever Cooling Tower Acceptance Test Using Process Data Reconciliation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnus Langenstein; Jan Hansen-Schmidt [BTB-Jansky GmbH, Gerlingerstrasse 151, D-71229 Leonberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling capacity of cooling towers is influenced by multiple constructive and atmospheric parameters in a very complex way. This leads to strong variations of the measured cold-water temperature and causes unacceptable unreliability of conventional acceptance tests, which are based on single point measurements. In order to overcome this lack of accuracy a new approach to acceptance test based on process data reconciliation has been developed by BTB Jansky and applied at a nuclear power plant. This approach uses process data reconciliation according to VDI 2048 to evaluate datasets over a long period covering different operating conditions of the cooling tower. Data reconciliation is a statistical method to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95% by considering closed material-, mass-and energy balances. Datasets which are not suitable for the evaluation due to strong transient gradients are excluded beforehand, according to well-defined criteria. The reconciled cold-water temperature is then compared, within a wet bulb temperature range of 5 deg. C to 20 deg. C to the manufacturer's guaranteed temperature. Finally, if the average deviation between reconciled and guaranteed value over the evaluated period is below zero, the cooling tower guarantee is fulfilled. (authors)

  14. (Acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam furnace)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohriner, E.K.; Howell, C.R.

    1990-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The travelers observed the acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam (EB) furnace constructed by Leybold (Hanau) Technologies prior to disassembly and shipping. The testing included: (1) operation of the mold withdrawal system (2) vacuum pumping and vacuum chamber leak-up rates, (3) power stability at full power, (4) x-radiation monitoring at full power, and (5) demonstration of system interlocks for loss of water cooling, loss of vacuum, loss of power, and emergency shutdown. Preliminary training was obtained in furnace operation, EB gun maintenance, and use of the programmable logic controller for beam manipulation. Additional information was obtained on water-cooling requirements and furnace platform construction necessary for the installation. The information gained and training received will greatly assist in minimizing the installation and startup operation costs of the furnace.

  15. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan: Phase 3 -- Test plan for centrally heated surrogate rodlet test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.N.; Baldwin, C.A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is investigating the use of weapons grade plutonium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light-water reactors (LWR). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons derived fuel may differ from the previous commercial fuels because of small amounts of gallium impurities. A concern presently exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel, react with and weaken the clad, and thereby promote loss of fuel pin integrity. Phases 1 and 2 of the gallium task are presently underway to investigate the types of reactions that occur between gallium and clad materials. This is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. This Plan summarizes the projected Phase 3 Gallium-Cladding compatibility heating test and the follow-on post test examination (PTE). This work will be performed using centrally-heated surrogate pellets, to avoid unnecessary complexities and costs associated with working with plutonium and an irradiation environment. Two sets of rodlets containing pellets prepared by two different methods will be heated. Both sets will have an initial bulk gallium content of approximately 10 ppm. The major emphasis of the PTE task will be to examine the material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport from the pellets to the clad.

  16. Open test assembly (OTA) shear demonstration testing work/test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiller, S.W.

    1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the development testing phase associated with the OTA Shear activity and defines the controls to be in place throughout the testing. The purpose of the OTA Shear Program was to provide equipment that is needed for the processing of 40 foot long, sodium wetted, irradiated core components previously used in the FFTF reactor to monitor fuel and materials tests. There are currently 15 of these OTA test stalks located in the Test Assembly Conditioning Station (TACS) inerted vault. These need to be dispositioned for a shutdown mission to eliminate this highly activated, high dose inventory prior to turnover to the ERC since they must be handled by remote operations. These would also need to be dispositioned for a restart mission to free up the vault they currently reside in. The waste handling and cleaning equipment in the J33M Cell was designed and built for the handling of reactor components up to the standard 12 foot length. This program will provide the equipment to the IEM Cell to remotely section the OTAS into pieces less than 12 feet in length to allow for the necessary handling and cleaning operations required for proper disposition. Due to the complexity of all operations associated with remote handling, the availability of the IEM Cell training facility, and the major difficulty with reworking contaminated equipment, it was determined that preliminary testing of the equipment was desirable, This testing activity would provide the added assurance that the equipment will operate as designed prior to performance of the formal Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) at the IEM Cell, This testing activity will also allow for some operator familiarity and procedure checkout prior to actual installation into the IEM Cell. This development testing will therefore be performed at the conclusion of equipment fabrication and prior to transfer of the equipment to the 400 Area.

  17. SUBJECT: ACCEPTANCE OF THE FINAL SITE OBSERVATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and concludes that it is generally acceptable as DOE’s proposed strategy for compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards in 40 CFR Part 192. The staff’s detailed review of the Grand Junction SOWP is documented in the enclosed

  18. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF.

  19. Bayesian Optimum Planning for Accelerated Life Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for a description of other such models. The use of a "known" activation energy in electronic component reliability tests (ALTs) are widely used in reliability studies. Because many modern high-reliability components these components under use conditions will usually yield little useful information about reliability within practi

  20. Test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokuda, E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration (CRD). Air monitors will be used to sample for the tracer elements neodymium, terbium, and ytterbium, and dysprosium. The results from this air monitoring will be used to determine if the CRD is successful in controlling dust and minimizing contamination. Procedures and equipment specifications for the test are included.

  1. Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our aim is to provide details of the experimental test plan for scaled model studies in St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Main Channel at the University of Minnesota, including a review of study objectives, descriptions of the turbine models, the experimental set-up, instrumentation details, instrument measurement uncertainty, anticipated experimental test cases, post-processing methods, and data archiving for model developers.

  2. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

  3. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

  4. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Jiricka, Antonin; McGrail, B. Peter; Jorgensen, Benaiah M.; Smith, Donald E.; Allen, Benjamin R.; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.; Brown, Kevin G.; Reamer, I. A.; Ebert, W. L.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix of 55 glasses was developed and tested with the aim to identify the impact of glass composition on the long-term corrosion behavior and to develop an acceptable low-activity waste glass composition region. Of the 55 glasses, 45 were designed to systematically vary the glass composition and 10 were selected because large and growing databases on their corrosion characteristics had accumulated. The performance of these 55 glasses in the vapor-phase hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) were characterized. VHT's were performed at temperatures between 150?C and 300?C for times up to 280 days; preliminary corrosion rates and type of alteration products were identified. PCTs were performed at 90?C with glass surface area's to solution volumes (S/V) of 2000 m-1 for 7 days and S/V of 20 000 m-1 for 10 h, 100 h, and 1000 h. The corrosion extents by PCT were determined as functions of time from solution composition analyses.

  5. Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

  6. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  7. Enraf Series 854 advanced technology gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure checks that the shipment of the gauge to Hanford did not cause a failure. This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer`s instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area. Enraf-Nonius Series 854 level gauges are certified by Factory Mutual (FM) for National Fire Protectional Association (NFPA 70) hazardous Class 1, Division 1, Groups B, C, and D Locations. Its measuring principle is based on the detection of variations in the weight of a displacer suspended in the process fluid. The displacer is connected to a wire wounded on a precision measuring drum. A level change causes a change in the weight of the displacer which will be detected by the force transducer. Electronics within the gauge cause a servo motor to adjust the position of the displacer and compute the tank level based on the new position of the displacer drum. The gauge displays the level in decimal inches. An analog output signal transmits the level data for remote data processing.

  8. Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems* Fei Su, Sule of droplet- based microfluidic systems for safety-critical biomedical applications. In order to ensure reliability, microsystems incorporating microfluidic components must be tested adequately. In this paper, we

  9. IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF. I. Introduction One important class of issues concerning

  10. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  11. A data base and a standard material for use in acceptance testing of low-activity waste products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have conducted replicate dissolution tests following the product consistency test (PCT) procedure to measure the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si at various combinations of temperature, duration, and glass/water mass ratio. Tests were conducted with a glass formulated to be compositionally similar to low-activity waste products anticipated for Hanford to evaluate the adequacy of test methods that have been designated in privatization contracts for use in product acceptance. An important finding from this set of tests is that the solution concentrations generated in tests at 20 C will likely be too low to measure the dissolution rates of waste products reliably. Based on these results, the authors recommend that the acceptance test be conducted at 40 C. Tests at 40 C generated higher solution concentrations, were more easily conducted, and the measured rates were easily related to those at 20 C. Replicate measurements of other glass properties were made to evaluate the possible use of LRM-1 as a standard material. These include its composition, homogeneity, density, compressive strength, the Na leachability index with the ANSI/ANS 16.1 leach test, and if the glass is characteristically hazardous with the toxicity characteristic leach procedure. The values of these properties were within the acceptable limits identified for Hanford low-activity waste products. The reproducibility of replicate tests and analyses indicates that the glass would be a suitable standard material.

  12. W-026 acceptance test report plant control system software(submittal {number_sign}223.02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System software was conducted throughout the construction of WRAP 1 with final testing on the glovebox software being completed in December 1996. The software tests were broken out into five sections; one for each of the four Local Control Units and one for the supervisory software modules. This document contains a completed copy of the software tests along with the applicable test log and completed Exception Test Reports. The ETRs outside the scope of the contractor are not signed off. These will be resolved by the Buyer and all 1280 open issues will be tracked on Buyer`s ETR database pending resolution.

  13. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  14. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  15. Hanford Site physical separations CERCLA treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct a physical separations soil treatability test in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site, Washington. The objective of this test is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems as a means of concentrating chemical and radioactive contaminants into fine soil fractions and thereby minimizing waste volumes. If successful the technology could be applied to clean up millions of cubic meters of contaminated soils in waste sites at Hanford and other sites. It is not the intent of this test to remove contaminated materials from the fine soils. Physical separation is a simple and comparatively low cost technology to potentially achieve a significant reduction in the volume of contaminated soils. Organic contaminants are expected to be insignificant for the 300-FF-I Operable Unit test, and further removal of metals and radioactive contaminants from the fine fraction of soils will require secondary treatment such as chemical extraction, electromagnetic separation, or other technologies. Additional investigations/testing are recommended to assess the economic and technical feasibility of applying secondary treatment technologies, but are not within the scope of this test. This plan provides guidance and specifications for the treatability test to be conducted as a service contract. More detailed instructions and procedures will be provided as part of the vendors (sellers) proposal. The procedures will be approved by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and finalized by the seller prior to initiating the test.

  16. Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

  17. Test plan : reducing soft costs of rooftop solar installations attributed to structural considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  18. C-018H LERF filtration test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moberg, T.P.; King, C.V.

    1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The following outlines the plan to test the polymeric backwash filtration system at the LERF. These tests will determine if the ETF filter design is adequate. If the tests show that the design is adequate, the task will be complete. If the tests show that the technology is inadequate, it may be necessary to perform further tests to qualify other candidate filtration technologies (e.g., polymeric tubular ultrafiltration, centrifugal ultrafiltration). The criteria to determine the success or failure of the backwash filter will be based on the system`s ability to remove the bacteria and inorganic contaminants from the evaporator process condensate. The tests are designed to qualify the design basis of the filtration technology that will be used in the ETF.

  19. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  20. SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [4] in response to the SRR request. The conclusions provided in this report are that no changes need to be made to the SME acceptability process (i.e., no modifications to WSRC-TR-95-00364, Revision 5, are needed) and no changes need to be made to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) itself (i.e. the spreadsheet utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) for acceptability decisions does not require modification) in response to thorium becoming a reportable element for DWPF operations. In addition, the inputs and results for the two test cases requested by WSE for use in confirming the successful activation of thorium as a reportable element for DWPF operations during the processing of SB6 are presented in this report.

  1. Fabrication Control Plan for ORNL RH-LOCA ATF Test Specimens to be Irradiated in the ATR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. Field; Richard Howard; Michael Teague

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this fabrication plan is (1) to summarize the design of a set of rodlets that will be fabricated and then irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and (2) provide requirements for fabrication and acceptance criteria for inspections of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) – Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) rodlet components. The functional and operational (F&OR) requirements for the ATF program are identified in the ATF Test Plan. The scope of this document only covers fabrication and inspections of rodlet components detailed in drawings 604496 and 604497. It does not cover the assembly of these items to form a completed test irradiation assembly or the inspection of the final assembly, which will be included in a separate INL final test assembly specification/inspection document. The controls support the requirements that the test irradiations must be performed safely and that subsequent examinations must provide valid results.

  2. Long term materials test program. Preliminary operations plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Testing (LTMT) PFB facility has been designed to duplicate the design point condition of the Coal-Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) reference commercial plant design developed by GE under contract to DOE, including bed temperature (1750/sup 0/F), pressure (10 atm), excess air (20%), and gas residence time (1.8 sec). The test rig has a one foot diameter bed and consumes about 1.6 tons/day of coal and 0.5 tons/day of dolomite sulphur sorbent. Material specimens are contained in two test sections. The low velocity test section houses 132 pin specimens 1/4 dia., sixty of which can be cooled below the gas stream temperature. The nominal exposure environment of 1650/sup 0/F, 10 atm, 27 fps should ensure representative corrosive conditions, without erosion. The control system for the LTMT facility is designed to operate the rig in such a manner that the test specimens are subjected to constant, controlled conditions representative of the actual service environment. The Preliminary Test Plan presented in Section V outlines three phases of PFB testing, plus screening tests for candidate materials. Operating costs have been updated to reflect the preliminary rig design data and current raw material quotes. The projected operating costs have been effected by raw material costs since the time of the original estimate, but the overall cost per hour of test is still very low: $122/test hour.

  3. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  4. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  5. System integration test plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.

    1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the system integration test plan for the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf, PassPort and PeopleSoft software, and custom software created to work with the COTS products. The PP software is an integrated application for AP, Contract Management, Inventory Management, Purchasing and Material Safety Data Sheet. The PS software is an integrated application for Project Costing, General Ledger, Human Resources/Training, Payroll, and Base Benefits.

  6. The UVA Program in Political Philosophy, Policy and Law (PPL) PPL is now accepting applications from students planning to graduate in 2013.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    The UVA Program in Political Philosophy, Policy and Law (PPL) PPL is now accepting applications from students planning to graduate in 2013. PPL is a selective interdisciplinary major for students who wish to study law and public policy from a philosophical perspective. PPL majors study such questions

  7. Advanced Test Reactor Capabilities and Future Irradiation Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the most versatile operating research reactors in the Untied States. The ATR has a long history of supporting reactor fuel and material research for the US government and other test sponsors. The INL is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and currently operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The ATR is the third generation of test reactors built at the Test Reactor Area, now named the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), whose mission is to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of customers--US DOE, foreign governments and private researchers, and commercial companies that need neutrons. The ATR has several unique features that enable the reactor to perform diverse simultaneous tests for multiple test sponsors. The ATR has been operating since 1967, and is expected to continue operating for several more decades. The remainder of this paper discusses the ATR design features, testing options, previous experiment programs, future plans for the ATR capabilities and experiments, and some introduction to the INL and DOE's expectations for nuclear research in the future.

  8. OTEC-1 Power System Test Program: test plan for first deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes in detail all tests planned for the first eight-month deployment of OTEC-1, a test facility constructed by the US Department of Energy in order to test heat exchangers for closed-cycle power plants using ocean thermal energy. Tests to be performed during the first-deployment period are aimed primarily at determining (1) the effectiveness of countermeasures in preventing biofouling of the heat exchanters, (2) the extent of environmental impacts associated with operation of an OTEC facility, and (3) the performance of a 1-MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser pair. The condenser to be tested has plain tubes, and the evaporator employs the Linde High Flux surface on the working-fluid (ammonia) side to enhance the heat-transfer rate. This plan provides a statement of the objectives and priorities of the test program, describes the test equipment, gives a detailed account of all tests to be performed and the test schedule, and discusses provisions for management of the test program.

  9. Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for success in this endeavor. If proper placement and alignment of the eddy current measurement probe on the coating could be achieved, the thickness of this non-conductive coating over the conductive fuel cladding (Zircaloy 2) should be measurable based on magnetic stand-off aspects. Eddy current devices are routinely used to measure paint coating thicknesses on metal surfaces in this regard. The purpose of this report is to document the development and acceptance testing of the eddy current system conducted to qualify its use for the measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses on fuel stored in the K West Basin.

  10. Acceptance test report for the AN valve pit leak detection and low point drain assembly mock up test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWER, K.L.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes The Performance Mock-up Test Procedure for the Valve Pit Leak Detection and Low Point Drain Assembly Performance Mock-Up Test Procedure.

  11. NOx control subsystem test plan: LEBS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is planned that NO{sub x} control subsystem testing in support of Phase II of the Low-Emissions Boiler Systems (LEBS) Project occur in ABB Power Plant Laboratories` (PPL) pilot scale Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF). This work will be performed to provide necessary design and operational information for inclusion of an optimized NO, control subsystem in the Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) and Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) designs. The BSF is a 50 to 90x10{sup 6} BTU/hr (15 to 26 MWt) coal, oil or natural gas fired tangential furnace designed to replicate the residence time/temperature history of a utility scale tangentially fired boiler. All major aspects of a typical utility boiler are duplicated in the BSF including the lower furnace, the ash hopper, multiple burner elevations, the arch section, superheater/reheater panels, and the convective heat transfer surfaces. The furnace walls and heat transfer surfaces are cooled by a surrounding water jacket. Steam generated is vented off at atmospheric pressure so that a constant sink temperature of 100{degrees}C (212{degrees}C) is maintained. The lower furnace water walls are selectively refractory lined to maintain an appropriate furnace gas temperature history. Refractory is required because the sink temperature (100{degrees}C) is cooler than that of a typical, utility boiler, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the BSF is greater than that of a utility boiler due to scale effects. For the subject testing, the BSF will be configured as a coal fired boiler. Design and planning activities associated with the construction of the NO{sub x} control subsystem test unit will continue through June, 1995. Additionally, the schedule for specification of certain low NO{sub x} firing system components was set to allow for precursor, internal and LEBS development activities to occur and subsequently provide necessary design parameters.

  12. Plan and Strategy for ITER Blanket Testing in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enoeda, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Akiba, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Tanaka, Satoru [University of Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, Akihiko [Kyushu University (Japan); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Kyoto University (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Kyoto University (Japan); Kohyama, Akira [Kyoto University (Japan); Sagara, Akio [National Institute of Fusion Science (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute of Fusion Science (Japan)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fusion Council of Japan has established the long-term program for the development of blanket in 1999. In the program, the solid breeder blanket was selected as the primary candidate blanket of the fusion power demonstration plant in Japan, while liquid breeder blankets and high temperature solid breeder blanket have been identified as the attractive advanced blanket. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is leading the development of solid breeder blankets, while, universities and National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) are developing the advanced blankets for potential options of the fusion power demonstration plant and commercial power plants. ITER blanket module testing is regarded as one of the most important milestones, by which integrity of candidate blanket design is qualified for the fusion power demonstration plant, together with material irradiation data by International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Japan is investigating the possibility of testing all types of blankets under TBWG framework with both of JAERI and universities/NIFS involvements. This paper presents a plan and strategy for the development of test blanket modules and ITER blanket module testing in Japan.

  13. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition.

  14. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobin, R., E-mail: rjgobin@cea.fr; Bogard, D.; Chauvin, N.; Chel, S.; Delferrière, O.; Harrault, F.; Mattei, P.; Senée, F. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)] [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Cara, P. [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany)] [Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Mosnier, A. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France) [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France); Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, Garching (Germany); Shidara, H. [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Okumura, Y. [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)] [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  15. Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

  16. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service, with Quality Level 0 (for PSI Phase 3). Quality Control inspections shall be performed to verify basic dimensions and overall configurations of fabricated components, and any special quality control verifications specified in this work plan (Section 3.1.5). These inspections shall serve to approve the test equipment for use in K West Basin (Acceptance Tag). This equipment is for information gathering only during PSI Phases 3 and 4 activities, and will be discarded at the completion of PSI. For equipment needed to support actual production throughput, development/fabrication/testing activities would be more rigorously controlled.

  17. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100{degrees}C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Acceptance Test Procedure for Project 251W, WBS 3, Substation A-8, Building 251-W, Bus {number_sign}2 switchgear replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanBaalen, R.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document records the steps taken and results of the acceptance testing of the new 13.8kV switchgear installed at 251W. This gear is under the administrative control of Electrical Utilities.

  19. Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

  20. Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Turner, P.C.; Oden, L.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

  1. TRT meeting Feb 03 Pauline Gagnon Indiana University 1 Acceptance tests for barrel modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Pauline

    tension 90% 80% 100% stringing 80% 100% not tested HV checks 100% 20% not done HV conditioning in design 20% not done gain mapping designed 100% not done #12;TRT meeting ­ Feb 03 Pauline Gagnon ­ Indiana Circulate ventilation through 3 modules: type 1,2 3 Active gas in series through 2 modules of the same type

  2. Hanford immobilized LAW product acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area testing data package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JD Vienna; A Jiricka; BP McGrail; BM Jorgensen; DE Smith; BR Allen; JC Marra; DK Peeler; KG Brown; IA Reamer; WL Ebert

    2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site's mission has been to produce nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during plutonium production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The total volume of LAW requiring immobilization will include the LAW separated from the tank waste, as well as new wastes generated by the retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes. Per the Tri-Party Agreement (1994), both the LAW and HLW will be vitrified. It has been estimated that vitrification of the LAW waste will result in over 500,000 metric tons or 200,000 m{sup 3} of immobilized LAW (ILAW) glass. The ILAW glass is to be disposed of onsite in a near-surface burial facility. It must be demonstrated that the disposal system will adequately retain the radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. This report describes a study of the impacts of systematic glass-composition variation on the responses from accelerated laboratory corrosion tests of representative LAW glasses. A combination of two tests, the product consistency test and vapor-hydration test, is being used to give indictations of the relative rate at which a glass could be expected to corrode in the burial scenario.

  3. Acceptance test procedure for removal of CS1K circuit switcher block and trip schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document provides a detailed process to test the functions of the circuit switcher, protective relays, alarms, SCADA and 125VDC control logic of 115kV and 13.8kV systems at B3S4 substation following the removal of trip and blocking schemes to Transformer No.1 Circuit Switcher B594.

  4. Acceptance testing report of Eductor System to be installed in the 105 K Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Engineering Support group cold-tested the Eductor System a 15 horsepower multi-stage centrifugal pump manufactured by the Grunfos Corporation with the housing manufactured and sold with the pump by the Tri-Nuclear Corporation and a 3-inch diameter water jet eductor manufactured by the Fox Valve Corporation. The Eductor System was tested to gather and document information to optimize sludge retrieval operations for use in the 105 K Basins. The cold-testing took place during February 12 through February 29, 1996 in the 305 Cold Test Facility basin located in the 300 area. The pump, utilized in conjunction with the eductor, makes up the core of the Eductor System. The pumping unit consists of a 15 hp stainless steel multi-stage centrifugal Grunfos pump which is seated in a stainless steel fabricated housing. Two baskets or filter elements make up part of the housing on the suction side of the pump. The pump can be used independent of the housing but the housing has two identified purposes. The first use is to stabilize the centrifugal pump and give the pneumatic valves and pump discharge piping a solid platform so the Eductor System can be more easily mobilized within the basin as one unit. The second use for the housing presents the option to utilize the suction-side filters for capturing larger fuel pieces after the smaller fines have been removed.

  5. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  6. Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

  7. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KINKEL, C.C.

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  8. BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrill, Andrew [HZB; Anders, W [HZB; Frahm, A. [HZB; Knobloch, Jens [HZB; Neumann, Axel [HZB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Turlington, Larry D. [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bERLinPro project, a 100 mA, 50 MeV superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for the purpose of studying the technical challenges and physics of operating a high current, c.w., 1.3 GHz ERL. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the injector, booster and linac module respectively. The booster cryomodule will contain three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, and will be equipped with twin 115 kW RF power couplers in order to provide the appropriate acceleration to the high current electron beam. This paper will review the status of the fabrication of the 4 booster cavities that have been built for this project by Jefferson Laboratory and look at the challenges presented by the incorporation of fundamental power couplers capable of delivering 115 kW. The test plan for the cavities and couplers will be given along with a brief overview of the cryomodule design.

  9. A Propellantless Propulsion Experiment Design and Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, David P. [United States Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics, SC-20/Germantown Building, 1000 Independence Ave SW, Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A propellantless propulsion experiment design and testing plan are described. The concept was initially presented during the Space Technology and Applications International Forum of 2001 and the experiment was initially presented during the Joint Propulsion Conference of 2001. New information is provided on how the experiment relates to the Human Exploration of Development of Space, the results of peer reviews, a cost estimate performed by a major U.S. aerospace company, and an alternative magnet design to reduce the cost of the experiment and potentially improve the reliability of the system. Recent improvements in high power solid state switches and superconducting magnets may have made propellantless propulsion possible. Propulsion may occur during the non-steady state ramp-up of a very rapidly pulsed, high power magnet. Propulsion would not occur after the first 100 nanoseconds of each pulse, since the magnetic field will have reached steady state. The United States Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics provided some of the funding for the developed a no maintenance superconducting magnet that can carry 2,000 amperes per square millimeter and a switch which can provide 100 nanosecond ramp-ups at a rate of 0.4 megahertz, and at 9,000 volts and 30 amperes.

  10. SUBJECT: ACCEPTANCE OF THE FINAL SITE OBSERVATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT SITE AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and concludes that it is generally acceptable as DOE’s proposed strategy for compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards in 40 CFR Part 192. The staff’s detailed review of the Grand Junction SOWP is documented in the enclosed

  11. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan- February 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document outlines gaps, needs, and opportunities identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee on Test Methods.

  12. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M. [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA; Joslyn, C. C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA; Venetz, T. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  13. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M. [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA; Joslyn, C. C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA; Venetz, T. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  14. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  15. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  16. Beta Test Plan for Advanced Inverters Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Basso, T.; Coddington, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a preliminary (beta) test plan for grid interconnection systems of advanced inverter-based DERs. It follows the format and methodology/approach established by IEEE Std 1547.1, while incorporating: 1. Upgraded tests for responses to abnormal voltage and frequency, and also including ride-through. 2. A newly developed test for voltage regulation, including dynamic response testing. 3. Modified tests for unintentional islanding, open phase, and harmonics to include testing with the advanced voltage and frequency response functions enabled. Two advanced inverters, one single-phase and one three-phase, were tested under the beta test plan. These tests confirmed the importance of including tests for inverter dynamic response, which varies widely from one inverter to the next.

  17. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, T.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to protect workers, soils, water, and biotic and cultural resources in and around the facility.

  18. Microsoft Word - DOE HBU Demo - Revised Test Plan Report - Rev...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development, and Demonstration RTN Removable Top Nozzle RX Recrystallized SCC Stress Corrosion Cracking SE Safety Evaluation SET Separate Effects Test SNF Spent Nuclear Fuel SSC...

  19. Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Jonathan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

  20. LATEST RESULTS AND TEST PLANS FROM THE 100 mA CORNELL ERL INJECTOR SCRF CRYOMODULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    LATEST RESULTS AND TEST PLANS FROM THE 100 mA CORNELL ERL INJECTOR SCRF CRYOMODULE M. Liepe , S developed and fabricated a SCRF injector cryomodule for the acceleration of a high current, low emittance

  1. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.; Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life even though they commonly meet or exceed the design criteria specified in current design standards. One of the basic premises of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is that the low gearbox reliability results from the absence of critical elements in the design process or insufficient design tools. Key goals of the GRC are to improve design approaches and analysis tools and to recommend practices and test methods resulting in improved design standards for wind turbine gearboxes that lower the cost of energy (COE) through improved reliability. The GRC uses a combined gearbox testing, modeling and analysis approach, along with a database of information from gearbox failures collected from overhauls and investigation of gearbox condition monitoring techniques to improve wind turbine operations and maintenance practices. Testing of Gearbox 2 (GB2) using the two-speed turbine controller that has been used in prior testing. This test series will investigate non-torque loads, high-speed shaft misalignment, and reproduction of field conditions in the dynamometer. This test series will also include vibration testing using an eddy-current brake on the gearbox's high speed shaft.

  2. Test plan for thermogravimetric analyses of BWR spent fuel oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for additional low-temperature spent fuel oxidation data to determine the behavior of spent fuel as a waste form for a tuffy repository. Short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests were recommended in a comprehensive technical approach as the method for providing scoping data that could be used to (1) evaluate the effects of variables such as moisture and burnup on the oxidation rate, (2) determine operative mechanisms, and (3) guide long-term, low-temperature oxidation testing. The initial test series studied the temperature and moisture effects on pressurized water reactor fuel as a function of particle and grain size. This document presents the test matrix for studying the oxidation behavior of boiling water reactor fuel in the temperature range of 140 to 225{degree}C. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Erik [CERN; Bruning, O S [CERN; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao [CERN; Schirm, Karl-Martin [CERN; Torres-Sanchez, R [CERN; Valloni, Alessandra [CERN; Aulenbacher, Kurt [Mainz; Bogacz, Slawomir [JLAB; Hutton, Andrew [JLAB; Klein, M [University of Liverpool

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  4. Development of test acceptance standards for qualification of the glass-bonded zeolite waste form. Interim annual report, October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, L.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Fortner, J.A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass-bonded zeolite is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the Electrometallurgical Treatment Program as a potential ceramic waste form for the disposition of radionuclides associated with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. The utility of standard durability tests [e.g. Materials Characterization Center Test No. 1 (MCC-1), Product Consistency Test (PCT), and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT)] are being evaluated as an initial step in developing test methods that can be used in the process of qualifying this material for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. A broad range of potential repository conditions are being evaluated to determine the bounding parameters appropriate for the corrosion testing of the ceramic waste form, and its behavior under accelerated testing conditions. In this report we provide specific characterization information and discuss how the durability test results are affected by changes in pH, leachant composition, and sample surface area to leachant volume ratios. We investigate the release mechanisms and other physical and chemical parameters that are important for establishing acceptance parameters, including the development of appropriate test methodologies required to measure product consistency.

  5. 300-FF-1 physical separations CERCLA treatability test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct physical separations soil treatability tests in the north process pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site. The overall objective of these tests is to evaluate the use of physical separations systems as a means of concentrating chemical and radioactive contaminants into fine soil fractions, and thereby minimizing waste volumes. If successful, the technology could be applied to clean up millions of cubic meters of contaminated soils at Hanford and other sites. In this document, physical separations refers to a simple and comparatively low cost technology to potentially achieve a significant reduction in the volume of contaminated soils without the use of chemical processes. Removal of metals and radioactive contaminants from the fine fraction of soils may require additional treatment such as chemical extraction, electromagnetic separation, or stabilization. Investigations/testing of these technologies are recommended to assess the economic and technical feasibility of additional treatment, but are not within the scope of this test. This plan provides guidance and specifications for two proposed treatability tests: one to be conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company; and another proposed as competitive bid service contract. The main body of this test plan discusses the tests in general and items that are common to both tests. Attachment A discusses in detail the EPA system test and Attachment B discusses the vendor test.

  6. Test Plan of the Anticipatory Wirelss Sensor Network for the Critical Energy Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Rentel

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The test plan for the performance of the Anticipatory Wireless Sensor Network (A-WSN) is presented. The results of the test campaigns will be obtained after actual measurements are taken in the field with the Wireless Sensor Network developed by The Innovation Center-Eaton Corp., and the Anticipatory algorithms developed by ORNL.

  7. NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; Halse, C.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

  8. U.S. Plans and Strategy for ITER Blanket Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M. [UCLA Fusion Engineering Sciences (United States); Sze, D. [UCSD Advanced Energy Technology Group (United States); Wong, C. [General Atomics (United States); Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute, Madison (United States); Ying, A. [UCLA Fusion Engineering Sciences (United States); Morley, N.B. [UCLA Fusion Engineering Sciences (United States); Malang, S

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing blanket concepts in the integrated fusion environment is one of the principal objectives of ITER. Blanket test modules will be inserted in ITER from Day 1 of its operation and will provide the first experimental data on the feasibility of the D-T cycle for fusion. With the US rejoining ITER, the US community has decided to have strong participation in the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) Program. A US strategy for ITER-TBM has evolved that emphasizes international collaboration. A study was initiated to select the two blanket options for the US ITER-TBM in light of new R and D results from the US and world programs over the past decade. The study is led by the Plasma Chamber community in partnership with the Materials, PFC, Safety, and physics communities. The study focuses on assessment of the critical feasibility issues for candidate blanket concepts and it is strongly coupled to R and D of modeling and experiments. Examples of issues are MHD insulators, SiC insert viability and compatibility with PbLi, tritium permeation, MHD effects on heat transfer, solid breeder 'temperature window' and thermomechanics, and chemistry control of molten salts. A dual coolant liquid breeder and a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket concept have been selected for the US ITER-TBM.

  9. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  10. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  11. D-area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, C.J.; Radway, J.C.; Alman, D.; Hazen, T.C.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The D Area Oil Seepage Basin (DOSB) was used from 1952 to 1975 for disposal of petroleum-based products (waste oils), general office and cafeteria waste, and apparently some solvents [trichloroethylene (TCE)/tetrachloroethylene (PCE)]. Numerous analytical results have indicated the presence of TCE and its degradation product vinyl chloride in groundwater in and around the unit, and of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils within the unit. The DOSB is slated for additional assessment and perhaps for environmental remediation. In situ bioremediation represents a technology of demonstrated effectiveness in the reclamation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, and has been retained as an alternative for the cleanup of the DOSB. The Savannah River Site is therefore proposing to conduct a field treatability study designed to demonstrate and optimize the effectiveness of in situ microbiological biodegradative processes at the DOSB. The introduction of air and gaseous nutrients via two horizontal injection wells (bioventing) is expected to enhance biodegradation rates of petroleum components and stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents. The data gathered in this test will allow a determination of the biodegradation rates of contaminants of concern in the soil and groundwater, allow an evaluation of the feasibility of in situ bioremediation of soil and groundwater at the DOSB, and provide data necessary for the functional design criteria for the final remediation system.

  12. Deflagration studies on waste Tank 101-SY: Test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K.L.; Zlochower, I.A.; Hertzberg, M.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste slurries produced during the recovery of plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel are stored in underground storage tanks. While a variety of waste types have been generated, of particular concern are the wastes stored in Tank 101-SY. A slurry growth-gas evolution cycle has been observed since 1981. The waste consists of a thick slurry, consisting of a solution high in NaOH, NaNO{sub 3}, NaAlO{sub 2}, dissolved organic complexants (EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, and degradation products), other salts (sulfates and phosphates), and radionuclides (primarily cesium and strontium). During a gas release the major gaseous species identified include: hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Significant amounts of nitrogen may also be present. Traces of ammonia, carbon oxides, and other nitrogen oxides are also detected. Air and water vapor are also present in the tank vapor space. The purpose of the deflagration study is to determine risks of the hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and oxygen system. To be determined are pressure and temperature as a function of composition of reacting gases and the concentration of gases before and after the combustion event. Analyses of gases after the combustion event will be restricted to those tests that had an initial concentration of {le}8% hydrogen. This information will be used to evaluate safety issues related to periodic slurry growth and flammable gas releases from Tank 101-SY. the conditions to be evaluated will simulate gases in the vapor space above the salt cake as well as gases that potentially are trapped in pockets within/under the waste. The deflagration study will relate experimental laboratory results to conditions in the existing tanks.

  13. Optimum combined test plans for systems and components JAYANT RAJGOPAL, MAINAK MAZUMDAR and SUBBA RAO V. MAJETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Optimum combined test plans for systems and components JAYANT RAJGOPAL, MAINAK MAZUMDAR and SUBBA on the reliability of a system could be made on the basis of tests of its constituent components. Prior research in the area of system-based component testing has for the most part addressed the development of plans

  14. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The second of these two planned tests, CCI-2, will be conducted with a nearly identical test facility and experiment boundary conditions, but with a Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete test section to investigate the effect of concrete type on the two-dimensional core-concrete interaction and debris cooling behavior. The objective of this report is to provide the overall test plan for CCI-2 to enable pretest calculations to be carried out. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus, followed by a description of the planned test operating procedure. Overall specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1.

  15. 105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

  16. Fabrication, inspection, and test plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel irradiation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, G.W.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of MOX fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the ATR to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. In addition, the test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the data base required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues (ORNL/MD/LTR-76). This Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan (FITP) is a level 2 document as defined in the FMDP LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-78).

  17. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

  18. Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

  19. U.S. PLANS AND STRATEGY FOR ITER BLANKET TESTING , M. Sawan4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    U.S. PLANS AND STRATEGY FOR ITER BLANKET TESTING M. Abdou1 , D. Sze2 , C. Wong3 , M. Sawan4 , A. Ying1 , N. B. Morley1 , S. Malang5 1 UCLA Fusion Engineering Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, abdou

  20. Test plan for reactions between spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating the long-term performance of a high-level nuclear waste form, spent fuel from commercial reactors. Permanent disposal of the spent fuel is possible in a potential repository to be located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the post-containment period the spent fuel could be exposed to water condensation since of the cladding is assumed to fail during this time. Spent fuel leach (SFL) tests are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under this condition. This Test Plan addresses the anticipated conditions whereby spent fuel is contacted by small amounts of water that trickle through the spent fuel container. Two complentary test plans are presented, one to examine the reaction of spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions and the second to examine the reaction of unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions. The former test plan examines the importance of the water content, the oxygen content as affected by radiolysis, the fuel burnup, fuel surface area, and temperature. The latter test plant examines the effect of the non-presence of Teflon in the test vessel.

  1. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  2. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

  3. Adaptive Management Plan for Sensitive Plant Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site supports numerous plant species considered sensitive because of their past or present status under the Endangered Species Act and with federal and state agencies. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office (DOE/NV) prepared a Resource Management Plan which commits to protects and conserve these sensitive plant species and to minimize accumulative impacts to them. This document presents the procedures of a long-term adaptive management plan which is meant to ensure that these goals are met. It identifies the parameters that are measured for all sensitive plant populations during long-term monitoring and the adaptive management actions which may be taken if significant threats to these populations are detected. This plan does not, however, identify the current list of sensitive plant species know to occur on the Nevada Test Site. The current species list and progress on their monitoring is reported annually by DOE/NV in the Resource Management Plan.

  4. Test plan: Laboratory-scale testing of the first core sample from Tank 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrey, E.V.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of the Radioactive Process/Product Laboratory Testing (RPPLT), WBS 1.2.2.05.05, are to confirm that simulated HWVP feed and glass are representative of actual radioactive HWVP feed and glass and to provide radioactive leaching and glass composition data to WFQ. This study will provide data from one additional NCAW core sample (102-AZ Core 1) for these purposes.

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 538: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]). (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk. (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for either clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and where DOE will reach consensus with NDEP before beginning the next phase of work.

  6. Salt spray testing of sacrificial and barrier type coatings for the purpose of finding a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, E.J.; Haeberle, T.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium plate is used to protect various components of offshore oil and gas production equipment from surface marine environments such as salt spray. This research project was performed to find an environmentally acceptable coating which provides equivalent or superior resistance to surface marine corrosion when compared to cadmium plate. In order to find a replacement for cadmium plate, a large number of sacrificial and barrier type coatings were exposed to an accelerated salt spray test in accordance with ASTM B117-94. The only sacrificial coating which resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without any indication of failure was the 0.0006-in. thick zinc-nickel plate with an olive drab chromate treatment. Based on these test results, zinc-nickel plate is recommended as a corrosion resistant and environmentally acceptable replacement for cadmium plate for use in surface marine environments. Electroless nickel coatings with a minimum applied thickness of 0.002-in. also resisted 1,000 hours of accelerated salt spray testing without indication of failure. Electroless nickel is not recommended for corrosion resistance in salt spray environments for two reasons. Electroless nickel is susceptible to microcracking when heat treated at moderate to high temperatures. Heat treatment improves the hardness and resultant wear resistance of the coating. Microcracking will compromise the integrity of the coating resulting in pitting, cracking or crevice corrosion of the substrate in corrosive environments. Secondly, any significant mechanical damage to the coating or disbonding of the coating substrate interface will also result in corrosive attack of the substrate.

  7. Test Plan for Characterization Testing of SO2-depolarized Electrolyzer Cell Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL received funding in FY 2005 to test the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process for generating hydrogen. This technology employs an electrolyzer that uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized anode to greatly reduce the electrical energy requirement. The required current is the same as for conventional electrolysis of water, but the required cell voltage is reduced. The electrolyzer is a key part of HyS technology. Completing the material loop for HyS requires a high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to regenerate the sulfur dioxide gas needed for the anode reaction. Oxygen is also produced and could be sold. The decomposition of sulfuric acid is being studied by others in a separately funded task. It is not included in this SRNL task.

  8. Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

  9. Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

  10. Test Planning for Mixed-Signal SOCs with Wrapped Analog Cores Anuja Sehgal, Fang Liu, Sule Ozev and Krishnendu Chakrabarty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Test Planning for Mixed-Signal SOCs with Wrapped Analog Cores Anuja Sehgal, Fang Liu, Sule Ozev. Even though the test cost for such mixed-signal SOCs is significantly higher than that for digital SOCs, most prior research in this area has focused exclusively on digital cores. We propose a low-cost test

  11. Test plan for long-term, low-temperature oxidation of BWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for more spent fuel oxidation data in order to determine the probable behavior of spent fuel in a tuff repository. Long-term, low-temperature testing was recommended in a comprehensive technical approach to (1) confirm the findings of the short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests; (2) evaluate the effects of variables such as burnup, atmospheric moisture,and fuel type on the oxidation rate; and (3) extend the oxidation data base to representative repository temperatures and better define the temperature dependence of the operative oxidation mechanisms. This document presents the test plan to study the effects of atmospheric moisture and temperature on oxidation rate and phase formation using a large number of boiling-water reactor fuel samples. Tests will run for up to two years, use characterized fragmented and pulverized fuel samples, cover a temperature range of 110{degree}C to 175{degree}C, and be conducted with an atmospheric moisture content ranging from <{minus}55{degree}C to {approximately}80{degree}C dew point. After testing, the samples will be examined and made available for leaching testing. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolid/water and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999.

  13. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  14. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  15. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design.

  16. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software test plan and report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document presents the test plan and report for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  17. Addendum to Environmental Monitoring Plan, Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities; Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1993 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/10630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1993 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US. All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

  18. Addendum to environmental monitoring plan Nevada Test Site and support facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1992 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/1 0630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1992 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

  19. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  20. Test plan for non-radioactive testing of vertical calciner for development of direct denitration conversion of Pu-bearing liquors to stable, storage solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, F.D.

    1995-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-bearing liquors, including ANL scrap liquors, will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those liquors to stable, storable PuO{sub 2}-rich solids. This test plan is to test with non-radioactive stand-in materials to demonstrate adequate performance of the vertical calciner and ancillary equipment.

  1. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, H.T.

    1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). This MAPAR provides a status on specific DARHT facility design- and construction-related mitigation actions that have been initiated in order to fulfill DOE`s commitments under the DARHT MAP. The functions of the DARHT MAP are to (1) document potentially adverse environmental impacts of the Phased Containment Option delineated in the Final EIS, (2) identify commitments made in the Final EIS and ROD to mitigate those potential impacts, and (3) establish Action Plans to carry out each commitment (DOE 1996). The DARHT MAP is divided into eight sections. Sections 1--5 provide background information regarding the NEPA review of the DARHT project and an introduction to the associated MAP. Section 6 references the Mitigation Action Summary Table which summaries the potential impacts and mitigation measures; indicates whether the mitigation is design-, construction-, or operational-related; the organization responsible for the mitigation measure; and the projected or actual completion data for each mitigation measure. Sections 7 and 8 discuss the Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report and Tracking System commitment and the Potential Impacts, Commitments, and Action Plans respectively. Under Section 8, potential impacts are categorized into five areas of concern: General Environment, including impacts to air and water; Soils, especially impacts affecting soil loss and contamination; Biotic Resources, especially impacts affecting threatened and endangered species; Cultural/Paleontological Resources, especially impacts affecting the archeological site known as Nake`muu; and Human Health and Safety, especially impacts pertaining to noise and radiation. Each potential impact includes a brief statement of the nature of the impact and its cause(s). The commitment made to mitigate the potential impact is identified and the Action Plan for each commitment is described in detail, with a description of actions to be taken, pertinent time frames for the actions, verification of mitigation activities, and identification of agencies/organizations responsible for satisfying the requirements of the commitment.

  2. Supplemental Investigation Plan for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is part of an effort to re-evaluate all FFACO URs against the current RBCA criteria (referred to in this document as the Industrial Sites [IS] RBCA process) as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). After reviewing all of the existing FFACO URs, the 12 URs addressed in this Supplemental Investigation Plan (SIP) could not be evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as sufficient information about the contamination at each site was not available. This document presents the plan for conducting field investigations to obtain the needed information. This SIP includes URs from Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 326, 339, 358, 452, 454, 464, and 1010, located in Areas 2, 6, 12, 19, 25, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada; and CAU 403, located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 165 miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  3. Plan

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of DOE activities on the environment. This monitoring allows estimates to be made of the rate of migration from the underground nuclear tests. Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring...

  4. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  5. Treatability test plan for the 200-BP-1 prototype surface barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November of 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Area is divided into operable units based on waste disposal information, location, facility, type, and other characteristics. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is one specific site located within the 200 East Area. Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RI) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination and assessing risks to human health and the environment at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. In March of 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan for the 200-BP-1 operable unit was issued (DOE-RL 1990a). The work plan outlined the first phase of site characterization activities, which were completed in March of 1993 with the issuance of Phase I Remedial Investigation Report for the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit (DOE-RL 1993, Draft A). Remedial action objectives outlined in the RI report suggest that a likely remedial action at the 200-BP-1 operable unit could involve the use of a surface barrier. To further evaluate this technology, additional performance and constructability data are needed to implement this remedial action. This test plan describes the general methodology for conducting a prototype barrier treatability study. The objectives of this treatability study are to determine overall performance and constructability data on an actual waste site in conjunction with the Hanford Site Barrier Development Program.

  6. Continuing the Validation of CCIM Processability for Glass Ceramic HLLW Forms: Plan for Test AFY14CCIM-GC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan covers test AFY14CCIM-GC1which is the first of two scheduled FY-2014 test runs involving glass ceramic waste forms in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Cold Crucible Induction Melter Pilot Plant. The test plan is based on the successes and challenges of previous tests performed in FY-2012 and FY-2013. The purpose of this test is to continue to collect data for validating the glass ceramic High Level Liquid Waste form processability advantages using Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology. The major objective of AFYCCIM-GC1 is to complete additional proposed crucible pouring and post tapping controlled cooling experiments not completed during previous tests due to crucible drain failure. This is necessary to qualify that no heat treatments in standard waste disposal canisters are necessary for the operational scale production of glass ceramic waste forms. Other objectives include the production and post-test analysis of surrogate waste forms made from separate pours into the same graphite mold canister, testing the robustness of an upgraded crucible bottom drain and drain heater assembly, testing the effectiveness of inductive melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a square wave configuration, and observing the tapped molten flow behavior in pans with areas identical to standard High Level Waste disposal canisters. Testing conditions, the surrogate waste composition, key testing steps, testing parameters, and sampling and analysis requirements are defined.

  7. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found.

  8. Engineering task plan for the ultrasonic inspection of hanford double-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LYSHER, R.W.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work (SOW) for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptances criteria be discovered.

  9. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

  10. EA-2012: Strategic Test Well (s) Planning and Drilling for Long-Term Methane Hydrate Production Testing in Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing financial support for planning, analysis, and engineering services to support a proposed project of...

  11. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  12. Challenges of deep drilling. Part 2 (Conclusion). Mississippi wildcat shows design, planning pay off in deep drilling, completing, testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, C.E.

    1981-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experienced, well-trained personnel who know when to solicit advice are the key to a successful deep-drilling operation. Planning and implementation are critical - the deeper the hole, the less latitude is available for deviation from the original casing design. Exxon spent 5 years planning a deep, abnormally pressured, sour-gas wildcat to test Mississippi's Smackover and Norphlet formations. Exxon details the preparations for drilling, completing, and testing this well, which reached a total depth of 23,130 ft and set a record for casing-string weight.

  13. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a {approx}2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

  14. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  15. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

  17. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

  18. Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site.

  19. PLANNED TESTS OF THE EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLE WITH A CRYOGENIC TORSION E. C. Berg, W. D. Cross, and R. D. Newman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Riley D.

    in the gravitational field of source masses at various ranges [2,3,4,5,6,7]. The torsion pendulum is extraordinary relative to a field source without stressing the torsion fiber. Both variants of the deflection methodPLANNED TESTS OF THE EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLE WITH A CRYOGENIC TORSION PENDULUM E. C. Berg, W. D

  20. Appendix C: DOE Super-ESPC Project Acceptance Guidelines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of DOE Super-ESPC Projects ECM Installation: All ECMs are installed in accordance with plans,...

  1. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units is listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) which was agreed to by the state of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). CAU 543 sites are located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad; CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank; CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. All Area 15 CASs are located at the former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, which operated from 1963 to 1981 and was used to support animal experiments involving the uptake of radionuclides. Each of the Area 15 CASs, except CAS 15-23-01, is associated with the disposal of waste effluent from Building 15-06, which was the primary location of the various tests and experiments conducted onsite. Waste effluent disposal from Building 15-06 involved piping, sumps, outfalls, a septic tank with leachfield, underground storage tanks, and an aboveground storage tank (AST). CAS 15-23-01 was associated with decontamination activities of farm equipment potentially contaminated with radiological constituents, pesticides, and herbicides. While the building structures were removed before the investigation took place, all the original tanks, sumps, piping, and concrete building pads remain in place. The Area 6 CAS is located at the Decontamination Facility in Area 6, a facility which operated from 1971 to 2001 and was used to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, clothing, and other materials that had become contaminated during nuclear testing activities. The CAS includes the effluent collection and distribution systems for Buildings 6-605, 6-606, and 6-607, which consists of septic tanks, sumps, piping, floor drains, drain trenches, cleanouts, and a concrete foundation. Additional details of the site history are provided in the CAU 543 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2004a), and the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2005).

  2. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  3. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Safer Work Plan for CAUs 452, 454, 456, and 464 Closure of Historical UST Release Sites Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Bonn

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses characterization and closure of nine underground storage tank petroleum hydrocarbon release sites. The sites are located at the Nevada Test Site in Areas 2, 9, 12, 23, and 25. The underground storage tanks associated with the release sites and addressed by this plan were closed between 1990 and 1996 by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. One underground storage tank was closed in place (23-111-1) while the remaining eight were closed by removal. Hydrocarbon releases were identified at each of the sites based upon laboratory analytical data samples collected below the tank bottoms. The objective of this plan is to provide a method for implementing characterization and closure of historical underground storage tank hydrocarbon release sites.

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites (i.e., the expected nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern [COPCs]) to recommend closure of CAU 553 using the SAFER process (FFACO, 1996).

  6. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 543: LIQUID DISPOSAL UNITS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document.

  7. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 300: SURFACE RELEASE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved CAU 300 CADD.

  8. Test plan for N2 HEPA filters assembly shop stock used on PFP E4 exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DICK, J.D.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) Self-contained HEPA filters, encased in wooden frames and boxes, are installed in the E4 Exhaust Ventilation System to provide confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. Recently during the routine testing in-leakage was discovered downstream of the Self-contained HEPA filters boxes. This Test Plan describes the approach to conduct investigation of the root causes for the in-leakage of HEPA filters.

  9. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the same project [1]. However, this work focuses on two materials: the LiF-BeF2 eutectic (67 and 33 mol%, respectively, also known as flibe) as primary coolant and the LiF-NaF-KF eutectic (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, respectively, also known as flinak) as secondary heat transport fluid. At first common issues are identified, involving the preparation and purification of the materials as well as the development of suitable diagnostics. Than issues specific to each material and its application are considered, with focus on the compatibility with structural materials and the extension of the existing properties database.

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 563 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 563 consists of the following CASs: #2; CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank #2; CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool #2; CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks #2; CAS 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls Site characterization activities were performed in 2007, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the CAU 563 Corrective Action Decision Document. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized below. #2; CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a best management practice (BMP), all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the septic tank will be removed, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. #2; CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a BMP, all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the cesspool will be abandoned by filling it with sand or native soil, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. #2; CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks, will be clean closed by excavating approximately 4 cubic yards (yd3) of arsenic- and chromium-impacted soil. In addition, as a BMP, the liquid in the South Tank will be removed, the North Tank will be removed or filled with grout and left in place, the South Tank will be filled with grout and left in place, all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout or similar material, approximately 10 yd3 of chlordane-impacted soil will be excavated, and debris within the CAS boundary will be removed. #2; CAS 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a BMP, three drain pipe openings will be sealed with grout.

  11. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  13. Field testing of an automated wood-combustion system and development of business plan for commercialization of production. Final report for period ending August 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunnel burner for burning wood chips has been installed and tested at a school building in Durham, NC. The test revealed many problems which did not exist while testing a prototype in laboratories. Controls were found to work reliably. A business plan was developed and is appended. (LEW)

  14. Test plan for the pilot cell test of inert anodes: Report on the June 1991 meeting at the Reynolds Metals Company facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T. (Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.)

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inert Electrodes Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes (OIP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (1) evaluate the anode material in a pilot cell facility, (2) investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anodes surface, and (3) develop sensors for monitoring various anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report discusses a test plan that has been developed for the pilot cell test of the inert anodes. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  16. Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

  17. Test Plan: Phase 1 demonstration of 3-phase electric arc melting furnace technology for vitrifying high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [ed.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of electric arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384216] is the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes feed preparation activities and melting of glass with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a 3-phase electric arc (carbon electrode) furnace.

  18. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 536: AREA 3 RELEASE SITE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 536 consists of CAS 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge, located in Area 3 of the NTS. The site was characterized in 2004 according to the approved CAIP and the site characterization results are reported in the CAU 536 CADD. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved CAU 536 CADD.

  19. Test Plan for Evaluating Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not listed

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass preprocessing is a critical operation in the preparation of feedstock for the front-end of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass material into a suitable feedstock for optimum conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Without this operation, the natural size, bulk density, and flowability characteristics of harvested biomass would decrease the capacities and efficiencies of feedstock assembly unit operations and biorefinery conversion processes to the degree that programmatic cost targets could not be met. The preprocessing unit operation produces a bulk flowable material that 1) improves handling and conveying efficiencies throughout the feedstock assembly system and biorefinery 2) increases biomass surface areas for improved pretreatment efficiencies, 3) reduces particle sizes for improved feedstock uniformity and density, and 4) fractionates structural components for improved compositional quality. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with defining the overall efficiency/effectiveness of current commercial hammer and fixed cutter grinding systems and other connecting systems such as harvest and collection, storage, transportation, and handling for a wide variety of feedstock types used in bioethanol or syngas production. This test plan details tasks and activities for two separate full-scale grinding tests: Material Characterization Test and Machine Characterization Test. For the Material Characterization Test, a small amount (~5-7 tons each) of several feedstock varieties will be ground. This test will define the fractionation characteristics of the grinder that affect the bulk density, particle size distribution, and quality of the size reduced biomass resulting from different separation screen sizes. A specific screen size will be selected based on the characteristics of the ground material. The Machine Characterization Test will then use this selected screen to grind several 30-ton batches of different feedstock varieties and moistures. This test will focus on identifying the performance parameters of the grinding system specific to the feed, fractionation, and screen separation components and their affect on machine capacity and efficiency.

  20. Integrated test plan ResonantSonic drilling system technology demonstration-1995, at the Hanford Site: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, G.W.

    1994-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration test of the ResonantSonic drilling system. This demonstration is part of the Office of Technology Development`s Volatile Organic Compound Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). Two main purposes of this demonstration are (1) to continue testing the ResonantSonic drilling system compatibility with the Hanford Site waste characterization programs, and (2) to transfer this method for use at the Hanford Site, other government sites, and the private sector. The ResonantSonic method is a dry drilling technique. Field testing of this method began in July 1993. During the next four months, nine holes were drilled, and continuous core samples were retrieved. Penetration rates were 2 to 3 times the baseline, and the operational downtime rate was less than 10%. Successfully demonstrated equipment refinements included a prototype 300 series ResonantSonic head, a new drill rod design for 18-centimeter diameter pipe, and an automated pipe handling system. Various configurations of sampling equipment and drill bits were tested, depending on geologic conditions. The principal objective of the VOC-Arid ID is to determine the viability of emerging technologies that can be used to characterize, remediate, and/or monitor arid or semiarid sites containing VOCs (e.g., carbon tetrachloride) with or without associated metal and radionuclide contamination.

  1. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  2. Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guettler, D.A.

    1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

  3. Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, Jack; Furukawa, Vance; Frost, Grant; Danna, Mike; Figueroa, Al; Scroppo, Joseph

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation's molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation`s molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  6. Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Evans

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

  8. Moving granular-bed filter development program topical report. Base contract test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, R.A.; Dilmore, W.J.; Fellers, A.W.; Gasparovic, A.C.; Kittle, W.F.; Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

    1991-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Science & Technology Center has proposed a novel moving granular-bed filter concept, the Standleg Moving Granular-Bed Filter (S-MGBF) system, that overcomes the inherent deficiencies of the current state-of-the-art moving granular-bed filter technology. The S-MGBF system combines two unique features that make it highly effective for use in advanced coal-fueled power plants. First, the S-MGBF system applies pelletization technology to generate filter pellets from the power plant solid waste materials, and uses these pellets as a ``once-through`` filtering media to eliminate the need for costly, complex, and large filter media recycling equipment. This pelletizing step also generates a more environmentally acceptable solid waste product and provides the potential to incorporate gas-phase contaminant sorbents into the filtering media. Secondly, the S-MGBF system passes these pellets and the flyash laden power plant gas through a highly compact S-MGBF that uses cocurrent gas-pellet contacting in an arrangement that greatly simplifies and enhances the distribution of dirty gas to the moving bed and the disengagement of clean gas from the moving bed.

  9. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dev, H.

    1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

  10. Second Line of Defense, Megaports Initiative, Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Jamie D.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phases of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports System supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)—located at the Export Lanes of the Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico—to the Government of Mexico (GOM).

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site • 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

  12. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  13. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. {sm_bullet} CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2){sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a{sm_bullet} CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site{sm_bullet} CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil{sm_bullet} CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10{sm_bullet} CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky) Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107.

  15. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Test report for PAS-1 cask certification for shipping payload B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MERCADO, J.E.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This test report documents the successful inspection and testing to certify two NuPac PAS-1 casks in accordance with US Department of Energy Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/9184/B(U). The primary and secondary containment vessels of each cask met the acceptance criteria defined in the CoC and the test plan.

  17. Dry Coal Feed System and Multi-Element Injector Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Sprouse; Fred Widman; Alan Darby

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine technology to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. One key feature of the PWR concept is the use of an ultra-dense phase feed system to provide dry coal to the multi-element injector. This report describes the layout, test procedures, instrumentation and data acquisition requirements for an ultradense phase multi-element injector and feed system to be operated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC).

  18. DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&DDepartmentContaminated GroundDOE National SCADA Test

  19. Test Plan for Field Experiments to Support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Performance Assessment at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the data collected to support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) simulations have been obtained in the laboratory on a relatively small scale (less than 10 cm). In addition, the PA simulations themselves are currently the only means available to integrate the chemical and hydrologic processes involved in the transport of contaminants from the disposal facility into the environment. This report describes the test plan for field experiments to provide data on the hydraulic, transport, and geochemical characteristics of the near-field materials on a more representative (i.e., larger) scale than the laboratory data currently available. The experiments will also provide results that encompass a variety of transport processes likely to occur within the actual disposal facility. These experiments will thus provide the first integrated data on the ILAW facility performance and will provide a crucial dataset to evaluate the simulation-based estimates of overall facility performance used in the PA.

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  1. Test Plan for Solvent Extraction Data Acquisition to Support Modeling Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica Rutledge; Kristi Christensen; Troy Garn; Jack Law

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This testing will support NEAMS SafeSep Modeling efforts related to droplet simulation in liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Physical characteristic determinations will be completed for the fluids being used in the experiment including viscosity, density, surface tension, distribution coefficients, and diffusion coefficients. Then, experiments will be carried out to provide data for comparison to the simulation’s calculation of mass transfer coefficients. Experiments will be conducted with solutions used in the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process extraction section. The TRUEX process was chosen since it is one solvent extraction system currently proposed for the separation of actinides and lanthanides from used nuclear fuel, it is diffusion limited, testing can be performed using non radioactive lanthanides to evaluate mass transfer. The extraction section involves transfer of one or more lanthanide species from an aqueous solution to an organic solvent. Single droplets rising by buoyancy will be studied first. Droplet size and number of species transferred will be varied independently to provide mass transfer coefficients as a function of each variable. An apparatus has been designed specifically for these experiments. In order to get more accurate measurements of droplet size, contact time, time of droplet formation, and possibly droplet breakup and coalescence, a high speed camera will be utilized for these experiments. Other potential experiments include examining the effects of jetted droplets and shear flow on the mass transfer coefficients.

  2. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  3. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  4. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  5. Operational test report for LERF Basin 242AL-44 integrity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galioto, T.M.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report documents the results of LERF operational testing per operational test procedure (OTP) TFPE-WP-0231, ``LERF Basin Integrity Testing.`` The primary purpose of the OTP was to resolve test exceptions generated as a result of TFPE-WP-0184. The TOP was prepared and performed in accordance with WHC-SD-534-OTP-002, ``Operational Test Plan for the 242-A Evaporator Upgrades and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility.`` WHC-S-086, ``Specification for Operational Testing of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, Basin Integrity Testing,`` identified the test requirements and acceptance criteria. The completed, signed-off test procedure is contained in Appendix A. The test log is contained in Appendix B. Section 2.1 describes all the test exceptions written during performance of the Operational Test Procedure. The test revisions generated during the testing are discussed in Section 2.2. The dispositioned test exception forms are contained in Appendix C.

  6. Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

  7. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LESPERANCE, C.P.

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009.

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543, Liquid Disposal Units, is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. CAU 543 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven CASs: {sm_bullet} CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad {sm_bullet} CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield {sm_bullet} CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area {sm_bullet} CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping From January 24, 2005 through April 14, 2005, CAU 543 site characterization activities were conducted, and are reported in Appendix A of the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2005). The recommended corrective action as stated in the approved CADD is No Further Action for five of the CAU 543 CASs, and Closure In Place for the remaining two CASs.

  9. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; Wilson, C. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Cunningham, M. E.; Marshall, R. K.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects on pressurized water reactor (PWR) test fuel bundles. This Experiment Operation Plan (EOP) Addendum 2, together with the referenced EOP, describes the desired operating conditions and additional hazards review associated with the four-part MT-2 experiment. The primary portions of the experiment, MT-2.2 and MT-2.3, will evaluate the following: 1) the mechanical deformation of pressurized fuel rods subjected to a slow LOCA, using reflood water for temperature control, that is designed to produce cladding temperatures in the range from 1033 to 1089K (1400 to 1500°F) for an extended time, and 2) the effects of the deformed and possibly failed cladding on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the test assembly during simulated LOCA heating and reflooding. The secondary portions of the experiment, MT-2.1 and MT-2.4, are intended to provide thermal-hydraulic calibration information during two-stage reflood conditions for 1) relatively low cladding temperatures, <839K (1050°F), on nondeformed rods, and 2) moderately high cladding temperatures, <1089K (1500°F), on deformed rods.

  10. Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  13. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    USDOE/NV

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Such is the case for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The current scope of the Frenchman Flat CAI includes the development and use of a three-dimensional (3-D), numerical, CAU-scale groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The CAU model will be developed and used to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The scope of this CAI does not currently include any characterization activities; however, such activities will be conducted if the CAU model results indicate that further characterization information is needed to develop a sufficiently reliable CAU model. Two areas of importance to the CAU model are the model area and the investigation area. The CAU-model area will be selected to encompass the Frenchman Flat CAU and the region located immediately downgradient where contamination may migrate. The extent of the CAU-model area is dependent on the extent of contamination and is uncertain at this point. The extent of the investigation area is not expected to increase during the CAI.

  15. Syringe Pump Factory Acceptance Testing Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    · Backpressure simulated using adjustable orifice - Pressure gage provided adjustment feedback · Flowmeter checkvalve, discharged through orifice & flowmeter to top of barrel Pressure Gage Checkvalve Orifice Flowmeter Water Lines #12;4VRVS Meeting 5 Apr 2006 Performance Results · Syringe operation very smooth

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  18. TEST PLAN AND PROCEDURE FOR THE EXAMINATION OF TANK 241-AY-101 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WYRWAS RB; PAGE JS; COOKE GS

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan describes the methods to be used in the forensic examination of the Multi-probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) installed in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). The probe was designed by Applied Research and Engineering Sciences (ARES) Corporation. The probe contains four sections, each of which can be removed from the tank independently (H-14-107634, AY-101 MPCMS Removable Probe Assembly) and one fixed center assembly. Each removable section contains three types of passive corrosion coupons: bar coupons, round coupons, and stressed C-rings (H-14-l07635, AY-101 MPCMS Details). Photographs and weights of each coupon were recorded and reported on drawing H-14-107634 and in RPP-RPT-40629, 241-AY-101 MPCMS C-Ring Coupon Photographs. The coupons will be the subject of the forensic analyses. The purpose of this examination will be to document the nature and extent of corrosion of the 29 coupons. This documentation will consist of photographs and photomicrographs of the C-rings and round coupons, as well as the weights of the bar and round coupons during corrosion removal. The total weight loss of the cleaned coupons will be used in conjunction with the surface area of each to calculate corrosion rates in mils per year. The bar coupons were presumably placed to investigate the liquid-air-interface. An analysis of the waste level heights in the waste tank will be investigated as part of this examination.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 166 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 166 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) CAS 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 166 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007).

  20. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a contaminant of concern to environmental media. • If no PSMs are present at the CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If a PSM is present at the CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed and disposed of as waste, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  4. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

  5. Test plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widing, M.A.; Dominiak, D.M.; Leser, C.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Manning, J.F.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the formal test plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation and assist experts in site analysis. The three major subsystems of this system are described in detail in this report. In addition, this report documents the component- and system-level test procedures that will be implemented at each phase of the project. Results of these test procedures are documented in this report.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Pastor

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 542 is located in Areas 3, 8, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 542 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-07, ''UD-3a Disposal Hole''; (2) 03-20-09, ''UD-3b Disposal Hole''; (3) 03-20-10, ''UD-3c Disposal Hole''; (4) 03-20-11, ''UD-3d Disposal Hole''; (5) 06-20-03, ''UD-6 and UD-6s Disposal Holes''; (6) 08-20-01, ''U-8d PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; (7) 09-20-03, ''U-9itsy30 PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; and (8) 20-20-02, ''U-20av PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 30, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 542. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 542 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  7. Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. E. Rawlinson

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (one site is in Area 3 and the other is in Area 5) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV). The current DOE Order governing management of radioactive waste is 435.1. Associated with DOE Order 435.1 is a Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) and Guidance (DOE G 435.1-1). The Manual and Guidance specify that preliminary closure and monitoring plans for a low-level waste (LLW) management facility be developed and initially submitted with the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for that facility. The Manual and Guidance, and the Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued for the Area 3 RWMS further specify that the preliminary closure and monitoring plans be updated within one year following issuance of a DAS. This Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) fulfills both requirements. Additional updates will be conducted every third year hereafter. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring both RWMSs, and is based on guidance issued in 1999 by the DOE for developing closure plans. The plan does not follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance in order to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. The closure and monitoring plans were integrated because much of the information that would be included in individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation and program management. The ICMP identifies the regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment where they are located, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the sites.

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 555: Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 555: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 555 is located in Areas 1, 3 and 6 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the five corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-59-01, Area 1 Camp Septic System; (2) CAS 03-59-03, Core Handling Building Septic System; (3) CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well; (4) CAS 06-59-01, Birdwell Septic System; and (5) CAS 06-59-02, National Cementers Septic System. An FFACO modification was approved on December 14, 2005, to include CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well, as part of the scope of CAU 555. The work scope was expanded in this document to include the investigation of CAS 06-20-05. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 555 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before the evaluation and selection of corrective action alternatives.

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  13. Complete Phase I Tests As Described in the Multi-lab Test Plan for the Evaluation of CH3I Adsorption on AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, S. H. [ORNL; Jubin, R. T. [ORNL

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified as a potential sorbent for iodine present in the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In such a facility, both elemental and organic forms of iodine are released from the dissolver in gaseous form. These species of iodine must be captured with high efficiency for a facility to avoid radioactive iodine release above regulatory limits in the gaseous effluent of the plant. Studies completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) examined the adsorption of organic iodine in the form of CH3I by AgZ. Upon breakthrough of the feed gas through the sorbent bed, elemental iodine was observed in the effluent stream, despite the fact that the only source of iodine in the system was the CH3I in the feed gas.1 This behavior does not appear to have been reported previously nor has it been independently confirmed. Thus, as a result of these prior studies, multiple knowledge gaps relating to the adsorption of CH3I by AgZ were identified, and a multi-lab test plan, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), INL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories, was formulated to address each in a systematic way.2 For this report, the scope of work for ORNL was further narrowed to three thin-bed experiments that would characterize CH3I adsorption onto AgZ in the presence of water, NO, and NO2. Completion of these three-thin bed experiments demonstrated that organic iodine in the form of CH3I was adsorbed by reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) to a 50% higher loading than that of I2 when adsorbed from a dry air stream. Adsorption curves suggest different adsorption mechanisms for I2 and CH3I. In the presence of NO and NO2 gas, the loading of CH3I onto Ag0Z is suppressed and may be reversible. Further, the presence of NO and NO2 gas appears to oxidize CH3I to I2; this is indicated by an adsorption curve similar to that of I2 on Ag0Z. Finally, the loss of organic iodine loading capacity by Ag0Z in the presence of NOx is unaffected by the addition of water vapor to the gas stream; no marked additional loss in capacity or retention was observed.

  14. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

  15. Integrated test plan for preliminary demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor in the unsaturated sediments at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor, developed by Sandia National Laboratory, to measure air flow in unsaturated sediments. The ability of this technology to measure groundwater flow velocity in saturated sediments has already been successfully demonstrated. This preliminary test of this device in the unsaturated zone will be considered successful if in fact the flowmeters are able to detect a gas flow velocity. The field demonstration described in this integrated test plan is being conducted as part of the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the testing of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate technologies that may be used to characterize, remediate, and/or monitor arid or semiarid sites containing VOCs (e.g., carbon tetrachloride) with or without associated metal and radionuclide contamination. Initially, the VOC-Arid ID activities are focusing primarily on the carbon tetrachloride and associated contamination found in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Testing of the in situ permeable flow sensor will be conducted at the location of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The data regarding subsurface air flow rates and pathways collected during the flow sensor testing will be used in the ongoing characterization of the proposed ERDF.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130, Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 130 consists of the seven following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 130 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) finalized on April 3, 2008, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 130. The DQO process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels, leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 130: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, geophysical surveys). • Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Obtain consensus from NDEP that the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. • Close the underground storage tank(s) and their contents, if any, in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code regulations. • Remove the lead brick(s) found at any CAS in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  17. Streamlined Approach for (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 566: E-MAD Compound, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566, EMAD Compound, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-20, EMAD Compound This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-99-20. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 566 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The data quality objective (DQO) strategy for CAU 566 was developed at a meeting on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 566. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 566: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  18. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 224: DECON PAD AND SEPTIC SYSTEMS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved CAU 224 CADD.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 121: Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 121, Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites. CAU 121 is currently listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO, 1996) and consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): CAS 12-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 12-01-02, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 12-22-26, Drums; 2 AST's. CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 are located to the west of the Area 12 Camp, and CAS 12-22-26 is located near the U-12g Tunnel, also known as G-tunnel, in Area 12 (Figure 1). The aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) present at CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil below the ASTs will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. If impacted soil above action levels is present, the soil will be excavated and disposed of at an appropriate facility. The CAS 12-22-26 site is composed of two overlapping areas, one where drums had formerly been stored, and the other where an AST was used to dispense diesel for locomotives used at G-tunnel. This area is located above an underground radioactive materials area (URMA), and within an area that may have elevated background radioactivity because of containment breaches during nuclear tests and associated tunnel reentry operations. CAS 12-22-26 does not include the URMA or the elevated background radioactivity. An AST that had previously been used to store liquid magnesium chloride (MgCl) was properly disposed of several years ago, and releases from this tank are not an environmental concern. The diesel AST will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil at the former drum area and the diesel AST area will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by releases, from the drums or the AST, with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. CAS 12-22-26 has different potential closure pathways that are dependent upon the concentrations and chemicals detected. If only petroleum hydrocarbons are detected above action levels, then the area will be use-restricted. It will not be excavated because of the more significant hazard of excavating within a URMA. Similarly, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will only be excavated for concentrations of 50 parts per million (ppm) or greater, if there are no other factors that require excavation. For PCBs at concentrations above 1 ppm, the area will be use-restricted as required by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 761 for PCBs (CFR, 2006), in the ''Toxic Substances Control Act'' (TSCA). Other chemicals at concentrations above the final action levels (FALs) will be excavated. If radioactivity is above action levels, then the soil will be excavated only to a depth of 1 foot (ft) below ground surface (bgs) and replaced with clean fill. This action is intended to remove the ''hot spot'' on the surface caused by leakage from a drum, and not to remediate the URMA.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the following three corrective action sites (CASs) in Area 12 of the NTS: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Site 12-06-09 consists of a muckpile and debris located on the hillside in front of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels on the eastern slopes of Rainier Mesa in Area 12. The muckpile includes mining debris (muck) and debris generated during the excavation and construction of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-08-02, CWD, consists of a muckpile and debris and is located on the hillside in front of the re-entry tunnel for K-Tunnel. For the purpose of this investigation CAS 12-28-01 is defined as debris ejected by containment failures during the Des Moines and Platte Tests and the associated contamination that is not covered in the two muckpile CASs. This site consists of debris scattered south of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnel muckpiles and extends down the hillside, across the valley, and onto the adjacent hillside to the south. In addition, the site will cover the potential contamination associated with ''ventings'' along the fault, fractures, and various boreholes on the mesa top and face. One conceptual site model was developed for all three CASs to address possible contamination migration pathways associated with CAU 309. The data quality objective (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQO process addresses the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CAU. Due to the practical constraints posed by steep slopes on and around the CAU 309 muckpiles, a conservative, simplifying strategy was developed to resolve the presence and nature of contaminants. This strategy includes the use of historical data from similar sites (i.e., previously investigated NTS muckpiles) and the collection of samples from accessible areas of the muckpiles. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous investigations of similar sites, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 309 collectively include radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel range only), polychlorinated biphenyls, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' metals, volatile organic compounds, and semivolatile organic compounds.

  4. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.

  5. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

  7. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Areas 8, 15, and 16 Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 124 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 15, and 16 of the Nevada Test Site as follows: • 08-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 15-02-01, Irrigation Piping • 16-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 16-02-04, Fuel Oil Piping • 16-99-04, Fuel Line (Buried) and UST This plan provides the methodology of field activities necessary to gather information to close each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 124 using the SAFER process.

  8. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  9. Summary description of the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabell, C.P. (comp.)

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been compiled and issued to provide an illustrated engineering summary description of the FFTF. The document is limited to a description of the plant and its functions, and does not cover the extensive associated programs that have been carried out in the fields of design, design analysis, safety analysis, fuels development, equipment development and testing, quality assurance, equipment fabrication, plant construction, acceptance testing, operations planning and training, and the like.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site • 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  11. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  12. Test plan/procedure for the shock limiting device of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator package mounting subsystem 145. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, J.A.

    1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the procedure to be used in the 18 inch drop test to be used for design verification of the RTG Transportation System Package Mounting.

  13. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator F7 Flight Unit Acceptance Buy Off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1997-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    These are viewgraphs from the subject presentation. The LMMS E-7 history is outlined; Qualification and use of the F-7 GPHS-RTG for the Cassini mission; and the F-7 acceptance test program and performance are described.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites''. The seven-step data quality objectives (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQOs address the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CASs. Corrective action closure alternatives (i.e., no further action, close in place, or clean closure) will be recommended for CAU 511 based on an evaluation of all the DQO required data. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 12, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 1263 SOC Test Planning Using Virtual Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    (Cost of investing in a new ATE, also known as Capital Expenditure): Complex cores often re- quire test cost requires that once a new, expensive ATE has been purchased, its resources must be utilized-speed ATE channels to drive slower scan chains leads to an underutilization of resources, thereby resulting

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266: Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department Of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 266, Area 25 Building 3124 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 266 consists of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-09 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 266. Corrective Action Unit 266 is located southwest of Building 3124 which is located southwest and adjacent to Test Cell A. Test Cell A was operational during the 1960s to test nuclear rocket reactors in support of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Operations within Building 3124 from 1962 through the early 1990s resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with Test Cell A reactor testing operations, various laboratories including a high-level radioactivity environmental sample handling laboratory, and possibly the Treatability Test Facility. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include radionuclides, oil/diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. Samples will also be analyzed for radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls not considered during the DQO process. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform a radiological walkover survey. (2) Perform video and radiation surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (3) Collect samples from within the septic tank. (4) Mark approximate locations of leachfield distribution lines on the ground surface. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tank and outfall end of the diversion chamber. (6) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze soil samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/diesel-range organics), and polychlorinated biphenyls. (1) Analyze a minimum of 25 percent of the soil samples for gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, isotopic americium, and strontium-90 if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (2) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters. (3) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at Site Supervisors discretion if volatile organic compounds exceed field-screening levels. Additional sampling and analytical details are presented.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CAIP presents a plan to investigate the nature and extent of the contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at CAU 135. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COPCs; (2) Determine the location of radiological contamination within the vault and determine the extent of COPCs in the sump area and on the floor; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-02-01. This CAIP was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) (EPA, 1994) process to clearly define the goals for collecting environmental data, to determine data uses, and to design a data collection program that will satisfy these uses. A DQO scoping meeting was held prior to preparation of this plan; a brief summary of the DQOs is presented in Section 3.4. A more detailed summary of the DQO process and results is included in Appendix A.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Matthews

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  20. Turing test: an historical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahl, D.H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article explains the turing test of machine intelligence. This test has become the accepted criteria for defining a computer as truly intelligent.

  1. Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is a requirement that the identity of a DOE Digital Identity Subscriber be verified against acceptable identity source documents. A Subscriber must appear in person and present their Federal...

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  3. SU-E-T-19: A New End-To-End Test Method for ExacTrac for Radiation and Plan Isocenter Congruence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Nguyen, N; Liu, F; Huang, Y [Rhode Island Hospital / Warren Alpert Medical, Providence, RI (United States); Sio, T [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina (United States); Pyakuryal, A [UniversityIllinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Jang, S [Princeton Radiation Oncology Ctr., Jamesburg, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To combine and integrate quality assurance (QA) of target localization and radiation isocenter End to End (E2E) test of BrainLAB ExacTrac system, a new QA approach was devised using anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. This test insures the target localization as well as radiation isocenter congruence which is one step ahead the current ExacTrac QA procedures. Methods: The head and neck phantom typically used for CyberKnife E2E test was irradiated to the sphere target that was visible in CT-sim images. The CT-sim was performed using 1 mm thickness slice with helical scanning technique. The size of the sphere was 3-cm diameter and contoured as a target volume using iPlan V.4.5.2. A conformal arc plan was generated using MLC-based with 7 fields, and five of them were include couch rotations. The prescription dose was 5 Gy and 95% coverage to the target volume. For the irradiation, two Gafchromic films were perpendicularly inserted into the cube that hold sphere inside. The linac used for the irradiation was TrueBeam STx equipped with HD120 MLC. In order to use ExacTrac, infra-red head–array was used to correlate orthogonal X-ray images. Results: Using orthogonal X-rays of ExacTrac the phantom was positioned. For each field, phantom was check again with X-rays and re-positioned if necessary. After each setup using ExacTrac, the target was irradiated. The films were analyzed to determine the deviation of the radiation isocenter in all three dimensions: superior-inferior, left-right and anterior-posterior. The total combining error was found to be 0.76 mm ± 0.05 mm which was within sub-millimeter accuracy. Conclusion: Until now, E2E test for ExacTrac was separately implemented to test image localization and radiation isocenter. This new method can be used for periodic QA procedures.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, REVISION 0, march 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 428 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03- 05- 002- SW01 and 03- 05- 002- SW05, respectively known as Area 3 Septic Waste System 1 and Septic Waste System 5. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada , Rev. 1 (DOE/ NV, 1998c). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 428. A system of leachfields and associated collection systems was used for wastewater disposal at Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990 to replace the discrete septic waste systems. Operations within various buildings at Area 3 generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with contaminants of potential concern and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Corrective Action Unit 428 is composed of two leachfield systems in the northern portion of Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include oil/ diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. A limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from four of the septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform video surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (2) Collect samples of material in the septic tanks. (3) Conduct exploratory trenching to locate and inspect subsurface components. (4) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tanks and outfall end of distribution boxes. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes via trenching. (6) Collect surface and near- surface samples near potential locations of the Acid Sewer Outfall if Septic Waste System 5 Leachfield cannot be located. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/ diesel range organics). Limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from particular septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (10) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/ hydrologic parameters. (11) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at the discretion of the Site Supervisor if total petroleum hydrocarbons exceed field- screening levels.

  5. Initiating the Validation of CCIM Processability for Multi-phase all Ceramic (SYNROC) HLW Form: Plan for Test BFY14CCIM-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vince Maio

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan covers test BFY14CCIM-C which will be a first–of–its-kind demonstration for the complete non-radioactive surrogate production of multi-phase ceramic (SYNROC) High Level Waste Forms (HLW) using Cold Crucible Induction Melting (CCIM) Technology. The test will occur in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) CCIM Pilot Plant and is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 15, 2014. The purpose of the test is to begin collecting qualitative data for validating the ceramic HLW form processability advantages using CCIM technology- as opposed to existing ceramic–lined Joule Heated Melters (JHM) currently producing BSG HLW forms. The major objectives of BFY14CCIM-C are to complete crystalline melt initiation with a new joule-heated resistive starter ring, sustain inductive melting at temperatures between 1600 to 1700°C for two different relatively high conductive materials representative of the SYNROC ceramic formation inclusive of a HLW surrogate, complete melter tapping and pouring of molten ceramic material in to a preheated 4 inch graphite canister and a similar canister at room temperature. Other goals include assessing the performance of a new crucible specially designed to accommodate the tapping and pouring of pure crystalline forms in contrast to less recalcitrant amorphous glass, assessing the overall operational effectiveness of melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a dedicated power source, and observing the tapped molten flow and subsequent relatively quick crystallization behavior in pans with areas identical to standard HLW disposal canisters. Surrogate waste compositions with ceramic SYNROC forming additives and their measured properties for inductive melting, testing parameters, pre-test conditions and modifications, data collection requirements, and sampling/post-demonstration analysis requirements for the produced forms are provided and defined.

  6. Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, consists of seven inactive sites located in the Yucca Flat area and one inactive site in the Pahute Mesa area. The eight CAU 545 sites consist of craters used for mud disposal, surface or buried waste disposed within craters or potential crater areas, and sites where surface or buried waste was disposed. The CAU 545 sites were used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat area during the 1950s through the early 1990s, and in Area 20 in the mid-1970s. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval.

  8. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  9. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

  10. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective Action Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 529, Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 529 consists of one Corrective Action Site (25-23-17). For the purpose of this investigation, the Corrective Action Site has been divided into nine parcels based on the separate and distinct releases. A conceptual site model was developed for each parcel to address the translocation of contaminants from each release. The results of this investigation will be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  12. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Obi

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: •06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area •09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

  14. www.elsevier.com/locate/csda Author's Accepted Manuscript

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Bayesestimatorsforreliabilitymeasuresingeometric distribution model using masked system life test data Ammar M. Sarhan, Debasis Kundu PII: S0167 distribution model using masked system life test data, Computa- tional Statistics & Data Analysis (2007), doi;Accepted m anuscript Bayes estimators for reliability measures in geometric distribution model using masked

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: • 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank • 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool • 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks • 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  16. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

  18. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

  20. Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nacht, S.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 03-51-01, Leach Pit • 06-04-02, Septic Tank • 06-05-03, Leach Pit • 06-05-04, Leach Bed • 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System • 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond • 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

  4. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: • Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. • Identifying and remediating disposal pits. • Collecting verification samples. • Performing radiological screening of soil. • Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9/2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A and B (25-04-06), Septic System (25-04-07), Leachfield (25-05-03), Leachfield (25-05-05), Leachfield (25-05-06), Radioactive Leachfield (25-05-08), Leachfield (25-05-12), and Dry Well (25-51-01). Situated in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), sites addressed by CAU 262 are located at the Reactor-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Test Cell C; and Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facilities. The R-MAD, Test Cell C, and E-MAD facilities supported nuclear rocket reactor and engine testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The activities associated with the testing program were conducted between 1958 and 1973. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for the site include oil/diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and tritium. The scope of the corrective action field investigation at the CAU will include the inspection of portions of the collection systems, sampling the contents of collection system features in situ of leachfield logging materials, surface soil sampling, collection of samples of soil underlying the base of inlet and outfall ends of septic tanks and outfall ends of diversion structures and distribution boxes, collection of soil samples from biased or a combination of biased and random locations within the boundaries of the leachfields, collection of soil samples at stepout locations (where needed) to further define lateral and vertical extent of contamination, conduction of discrete field screening, and logging of soil borings and collection of geotechnical samples to assess soil characteristics. Historical information indicates that significant quantities of radioactive material were produced during the rocket engine testing program, some of which was disposed of in radioactive waste disposal systems (posted leachfields) at each of these locations. Process and sanitary effluents were generated and disposed of in other leachfields. The results of this field investigation will be used to develop and evaluate corrective action alternatives for these CASs.

  6. Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing and Recording Radiation Doses to Individuals Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing and Recording Radiation Doses...

  7. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers,...

  8. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Acceptable Knowledge Documentation Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentation This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the...

  9. ACCEPTANCE REQUIREMENTS AND HOME ENERGY RATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. NJ-5 NJ.6. Lighting Control Systems ........................................................................................................... NJ-6 NJ.6.1 Automatic Daylighting Controls Acceptance ........................................................................... NJ-9 NJ.6.4 Automatic Time Switch Control Acceptance

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines November...

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  12. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Draft of Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329: Area 22, Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 22-44-01, which encompasses an area contaminated by three recorded spills from a 25,000-gallon underground fuel storage tank. The tank was installed in 1980 and was imbedded in sand and gravel approximately 16 feet below the ground surface. Historically, the DRA consisted of a single runway, several portable buildings, two underground storage tanks containing aviation jet fuel, and plumbing to several refueling areas on the ramp. The constituents of potential concern from the spill were total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline or JP-4. This provides the methodology for sampling contaminated soil-vapor and soil to determine what activities, if any, are required for closure of this si te. In addition, there is sufficient process knowledge of the tank's historical use to recommend closure of CAU 329 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process. This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. The study concluded that the spill is localized; therefore, it is very unlikely that the underground water supply has been or will be affected by these spills. In addition, there were high levels of carbon dioxide detected above the release which indicate that the spill is currently in the process of undergoing biological degradation and is not migrating. This CAU has been approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to be moved into Appendix III of the FFACO. Closure is expected to be in-place with administrative controls and soil-vapor sampling. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval upo n completion of the field activities.

  13. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Matthews

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Strand

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

  16. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0 with ROTC No. 1 and ROTC No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to CAS 23-02-08. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 554 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Perform field screening. (3) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (4) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (5) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 34: Area 3 Contaminated Waste Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, March 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 34 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 34 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located within the Area 3 Compound at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the vicinity of the Mud Plant Facility in Yucca Valley. Historically, CAS 03-09-07, Mud Pit, was used for disposal of excess mud from washing drilling equipment from 1968 to 1974, at which time it began to be used for excess mud disposal (currently inactive); CAS 03-44-01, Chromium Contamination Spill, was used to store additives used in the formulation of drilling mud from the early 1960s to the mid-1990s; CAS 03-47-02, Area 3 Mud Plant Pond, was used as a freshwater storage reservoir for the mud plant as well as supplied water for a number of activities including the mixing of mud, the rinsing and cleaning of tanks, and various washdowns from the 1960s through 1990s; and CAS 03-09-06, Mud Disposal Crater, was created in 1962 by an underground nuclear detonation (i.e., Chinchilla test) and was used to mix and store mud, dispose of receiving waste from the mud plant floor drains and excess drilling mud, and clean/flush mix tanks through the mid-1990s. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to identify potentially contaminated ground soil at each of the four CASs and determine the quantity, nature, and extent of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs). The investigation will include systematic and biased surface and subsurface soil and mud sampling using hand-auguring and direct-push techniques; visual, video, and/or electromagnetic surveys of pipes; field screening for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alpha/beta-emitting radionuclides; and laboratory analysis to characterize any investigation-derived waste for disposal both on site at NTS and at off-site locations. Historical information provided by former NTS employees indicates that COPCs include VOCs, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, and strontium-90. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  3. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerel G. Nelson

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan provides the closure methods for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems (SWS) 2 and 6, located at the Tonopah Test Range. SWS 2 consists of Septic Tanks 33-4, 33-5, 33-6, and two associated leachfields. SWS 6 consists of one associated leachfield. The Area 3 SWS 2 and 6 are also known as Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 03-05-002-SW02 and 03-05-002-SW06 respectively. Site investigation activities were completed in February 1998 and are documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). The site characterization found septage in Septic Tank 33-5. Septic Tank 33-4 is closed. Septic Tank 33-6 is still active and in line with the Sandia National Laboratories consolidated system. This site was investigated for volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, RCRA metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Characterizations of the three leachfields associated with these septic tanks were characterized and not detected above the Preliminary Action Levels. During the characterization, it was determined that Septic Tank 33-5 had not been closed. Therefore, closure activities will consist of removal of the residual septage and closure-in-place. Septic Tank 33-5 will be closed by filling of the emptied tank with clean inert material (sand) and sealing the top with a concrete cap.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium, beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Strand

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

  8. Continuous cleanup of oilfield waste in an environmentally acceptable manner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally, R.F.; Dowdy, S.A.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After several years of research and field testing, a process has been developed which can economically treat reserve pit waste. This continuous process converts the reserve pit contents into two environmentally acceptable products: a relatively dry, non-leachable cake-like solid material, and water which is purified for recycle or release directly into the environment.

  9. Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The Role of Self-Esteem in Capitalizing on Social Acceptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luerssen, Anna Maud

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The Role of Self-Esteem inGlaser Spring 2013 Abstract Blind and Deaf to Acceptance:never have been possible. Blind and Deaf to Acceptance: The

  10. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  12. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Plan has been prepared for the Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit Corrective Action Unit 110 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). The U-3ax/bl is a historic disposal unit within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit, which was formed by excavating the area between two subsidence craters (U-3ax and U-3bl), was operationally closed in 1987. The U-3ax/bl disposal unit is scheduled for permanent closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as a hazardous waste landfill. Existing records indicate that, from July 1968 to December 1987, U-3ax/bl received 2.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meters (8.12 x 10{sup 6} cubic feet) of waste. NTS nuclear device testing generated approximately 95 percent of the total volume disposed of in U-3ax/bl, the majority of which came from the Waste Consolidation Project (80 percent of the total volume) (Elletson and Johnejack, 1995). Area 3 is located in Yucca Flat, within the northeast quadrant of the NTS. The Yucca Flat watershed is a structurally closed basin encompassing an area of approximately 780 square kilometers (300 square miles). The structural geomorphology of Yucca Flat is typical of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. Yucca Flat lies in one of the most arid regions of the country. Water balance calculations for Area 3 indicate that it is continuously in a state of moisture deficit. The U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit will be closed in place by installing a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act equivalent cover. Following cover construction a fence will be installed around the cover to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover and cover performance monitoring using Time-Domain Reflectometry arrays to monitor moisture migration in the cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 60 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP. Soil moisture will be monitored within the cover for a period of at least two years prior to establishing performance criteria for NDEP regulatory purposes.

  13. Hydrogen Student Design Contest - Now accepting applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Student Design Contest - Now accepting applications Hydrogen Student Design Contest - Now accepting applications December 1, 2014 9:00AM EST to January 16, 2015 11:59PM...

  14. Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

  15. ALTERNATE ACCEPTANCE OF WULFENSTEIN PIT AGGREGATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Keifer

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate Wulfenstein fine aggregate for acceptability under ASTM C 33 standard specification.

  16. Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security at Nuclear Weapons Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  17. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) began in November 2009 upon acceptance of the WPP by EPA. The primary goals of implementing the plan are to improve the health of the Pecos River watershed and instream water quality...

  18. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

  19. hurricane plan UNO HURRICANE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    hurricane plan #12;UNO HURRICANE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1 I. HURRICANE EMERGENCY TEAMS Hurricane Emergency Implementation Team (HEIT)......................................... 2 PPoosstt

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; the Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of contaminated materials. Future land-use scenarios limit subsequent uses of the CASs to various nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. Field activities will consist of radiological walkover and screening surveys, and field-screening and collecting of both tank content and soil samples, and further sample testing as appropriate. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) Phase I will be to collect environmental samples for laboratory analysis to confirm the presence or absence of contaminants at concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels; and (2) Phase II will be to collect additional environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the extent of contamination identified in Phase I. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539, Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A modification to the FFACOwas approved in May 2010 to transfer the two Railroad Tracks corrective action sites (CASs) from CAU 114 into CAU539. The two CASs are located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of the CAU 539 Railroad Tracks CASs using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation should support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 14, 2009, by representatives of U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC (NNES); and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each Railroad Tracks CAS in CAU 539. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 539: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect in situ dose measurements. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., lead bricks) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, NNES will consult NDEP to determine the path forward, then either: • Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or • Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions.

  4. Engineering testing and technology projects FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan, WBS 6.3.3 and 6.3.8. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering laboratory services for development, assembly, testing, and evaluation to support the resolution of WHC, Hanford, and DOE complex wide engineering issues for 1996 are presented. Primary customers are: TWRS, spent nuclear fuels, transition projects, liquid effluent program, and other Hanford contractors and programs. Products and services provided include: fabrication and assembly facilities for prototype and test equipment, development testing, proof of principle testing, instrumentation testing, nondestructive examination application development and testing, prototype equipment design and assembly, chemical engineering unit operations testing, engineering test system disposal, and safety issue resolution.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  6. Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

  8. ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet: D2L105

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of this magnet to be satisfactory [1]. Engineering: Escallier reviewed the electrical tests of the magnetACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet: D2L105 Date of this summary: 20 August 2003 of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance Status: The BNL committee has approved the magnet for shipment

  9. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  10. A study of IMRT planning parameters on planning efficiency, delivery efficiency, and plan quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittauer, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32603 and J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lu Bo; Yan Guanghua; Kahler, Darren; Amdur, Robert; Liu Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32603 (United States); Gopal, Arun [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve planning and delivery efficiency of head and neck IMRT without compromising planning quality through the evaluation of inverse planning parameters.Methods: Eleven head and neck patients with pre-existing IMRT treatment plans were selected for this retrospective study. The Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) was used to compute new treatment plans for each patient by varying the individual or the combined parameters of dose/fluence grid resolution, minimum MU per segment, and minimum segment area. Forty-five plans per patient were generated with the following variations: 4 dose/fluence grid resolution plans, 12 minimum segment area plans, 9 minimum MU plans, and 20 combined minimum segment area/minimum MU plans. Each plan was evaluated and compared to others based on dose volume histograms (DVHs) (i.e., plan quality), planning time, and delivery time. To evaluate delivery efficiency, a model was developed that estimated the delivery time of a treatment plan, and validated through measurements on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Results: The uncertainty (i.e., variation) of the dose-volume index due to dose calculation grid variation was as high as 8.2% (5.5 Gy in absolute dose) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and 13.3% (2.1 Gy in absolute dose) for planning at risk volumes (PRVs). Comparison results of dose distributions indicated that smaller volumes were more susceptible to uncertainties. The grid resolution of a 4 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid was recommended, since it can reduce the final dose calculation time by 63% compared to the accepted standard (2 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid resolution) while maintaining a similar level of dose-volume index variation. Threshold values that maintained adequate plan quality (DVH results of the PTVs and PRVs remained satisfied for their dose objectives) were 5 cm{sup 2} for minimum segment area and 5 MU for minimum MU. As the minimum MU parameter was increased, the number of segments and delivery time were decreased. Increasing the minimum segment area parameter decreased the plan MU, but had less of an effect on the number of segments and delivery time. Our delivery time model predicted delivery time to within 1.8%. Conclusions: Increasing the dose grid while maintaining a small fluence grid allows for improved planning efficiency without compromising plan quality. Delivery efficiency can be improved by increasing the minimum MU, but not the minimum segment area. However, increasing the respective minimum MU and/or the minimum segment area to any value greater than 5 MU and 5 cm{sup 2} is not recommended because it degrades plan quality.

  11. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  12. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

  13. NETL Center Completes Site Acceptance Test for IGCC Dynamic Simulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate -AdvancedMIR Analysis Damian Hazen, NESEACO21,

  14. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

  15. Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Giesbrecht

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

  16. Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Mixed Transuranic Waste Streams Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Los Alamos National...

  17. FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL counterintelligence FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post Cloyd has most recently served as assistant director of the Counterintelligence Division of the Federal...

  18. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

  20. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients with unfavorable anatomy.

  1. Soil Testing and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

  2. Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement Surfaces for Tire/Pavement Noise Designation: CPSCP PP 1-11 (rev 3/1/2011) National Concrete Pavement Technology Center 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 Ames, IA 50010 #12;PP 1-1 CPSCP Recommended Practice for Accepting New Concrete Pavement

  3. TENDER AND ACCEPTANCE FORM STIPULATED PRICE CONTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    TENDER AND ACCEPTANCE FORM FOR STIPULATED PRICE CONTRACT June 2013 #12;Stipulated Price Contract with that of all Subcontractors working on the Project. (See Appendix "D" for sample schedule that must be submitted within 10 days #12;Stipulated Price Contract Tender and Acceptance Form Page 2 of contract award

  4. Work plan for monitor well installation water and sediment sample collection aquifer testing and topographic surveying at the Riverton, Wyoming, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations conducted during preparation of the site observational work plan (SOWP) at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site support a proposed natural flushing ground water compliance strategy, with institutional controls. However, additional site-specific data are needed to reduce uncertainties in order to confirm the applicability and feasibility of this proposed compliance strategy option. This proposed strategy will be analyzed in the site-specific environmental assessment. The purpose of this work plan is to summarize the data collection objectives to fill those data needs, describe the data collection activities that will be undertaken to meet those objectives, and elaborate on the data quality objectives which define the procedures that will be followed to ensure that the quality of these data meet UMTRA Project needs.

  5. GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    98-36 GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST by R. BRANKA and C. MICHOT, FRANCE (tel.: 33 3 44 55 65 19, fax: 33 3 44 55 65 10) ABSTRACT: UN gap test, type 1(a) or 2(a), is the recommended test in the acceptance procedure for transport of explosives in class 1. Up to the revision

  6. Robust, goal-directed plan execution with bounded risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ono, Masahiro, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need for robust optimal plan execution for multi-agent systems in uncertain environments, while guaranteeing an acceptable probability of success. For example, a fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles ...

  7. Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katich, Kristina Noel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  9. Proactive Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 20 Landowners and agricultural producers in the Cedar Creek watershed are working with agency representatives and gov- ernment leaders on a proactive plan to help reduce pollution flowing into Cedar Creek Reservoir. The 34...-county watershed have an opportunity to voice their opinions and help draft the watershed protection plan for the reservoir. The plan, which will outline ways to reduce pollution and improve water quality, is an outgrowth of years of water quality monitoring...

  10. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Startup Test Plans Â… June 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced5Plant -Office of

  11. Strategic Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a single BPA data repository * Data quality improvements * Improve model alignment with WECC planning data * Improve WECC base case coordination * Align the BPA data model with...

  12. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NTS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  14. Overview progress and future planOverview progress and future plan EAST project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview progress and future planOverview progress and future plan ofof EAST project Yuanxi WanUnique CharacteristicCharacteristic III.III. Future planFuture plan Conten t #12;1997 The project approved by government;workshops with good quality; All magnets has been tested successfully by cooling and charging,All magnets has been

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-8A NA7.5.7 Valve Leakage Test (Page 1 of 3) Project Name/Address: System Name VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE

  16. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  17. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  18. NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, M.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

  19. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, consists of 12 inactive sites located in the north and northeast section of the NTS. The 12 CAU 234 sites consist of mud pits, mud spills, mud sumps, and an open post-test cellar. The CAU 234 sites were all used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat and Rainier Mesa areas during the 1950s through the 1970s. The CASs in CAU 234 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting appropriate corrective action alternatives.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  2. ACQUISITION PLANNING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition...

  3. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  4. Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

  5. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  6. Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review of the Literature Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Acceptability of Sustainable...

  7. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action...

  8. Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of Super ESPC Projects Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of Super ESPC...

  9. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27...

  10. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  11. An economic approach to acceptance sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth, Robert Justin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ECONOMIC APPROACH TO ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING A Thesis by ROBERT JUSTIN RUTH Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub... JUSTIN RUTH I Approved as to style and content by& , J ~ W P. H. Newell Head Departmen J McNicho e Mem er 8w~ D. R. Shreve Member May 1973 ABSTRACT An Economic Approach to Acceptance Sampling (&m 1973) Robert Justin Ruth, S. S ~ , Virgin1a...

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area •05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able •05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton •05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area •05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), “equation of state” experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: •Conduct radiological surveys. •Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. •If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). •Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  13. AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity transit projects follow a rigorous data collection and analysis protocol. Refer to "General Evaluation Plan: Fleet Test and Evaluation Projects" for...

  14. Treatability Study Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support future decision making of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU) remedy selection, the Department of Energy (DOE) is performing a Treatability Study (TS), consistent with the EPA guidance for Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability studies. The study will inform stakeholders about various waste removal technologies and the cost of potential remediation approaches, particularly the cost associated with sluicing and the reduction in risk to human health and the environment from tank content removal. As part of the GAAT OU remedy, a series of studies and technology tests will be preformed. These may address one or more of the following areas, characterization, removal, treatment, and transfer of wastes stored in the GAAT OU.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 367 is located in Area 10 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The CASs in CAU 367 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive contaminants may be present in concentrations that exceed risk-based corrective action (RBCA) levels. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting CAAs. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 367 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the area where TED at the site exceeds FALs (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Evaluate TED to potential receptors in areas along Mercury Highway that have been impacted by a release of radionuclides from the Sedan test. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis related to the drilling mud within CAS 10-09-03, Mud Pit, and any encountered stains or waste as necessary to determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  16. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RIECK, C.A.

    1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization.

  17. PVUSA procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for photovoltaic power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dows, R.N.; Gough, E.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one in a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California, and from participating utility host sites. During the course of approximately 7 years (1988--1994), 10 PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Six 20-kW emerging module technology arrays, five on universal project-provided structures and one turnkey concentrator, and four turnkey utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed. PVUSA took a very proactive approach in the procurement of these systems. In the absence of established procurement documents, the project team developed a comprehensive set of technical and commercial documents. These have been updated with each successive procurement. Working closely with vendors after the award in a two-way exchange provided designs better suited for utility applications. This report discusses the PVUSA procurement process through testing and acceptance, and rating of PV turnkey systems. Special emphasis is placed on the acceptance testing and rating methodology which completes the procurement process by verifying that PV systems meet contract requirements. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided based on PVUSA experience.

  18. Optimizing Organ Allocation and Acceptance OGUZHAN ALAGOZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Andrew

    it is transplanted is called the cold ischemia time (CIT). During this time, organs are bathed in storage solutions J. SCHAEFER Departments of Industrial Engineering and Medicine University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh of Transplant Recipients states that the acceptable cold ischemia time limit for a liver is 12 to 18 hours [22

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  20. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  1. THESIS/DISSERTATION ACCEPTANCE AND DEPOSIT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Allen P.

    THESIS/DISSERTATION ACCEPTANCE AND DEPOSIT FORM Name: Student ID: Future Employment: (ex.: Asst Spring Summer Year: Title of Thesis/Dissertation: I authorize the library of the University of California, Riverside to use or duplicate my thesis/dissertation whenever the University Library is approached

  2. RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L [Idaho National Laboratory; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 372 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater • 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater • 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area • 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 10, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; Desert Research Institute, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 372.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT CEC-LTG-3A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE LTG-3A Automatic Daylighting Control Acceptance fraction of rated light output. #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA AUTOMATIC DAYLIGHTING CONTROL ACCEPTANCE DOCUMENT

  5. Alternatives To the Use of Contractor's Quality Control Data For Acceptance and Payment Purposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wani, Sujay Sudhir

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ............................................................................ 93 Table C-1 Constants for SkSP-2 Plans Having Acceptance Constant of 0 ......... 98 Table C-2 Constants for SkSP-2 Plans Having Acceptance Constant of 1 ......... 99 Table C-3 Constants for SkSP-2 Plans Having Acceptance Constant of 2... 2 SD =0.177% Case 3 SD=0.149% Case 4 SD =0.105% Case 5 SD= 0.098% 1 5.02 5.06 5.03 4.97 4.97 4.94 2 5.18 5.07 5.08 5.07 5.02 5.00 3 4.52 4.62 4.66 4.73 4.74 4.76 4 4.88 4.90 4.87 4.88 4.89 4.88 5 4.95 4.94 4.91 4.93 4.92 4.92 6 4.97 4...

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 561: Waste Disposal Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 561 is located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 5, 12, 22, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 561 is comprised of the 10 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-19-01, Waste Dump • 02-08-02, Waste Dump and Burn Area • 03-19-02, Debris Pile • 05-62-01, Radioactive Gravel Pile • 12-23-09, Radioactive Waste Dump • 22-19-06, Buried Waste Disposal Site • 23-21-04, Waste Disposal Trenches • 25-08-02, Waste Dump • 25-23-21, Radioactive Waste Dump • 25-25-19, Hydrocarbon Stains and Trench These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 561. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the Corrective Action Investigation for CAU 561 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform exploratory excavations. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples.

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

  8. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  9. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  10. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  11. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report detailing very-high density fuel behavior will be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Assuming acceptable fuel behavior, it is anticipated that NRC will issue a Safety Evaluation Report granting generic approval of the developed fuels based on the qualification report. It is anticipated that Phase I of fuel qualification will be completed prior to the end of FY10. Phase II of the fuel qualification requires development of fuels with density greater than 8.5 g-U/cm3. This fuel is required to convert the remaining few reactors that have been identified for conversion. The second phase of the fuel qualification effort includes both dispersion fuels with fuel particle volume loading on the order of 65 percent, and monolithic fuels. Phase II presents a larger set of technical unknowns and schedule uncertainties than phase I. The final step in the fuel qualification process involves insertion of lead test elements into the converting reactors. Each reactor that plans to convert using the developed high-density fuels will develop a reactor specific conversion plan based upon the reactor safety basis and operating requirements. For some reactors (FRM-II, High-Flux Isotope Reactor [HFIR], and RHF) conversion will be a one-step process. In addition to the U.S. fuel development effort, a Russian fuel development strategy has been developed. Contracts with Russian Federation institutes in support of fuel development for Russian are in place.

  12. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  13. Quantitative Methods for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    by one refinery Refinery Opera*onal Planning - Simulate the Refining Scenarios Supply Chain Investments Planning - Test the refinery best scenarios

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  15. Plan Your School Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

  16. SPECTR System Operational Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.H. Landman Jr.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report overviews installation of the Small Pressure Cycling Test Rig (SPECTR) and documents the system operational testing performed to demonstrate that it meets the requirements for operations. The system operational testing involved operation of the furnace system to the design conditions and demonstration of the test article gas supply system using a simulated test article. The furnace and test article systems were demonstrated to meet the design requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Therefore, the system is deemed acceptable and is ready for actual test article testing.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. Low-Level Burial Grounds Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage and/or disposal at the Low-Level Burial Grounds which are located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

  20. Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Documents Individual Permit: Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents1335769200000Plans...

  1. Annual Training Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  2. An economic approach to acceptance sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth, Robert Justin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ECONOMIC APPROACH TO ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING A Thesis by ROBERT JUSTIN RUTH Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1973 Ma)or Sub...)sot~ Industrial Eng1neer1ng FOREWORD The research discussed in this thesis was accomplished as part of 'the Product/Production Engineering Graduate Program conducted jointly y USAMC Intern Training Center and Texas A8M University. As such, the , deas...

  3. Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWind Energy AlaskaAcceptance

  4. Now Accepting Applications for Alvarez Fellowship!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives,838 November 8Now Accepting

  5. Disability Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirectionsDirectorateDisability Plans

  6. Vision Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 The History of theVision Plan

  7. Plans, Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Oursources |VisitPlans,

  8. Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSiteSeparationsRelevantStrategic Plan

  9. Medical Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDispositionMechanical R&DMakingMedical Plans

  10. Towards Controlling the Acceptance Factors for a Collaborative Platform in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Controlling the Acceptance Factors for a Collaborative Platform in Engineering Design factor which are supposed to influence future users of a collaborative KM platform (Dimocode). At the end management systems (KMS) deployment. Keywords: acceptance factors, collaborative, platforms, engineering

  11. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  12. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

  13. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  14. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-14A NA7.5.13 Distributed Energy Storage DX AC DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  16. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-15A NA7.5.14 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) System THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  17. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEMAND CONTROL VENTILATION SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEMAND CONTROL VENTILATION SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-6A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-6A NA7.5.5 Demand Control Ventilation Systems DEMAND CONTROL VENTILATION SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-6A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  18. Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses concepts and trends in social acceptance of wind energy, profiles recent research findings, and discussions mitigation strategies intended to resolve wind power social acceptance challenges as informed by published research and the experiences of individuals participating in the International Energy Agencies Working Group on Social Acceptance of Wind Energy

  19. ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Journal: Wind, Andrew; Minerals Management Service Keywords: offshore wind power, public opinion, social acceptancePeerReview 1 PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Jeremy Firestone*, Willett

  20. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  1. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion testing of western Kentucky limestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Holcomb, R.S.; Guymon, R.H.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is studying and testing the burning of coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) as a means of generating electricity and/or process heat in an environmentally acceptable manner. The abundant, high-sulfur coal resources in this country can be utilized effectively in such a system. The ORNL test program supporting the 20-MW(e) AFBC pilot plant planned for operation by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1982 is described. During the test program 625 hours of coal combustion were accumulated in a 25-cm-diam bench scale AFBC. The fuel was Kentucky No. 9 coal with about 4% sulfur. Five different limestones from the Western Kentucky area were tested for their ability to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. The bench scale combustor was operated under a variety of conditions including changes in bed temperature, bed height and superficial velocity. At a superficial velocity of 1.2 m/s, four of the five limestones achieved 90% sulfur retention with weight ratios of limestone feed to coal feed near 0.40:1 under no recycle (once through) operation. Carbon utilization (based on carbon loss data) averaged 84% for these tests. Two of the more promising stones were tested by recycling the material elutriated from the combustor. The amount of fresh limestone required for 90% sulfur retention was reduced by up to 50%. Carbon utilization approaching 98% was obtained under these conditions.

  2. Grazing function g and collimation angular acceptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The grazing function g is introduced—a synchrobetatron optical quantity that is analogous (and closely connected) to the Twiss and dispersion functions ?, ?, ?, and ??. It parametrizes the rate of change of total angle with respect to synchrotron amplitude for grazing particles, which just touch the surface of an aperture when their synchrotron and betatron oscillations are simultaneously (in time) at their extreme displacements. The grazing function can be important at collimators with limited acceptance angles. For example, it is important in both modes of crystal collimation operation—in channeling and in volume reflection. The grazing function is independent of the collimator type—crystal or amorphous—but can depend strongly on its azimuthal location. The rigorous synchrobetatron condition g=0 is solved, by invoking the close connection between the grazing function and the slope of the normalized dispersion. Propagation of the grazing function is described, through drifts, dipoles, and quadr...

  3. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

  4. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

  5. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  6. Advancing the environmental acceptability of open burning/open detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, K.D.; Tope, T.J. [Radian Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacturers and users of energetic material (e.g., propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics (PEP)) generate unserviceable, obsolete, off-specification, damaged, and contaminated items that are characterized as reactive wastes by definition, and therefore regulated under RCRA, Subtitle C, as hazardous waste. Energetic wastes, to include waste ordnance and munitions items, have historically been disposed of by open burning/open detonation (OB/OD), particularly by the Department of Defense (DoD). However, increasing regulatory constraints have led to the recent reduction and limited use of OB/OD treatment. DoD maintains that OB/OD is the most viable treatment option for its energetic waste streams, and has spurred research and development activities to advance the environmental acceptability of OB/OD. DoD has funded extensive testing to identify and quantify contaminant releases from OB/OD of various PEP materials. These data are actively being used in risk assessment studies to evaluate the impact of OB/OD on human health and the environment. Additionally, in an effort to satisfy regulatory concerns, DoD has been forced to reevaluate its current PEP disposal operations as they relate to the environment. As a result, numerous pollution prevention initiatives have been identified and initiated, and life cycle analyses of treatment options have been conducted. Many of the DoD initiatives can be applied to the commercial explosives industry as well. Implementation of proactive and innovative pollution prevention strategies and the application of sound technical data to evaluate risk will serve to advance the environmental acceptability of OB/OD amongst the regulatory community and the public and can result in significant cost savings as well.

  7. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W. [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (United States); Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G. [Hanford Tank Operations Contractor - Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process. Data quality requirements for sample collection and analysis of all WAC parameters were specified during the DQO process. There were eighteen key parameters identified with action limits to ensure the feed transfer and receipt would not exceed plant design, safety, permitting, and processing requirements. The remaining WAC parameters were grouped in the category for obtaining data according to WTP contract specifications, regulatory reporting requirements, and for developing the feed campaign processing sequence. (authors)

  8. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, Amanda J.; Pereira, Mario M.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  9. 2030 OCARTS Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Association of Central Oklahoma Governments

    ......................................Director of Planning & Program Development Pearlie Tiggs................................................................... Community Planner 2030 OCARTS Plan Report Table of Contents PART 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................ 1 Federal Legislation.......................................................................... 1 Purpose of the Plan Report and Relationship to other Plan Documents............. 3 Organization of the Transportation Planning Process...

  10. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

  11. PLAN100%DIGITAL PLAN100%DIGITAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    en un conjunto d e servicios digitales. RAZONES DEL PLAN: Existe un nú mero importante de institu tos

  12. Performance assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, B.H.

    1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    B and W Protec, Inc. (BWP) is responsible for implementing the Performance Assurance Program for the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) in accordance with DOE Order 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program (DOE 1995a). The Performance Assurance Program applies to safeguards and security (SAS) systems and their essential components (equipment, hardware, administrative procedures, Protective Force personnel, and other personnel) in direct support of Category I and H special nuclear material (SNM) protection. Performance assurance includes several Hanford Site activities that conduct performance, acceptance, operability, effectiveness, and validation tests. These activities encompass areas of training, exercises, quality assurance, conduct of operations, total quality management, self assessment, classified matter protection and control, emergency preparedness, and corrective actions tracking and trending. The objective of the Performance Assurance Program is to capture the critical data of the tests, training, etc., in a cost-effective, manageable program that reflects the overall effectiveness of the program while minimizing operational impacts. To aid in achieving this objective, BWP will coordinate the Performance Assurance Program for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and serve as the central point for data collection.

  13. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Design basis integrated operations plan (Title I design)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) will be a fully integrated, pilotscale facility for the demonstration of low-level, organic-matrix mixed waste treatment technologies. It will provide the bridge from bench-scale demonstrated technologies to the deployment and operation of full-scale treatment facilities. The MWMF is a key element in reducing the risk in deployment of effective and environmentally acceptable treatment processes for organic mixed-waste streams. The MWMF will provide the engineering test data, formal evaluation, and operating experience that will be required for these demonstration systems to become accepted by EPA and deployable in waste treatment facilities. The deployment will also demonstrate how to approach the permitting process with the regulatory agencies and how to operate and maintain the processes in a safe manner. This document describes, at a high level, how the facility will be designed and operated to achieve this mission. It frequently refers the reader to additional documentation that provides more detail in specific areas. Effective evaluation of a technology consists of a variety of informal and formal demonstrations involving individual technology systems or subsystems, integrated technology system combinations, or complete integrated treatment trains. Informal demonstrations will typically be used to gather general operating information and to establish a basis for development of formal demonstration plans. Formal demonstrations consist of a specific series of tests that are used to rigorously demonstrate the operation or performance of a specific system configuration.

  14. Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan November 26, 2004 Prepared for the Presented's subbasin planning process is iterative and designed within an adaptive management framework. Management is comprised of elected officials from local governments throughout the subbasin, and meets regularly to work

  15. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Officer Biological (Accident Reports) 2204 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) (4/2007) 1

  16. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

  17. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

  18. Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Death & Dismemberment Plan A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact...

  19. IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 Planning of Cellular Networks Enhanced by Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    by Energy Harvesting Meng Zheng, Przemyslaw Pawelczak, Member, IEEE, Slawomir Sta´nczak, Senior Member, IEEE energy sources and a fundamentally new concept of energy balancing, and propose a novel algorithm be made by enriching cellular infrastructure with energy harvesting sources, in comparison to traditional

  20. Probabilistic Plan Verification through Acceptance Sampling H akan L. S. Younes #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiébaux, Sylvie

    Automated Reasoning Group Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418, U.S.A. musliner@htc.honeywell.com Abstract CIRCA is an architecture for real­time intelligent control. The CIRCA at Honeywell Laboratories. actions and uncertainty about the timing and occurrence of externally