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1

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor Valeryi Sizyuk

Harilal, S. S.

2

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A review on evolution of e-commerce user acceptant behaviour under collaborative commerce: a study based on Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to identify mobile payment opportunities and what factors affect the user acceptance of mobile payments in Sri Lanka. This study was carried out through a situational analysis and an in-depth questionnaire survey. This ...

  Dasanayaka;   Samarawickrama

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG - Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Genon, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.genon@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Zanetti, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mariachiara.zanetti@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Study of few-nucleon systems with the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of few-nucleon systems at intermediate energies is an important aspect of the nuclear-physics program carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory. Our investigations aim at understanding the nuclear dynamics at short distances, the transition from hadronic to partonic description of nuclei, and how nuclei can be described in the framework of Quantum Chromodynamics. Our data on photodisintegration of 3He and 4He at beam energies from 0.3 GeV to 1.5 GeV strongly favor theoretical calculations that include three-body mechanisms and indicate significant contributions of these mechanisms at large momentum transfer, especially in the range of photon energies from 0.6 GeV to 0.8 GeV. Our investigations of exclusive and inclusive electron scattering off nuclear targets have yielded the determination of the ratio of pp to pn correlated pairs in 3He and of the probabilities of short-range correlations in nuclei. We have studied the transition from hadronic to partonic dynamics in nuclear processes by searching for the onset of scaling of the invariant cross sections of photoinduced reactions on few-nucleon systems. Our data are consistent with scaling at momentum transfer as low as 1 (GeV/c)2

Yordanka Ilieva

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The road to renewables : a case study of wind energy, local ownership and social acceptance at Samsø.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to investigate how local participation and local ownership enhances social acceptance of wind energy. In Norway many planned wind… (more)

Jakobsen, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Accepted to Combustion and Flame Feb. 11, 2004 Demonstration of a Free-Piston Rapid Compression Facility for the Study of High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted to Combustion and Flame Feb. 11, 2004 Demonstration of a Free-Piston Rapid Compression Facility for the Study of High Temperature Combustion Phenomena M. T. Donovan, X. He, B. T. Zigler, T. R developed at the University of Michigan (UM) for use in studying high-temperature combustion phenomena

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

8

Accepted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in building and computational technologies, coupled with a reorganized and integrated system of residential design, may make custom homes a possibility for a larger segment of the population in the years to come. While tools and materials that embody building and design expertise are necessary for making such a system workable, how the homeowner is supported and represented will determine whether the resulting houses are not just custom, but personally meaningful. The particular focus of this work is on how to externalize the layperson's task of establishing needs and setting goals as an essential stage within a sophisticated design process. The work is informed by interviews with homeowners and a participant study of constructive and interpretative exercises. One such exercise asked participants to serve as investigators into their own practices through use of simple sensors placed in the home environment. The work concludes with a proposal for tools and approaches to collect rich requirement data and prime users for design decisions by helping them to identify their

Jennifer Suzanne Beaudin; Ba Psychology; Kent Larson; William J. Mitchell; Jennifer Suzanne Beaudin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Acceptance Test Refactoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In Executable Acceptance Test Driven Development, acceptance tests represent the requirements of a software system. As requirements change over time, the acceptance tests have to be updated and maintained. This process can be time-consuming and risky as acceptance tests lack the regression safety net that production code has. Refactoring of acceptance tests is used to keep the fixtures and the acceptance test definitions consistent.

Heiko Ordelt; Frank Maurer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Microsoft Word - acceptance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptance Checklist Acceptance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and planning information system acceptance activities. The checklist reflects recognized acceptance management activities to be performed throughout the information systems project lifecycle. Information systems acceptance is generally characterized as a process to officially accept new or modified software components, which, when integrated, form an information system. Within this context, the objectives of software acceptance are summarized as the following: C Verify that the software product meets users= requirements and is fully operational.

11

A cross country study of the role of the three sectors on the acceptance and integration of people with intellectual and physical disabilities in Kenya and the United States of America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines acceptance and integration of people with intellectual and physical disabilities in the United States and Kenya and the involvement of the three… (more)

Nash, Whitney

12

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

3G Mobile TV Acceptance in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies on intention to use, adopting the technology acceptance model (TAM), have been reported but their extended models do not provide a good explanation of the determinants of intention to use 3G mobile TV. The present study develops and examines ... Keywords: mobile communication system, 3G mobile TV, behavioral intention to use, Technology Acceptance Model

Andri Qiantori; Agung Budi Sutiono; Hirohiko Suwa; Toshizumi Ohta

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

16

Order acceptance using genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses a genetic algorithm to solve the order-acceptance problem with tardiness penalties. We compare the performance of a myopic heuristic and a genetic algorithm, both of which do job acceptance and sequencing, using an upper bound based on ... Keywords: Genetic algorithms, Order acceptance, Scheduling

Walter O. Rom; Susan A. Slotnick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Acceptance Test Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptance Test Plan Acceptance Test Plan This template is used to document the plan for performing the systems acceptance test, the roles and responsibilities of individuals...

18

Consumers (Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure) Consumer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSUMERS (CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE) EV Everywhere Workshop July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Session 1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance...

19

The relationship between information technology acceptance and organizational agility in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined the influence of information technology (IT) acceptance on organizational agility. The study was based on a well-established theoretical model, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). We attempted to identify the relationships between IT acceptance ... Keywords: IT acceptance, IT adoption, Malaysia, Organizational agility, Structural equation models

Mohamed Zain; Raduan Che Rose; Iskandar Abdullah; Maslin Masrom

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Acceptable Materials for Recycling at Colorado State University Mixed Paper -Acceptable Items  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acceptable Materials for Recycling at Colorado State University Mixed Paper - Acceptable Items - Acceptable Items Refrigerators Microwave ovens Electrical Equipment: computers, monitors, TV's, etc. Remember

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A model of organizational employees' e-learning systems acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the factors that influence employees' adoption and use of e-learning systems and tests the applicability of the technology acceptance model (TAM) in the organizational context. We examined the relationship of employees' perceptions ... Keywords: Computer self-efficacy, Organizational support, Subjective norm, Task equivocality, Technology acceptance model

Yi-Hsuan Lee; Yi-Chuan Hsieh; Chun-Yuan Ma

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Electricity Advisory Committee June 6, 2013 Thanks To * Sonny Popowsky * Sue Kelly * Phyllis Reha * Bob Curry * Paul Centolella * Chris Peters * David Till * Paul Hudson * Tom Sloan * Wanda Reder Paper Objective * End-Use Consumer Acceptance Of Smart Grid Critical To Infrastructure Investments Being Fully Realized * While Utilities & Regulators Have Prime Role In Shaping SG, There Is Role For DOE As Facilitator & Educator * Focus Of This Paper Is On Systems Installed Inside Homes & Businesses Issues Experienced In Early Smart Grid Roll-Outs * Initial Resistance By Some End-Use Consumer Groups To Smart Grid Installation * Early Technology Roll-Outs Were Not Prepared For This Pushback * Since These Initial Efforts, Lessons-Learned

23

Toward an acceptable nuclear future  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear option is in danger of being foreclosed. The trend toward antinuclearism may be reversed if concerns about low-level radiation insult can be shown ultimately to be without foundation; evidence for this speculation is presented. Nevertheless it is suggested that the nuclear enterprise itself must propose new initiatives to increase the acceptability of nuclear energy. A key element of an acceptable nuclear future is cluster siting of reactors. This siting plan might be achieved by confining new reactors essentially to existing sites.

Weinberg, A.M.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

L-286 Acceptance Test Record  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

HARMON, B.C.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

W-025, acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This acceptance test report (ATR) has been prepared to establish the results of the field testing conducted on W-025 to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation systems functioned as intended by design. This is part of the RMW Land Disposal Facility.

Roscha, V.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Surface of Acceptability in Virtual Faces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the surface properties of skin and eyes and their importance in the acceptance and success of a digital human face, specifically in relation to the uncanny valley. The uncanny valley hypothesis states that as a human representation approaches photo-realism, subtle differences from reality become unsettling. Recent studies suggest that the uncanny valley could exist over a far greater range, affecting abstract human representations as well. These competing findings are explored by analyzing how changes to the surface of a digital character affect its level of acceptance. A female facial model is used as a base to compare a spectrum of different simulated real-world materials. The variations range from materials that are nearly identical to human skin, to those that are completely divergent from it, thus unnatural. After studying this catalogue of materials, it is concluded that given the right conditions, the uncanny valley can occur when facial representations are very near realism, as well as when human-likeness is quite distant from reality.

Andreason, Scot Philip

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer Accepted Manuscript, which has been through the RSC Publishing peer review process and has been accepted for publication. Accepted Manuscripts are published online shortly after acceptance, which is prior to technical editing, formatting and proof reading. This free service from RSC Publishing allows authors to make their results available to the community, in citable form, before publication of the edited article. This Accepted Manuscript will be replaced by the edited and formatted Advance Article as soon as this is available. To cite this manuscript please use its permanent Digital Object Identifier (DOI®), which is identical for all formats of publication. More information about Accepted Manuscripts can be found in the Information for Authors.

30

SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Venture Acceleration Fund now accepting 2012 applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 applications Venture Acceleration Fund now accepting 2012 applications The three companies selected will receive up to 100,000 each to commercialize technology and take it to...

32

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and meals. Gifts from outside sources. Generally, as a Federal employee, you may not solicit or accept a gift (1) from a "prohibited source" or (2) if given because of your official position. A "prohibited

33

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy - Consumer Acceptance Group B Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'B' 'B' Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Consumer Education/Emotion * Vehicle Exposure - butts in seats (ride & drive, car sharing, IT/phones, rental fleets) * Consumers understanding their needs * Range anxiety/opportunity * Customer Personal Value Proposition * Charging Exposure * Start small (battery size and charging level), move complicated * Marketing * Got Milk? * Patriotism, etc., in place of only green focus * Creating Demand * Emphasize fun/cool/patriotism (again) * Make & model availability * Workplace/public Charging * Multi-unit * V2G * Signage * Financial Incentives Consumer Acceptance 'B' July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure

35

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers information about the physical, dielectric, chemical, and environmental properties of transformer fluids and their operational impacts. Companies can use this information to choose environmentally acceptable green fluids.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modeling gap acceptance at freeway merges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a merging model that captures the gap acceptance behavior of drivers that merge from a ramp into a congested freeway. Merging can be classified into three types: normal, forced and cooperative lane ...

Lee, Gunwoo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wind Energy Community Acceptance Jump to: navigation, search In 2012 in Lamar, Colorado, Bob Emick (center, back to camera and Greg Emich (right in cowboy hat) talk about the 98 1.5-megawatt wind turbines on their ranch. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 21768 The following resources address community acceptance topics. Baring-Gould, I. (June 5, 2012). Social Acceptance of Wind Energy: Managing and Evaluating Its Market Impacts. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Accessed August 14, 2013. This presentation offers background information on social acceptance issues, results of surveys conducted by the New England Wind Forum at a

40

Ubiquitous Computing Acceptance Model: end user concern about security, privacy and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study integrates cognitive and affective attitudes as the primary factors of influence to formulate a Ubiquitous Computing Acceptance Model (UCAM), which is intended to predict whether potential users will accept ubiquitous computing (u-computing). ... Keywords: UCAM, behavioural intention, mobile communications, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, pervasive computing, privacy, security, trust, ubiquitous city, ubiquitous computing acceptance model, ubiquitous u-city, usefulness, user attitudes, user intentions

Dong-Hee Shin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Review: A meta-analysis of e-learning technology acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing literature in the field of e-learning technology acceptance reflects a significant number of independent studies that primarily investigate the causal relationships proposed by technology acceptance theory, such as the technology acceptance ... Keywords: Acceptance, E-learning, Meta-analysis, Moderator analysis

BošTjan ŠUmak; Marjan Heri?Ko; Maja PušNik

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Social Acceptance of Wind Power in the United States: Evaluating Stakeholder Perspectives (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the wind industry strives to achieve 20% wind energy by 2030, maintaining high levels of social acceptance for wind energy will become increasingly important. Wind Powering America is currently researching stakeholder perspectives in the U.S. market and reviewing findings from wind energy projects around the world to better understand social acceptance barriers. Results from European studies show that acceptance varies widely depending on local community values. A preliminary survey shows similar results in the United States. Further research will be conducted to refine our understanding of key social acceptance barriers and evaluate the best ways to mitigate negative perspectives on wind power.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance Lakeview GCAP Acceptance July 12, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis The Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site's groundwater compliance action plan (GCAP) received U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concurrence last month. This makes Lakeview the first Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, Title I site where a finalized GCAP has selected a "no remediation" compliance strategy because concentration limits for regulated constituents have been met. Lakeview, Oregon, location map. The Lakeview processing site, located in south-central Oregon, was once a privately owned and operated facility that processed uranium ore from the nearby Lucky Lass and White King mines from 1958 through 1960. The 258-acre site, including the areas formerly occupied

44

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is intended to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) consists of three tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, and Technology Verification. As currently conceived, the ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. This report covers activities during the first 6 months of the 3-year ETA program.

Christina B. Behr-Andres

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

E. Pasyuk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Analyzing Electronic Book Acceptance: A Compatibility Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The digitization is posing great challenges to the European book industry. While some national markets show a fair diffusion of electronic book (ebook) technology, others are still resisting the digital trend. The lack of differentiated knowledge about ... Keywords: Electronic Book Adoption, Technology Acceptance, Compatibility

Jin Gerlach, Peter Buxmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Acceptance test report: Backup power system  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control.

Cole, D.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This acceptance test procedure (ATP) was written to test the void fraction instrument (VFI) and verify that the unit is ready for field service. The procedure verifies that the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed in the software ATP) and software alarms are operating as designed.

Pearce, K.L.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R and D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

Suhaemi, Tjipta [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia); Syaukat, Achmad [Centre for Nuclear Technology Business, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang Selatan (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing.

Keck, R.D.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests.

Watson, T.L.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ribonucleotide reduction and redox regulation in Archaea : surprising twists on a common theme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To study the nucleotide reduction system in Archaea, we have expressed the Archaeoglobus fulgidus gene encoding the adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) dependent ribonucleotide reductase (afuRNR) protein. Initial characterization ...

Hernandez, Hector Hugo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

User acceptance OTM machine: in the Arab culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User acceptance and support is one of the most important factors in determining the success or failure of information technology systems. Behavioural biometrics mostly have the characteristics needed for effortless acceptance, such as easiness and usefulness ...

Abdullah A. Rashed; Henrique M. Dinis Santos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

Freeman, R.D.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system. Acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on Flammable Gas Watch List waste tank 104-AN. This document is the acceptance test report for the acceptance testing of the SHMS.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Socio-cultural acceptability of cadaver Transplantation in Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organ transplantation is known to be a new and innovative treatment for patients with progressive organ failures. The present study investigates the current status of transplantation from cadaver along with its socio-cultural acceptability in Iran. The present study is a descriptive research in a systematic review method. Here, by investigating previously conducted researches in Iran during the period 2002-2010, the status of transplantation from cadaver and its socio-cultural acceptability in Iran has been investigated. To collect the data, the access to Iranmedex website, the premier medical data center in Iran, was made possible using the related keywords. The obtained data indicate whereas there is an increase in the number of organ donations from cadaver, it is still low in comparison to other countries. The lack of consent from families of brain-dead patients is a major hurdle on the way of organ transplantation in Iran. In the cases of willingness to donate organs, the major effective factors were the deceased’s religious beliefs and prior tendency. In 66 % of the cases, the donors ’ families deemed organ donation phenomenon effective in alleviating the sorrow after the death of their beloved ones. The number of organ donation from cadaver in Iran is low contrary to other countries. It seems that general instructions to raise the knowledge on the subject and lay the foundation to increase the tendency towards posthumous organ donation are necessary.

Mobasser N; Zahmatkeshan N; Farhadi N; Nikeghbalian S; Hasankhani H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Satellite power system (SPS) public acceptance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a preliminary perspective on the public acceptability of the Solar Satellite Power System (SPS) Program, and a means to monitor it. A literature review and informal contacts with interest groups likely to take a position on the program reveal a number of concerns (anti-SPS arguments), as well as potential benefits (pro-SPS arguments). The concerns expressed include: environmental issues (microwaves, high altitude air pollution from space launches, land use), the program's cost in dollars, energy and other resources; communications interference; military implications; ownership and control of the system (particularly strengthening the power of utility monopolies); SPS as representing a centralized, high technology hard energy policy (rather than a decentralized smaller-scale soft approach); and the fear that SPS might dominate solar R and D budgets at the expense of decentralized solar technologies. Pro-SPS arguments stress its efficiency compared to terrestrial solar applications (i.e. virtually continuous exposure, no atmospheric attenuation). The program could be a major contributor to solving America's (and the world's) long-term energy crisis. It would improve our balance of payments; create many jobs both directly and through technology spinoffs; advance the space program; strengthen the U.S. position as a world leader in high technology; provide a great boost to American national pride; and would be environmentally preferable to alternative power generation technologies (e.g. coal, nuclear). Several key issues in SPS acceptability are: the outcome (and credibility) of future research into program environmental and non-environmental impacts, and the comparison of SPS impacts with those of alternative energy options. Recommendations for future research are given.

Bachrach, A.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, D2L102 1, D2L102 Date of this summary: 30 December 2003. This document contains a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets with the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance status: The BNL committee has approved the magnets for shipment to CERN, assuming satisfactory completion of several items: * Survey of the pipe positions [completed-see [1]] * Sign "BNL acceptance" certificate -[signed 17 December 2003] * Make official nameplate - [completed as of 29 Dec.] * Apply "BNL" decal - [completed as of 29 Dec.] The following items are needed for MEB acceptance: * ·Review and acceptance of the survey data by CERN - see [4]

64

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

MIT validation probe acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Multi-Functional Instrument Trees (MITs) a Validation Probe is being fabricated by Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). The Validation Probe assembly is equipped with a Winch, depth counter, and a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of which will render a means for verifying the temperature readings of the MIT thermocouples. The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to provide verification that the Validation Probe functions properly and accordingly to LANL design and specification. This ATP will be used for all Validation Probes procured from LANL. The ATP consists of a receiving inspection, RTD ambient temperature; RTD electrical failure, RTD insulation resistance, and accurate depth counter operation inspections. The Validation Probe is composed of an intank probe, a cable and winching system, and a riser extension (probe guide) which bolts onto the MIT. The validation`s thermal sensor is an RTD that is housed in a 0.062 inch diameter, magnesium oxide fill, 316 stainless steel tube. The sheath configuration provides a means for spring loading the sensor firmly against the validation tube`s inner wall. A 45 pound cylindrical body is connected above the sheath and is used as a force to lower the probe into the tank. This cylindrical body also provides the means to interconnect both electrically and mechanically to the winch system which lowers the probe to a specified location within the validation tube located in the tank.

Escamilla, S.A.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electric top drives gain wide industry acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its introduction, the top drive drilling system has gained acceptance as a productive and safe method for drilling oil and gas wells. Originally, the system was used mostly for offshore and higher cost land drilling, and it had to be installed as a permanent installation because of its enormous weight and size. Essentially, a top drive replaces the kelly and rotary table as the means of rotating drillpipe on oil, gas and geothermal rigs and is considered to be 15% to 40% more efficient than a kelly drive. Top drive systems allow the operator to drill and maintain directional orientation for triple stands and provide tripping efficiency because of the ability to ream and circulate with triple stands, to reduce the risk of stuck pipe or lost wells, and to improve well control and pipe handling safety. The paper describes electric top drives with DC motors, top drives with AC motors, top drives with permanent magnet motors, and top drives with permanent magnet brushless synchronous motors.

Riahi, M.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet: D2L105 Magnet: D2L105 Date of this summary: 20 August 2003 This document has a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets with the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance Status: The BNL committee has approved the magnet for shipment to CERN. However, several items need further work: * CERN acceptance of the waiver on pipe positions in the interconnect region * Determine LHC part number, sign "BNL acceptance" certificate, make official name plate * BNL/CERN resolve dry N2 fill of cold mass before shipment * Decision about tracking: use FQ data available now or wait for all D2 FQ data. * Software to rotate the survey and field angle data into the magnet frame

68

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

appendix 5. Present: Anerella, Cozzolino, Escallier, Hocker, Jain, Killian, Muratore, Pilat, Plate, Porretto, Wanderer, Willen Information added after the acceptance meeting is...

70

March 18, 2005, Department letter accepting Board Recommendation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors as intrinsically safe form or containerization of the nuclear hazards, declining nuclear material inventories, and planned decommissioning in the near future. We accept...

71

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Monday, July 30, 2012 - LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on...

72

Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing It is a requirement that the identity of a DOE Digital Identity Subscriber be verified against acceptable identity source documents. A Subscriber must appear in person and present their Federal Agency Identification Badge or HSPD-12 Badge as proof of identity. Either of these badges individually are sufficient identification. Lacking a Federal Agency Identification Badge or HSPD-12 Badge, a Subscriber must appear in person and provide two forms of identity source documents in original form unless otherwise noted. One of these two identity source documents must be a photo ID. Acceptable documents are listed below. Please note that all of these documents can be used to establish identity:

73

Using acceptance tests as a support for clarifying requirements: A series of experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main reasons for the failure of many software projects is the late discovery of a mismatch between the customers' expectations and the pieces of functionality implemented in the delivered system. At the root of such a mismatch is often a set ... Keywords: Acceptance testing, Empirical studies, Fit tables, Requirements

Filippo Ricca; Marco Torchiano; Massimiliano Di Penta; Mariano Ceccato; Paolo Tonella

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Citizen acceptance of new fossil fuel infrastructure: Value theory and Canada's Northern Gateway Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Bakken shale oil) to the Texas Gulf coast for refinement. This study explores citizen acceptance), which would transport unconventional oil (bitumen) 1,172 km from Alberta's oil sands to British Columbia Pipeline system) which would transport oil from Canada and the northern U.S. (including oil sands bitumen

75

What Predicts Commercial Bank Leaders' Intention to Use Mobile Commerce?: The Roles of Leadership Behaviors, Resistance to Change, and Technology Acceptance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles leadership behaviors have on technology acceptance models, focusing on bank leaders' intention to use mobile-commerce. The study included responses from 101 senior-level managers working at FDIC-insured ... Keywords: Business Management, Electronic Commerce, Leadership Competencies, Mobile Commerce, Resistance to Change, Technology Acceptance Model, Transformational Leadership

Maddy Halbach; Tao Gong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NOTE: This list was prepared as a courtesy to assist students in finding local dentists who are: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: accepting new patients, accept Delta Dental, have hygiene services and are available for emergency care

California at Santa Cruz, University of

77

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - With the goal of expanding development of renewable energy projects throughout the United States and creating new jobs, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced they are now accepting applications for a program that will make direct payments in lieu of tax credits to companies that create and place in service renewable energy facilities. The two Departments estimate distributing at least $3 billion in financial support to approximately 5,000 bio-mass, solar, wind, and other types of renewable energy production

78

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - With the goal of expanding development of renewable energy projects throughout the United States and creating new jobs, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced they are now accepting applications for a program that will make direct payments in lieu of tax credits to companies that create and place in service renewable energy facilities. The two Departments estimate distributing at least $3 billion in financial support to approximately 5,000 bio-mass, solar, wind, and other types of renewable energy production

79

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications March 12, 2013 - 1:43pm Addthis Washington, DC - Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2013, scheduled for June 2-12, in Birmingham, AL. The deadline to apply is April 20. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2013 will combine background briefings with group exercises and field activities at an

80

NETL: News Release - NETL and NETL-Sponsored Innovations Accept...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NETL-Sponsored Innovations Accept R&D 100 Awards MORGANTOWN, WV - At a black-tie banquet to be held this week at Chicago's Navy Pier, researchers from the National Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Acceptance test procedure MICON software exhaust fan control modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This acceptance test verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, and the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor.

SILVAN, G.R.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Abhinav Bhatele, a 2009 George...

83

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Now Accepting 2010 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications April 20, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and visits to a power plant and coal mine. Topics cover the range of CCS

84

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

85

Social influence on the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems: Revisiting the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology by the fuzzy DEMATEL technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of study is to examine whether social influence affects medical professionals' behavioral intention to use while introducing a new Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS). The series of Technology Acceptance Models (TAMs) have been widely applied ... Keywords: Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS), Fuzzy Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (fuzzy DEMATEL), Social influence, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT)

Don Jyh-Fu Jeng; Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fuel fabrication acceptance report FSV: initial core  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of the Fort St. Vrain initial core is described. Detailed summaries of the final fuel element metal loadings and other properties are given. Problems that occurred during fabrication and their resolutions have been given special attention, including the results of analyses made prior to their adoption. A final substantiation for the Fort St. Vrain initial core was provided by a full-core, three-dimensional analysis considering control rod insertion and fuel depletion and with explicit representation of the as-built fuel elements. The calculated power distributions from the three dimensional analysis are well within the limits specified for the reference design. During fabrication of the initial core fuel elements, some difficulties with assayed quantities of uranium and thorium were encountered. These difficulties resulted from changes in the fuel rod standards used in assay equipment calibration and in the techniques employed for assaying fuel particles and fuel rods. As a result the apparent values for the average metal loadings for some fuel rods and fuel elements changed. For certain blends some already-assembled fuel elements were outside the tolerances given in the fuel specification. A study was undertaken to make recommendations on the disposition of already-fabricated fuel and adjustments for the remainder of fuel fabrication. This study focused on utilizing, as much as possible, already-fabricated fuel without compromising the performance of the core. A variety of adjustments were considered and used in some instances, but the most successful method was the imposition of a layer location on fuel elements. By use of this additional core assembly requirement, a distribution of high metal load and low metal load fuel elements was obtained that assured that power perturbations would be small and localized and that temperature perturbations would be small and confined to axial layers where temperatures are nominally low. (auth)

Kapernick, R.J.; Nirschl, R.J.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The High-Acceptance Dielectron Spectrometer HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 degree, a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range. This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system.

The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; B. Bannier; R. Bassini; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; W. Enghardt; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. PerezCavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebac; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wuestenfel; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers  

SciTech Connect

The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each exposed to local cooling airflow, where temperatures were 22, 25 and 28°C. Thirty randomly-selected male subjects, dressed in shorts, were exposed to each condition for 30 minutes. Data were collected on their local thermal sensations of each body part, overall thermal sensation, and overall thermal acceptability on voting scales at regular intervals during the exposure. Results show that the non-uniformity of thermal sensation is a key factor affecting thermal acceptability except for overall thermal sensation. A new assessment model for local cooling was proposed. The model shows that face cooling can improve thermal acceptability more than chest or back cooling, and the upper boundary of the acceptable range of room temperature can be shifted from 26°C to 30.5°C when face cooling is provided.

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

MINUTES - ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet: D1L101 Date of meeting: 29 January 2004 Date of these minutes: 30 January 2004 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Durnan, J. Escallier, H. Hocker, A. Jain, J. Muratore, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The acceptance committee previously reviewed this magnet in March 2003 and May 2003. Since the last review, the magnet has been cold-tested to check whether the high- resistance short between one of the two strip heaters and the magnet coil affected the magnet operation (including quench performance). It was concluded that the heater-to- coil short did not affect the magnet operation during the cold test. The committee also reviewed the field quality data, which indicated that the yoke keys were stainless steel,

94

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multiport riser and flange assemblies acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the multiport riser (MPR) and multiport flange (MPF) assemblies. The accepted MPR and MPF assemblies will be used in support of the hydrogen mitigation project for double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 and other related projects. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and interface features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The objectives of the acceptance testing were as follows: Basic equipment functions and mechanical interfaces were verified; Installation and removal of equipment were demonstrated to the degree possible; Operation of the decon spray system and all valving was confirmed; and the accumulated leak rate of the MPR and MPF assemblies was determined.

Precechtel, D.R.; Schroeder, B.K.

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Program Now Training Program Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting Applications March 26, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - A Department of Energy (DOE) program that helps graduate students and early career professionals gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) is accepting applications until April 15. The Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) initiative is supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory. A collaboration between EnTech Strategies, Southern Company and SECARB-Ed, RECS 2012 isscheduled for June 3-13, in Birmingham, AL. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2012 will combine

97

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Test driven: practical tdd and acceptance tdd for java developers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In test driven development, you first write an executable test of what your application code must do. Only then do you write the code itself and, with the test spurring you on, you improve your design. In acceptance test driven development (ATDD), you ...

Lasse Koskela

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Acceptance test report MICON software exhaust fan control modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results the acceptance test HNF-4108 which verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor, and the generator sequencer logic.

SILVAN, G.R.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas characterization system 241-AN-105 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AN-105. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dependability and acceptability of handheld computers in school-based data collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the increasing influence of technology and the explosion in data collection demands, the acceptance and assimilation of new paradigms and technologies require today’s educators, researchers, and evaluators to select appropriate tools and apply them effectively. One of these technologies—handheld computers—makes the benefits of computerized data collection more accessible to field-based researchers. Three related studies were conducted to evaluate handheld-based data collection system for use in special education settings and to highlight the acceptability factors to effectively use this emerging technology. The first study reviewed the recent literature on the dependability and willingness of teachers to adopt handheld data collection systems and emphasized five important factors: (1) perceived ease of use; (2) perceived usefulness; (3) intention to use; (4) dependability; and (5) subjective norms. The second study discussed the dependability of handheld computers used by special education teachers for collecting self-report data by addressing four dependability attributes: reliability, maintainability, availability, and safety. Data were collected from five sources: (1) self-reports of time use by 19 special education teachers using Pocket PC computers, (2) observations of time use from eight external data collectors, (3) teacher interviews, (4) technical reports prepared by the researcher, and (5) teacher satisfaction. Results indicated that data collection via handheld computers yielded accurate, complete, and timely data, and was appropriate for these four dependability attributes. The last study investigated teachers’ acceptance of handheld computer use by testing the relationship among five factors that influence intention to use this technology which was based on a modified version of the technology acceptance model using the handheld computer acceptance survey responses from 45 special education teachers. The results showed that intention to use handheld computer was directly affected by the devices’ perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. The issue of dependability had a direct and indirect statistically significant effect on perceived ease of use and usefulness, and intention to use a handheld computer, respectively. Overall, three studies demonstrated that handheld computers can be effectively used in the direct observation of behavior in a school environment, without requirements of any settings.

Adiguzel, Tufan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

Weidert, R.S.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

Jeppson, L.A.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Glossary Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Residential Space Heating Residential Space Cooling Residential Water Heating Commercial Space Cooling Commercial Space Heating Commercial Refrigeration Lighting Building Descriptions Commercial Residential Acronyms and Initialisms A B C D E F G H I L M N O P Q R S U V AAMA - American Architectural Manufacturers Association ACEEE - American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy AEO - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook AFEAS - Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study AFUE - Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency AHAM - Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers ARI - Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute ASHRAE - American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers BTS - DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

107

Treatment Acceptability of Social Skills Programs for Children with Autism: The Influence of Ethnicity, Age, and Problem Severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compared the treatment acceptability of four social skills interventions that are commonly used with children with autism, as rated by parents of children with autism spectrum disorders, general education teachers, and special education teachers. Using the survey method and the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form, ratings of the acceptability of social stories, cognitive-behavorial programs, peer-mediated interactions, and technological devices were explored. The influence of ethnicity of respondent, age of child, and problem severity on acceptability ratings was also investigated. Major findings were as follows: (a) all four of the social skills programs were viewed as acceptable interventions; (b) treatment acceptability ratings were not influenced by group membership, ethnicity (Caucasian/Non-Caucasian), child age, and problem severity; (c) peer-mediated interactions and cognitive-behavioral programs received the highest rankings, followed by social stories and technological devices; (d) significant associations were found between group membership and the overall rankings of cognitive-behavioral programs and technological devices. Study limitations and implications for intervention are also discussed.

Fragioudakis, Maria

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MINUTES -ACCEPTANCE MEETING FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Date of meeting: 2 May 2003 Date of these minutes: 6 May 2003 Attending: M. Anerella, J. Cozzolino, J. Escallier, M. Gaffney, G. Ganetis, H. Hocker, A. Jain, S. Plate, C. Porretto, P. Wanderer, E. Willen Summary. The meeting was called to review the results of the electrical tests and options for use for this magnet. This information will be transmitted to LHC staff. The magnet has a failed temperature sensor that must be replaced if the magnet is to be the spare. (Other acceptance issues for this magnet were considered at a previous meeting of the acceptance committee.) Electrical test results. J. Escallier summarized the electrical tests of the quench protection heaters. The results are formally documented in deviation waiver M0303.

109

W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

Leist, K.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

SHERRELL, D.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays.

Blackaby, W.B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Enhancing Curriculum Acceptance among Students with E-learning 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-learning; enhanced by communicating and interacting is becoming increasingly accepted and this puts Web 2.0 at the center of the new educational technologies. E-Learning 2.0 emerges as an innovative method of online learning for its incorporation of Web 2.0 tools. For any academic study, the curriculum provides overview of intact learning area. The Curriculum provides overview to content of the Subject. Many institutions place student interaction as a priority of their online curriculum design. It is proved that interaction has a great effect on the students' involvement in learning and acceptance of Curriculum. Students are accepting curriculum that is designed by teacher; whereas E-learning 2.0 enabled Curriculum management system allows student to involve in learning activities. It works as a stimulus and increases their dedication to the Curriculum. While Institute adapts E-Learning 2.0 as Learning Management System, it also provides Social Networking services and provides direct and transparent interac...

Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I; Gandhi, Ankita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Acceptability of risk from radiation: Application to human space flight  

SciTech Connect

This one of NASA`s sponsored activities of the NCRP. In 1983, NASA asked NCRP to examine radiation risks in space and to make recommendations about career radiation limits for astronauts (with cancer considered as the principal risk). In conjunction with that effort, NCRP was asked to convene this symposium; objective is to examine the technical, strategic, and philosophical issues pertaining to acceptable risk and radiation in space. Nine papers are included together with panel discussions and a summary. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Acceptability of DUF6 Converison Products at Envirocare Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 55 Chemical Technology Division EVALUATION OF THE ACCEPTABILITY OF POTENTIAL DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION PRODUCTS AT THE ENVIROCARE DISPOSAL SITE Allen G. Croff, J. Robert Hightower, and Nancy L. Ranek* *Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois December 2000 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. LICENSE RECEIPT LIMITS

117

PVUSA procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for photovoltaic power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is one in a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California, and from participating utility host sites. During the course of approximately 7 years (1988--1994), 10 PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Six 20-kW emerging module technology arrays, five on universal project-provided structures and one turnkey concentrator, and four turnkey utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed. PVUSA took a very proactive approach in the procurement of these systems. In the absence of established procurement documents, the project team developed a comprehensive set of technical and commercial documents. These have been updated with each successive procurement. Working closely with vendors after the award in a two-way exchange provided designs better suited for utility applications. This report discusses the PVUSA procurement process through testing and acceptance, and rating of PV turnkey systems. Special emphasis is placed on the acceptance testing and rating methodology which completes the procurement process by verifying that PV systems meet contract requirements. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided based on PVUSA experience.

Dows, R.N.; Gough, E.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Use of explosives for boiler deslagging gains acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines an unconventional technique for removing slag from solid-fuel-fired boilers, used for more than two decades, that recently has exploded in popularity. The risks are very real; extensive damage at several recent jobs confirms that all blasters are not created equal. At solid-fuel-fired powerplants, slag removal can be a constant battle. Conventional weapons include picks, jackhammers, shotguns fired through portholes, hydro-blasting, and CO{sub 2}-blasting. But each of these methods is labor intensive, consumes substantial amounts of downtime, and may not dislodge severe deposits. In the 1960s, a midwestern plant superintendent, short of personnel because of a labor strike and frustrated by seemingly immovable slagging, resorted to dynamite. The good results surprised both the superintendent and the blasting contractor who had been called in from a nearby civil engineering job. Over the next two decades or so, the technique spread through a core group of believers at powerplants who largely relied on the one original blasting contractor. In recent years, explosive deslagging has become more widely accepted as a state-of-the-art combat technique and several hundred powerplants through the US now make use of it during annual outages. As the technique`s acceptance has grown, so has the number of contractors entering the field. Some veterans worry that the industry has expanded too fast, and unqualified blasters are being allowed into the powerplant.

Swanekamp, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary  

SciTech Connect

On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The role of acceptable knowledge in transuranic waste disposal operations - 11117  

SciTech Connect

The Acceptable Knowledge (AK) process plays a key role in the delineation of waste streams destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). General Electric's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (GEVNC) provides for an ideal case study of the application of AK in a multiple steward environment. In this review we will elucidate the pivotal role Acceptable Knowledge played in segregating Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities from a commercial facility. The Acceptable Knowledge process is a necessary component of waste characterization that determines whether or not a waste stream may be considered for disposal at the WIPP site. This process may be thought of as an effort to gain a thorough understanding of the waste origin, chemical content, and physical form gleaned by the collection of documentation that concerns generator/storage site history, mission, and operations; in addition to waste stream specific information which includes the waste generation process, the waste matrix, the quantity of waste concerned, and the radiological and chemical make up of the waste. The collection and dissemination of relevant documentation is the fundamental requirement for the AK process to work. Acceptable Knowledge is the predominant process of characterization and, therefore, a crucial part of WIPP's transuranic waste characterization program. This characterization process, when conducted to the standards set forth in WIPP's operating permit, requires confirmation/verification by physical techniques such as Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), Visual Examination (VE), and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA). These physical characterization techniques may vary in their appropriateness for a given waste stream; however, nothing will allow the substitution or exclusion of AK. Beyond the normal scope of operations, AK may be considered, when appropriate, a surrogate for the physical characterization techniques in a procedure that appeals to concepts such As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and budgetary savings. This substitution is referred to as an Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination. With a Sufficiency Determination Request, AK may supplant the need for one or all of the physical analysis methods. This powerful procedure may be used on a scale as small as a single container to that of a vast waste stream. Only under the most stringent requirements will an AK Sufficiency Determination be approved by the regulators and, to date, only six such Sufficiency Determinations have been approved. Although Acceptable Knowledge is legislated into the operational procedures of the WIPP facility there is more to it than compliance. AK is not merely one of a long list of requirements in the characterization and verification of transuranic (TRU) waste destined for the WIPP. Acceptable Knowledge goes beyond the regulatory threshold by offering a way to reduce risk, cost, time, and uncertainty on its own laurels. Therefore, AK alone can be argued superior to any other waste characterization technique.

Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Roger [DOE-CARLSBAD

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Acceptance Test Report for AMS-4 Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) at 241AN Exhausters  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the completed copy and test results of the Acceptance Test Procedure (TWR-4713). Test results were actually hand written in the ATP including redline changes. All acceptance criteria steps were completed satisfactorily without exceptions.

SCAIEF, C.C.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Predictive Models For Time To Acceptance: An Example Using “Hurricane” Articles in AMS Journals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate a statistical model for the time it takes a manuscript to be accepted for publication. The manuscript received and accepted dates from published manuscripts with the term “hurricane” in the title are obtained from the American ...

Robert E. Hodges; James B. Elsner; Thomas H. Jagger

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Risk analysis for new nuclear waste sites: Will it generate public acceptance?  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses public acceptance of radioactive waste facilities and what seems to be increasingly militant stances against such facilities. The role of risk assessment in possibly enhancing public acceptance is investigated.

Inhaber, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ACCEPTANCE SUMMARY FOR LHC MAGNETS BUILT AT BNL Magnet D4L102  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Date of this summary: September 2, 2004 This document contains a short summary of the acceptance status (in italics, just below), the minutes of the acceptance meeting, and actions taken after the acceptance meeting [in square brackets within the text of the minutes, or as footnotes]. Acceptance status: The BNL Acceptance Committee met on September 2, 2004 and approved the magnet for shipment to CERN. On July 28, R. Ostojic reported that CERN accepted the waiver on QQS locations (M0324). The survey data were sent to D. Missiaen on July 28, 2004. The field quality data have been loaded into the CERN data base. It is planned that the ID card will be sent by Sept. 15. MINUTES OF ACCEPTANCE MEETING Date of acceptance meeting: September 2, 2004

126

Disoriented Chiral Condensates: A White Paper for the Full Acceptance Detector at the SSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical speculations and experimental data suggesting the possibility of observing disoriented chiral condensates at a Full Acceptance Detector are reviewed.

K. L. Kowalski; C. C. Taylor

1992-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Towards a Conceptual Model of User Acceptance of Location-Based Emergency Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the introduction of location-based services by government as part of an all-hazards approach to modern emergency management solutions. Its main contribution is in exploring the determinants of an individual's acceptance or rejection ... Keywords: Acceptance, Location-Based Emergency Services, Privacy, Risk, Service Quality, Technology Acceptance Model TAM, Theory of Reasoned Action TRA, Trust, Visibility

Anas Aloudat, Katina Michael

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Acceptability of Four Transformer Top-Oil Thermal Models: Pt. 2: Comparing Metrics Lida Jauregui transformer top-oil thermal models are examined vis-à-vis training with measured data. Acceptability is unacceptable for model identification purposes. The linear top-oil model is acceptable for FOFA transformers

129

Acceptance test specifications for test number eleven: sodium system filling, heatup, pressurization, and drain. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance test number eleven as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified.

Bell, C.R.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Acceptance-test specifications for Test Number Four: process sensor and display test. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the general instructions for performing acceptance Test Number Four as indicated in the Acceptance Test Index (TI-022-130-003). Also indicated are the plant conditions and special equipment required to conduct the test. The acceptance criteria for each portion of the test are specified.

Bell, C.R.

1975-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

132

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial SPR Bids Initial SPR Bids DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids April 4, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy today said that it had reviewed, and deemed unacceptable, the bids that it had received in response to a solicitation to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The Office of Fossil Energy determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. In keeping with Secretary Bodman's commitment to fill the SPR in a deliberate, predictable, and transparent manner, consistent with the Department's updated guidelines that were announced in November 2006, the Office of Fossil Energy will issue another solicitation for bids in mid-April.

135

Contested environmental policy infrastructure: Socio-political acceptance of renewable energy, water, and waste facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of new infrastructure is hotly contested. This paper presents a comparative study on three environmental policy domains in the Netherlands that all deal with legitimising building and locating infrastructure facilities. Such infrastructure is usually declared essential to environmental policy and claimed to serve sustainability goals. They are considered to serve (proclaimed) public interests, while the adverse impact or risk that mainly concerns environmental values as well is concentrated at a smaller scale, for example in local communities. The social acceptance of environmental policy infrastructure is institutionally determined. The institutional capacity for learning in infrastructure decision-making processes in the following three domains is compared: 1.The implementation of wind power as a renewable energy innovation; 2.The policy on space-water adaptation, with its claim to implement a new style of management replacing the current practice of focusing on control and 'hard' infrastructure; 3.Waste policy with a focus on sound waste management and disposal, claiming a preference for waste minimization (the 'waste management hierarchy'). All three cases show a large variety of social acceptance issues, where the appraisal of the impact of siting the facilities is confronted with the desirability of the policies. In dealing with environmental conflict, the environmental capacity of the Netherlands appears to be low. The policies are frequently hotly contested within the process of infrastructure decision-making. Decision-making on infrastructure is often framed as if consensus about the objectives of environmental policies exists. These claims are not justified, and therefore stimulating the emergence of environmental conflicts that discourage social acceptance of the policies. Authorities are frequently involved in planning infrastructure that conflicts with their officially proclaimed policy objectives. In these circumstances, they are often confronted with local actors who support alternatives that are in fact better in tune with the new policy paradigm.

Wolsink, Maarten, E-mail: M.P.Wolsink@uva.n [Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018 VZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit  

SciTech Connect

The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

Becken, G.W.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Standard-B hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test Engineering was supported by Tank Waste Remediation System Safety Programs Engineering Support in the performance of an Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) to qualify the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet installed on waste tank 241-SY-103. The June 7, 1994 ATP performance was controlled by West Waste Tank Farms work package 2W-94-322. The ATP was conducted following the final installation of a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring cell. The cabinet had been sited on the waste tank two years earlier, but never connected to the exhaust vent header to monitor Tank 241-SY-103 vent header exhaust gases. The cabinet was then modified, to remove two undesirable solid state hydrogen monitors and install a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring sensor and signal conditioning. The ATP was used to assure that the cabinet wiring and components were properly installed and labeled and that the two years without operation had not seriously damaged the installed equipment. Electrical and pneumatic tests were performed to assure system integrity.

Tran, T.T.

1994-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

140

ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Why did the people of New Brunswick fail to accept the agreement between the governments of New Brunswick and Québec to sell NB Power to… (more)

Bourque, Angelle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Healthful LipidsChapter 2 Safety, Regulatory Aspects, and Public Acceptance of Genetically Modified Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 2 Safety, Regulatory Aspects, and Public Acceptance of Genetically Modified Lipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf o

143

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid- June 6, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid, approved at the June 5-6, 2013 EAC Meeting.

144

EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was issued that recommended that the mixed acid method be replaced by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method for the measurement of magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zirconium (Zr) with additional testing of the method by DWPF Laboratory being needed before further implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method at that laboratory. While the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok does not address any of the open issues remaining after the publication of the recommendation for the replacement of the mixed acid method by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method (since those issues are to be addressed by the DWPF Laboratory), the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} testing associated with the Isolok testing does provide additional insight into the performance of the method as conducted by SRNL. The performance is to be investigated by looking to the composition measurement data generated by the samples of a standard glass, the Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1), that were prepared by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method and included in the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. The measurements of these samples were presented as part of the study results, but no statistical analysis of these measurements was conducted as part of those results. It is the purpose of this report to provide that analysis, which was supported using JMP Version 7.0.2.

Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Information kiosk based Indian e-governance service delivery: value chain based measurement and acceptance modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, e-governance systems are evolving towards wider acceptance. Almost all the countries have embraced e-governance as part of their long term policy. Contemporary e-governance implementation efforts however, are not free from challenges. While ... Keywords: e-governance, information kiosk based services, modeling citizen acceptance, user centered services, user interfaces, value chain

Harekrishna Misra

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Technology acceptance in learning settings from a student perspective: a theoretical framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As learning and training with internet technologies and web-based distance learning become more and more popular, more emerging technologies are utilized in delivering instructional material to students. User acceptance of technology has been an important ... Keywords: TAM, technology acceptance, technology-mediated learning, virtual worlds

Chi Zhang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Boiler Efficiencies (1) Gas-Fired Boilers Oil-Fired Boilers Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 86% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 96% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 89% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 80% AFUE (except gas-fired steam boiler, which must have a 75% AFUE or higher). 2) Includes furnaces. GAMA, Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Residential Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Aug. 2005, p. 88 and 106 for best- available AFUE; and GAMA for 1985 average AFUEs; GAMA Tax Credit Eligible Equipment: Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers 95% AFUE or Greater, May 2007; and GAMA Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, May 2007

149

EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Acceptance Product EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony Kluk/Ken Picha 2 Background * Originally Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications were Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) documents and project specific: - Defense Waste Processing Facility (PE-03, July 1989) - West Valley Demonstration Project (PE-04, January 1990) * Included many of same specifications as current version of WAPS * First version of RW Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document in January 1993 (included requirements for both SNF and HLW) * EM decided to extract requirements for HLW and put into the WAPS document 3 Background (Cont'd) * Lists technical specifications for acceptance of borosilicate HLW

150

Fall 2012 Orientation Congratulations on being accepted to UW-Madison, one of the finest schools in the US! We are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2012 Orientation Congratulations on being accepted to UW-Madison, one of the finest schools in the US! We are very excited to meet you at an ISS Orientation. Depending on your program of study, please plan to attend your orientation as listed below. Please make sure to arrive on time and bring along

Sheridan, Jennifer

151

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

Rothgeb, S.; Brand, L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

How to assess the acceptability and credibility of simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive life cycle of a simulation study and guide the simulationist in conducting 10 processes, 10 phases, and 13 credibility assessment stages of the life cycle. The guidelines assist the simulation practitioners ...

O. Balci

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Social Acceptance of School-based Solar Photovoltaic Projects: An Ontario, Canada Case Study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The installation of solar photovoltaic (solar PV) technology on elementary and secondary schools has been undertaken around the world in an attempt to tie together… (more)

Beckstead, Claire Louise

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Presentation to the EAC - Smart Grid Customer Acceptance Paper Outline - Wanda Reder  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Acceptance Customer Acceptance Paper Outline Electricity Advisory Committee October 16,2012 ∗ Wanda Reder ∗ Susan Kelly ∗ Bob Curry ∗ Phyllis Reha ∗ Elliot Roseman ∗ Paula Klein Thanks To ∗ In Smart Grid Committee, Conclusion That Issues & Challenges Associated With Consumer Acceptance Required More Detailed Discussion ∗ Reaching This Conclusion Close To October EAC Meeting Resulted In A Detailed Outline Of A Paper Being Achievable Why Separate Paper On Consumer Acceptance & Why An Outline? ∗ Brief Discussion Of Detailed Outline & Draft Recommendations To Guide Developing A Full Paper For EAC Review ∗ Comments Can Be Submitted Over The Next Two Weeks ∗ Develop An Approach & Schedule To Develop Full Paper For EAC Review

155

Geologic Storage of carbon dioxide : risk analyses and implications for public acceptance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology has the potential to enable large reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, but one of the unanswered questions about CCS is whether it will be accepted by the public. In ...

Singleton, Gregory R. (Gregory Randall)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Growth Of Cloud Drops by Condensation: A Criticism of Currently Accepted Theory and a New Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The currently accepted theory of the growth of cloud drops by condensation employs an equation for the rate of increase of drop mass and an equation for the supersaturation. The latter equation gives the average supersaturation over a large ...

R. C. Srivastava

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Acceptance of Lightning Detectors and Localization Systems under Different Damping Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acceptance of individual lightning detectors, idealized detection networks using both loop antenna and time of arrival techniques, and the Swedish lightning localization network have been investigated. The calculations were based on Weibull-...

Th Schütte; E. Pišler; D. Filipovic; S. Israelsson

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE Accepted Carriers Date: April 8, 2008 POC: Dave Lopez, MA-30  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States DOE-Accepted Charter 138 Axis Airways France ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 139 Azerbaijan Airlines Azerbaijan IATA Member Airline 140 Bahamasair Bahamas ICAO Designated Cat 1 Carrier 141 Bangkok

159

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3-3 Acceptance Test Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3S4 Acceptance Test Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Constructing optimal drug-testing plans using a Bayesian acceptance sampling model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drug testing has become an accepted strategy for controlling drug use, particularly among individuals in the custody of the criminal justice system. Emphasis has been placed on testing those free in the community, either on pretrial release, probation, ...

Joanna R Baker; Pamela K Lattimore; Lance A Matheson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

163

W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system software (submittal {number_sign} 216)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System software will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP 1 with final testing on the glovebox software being completed in December 1996. The software tests will be broken out into five sections; one for each of the four Local Control Units and one for the supervisory software modules. The acceptance test report will contain completed copies of the software tests along with the applicable test log and completed Exception Test Reports.

Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 1 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the Phase 1 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). This acceptance test consisted of a pressure-decay/leak test of the containment bag to verify that the seams along the length of the bag had been adequately sealed. The sealing integrity of the FRS must be verified to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at Lancs Industries in Kirkland, Washington on January 17, 1995. The bag temperature-compensated pressure loss of 575 Pa was below the acceptance criteria of 625 Pa and the test results were therefore found to be acceptable. The bag manufacturer estimates that 80--90% of the pressure loss is attributed to leakage around the bag inflation valve where the pressure gage was connected. A leak detector was applied over the entire bag during the pre-tests and no leakage was found. Furthermore, the leak rate corresponding to this pressure loss is very small when compared to the acceptable leak rate of the completely assembled FRS. The sealing integrity of the assembled FRS is verified in Phase 3 testing.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

166

Accepted by...................................................................................................................................  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology and Policy Rural economic development is a national priority in many developing countries. However, rural areas frequently lack the safe and reliable electricity supply that is needed for the development of numerous economic activities. At the same time, the remoteness, isolation, and low electricity demand of many rural communities make them very unlikely to be reached by the extension of the grid. Therefore, off-grid generation systems are required to provide electricity services to those isolated rural communities. The traditional solution to this problem has been the use of internal combustion engines. However, combustion engines are short-lived and expensive to maintain, require a regular supply of fuel, and have a significant impact on the environment. In recent years, renewable energy systems (RES) have emerged as a clean and easy-to-maintain alternative to the use of

Ricardo Forcano; Stephen R. Connors; Daniel E. Hastings

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Accepted by………………………………………………………………………………...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer-calcium phosphate composites for use as an injectable bone substitute Polymer-calcium phosphate composites for use as an injectable bone substitute by

Rafal Adam Mickiewicz; Anne M. Mayes; Harry L. Tuller; Rafal Adam Mickiewicz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Probe Tree Assembly  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, and a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP`s performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12.

Lott, D.T.

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation requests for E85 fuel dispensing equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Hirschmugl Global Media Relations Supervisor Underwriters Laboratories Phone: +1 847 830-1404 E-mail: Joseph.F.Hirschmugl@us.ul.com PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Underwriters Laboratories Announces Development of Certification Requirements for E85 Dispensers Now Accepting Product Submittals for Certification Investigation NORTHBROOK, Ill. Oct. 16, 2007 - Underwriters Laboratories (UL), North America's leading safety testing and certification organization, announced the establishment of safety requirements for E85 fuel dispensing equipment, and is now accepting submittals for certification investigations. The establishment of safety requirements follows the completion of UL's comprehensive research program to investigate potential safety concerns associated with dispensing

171

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Group E Charging Infrastructure Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Domicile & Workplace Charging: Being available were vehicles spend a lot of time (Level 1/2) * Gas Station model * Fast charging * Battery Swap * Flow Batteries: Electrolyte swap for long distance traveling * Dynamic Wireless Charging * Strategically placed and visible * Widespread and visible Charging Infrastructure (Group E) July 30, 2012 Breakout Session #2 - Refine Consumer Acceptance Concepts and Infrastructure Scenarios * DOE Actions for Fast Charging Scenario: * R&D on power transfer rates for batteries * Energy storage research to minimize grid impacts and demand charges

172

Acceptances for Space-Based and Ground-Based Fluorescence Detectors, and Inference of the Neutrino-Nucleon Cross-Section above 10^19 eV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos will be useful for unraveling the dynamics of the most violent sources in the cosmos and for revealing the neutrino cross-section at extreme energy. Above ~ 10^20 eV, neutrinos may well be the only cosmic primariies. Thus, it is important to know the acceptances (event rate/flux) of proposed air-shower experiments for detecting ``horizontal'' neutrino events initiated in our atmosphere, and ``Earth-skimming'' events initiated in the Earth's surface rock or ocean. We calculate these acceptances for fluorescence detectors, both space-based as with the EUSO and OWL proposals, and ground-based, as with Auger, HiRes and Telescope Array. The neutrino cross-section sigma_nuN is not measured at energies above 5.2 x 10^13 eV. Although QCD extrapolations offer motivated guesses for sigma_nuN, new physics could intervene to provide a surprise. Therefore, we present the acceptances of horizontal (HAS) and upgoing (UAS) air showers as a function of sigma_nuN over the interesting range 10^(-34) to 10^(-30) cm^2. The dependences of acceptances on neutrino energy, shower-threshold energy, shower length and column density, and cloud layers are also studied. For UAS, we present acceptances for events over land (rock), and over the ocean (water). The latter are larger by about an order of magnitude, thus favoring space-based detectors. We revisit the idea of Kusenko and Weiler to infer sigma_nuN at E_nu ~ 10^20 eV from the ratio of HAS-to-UAS events, and find favorable results. Our calculation is mostly analytic. Included in the UAS calculation are realistic energy-losses for taus, and Earth-curvature effects.

Sergio Palomares-Ruiz; Andrei Irimia; Thomas J. Weiler

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University; Greene, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Residential Furnace Efficiencies (Percent of Units Shipped) (1) AFUE Range 1985 AFUE Range 2006 AFUE Range 1985 Below 65% 15% 75% to 88% 64% Below 75% 10% 65% to 71% 44% 88% or More 36% 75% to 80% 56% 71% to 80% 10% Total 100% More Than 80% 35% 80% to 86% 19% Total 100% More than 86% 12% Total 100% Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Average shipped in 1995: 84% AFUE Average shipped in 1995: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 85% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 85% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 97% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 95% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): Gas-Fired Oil-Fired 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 78% AFUE for furnaces. 3) Includes boilers. GAMA's Internet Home Page for 2006 AFUE ranges; GAMA News, Feb. 24, 1987, for 1985 AFUE ranges; LBNL for average shipped AFUE; GAMA,

175

New England Wind Forum: Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Wind farm proponents seek to identify locations with the greatest wind resource and the smallest population. This approach mitigates human interaction and impact whenever possible. Uninhabited areas are scarce in New England, however. Due to the region's population density, many of the region's windy locations - which include coastal areas and high elevations - are in view of nearby communities or valued for their natural beauty or recreational value. As a result, the importance of public acceptance is magnified in determining the viability of wind power installations. Further complicating public acceptance of wind power installations is the local nature of wind project impacts compared to wind power's substantial benefits. All forms of energy have impacts on their surroundings, and our society requires power plants to satisfy its demand for electricity. On a regional and broader scale, wind power's benefits are considerable, and surveys show that the majority of the population supports wind power when compared to the alternatives. In light of these benefits and the broad public support, some communities focus on the question of "compared to what?" and then embrace wind power proposals.

176

AcceptedArticleGlobal modes of climate variability O. de Viron,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process as doi: 10.1002/grl.50386 c 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. #12;Accepted-scale variations of sea surface tem- peratures. c 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. #12

Ghil, Michael

177

Accepted to Energy Policy, December 2011. A generic framework for the description and analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted to Energy Policy, December 2011. ERG/201104 A generic framework for the description policies. The framework can be employed to capture the evolution of energy security in an energy system associated with the system's constituent processes. Energy security policies are treated as flows

Hughes, Larry

178

A conceptual framework and propositions for the acceptance of mobile services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile services are heralded to create a tremendous spectrum of business opportunities. User acceptance of these services is of paramount importance. Consequently, a deeper insight into theory-based research is required to better understand the underlying ... Keywords: innovation adoption, mCommerce, mobile services

Sally Rao; Indrit Troshani

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks.

Waldo, E.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy efficiency and renewable energy. In fiscal years 2010-2014, $100,000 in funding is made available projects that decrease OSU's use of non-renewable energy and create competent graduates in the areas_________________ Applicant Accepts Application Instructions Page 1 Sustainable Energy Revolving

Escher, Christine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report  

SciTech Connect

The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory.

Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

NONE

1998-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article Accepted version (v1, Jul. 2012) 1 THE SG2-00725987,version1-16Oct2012 Author manuscript, published in "Solar Energy 88, 10 (2012) Pages 3072-3083" DOI : 10.1016/j.solener.2012.07.018 #12;Submitted to Solar Energy (Nov. 2011) Complete article

184

Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

KOCH, M.R.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Profiling the non-user: Rethinking policy initiatives stimulating ICT acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business strategies and policies that were successful in increasing internet penetration in the early days may no longer be appropriate. This is most probably so in countries where a bigger proportion of the population is already connected to the internet. ... Keywords: E-inclusion, ICT acceptance, ICT literacy, Non-users, PC and internet penetration, Policy initiatives, User research

Pieter Verdegem; Pascal Verhoest

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION 1 A Review on Distributed Application Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offload computational intensive applications to remote servers by employing different cloud models SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION remote server nodes. Current offloading procedures employ Provider UMSC Universal Mobile Service Cell URL Uniform Resource Locator VM Virtual Machine Wi-Fi Wireless

Melbourne, University of

190

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg.

Ritter, G.A.

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Nuclear Energy Option for the U.S.--How Far Are We from Public Acceptance?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent rise of oil and gasoline prices accompanied by reluctant acknowledgement that traditional sources of energy are limited has renewed public interest in renewable energy sources. This perspective on energy is focusing attention on and facilitating acceptance of alternative energy concepts, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The nuclear energy alternative, while clean with potentially abundant fuel supplies and associated with low costs, is burdened with the frequently negative public opinion reserved for things nuclear. Coincident with the heightened examination of alternative energy concepts, 2004 marks the 25-year anniversary of the Three Mile Island accident. Since this pivotal accident in 1979, no new reactor licenses have been granted in the U.S. The resolution of the issues of nuclear waste management and disposition are central to and may advance public discussions of the future use of nuclear energy. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently preparing the licensing application for Yucca Mountain, which was designated in 2003 as the site for a high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository in the U.S. The DOE also has been operating a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The operational status of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a repository for TRU waste was successfully realized along with the lesson learned that stakeholder trust and acceptance are as critical to the success of a repository program as the resolution of technical issues and obtaining regulatory approvals. For the five years of its operation and for decades prior, the challenge of attaining public acceptance of the WIPP has persisted for reasons aligned with the opposition to nuclear energy. Due to this commonality, the nuclear waste approach to public acceptance, with its pros and cons, provides a baseline for the examination of an approach for the public acceptance of nuclear energy in the U.S. This paper will present these concepts and discuss the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. in light of the challenge of gaining public acceptance.

Biedscheid, J.A.; Devarakonda, M.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Acceptance test plan for the 241-AN-105 multi-function corrosion monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the corrosion probe tree assembly destined for installation into tank 241-AN-105. This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion probe tree assembly to be installed into tank 241-AN-105. The test will consist of a pressure test to verify leak tightness of the probe tree body, a continuity test of the probe tree wiring, a test of the high level detector wiring, a test of the operation of the Type K thermocouples along the probe body, and verification of operation of corrosion monitoring computer and instrumentation.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Model Acceptability Measure for the Identification of Failures in Qualitative Fault Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with two of the main tasks of Fault Monitoring Systems (FMS): fault detection and fault identification. During fault detection, the FMS should recognize that the plant behavior is abnormal, and therefore, that the plant is not working properly. During fault identification, the FMS should conclude which type of failure has occurred. The first goal of this work is to consolidate a new fault detection technique, called enveloping, that was developed in the context of the Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning Fault Monitoring System (FIRFMS). The second and primary goal of this paper is to introduce the model acceptability measure as a tool to enhance and make more robust the fault identification process in the context of FIRFMS. The enveloping technique and the model acceptability measure are applied to an electric circuit model previously used for such purpose in the literature. It is shown that the new methods outperform the ones previously advocated in FIRFMS for that purpose 1 ...

Antoni Escobet Angela; Angela Nebot; Francois E. Cellier

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Appendix C: DOE Super-ESPC Project Acceptance Guidelines and Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of DOE Super-ESPC Projects  ECM Installation: All ECMs are installed in accordance with plans, specifications, standards, and other contract documents (sometimes by the Contractor, often by a subcontractor and always over a period of months).  Inspection, start-up, testing and commissioning. All ECMs are inspected, brought on line, tested, and commissioned interactively with all related Government-owned or Contractor-installed ECMs. Again, the ECMs should be operating in accordance with the design, plans, specifications, standards and other contract documents and manufacturer's recommendations. Individual ECMs may go through start-up and testing, but all interrelated

197

Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 August 2010 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (938 KB) Technical Report Example Procedures for NREL/TP-550-47502 Developing Acceptance-Range August 2010 Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Prepared under Task No. ARRB.1000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

198

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/26/2012 7/26/2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Monday, July 30, 2012 - LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on the consumer acceptance and charging infrastructure barriers associated with the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. This input will help guide the Challenge and the next-generation technology development necessary to enable U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles - and to do so within the next 10 years. 8:00-8:30AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:30-8:35 AM CALL TO ORDER Mr. Patrick Davis, DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program

199

Risk-embedded Bayesian acceptance sampling plans via conditional value-at-risk with Type II censoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acceptance sampling plan is usually determined by minimizing the expectation of the sum of the relevant costs involved. This expected cost minimization approach, however, could result in a great cost at a probability that is unacceptable to a decision ... Keywords: Bayesian acceptance sampling, Conditional value-at-risk, Life distribution, Reliability, Risk aversion, Type II censoring

Chung-Chi Hsieh, Yu-Ting Lu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Book and Journals Donation Policy Books: The Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Library accepts book donations that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book and Journals Donation Policy Books: The Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Library accepts book donations that support the collection. If the Library is unable to accept your donation, due to space and staffing limitations, the alternative disposition list http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/education/library/about/departments/journal-and-book

Chapman, Michael S.

202

Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler (ISVS) system. This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This ABU documents items for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Ultrasonic Acceptance Small Diameter Boiler Tube Butt Weld: Project Status Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report documenting the progress of a multiyear project for developing an alternative ultrasonic testing (UT) acceptance guideline for small diameter boiler tube butt welds.BackgroundHistorically, small diameter boiler tube butt welds have either been examined for defects using radiography or not inspected, with the owner relying only on a hydrostatic pressure test at 1.5 times the design pressure to assess weld quality. This reliance is ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

User Acceptance of Agile Information Systems: A Model and Empirical Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the rapid changes in users' requirements, a new generation of information systems (IS), namely, agile IS, has emerged. Agile IS, defined as information systems developed using agile methods, are characterized by frequent upgrades with ... Keywords: Agile Methods, Agile Systems, Availability Heuristic, Comfort With Change, Habit, Information Systems Continuance, Omission Bias, Personal Innovativeness, Status Quo Bias, Unified Theory Of Acceptance And Use Of Technology (Utau T)

Weiyin Hong; James Thong; Lewis Chasalow; Gurpreet Dhillon

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo mission. ETG acceptance test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrically-Heated Thermoelectric Generators (ETGs) shall be subjected to a flight level acceptance test program to certify the design of the SIG/Galileo flight generator. Each test in the test program is designed to simulate critical conditions and environments associated with generator ground handling, spacecraft launch and in-space operations. Successful completion of the test program shall be evidenced by the satisfactory performance of the ETG during and after the application of the various test environments. The ETG Acceptance Test Plan is designed to specify the testing sequence, the severity of the applied test environments and the acceptance criteria for assessing generator performance. Two test facilities shall be required for the execution of the proposed test program. The Teledyne Energy Systems (TES) facility in Timonium, Maryland shall be the site for the ETG thermal performance evaluation testing; and the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) facility in White Oak, Maryland, shall be the site of the dynamic, mass-properties and magnetic properties testing.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

Purchase, Iain F.H. [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ifhp@chadzombe.u-net.com

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

An application of the Threshold Accepting metaheuristic for curriculum based course timetabling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article presents a local search approach for the solution of timetabling problems in general, with a particular implementation for competition track 3 of the International Timetabling Competition 2007 (ITC 2007). The heuristic search procedure is based on Threshold Accepting to overcome local optima. A stochastic neighborhood is proposed and implemented, randomly removing and reassigning events from the current solution. The overall concept has been incrementally obtained from a series of experiments, which we describe in each (sub)section of the paper. In result, we successfully derived a potential candidate solution approach for the finals of track 3 of the ITC 2007.

Geiger, Martin Josef

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure infrastructure Group D Charging Infrastucture Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Limited infrastructure * PHEVs (110V infrastructure suitable) * AEVs (tethered to home) * Make commercial charging free (to consumers) - Google model * Utilities are compensated * Value proposition for site host? Infrastructure provider? * Parking garage - put EVSEs on high floors * Free parking for EVs * Fast charging - needs to be worked from the vehicle OEMs * Premature to discuss at this point - "you gotta sell cars" - chicken & egg * Issues: installation costs, standards, vehicle availability, energy costs/demand costs * Electrification and automation * Wireless charging, platooning, let the grid be the energy carrier

213

The Worlds First Ever Cooling Tower Acceptance Test Using Process Data Reconciliation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cooling capacity of cooling towers is influenced by multiple constructive and atmospheric parameters in a very complex way. This leads to strong variations of the measured cold-water temperature and causes unacceptable unreliability of conventional acceptance tests, which are based on single point measurements. In order to overcome this lack of accuracy a new approach to acceptance test based on process data reconciliation has been developed by BTB Jansky and applied at a nuclear power plant. This approach uses process data reconciliation according to VDI 2048 to evaluate datasets over a long period covering different operating conditions of the cooling tower. Data reconciliation is a statistical method to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95% by considering closed material-, mass-and energy balances. Datasets which are not suitable for the evaluation due to strong transient gradients are excluded beforehand, according to well-defined criteria. The reconciled cold-water temperature is then compared, within a wet bulb temperature range of 5 deg. C to 20 deg. C to the manufacturer's guaranteed temperature. Finally, if the average deviation between reconciled and guaranteed value over the evaluated period is below zero, the cooling tower guarantee is fulfilled. (authors)

Magnus Langenstein; Jan Hansen-Schmidt [BTB-Jansky GmbH, Gerlingerstrasse 151, D-71229 Leonberg (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V  

SciTech Connect

A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components.

Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

Solonick, W. [Electric Boat Corp., Groton, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

W.R. Solonick

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

218

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: Phase I State-of-the-Art Review; Phase II Laboratory Testing of Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this investigation were to identify, obtain, and test environmentally acceptable dielectric fluids for power transformers. In addition, the report provides a resource guide to the environmental qualities and performances of conventional transformer oils and environmentally acceptable alternatives. A literature review was conducted to identify appropriate candidates and, once identified, samples of the oil were obtained and tested. The findings of the literature review and the laboratory...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Initial Acceptance Criteria Concepts and Data for Assessing Longevity of Low-Voltage Cable Insulations and Jackets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cables installed in nuclear plants have long lives in most applications. However, the service conditions for some applications can cause the jackets and insulations of cables to age more rapidly than normal. It is desirable to have acceptance criteria for continued service of those cables experiencing significant aging. This report establishes a basis for acceptance criteria, provides a method for estimating remaining cable life, and provides aging profiles under various thermal and radiation conditi...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Office of Science Announces the Early Career Research Program for FY 2011 News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 07.01.10 Office of Science Announces the Early Career Research Program for FY 2011 Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page dept of science logo ------------------------------------------------------------------------ WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting proposals for the second year of the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program to support the research of outstanding scientists early in their careers. Up to $15 million in funding will be

223

The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is, in some cases, similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for successful methods of remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders` requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at and DOE sites throughout the West -- issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Niesen, K.; Serie, P. [Environmental Issues Management, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

Brockbank, B.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

Kearney, D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases May 2, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has rejected all offers received from the second solicitation issued this spring that sought to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the United States' crude oil reserve. Both solicitations resulted in no awards because the Department determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. The solicitations for the purchase of crude oil were meant to replace oil sold on an emergency basis after Hurricane Katrina caused significant damage to the production, distribution, and refining capabilities of the

229

Technical Barriers and Reasonable Price Solutions to Contractor Acceptance in the Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barriers and Reasonable Barriers and Reasonable Price Solutions to Contractor Acceptance in the Field Ben Schoenbauer, Research Engineer, Center for Energy and Environment February 22, 2012 Gaps and Barriers in High Efficiency Space and Water Heating - System Optimization and Improved Installation What have we achieved so far? - This presentation will look at laboratory work used to address this gap - Risks that needed to be managed were a lack of familiarity of contractors and homeowner comfort - The major benefit of this project is high efficiency space and water heating as well as combustion safety What is left to achieve? - The highest priority issue remaining to be solved is to analyze actual installed efficiency and energy savings - We plan to continue to close this gap by doing a 20 site

230

DOE-STD-1167-2003; Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1167-2003 OCTOBER 2003 DOE STANDARD THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESPIRATORY ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM FOR SUPPLIED-AIR SUITS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii DOE-STD-1167-2003 FOREWORD This non-mandatory Technical Standard provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor

231

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 50 SLURRY FOR SALTSTONE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, APRIL 2007 SAMPLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from the characterization of the second quarter April 2007 sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Six one liter samples were taken in polyethylene bottles to analyze for the WAC contaminants and a 200 mL sample was taken in a steel container for analysis of volatile organic compounds. The information from this characterization will be given to Waste Solidification Engineering personnel to qualify the transfer of aqueous waste to the Saltstone Facility. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) All six of the one liter samples taken in April 2007 from the mixed slurry in Tank 50 have the same compositions within the experimental uncertainty of the analyses. (2) Of the ninety-one process, chemical, and radioactive WAC target or limit contaminants listed in Revision 7 of the 'Waste Acceptance Criteria for Aqueous Waste sent to the Z-Area Saltstone Production Facility', eighty-nine had concentrations that were unequivocally less than the WAC limit or target. (3) The two contaminants whose concentrations could not be shown to be less than their WAC targets were methanol and radioactive Nb-93m. Currently the AD Section of SRNL does not have a method for measuring methanol in caustic solutions. For Nb-93m the results are ambiguous due to possible interferences in the ICP-MS analysis from Zr-93 or Mo-93. (4) Of the six additional chemical and radioactive contaminants requested in the TTR for Saltstone qualification, five were measured or calculated. These were Sb, Be, Tl, along with total beta and gamma. The AD Section does not have a method to measure the 6th contaminant which was the cyanide ion.

Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sunnybrook.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chartier, Carole [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Accepte J Europ. Ceramic Soc. Impedance spectroscopy study of Nd2NiO4+ , LSM and Platinum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have been estimated 61 from available SN progenitors counts (Tammann et al., 1994; Grenier, 2000). Both around the Sun. Originally this idea has 40 been suggested by Grenier (2000) and Gehrels et al. (2000 be numerous (Grenier, 2000). 234 4. Conclusions 235 In this paper we presented results of more advance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Construction: 600-3500home Home Energy Audit: Free Boilers: 150 or 400 depending on AFUE Furnaces: 250 or 400 depending on AFUE Programmable...

236

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Final Report Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 2 Acknowledgments Thanks to Don Sheaffer, Department 8120, Mark Powell, Department 9611, and Marcey Abate, Department 12323, for their contributions to this final report. Thanks to Tony Bryce, and Dennis Clingan, Department 1484, Phil Skogmo, Department 2645, and Charles Steinhaus, Department 8240, for their assistance in writing this report. Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components 3 Contents 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................

Naomi Christensen Precision; Naomi G. Christensen; Lane D. Harwell; Andrew Hazelton

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... procedure for testing the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) of residential central furnaces and boilers references ASHRAE Standard 103 ...

238

Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cross-Site Transfer System at Hanford: long-term strategy for waste acceptance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of a technical panel review of the current methodology for accepting waste for transport through the Hanford Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS), which was constructed to replace the existing pipelines that hydraulically connect the 200 West and 200 East areas. This report is a complement to an existing document (Hudson 1996); the methodology proposed in that document was refined based on panel recommendations. The refinements were focused around predicting and preventing the 3 main modes suspected of plugging the existing CSTS: precipitation, gelation, particle dropout/settling. The proposed analysis will require integration of computer modeling and laboratory experiments to build a defensible case for transportability of a proposed slurry composition for a given tank. This will be validated by recirculating actual tank waste, in-tank and in-farm, prior to transport. The panel`s recommendation was that the probability of success of waste transfer would be greatly improved by integrating the predictive analysis with real-time control during RCSTS operation. The methodology will be optimized.

Shekarriz, A; Onishi, Y.; Smith, P.A.; Sterner, M.; Rector, D.R.; Virden, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Guidelines for the Selection, Procurement, and Acceptance of Nuclear Safety-Related Mild Environment Motor Insulation for Rewinds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As existing nuclear power plants mature, a need exists to provide high quality repair services for safety-related electric motors. This guideline supplements previous EPRI efforts to provide guidance on the selection, procurement, acceptance, and dedication of the insulating materials used during the rewinding of motors located in mild environment plant areas.

1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage Control in Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage) problem associated with reactive power and voltage control in distribution systems to minimize daily on the number of switching operations of transformer load tap changers (LTCs) and capacitors, which are modeled

Cañizares, Claudio A.

243

Are American astrophysics papers accepted more quickly than others? Part II: correlations with citation rates, subdisciplines, and author numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We continue the investigation for more than 2,150 astrophysics papers published from July 2007 to June 2008 of various possible correlations among time from submission to acceptance; nationalities of lead authors; numbers of citations to the papers in ... Keywords: Astronomical journals, Citations, Publications

Virginia Trimble; Jose A. Ceja

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The use of technology as one of the possible means of performing instructor tasks: Putting technology acceptance in context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many instructors in higher education, use of a learning management system (LMS) is de facto mandatory. Nevertheless, instructors often have much freedom in deciding which functionalities of the LMS they use; that is, whether they perform each individual ... Keywords: Higher education, Instructor tasks, Learning management systems, Task importance, Technology acceptance model

Judith Schoonenboom

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 1 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity

Cañizares, Claudio A.

246

Social acceptability of Satellite Power Systems (SPS): the near-term outlook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is important, at this early stage in the concept development and evaluation of Satellite Power Systems, to explore aspects of contemporary social change that may be expected to complicate the process of achieving the necessary support of the American public for this new technological venture. Current public attitudes make it appear unlikely that a consensus will evolve during the 1980s favoring costly efforts to develop vast new supplies of conventional energy. Opinion polls reveal a pervasive worry over inflation, a broadening of aspirations to encompass quality-of-life concerns, a growing distrust of central governments, large corporations, big science and technology, and a continuing commitment to environmental protection - all of which suggests a social environment that is likely to resist the development of a major new high-technology energy system such as the SPS. Opposition to satellite power will focus on the high front-end development costs, on environmental and technical uncertainties, and on a generalized distrust of large bureaucracies and esoteric technologies. The SPS concept is also likely to be viewed with skepticism by those with vested interests in the long-run uses of coal, shale, fission, fusion, or on-site solar technologies. The growing commitment to energy conservation and the spreading deployment of dispersed renewable-energy systems strongly suggest that the unmet US demand for centrally generated electricity is unlikely to grow sufficiently over the next twenty years to convince a reluctant public of the need for so large an investment of scarce resources in the SPS program. Satellite Power Systems will have a problem in the area of public acceptability.

Klineberg, S.L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Accepting Mixed Waste as Alternate Feed Material for Processing and Disposal at a Licensed Uranium Mill  

SciTech Connect

Certain categories of mixed wastes that contain recoverable amounts of natural uranium can be processed for the recovery of valuable uranium, alone or together with other metals, at licensed uranium mills, and the resulting tailings permanently disposed of as 11e.(2) byproduct material in the mill's tailings impoundment, as an alternative to treatment and/or direct disposal at a mixed waste disposal facility. This paper discusses the regulatory background applicable to hazardous wastes, mixed wastes and uranium mills and, in particular, NRC's Alternate Feed Guidance under which alternate feed materials that contain certain types of mixed wastes may be processed and disposed of at uranium mills. The paper discusses the way in which the Alternate Feed Guidance has been interpreted in the past with respect to processing mixed wastes and the significance of recent changes in NRC's interpretation of the Alternate Feed Guidance that sets the stage for a broader range of mixed waste materials to be processed as alternate feed materials. The paper also reviews the le gal rationale and policy reasons why materials that would otherwise have to be treated and/or disposed of as mixed waste, at a mixed waste disposal facility, are exempt from RCRA when reprocessed as alternate feed material at a uranium mill and become subject to the sole jurisdiction of NRC, and some of the reasons why processing mixed wastes as alternate feed materials at uranium mills is preferable to direct disposal. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of the specific acceptance, characterization and certification requirements applicable to alternate feed materials and mixed wastes at International Uranium (USA) Corporation's White Mesa Mill, which has been the most active uranium mill in the processing of alternate feed materials under the Alternate Feed Guidance.

Frydenland, D. C.; Hochstein, R. F.; Thompson, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas furnaces are rated for efficiency using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) test standard under controlled laboratory test conditions. In the home, these furnaces are then installed under conditions that can vary significantly from the standard, require adjustment by the installing contractor to adapt to field conditions, may or may not be inspected over their useful lifetimes, and can operate with little maintenance over a 30-year period or longer. At issue is whether the installation practices, field conditions, and wear over the life of the furnace reduce the efficiency significantly from the rated efficiency. In this project, nine furnaces, with 15-24 years of field service, were removed from Iowa homes and tested in the lab under four conditions to determine the effects of installation practices, field operating conditions, and age on efficiency.

Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data from ancillary systems was collected manually and recorded on log sheets.

Berglin, B.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

Lunsford, G.F.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s Modeling exhaust dispersion for specifying acceptable exhaust/intake designs Introduction This guide provides general information on specify- ing acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also offers various quantitative approaches (dispersion modeling) that can be used to determine expected concentration (or dilution) levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint pro- gram of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

252

NREL Developing Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. (2012). "A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines." Accepted by Proceedings of the...

253

Study of electromagnetic processes with the dielectron spectrometer HADES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectron production in pp and dp reactions at 1.25 A.GeV has been studied with the High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI. Results obtained in inclusive and exclusive channels are shown

B. Ramstein; The HADES collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Designs; Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This publication is one in series of best practice guides for ''Laboratories for the 21st Century,'' a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions.

Petersen, R. L.; Carter, J. J.; Cochran, B. C.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of an Evaluation and Acceptance Methodology for Commercial Two- and Three-Dimensional Plant Modeling Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies a methodology for owner-operators to use to evaluate and then accept commercial two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) software tools and databases to support maintaining nuclear plant design basis information. These tools are currently used only to produce hard copy documents, which are then manually reviewed corner-to-corner each time the document is printed. After the manual review, the signed hard copy documents are used as a source of configuration-controlled ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Market driven strategy for acquisition of waste acceptance and transportation services for commercial spent fuel in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has the responsibility for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from commercial reactors to a Federal facility for storage and/or disposal. DOE has developed a strategy for a market driven approach for the acquisition of transportation services and equipment which will maximize the participation of private industry. To implement this strategy, DOE is planning to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the provision of the required services and equipment to accept SNF from the utilities and transport the SNF to a Federal facility. The paper discusses this strategy and describes the RFP.

Lemeshewky, W.; Macaluso, C.; Smith, P. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Teer, B. [JAI Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Mixed TRU Waste Streams: SR-W026-221F-HET-A through D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for the heterogeneous debris mixed transuranic waste streams generated in the FB-Line after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997.

Lunsford, G.F.

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Acceptance Test Procedure for Project 251W, WBS 3, Substation A-8, Building 251-W, Bus {number_sign}2 switchgear replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document records the steps taken and results of the acceptance testing of the new 13.8kV switchgear installed at 251W. This gear is under the administrative control of Electrical Utilities.

VanBaalen, R.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Plant Engineering: Guideline for the Acceptance of Commercial-Grade Design and Analysis Computer Programs Used in Nuclear Safety-Rel ated Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides methodology that can be used to perform safety classification of non-process computer programs, such as design and analysis tools, that are not resident or embedded (installed as part of) plant systems, structures, and components. The report also provides guidance for using commercial-grade dedication methodology to accept commercially procured computer programs that perform a safety-related function. The guidance is intended for use by subject matter experts in the acceptance of com...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators  

SciTech Connect

The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F. [and others] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Storage Ring Section for a Polarized Gas Target with High Angular Acceptance  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of the FAIR project, the PAX collaboration has suggested new experiments using polarized protons and antiprotons. In order to provide polarized antiprotons, the polarization buildup by spin-dependent attenuation due to nuclear interaction (spin-filtering) must be studied. The goal of these investigations is to understand the physics of the spin-filtering process with stored protons at COSY, and to shed light on the role of polarized electrons for the polarization buildup. Later on, the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton interaction will be investigated at the Antiproton Decelerator ring (AD) of CERN. In order to carry out these investigations, a storage ring section has to be developed which minimizes the spin-independent losses due to single Coulomb scattering.

Garishvili, A. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen, (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Lorentz, B.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Rathmann, F.; Stroeher, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Nass, A.; Steffens, E. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lenisa, P.; Statera, M. [Universita' di Ferrara and INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Martin, S. [UGS Gerlinde Schulteis and Partner, 08428 Langenbernsdorf (Germany)

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?  

SciTech Connect

25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which have recently been proposed for energy production, is critically reviewed. There are major challenges remaining that are shortly outlined. Scientific/technical achievements that are required in the light of the Fukushima accident are highlighted.

Schenkel, Roland [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [4] in response to the SRR request. The conclusions provided in this report are that no changes need to be made to the SME acceptability process (i.e., no modifications to WSRC-TR-95-00364, Revision 5, are needed) and no changes need to be made to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) itself (i.e. the spreadsheet utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) for acceptability decisions does not require modification) in response to thorium becoming a reportable element for DWPF operations. In addition, the inputs and results for the two test cases requested by WSE for use in confirming the successful activation of thorium as a reportable element for DWPF operations during the processing of SB6 are presented in this report.

Edwards, T.

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

January 7, 2013, Department letter accepting Board Recommendation 2012-2, Hanford Tank Farms Flammable Gas Safety Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2013 7, 2013 The Honorable PeterS. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana A venue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20004 Dear Mr. Chairman: The Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges receipt of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2012-2, Iianford Tank Fanns Flammable Gas Safety Strategy, issued on September 28, 2012, published in the Federal Register on October 12, 20 12, and accepts the Recommendation. The Board acknowledged in its Recommendation that some improvements had been made to the specific administrative controls used for flamn1able gas monitoring, but noted that more work was needed to make the ventilation systetn a credited safety control. DOE agrees. In developing an Implementation Plan (IP), DOE will take the

267

Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements  

SciTech Connect

There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Science as an Anomaly-Driven Enterprise: A Computational Approach to Generating Acceptable Theory Revisions in the Face of Anomalous Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous data lead to scientific discoveries. Although machine learning systems can be forced to resolve anomalous data, these systems use general learning algorithms to do so. To determine whether anomaly-driven approaches to discovery produce more accurate models than the standard approaches, we built a program called Kalpana. We also used Kalpana to explore means for identifying those anomaly resolutions that are acceptable to domain experts. Our experiments indicated that anomaly-driven approaches can lead to a richer set of model revisions than standard methods. Additionally we identified semantic and syntactic measures that are significantly correlated with the acceptability of model revisions. These results suggest that by interpreting data within the context of a model and by interpreting model revisions within the context of domain knowledge, discovery systems can more readily suggest accurate and acceptable anomaly resolutions.

Will Bridewell; Will Bridewell Phd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thesis Supervisor Accepted by……..…………………………………………………………………….……  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plant can be considered to be capture-ready if, at some point in the future it can be retrofitted for carbon capture and sequestration and still be economical to operate. The concept of capture-ready is not a specific plant design; rather it is a spectrum of investments and design decisions that a plant owner might undertake during the design and construction of a plant. Power plant owners and policymakers are interested in capture-ready plants because they may offer relatively low cost opportunities to bridge the gap between current coal-fired generation technologies without CO2 capture to future plants that may be built from the start to capture CO2, and reduce the risks of possible future regulations of CO2 emissions. This thesis explores the design options, technologies and costs of capture-ready coal-fired power plants. The first part of the thesis outlines the two major designs that are being considered for construction in the near-term – pulverized coal (PC) and integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC). It details the steps that are necessary to retrofit each of these plants for CO2 capture and sequestration. Finally, for each technology, it provides a qualitative

Mark C. Bohm; Howard J. Herzog; Dava J. Newman; Mark C. Bohm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

view accepted abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solute Redistribution During Planar and Dendritic Growth of Directionally Solidified Ni-Base Superalloy CMSX-10. Seong Moon SEO. Korea Institute of Materials ...

271

ESnet Acceptable Use Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is subordinate to all applicable U.S. government laws, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) orders. General Guidelines ESnet is a Wide Area Network (WAN) infrastructure project...

272

Technology acceptance in organizations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New technology has changed how people do business. With rapid development of technology, it has been difficult for businesses and organizations to successfully implement technology… (more)

Stewart, Laurie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High acceptance recoil polarimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization an efficient

The HARP Collaboration

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar heating and cooling of housing : five institutional analysis case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is one of a series resulting from institutional analysis of photovoltaic (PV) acceptance. The case studies reported here involve use of solar thermal technologies in variuos residential settings. All of the ...

Nutt-Powell, Thomas E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hanford personnel dosimeter supporting studies FY-1981  

SciTech Connect

This report examined specific functional components of the routine external personnel dosimeter program at Hanford. Components studied included: dosimeter readout; dosimeter calibration; dosimeter field response; dose calibration algorithm; dosimeter design; and TLD chip acceptance procedures. Additional information is also presented regarding the dosimeter response to light- and medium-filtered x-rays, high energy photons and neutrons. This study was conducted to clarify certain data obtained during the FY-1980 studies.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Accepted for Presentation at IEEE Power Engineering Society 2006 General Meeting, Montreal , Quebec, June 18-22, 2006 Abstract--This paper presents experimental results associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, transformer tap positions, flowgate values, and scheduled versus actual power transactions. With systemsAccepted for Presentation at IEEE Power Engineering Society 2006 General Meeting, Montreal , Quebec aspects of using three-dimensional (3D) visualizations to display electric power system generation

277

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called {open_quotes}Acceptance Standards{close_quotes} is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called [open quotes]Acceptance Standards[close quotes] is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

History of Uranium-233(sup233U)Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant. In support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the processing of Uranium-233 at the Rocky Flats Plant (Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site). The information may be used to meet Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)and for determining potential Uranium-233 content in applicable residue waste streams.

Moment, R.L.; Gibbs, F.E.; Freiboth, C.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster presentation at EAGE conference, Leipzig 1998)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster to the computation of re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with four boulders located in the upper bed of the coal. Tselentis, pers. comm.). The model is composed of a low velocity layer, upper bed, four boulders, coal seam

Cerveny, Vlastislav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Landsea heating contrast in an idealized Asian summer monsoon Received: 18 January 2002 / Accepted: 30 December 2002 / Published online: 4 March 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land­sea heating contrast in an idealized Asian summer monsoon Received: 18 January 2002 / Accepted determining the tropospheric temperature gradient that is related to the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon tropospheric temperature gradient thus a weak Asian summer monsoon circulation. Higher pre- scribed heating

Chou, Chia

282

Using the DEMATEL based network process and structural equation modeling methods for deriving factors influencing the acceptance of smart phone operation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smartphones have emerged as one of the most important consumer-electronic products during the past years. Therefore, researches on factors influencing consumers' behavior and thus, repurchase intention toward smartphones become the most critical issue ... Keywords: decision making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL), lead user theory, structural equation modeling (SEM), technology acceptance model (TAM)

Chi-Yo Huang; Ming-Jenn Wu; Yu-Wei Liu; Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two field studies were conducted in a university classroom in the autumn of 2004 in Harbin. The objective of these studies was to assess the thermal conditions and the subjective effects on occupant thermal comfort. A field study was carried out when the undergraduate students were not taught the theory of thermal comfort. A second study was conducted after the undergraduate students knew something about thermal comfort. The thermal comfort variables were measured when the students were filling in the subjective questionnaires on thermal sensation and thermal comfort. A total of 167 sets of questionnaire responses were obtained. The indoor thermal environmental data for the two days are almost the same; however the thermal acceptability is different. The acceptability of the first study is 96.0%, which is higher than the acceptability of 91.5% according to the PPD. In contrast, the acceptability of the second study is 57.4%, which is very low compared with the acceptability of 95.0% according to the PPD. The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort.

Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Front End Studies and PlansFront End Studies and Plans David Neuffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Need one design likely to work for Vrf/B-field rf studies are likely to be inconclusive B=1.25T; V a potential design for IDS ­ likely to be acceptable (Vrf/B-field) April 2010 ? Use reviewed design

McDonald, Kirk

285

Guidelines for Hydro Turbine Fish Entrainment and Survival Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides peer- and agency-reviewed specific guidelines for planning, conducting, analyzing, and reporting results from hydro turbine fish entrainment and mortality studies. Experience to date suggests that using the Guidelines can reduce the time and cost of developing a fish study plan that is acceptable to the regulatory agencies.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

150 or 400 Programmable Thermostat: 25 WindowsSash: 20 Custom: Based on Annual Energy Dollar Savings Equipment Requirements Boilers (< 300,000 Btu): AFUE 85% Furnaces (<...

288

Heating Fuel Comparision Calculator - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HEAT CONTENT PRICES INSTRUCTIONS CALCULATOR Fuel Heat Content Per Unit (Btu) Fuel Type Electricity Propane Kerosene Gallon Cord Ton AFUE Natural Gas COP Geothermal ...

289

Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

Lunsford, G.F.

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Analysis of health aspects, food acceptability, and economics benefits of the solar box cooker in Sierra Leone. Rept. for 1 Oct 88-31 May 90 (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides the results of a project whose aim was ascertaining the effectiveness of the Solar Box Cooker as an instrument for cooking and pasteurizing water, as well as, the degree to which it and its products are acceptable to the people of Sierra Leone. Specific Objectives were as follows: (1) To ascertain the extent of reduction of pathogenic micro-organism of foods cooked and water pasteurized via the solar box cooker in the village environment; (2) To determine the acceptability of solar box cooked food as compared with foods cooked via the traditional methods; (3) To estimate the costs savings of fuel and labor for foods cooked via the solar box cooker; and (4) To adopt Solar Box Cooker technologyfor successful use in a designated developing country.

Carpenter, B.W.; Davis, L.

1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Simulation Test for Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Mike Kennedy Mike D. Kennedy, Inc. Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (3.9 MB) This document is intended for use with the following documents: Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), NREL/TP-550-47427 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX, NREL/TP-550-47502 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52414 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy

292

Plant Engineering: Guideline for the Acceptance of Commercial-Grade Design and Analysis Computer Programs Used in Nuclear Safety-Related Applications: Revision 1 of 1025243  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report supersedes EPRI 1025243 and provides methodology that can be used to perform safety classification of non-process computer programs, such as design and analysis tools, that are not resident or embedded (installed as part of) plant systems, structures, and components. The report also provides guidance for using commercial-grade dedication methodology to accept commercially procured computer programs that perform a safety-related function. The guidance is intended for use by subject matter ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ak-Chin Indian Community Biomass Feasiiblity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of the conversion of chicken litter to biogas for the production of energy. There was an additional requirement that after extracting the energy from the chicken litter the nutrient value of the raw chicken litter had to be returned to the Ak-Chin Farms for use as fertilizer in a form and delivery method acceptable to the Farm.

Mark A. Moser, RCM Digesters, Inc.; Mark Randall, Daystar Consulting, LLC; Leonard S. Gold, Ak-Chin Energy Services & Utility Strategies Consulting Group

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Explaining B2C e-commerce acceptance: An integrative model based on the framework by Gatignon and Robertson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to analyze e-commerce adoption, proposing a global model that integrates the most relevant approaches in the literature. Gatignon and Robertson's Adoption Model is taken as a reference framework because of its overall nature and its ... Keywords: Adoption intention, Attitude, E-commerce, Perceived risk, Personal innovativeness, Subjective norm

Ángel Herrero Crespo; Ignacio A. Rodríguez Del Bosque Rodríguez

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Please accept my gift to further the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program's work. If you would like your donation to support a UH Sea Grant center of excellence, please indicate this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please accept my gift to further the University of Hawaiÿi Sea Grant College Program's work. If you allows us to conduct innovative research, extension and education programs to improve the understanding

Holland, Kim N.

297

Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

accepted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters WHAM Observations of H? from High Velocity Clouds: Are They Galactic or Extragalactic?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested that high velocity clouds may be distributed throughout the Local Group and are therefore not in general associated with the Milky Way galaxy. With the aim of testing this hypothesis, we have made observations in the H? line of high velocity clouds selected as the most likely candidates for being at larger than average distances. We have found H? emission from 4 out of 5 of the observed clouds, suggesting that the clouds under study are being illuminated by a Lyman continuum flux greater than that of the metagalactic ionizing radiation. Therefore, it appears likely that these clouds are in the Galactic halo and not distributed throughout the Local Group.

S. L. Tufte; J. D. Wilson; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Is the Distribution Grid Ready to Accept Large Scale Photovoltaic Deployment? - State of the Art, Progress and Future Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The installed capacity of photovoltaic systems has recently increased at a much faster rate than the development of grid codes to effectively and efficiently manage high penetrations of PV within the distribution system. In a number of countries, PV penetrations in some regions are now raising growing concerns regarding integration. Management strategies vary considerably by country - some still have an approach that photovoltaic systems should behave as passive as possible while others demand an active participation in grid control. This variety of grid codes also causes challenges in learning from 'best practice'. This paper provides a review of current grid codes in some countries with high PV penetrations. In addition, the paper presents a number of country-specific case studies on different approaches for improved integration of photovoltaic systems in the distribution grid. In particular, we consider integration approaches using active and reactive power control that can reduce or defer expensive grid reinforcement while supporting higher PV penetrations.

Braun, M.; Stetz, T.; Brundlinger, R.; Mayr, C.; Hatta, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogimoto, K.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Coddington, M.; Lynn, K.; Graditi, G.; Woyte, A.; MacGill, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Residential Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rewards Program Rewards Program Residential Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Focus On Energy Program Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (90% AFUE with ECM): $125 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM): $275 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM) and AC (16 SEER): $400 Air Source Heat Pump (16 SEER): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (90% AFUE): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (95% AFUE): $400 Indirect Water Heater (with high efficiency space heating boiler): $100 Tankless Water Heater (0.82 EF or higher): $100 Storage Water Heater (0.67 EF or higher): $50

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project W-314 updated acceptance test report HNF-4649 for HNF-4648 241-AN-A pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm AN-A Pit Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications. The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4648,24l-AN-A-Pit Leak Detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 was conducted between 23 June and 01 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions. The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Project W-314 acceptance test report HNF-4651 for HNF-4650 SN-268 encasement leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-335 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm Encasement Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4650, SN-268 Encasement Leak Detection ANA-W-LDSTA-335, was conducted between 22 June and 01 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure, were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Project W-314 acceptance test report HNF-4647 for HNF-4646 241-B pit leak detection ANB-WT-LDSTA-231 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm B Pit Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications. The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4646,241-AN-B-Pit Leak Detection ANB-WT-LDSTA-231 was conducted between 26 June and 02 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions. The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Consumer Acceptance Group...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOV incentives, free charging (advertise locations), adverting free charging locations, car-sharing. * EducationCommunication: * Understand total cost of ownership, greater...

306

TRAINING FROM OTHER FACILITIES ACCEPTABLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agreements in place. Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL, HFIR and SNS); Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Lujan Center; ...

307

Nitrogen chiller acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the inspection and testing requirements for the Nitrogen Chiller unit. The Chiller will support the Rotary Mode core Sampling System during the summer. The Chiller cools the Nitrogen Purge Gas that is used when drilling in tank wastes to cool the drill bit.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

Singh, B.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[USDOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards, Washington, DC (United States). Systems Analysis and Standards Div.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

McMillan, J. [ed.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

BEAM STUDIES AT THE SNS LINAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent beam dynamics studies at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac, including major beam loss reduction efforts in the normal conducting linac and in the superconducting linac (SCL), and the simulation and measurement of longitudinal beam halo and longitudinal acceptance at the entrance of the SCL are discussed. Oscillation of the beam centroid around the linac synchronous phase and the phase adiabatic damping curves in the SNS linac are investigated with linac longitudinal models and measured with all the linac beam phase monitors.

Zhang, Yan [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Generic turbine design study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 12, Generic Turbine Design Study was to develop a conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that would perform in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application. A single inlet/outlet casing design that modifies the W251B12 combustion turbine to provide compressed air to the PFBC and accept clean hot air from the PFBC was developed. Performance calculations show that the net power output expected, at an inlet temperature of 59{degrees}F, is 20,250 kW.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Investigating the use of information technology in managing innovation: A case study from a university technology transfer office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of information technology to manage innovation. It is based on a case study on the adoption of an innovation application, which provides an interface between R&D, marketing and administration functions of innovation development. ... Keywords: Innovation applications, Innovation process management, O31 (secondary), O32 (primary), Technology acceptance

Giselle Rampersad; Carolin Plewa; Indrit Troshani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, which typically run between $500  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, whichThe Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects typically run between $500 and $1,000. Though you are not limited to these, typically projects fall within

Saskatchewan, University of

315

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORKING 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORKING 1 Bounds of Asymptotic be effectively disseminated among vehicles in proximity by means of over-the-air communications April 14, 2012; revised January 14, 2013; accepted April 07, 2013; approved by IEEE/ACM TRANSACTIONS

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

316

SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@ Pergamon SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM Nouember 1993; accepted I March 1994) Abstract-e3Nb and 7Li wideline- as well as MAS-NMR measurements were could be reduced to 0.6kHz by using MAS-NMR with a rotational lrequency of 4000Hz, thsre was no second 7

Bluemel, Janet

317

A study of the spin dependence of pion electroproduction near the [delta] region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work studies two double polarized pion electroproduction reactions 1(e', e'p)o0 and H(e', e'r+)n near the A region at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. With the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) ...

Xiao, Yuan, Ph. D., 1974-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

Das, Suman

319

Monte Carlo Study of the Scattering Error of a Quartz Reflective Absorption Tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo model was used to study the scattering error of an absorption meter with a divergent light beam and a limited acceptance angle of the receiver. Reflections at both ends of the tube were taken into account. Calculations of the effect ...

Jacek Piskozub; Piotr J. Flatau; J. V. Ronald Zaneveld

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biology Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Radiation biologists study the effect of radiation on living tissue. This field, which has direct analogies to the SEE studies, looks at the damage sustained by cells in...

322

ATLAS parameter study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to make an independent assessment on the parameters chosen for the ATLAS capacitor bank at LANL. The contractor will perform a study of the basic pulsed power parameters of the ATLAS device with baseline functional parameters of >25 MA implosion current and <2.5 microsecond current risetime. Nominal circuit parameters held fixed will be the 14 nH from the vacuum interface to the load, and the nominal load impedances of 1 milliohm for slow loads and 10 milliohms for fast loads. Single Ended designs, as opposed to bipolar designs, will be studied in detail. The ATLAS pulsed power design problem is about inductance. The reason that a 36 MJ bank is required is that such a bank has enough individual capacitors so that the parallel inductance is acceptably low. Since about half the inductance is in the bank, and the inductance and time constant of the submodules is fixed, the variation of output with a given parameter will generally be a weak one. In general, the dl/dt calculation demonstrates that for the real system inductances, 700 kV is the optimum voltage for the bank to drive X-ray loads. The optimum is broad, and there is little reduction in performance at voltages as low as 450 kV. The direct drive velocity analysis also shows that the optimum velocity is between 480 and 800 kV for a variety of assumptions, and that there is less than a 10% variation in velocity over this range. Voltages in the 120 kV--600 kV range are desirable for driving heavy liners. A compromise optimum operating point might be 480 kV, at which all X-ray operation scenarios are within 10% of their velocity optimum, and heavy liners can be configured to be near optimum if small enough. Based on very preliminary studies the author believes that the choice of a single operating voltage point (say, 480 kV) is unnecessary, and that a bank engineered for dual operation at 480 and 240 kV will be the best solution to the ATLAS problem.

Adler, R.J. [North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Heat Management Strategy Trade Study  

SciTech Connect

This Heat Management Trade Study was performed in 2008-2009 to expand on prior studies in continued efforts to analyze and evaluate options for cost-effectively managing SNF reprocessing wastes. The primary objective was to develop a simplified cost/benefit evaluation for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing that combines the characteristics of the waste generated through reprocessing with the impacts of the waste on heating the repository. Under consideration were age of the SNF prior to reprocessing, plutonium and minor actinide (MA) separation from the spent fuel for recycle, fuel value of the recycled Pu and MA, age of the remaining spent fuel waste prior to emplacement in the repository, length of time that active ventilation is employed in the repository, and elemental concentration and heat limits for acceptable glass waste form durability. A secondary objective was to identify and qualitatively analyze remaining issues such as (a) impacts of aging SNF prior to reprocessing on the fuel value of the recovered fissile materials, and (b) impact of reprocessing on the dose risk as developed in the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Results of this study can be used to evaluate different options for managing decay heat in waste streams from spent nuclear fuel.

Nick Soelberg; Steve Priebe; Dirk Gombert; Ted Bauer

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ecological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Studies Book 1 Rulison Animal (and Fish) Printout . . Results g4-..* 9%- mc,-y----T. . , -..-- x.. ? ,.-: ? . - ; : . * r - . - . ; r m - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

325

In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electric-field-induced microcracking in single crystal Pb,,Mg13Nb23...O3 PbTiO3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electric-field-induced microcracking in single March 2000; accepted for publication 2 May 2000 In this letter, we report in situ transmission electron microscopy TEM study of effect of a cyclic electric field on microcracking in a single crystal piezoelectric

Chen, Haydn H.

326

Irradiation Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II: Irradiation Studies Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division, ...

327

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Study protocol for iQuit in Practice: a randomised controlled trial to assess the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of tailored web- and text-based facilitation of smoking cessation in primary care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,5*, Susan Smith1, James Jamison1, Sue Boase2, Dan Mason1, A Toby Prevost3, James Brimicombe1, Melanie Sloan1, Hazel Gilbert4 and Felix Naughton1 Abstract Background: Primary care is an important setting for smoking cessation interventions. There is evidence... . West R, McNeill A, Raw M: Smoking cessation guidelines for health professionals: an update. Thorax 2000, 55:987–999. 5. Rice VH, Stead LF: Nursing interventions for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008, 1:CD001188. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD...

Sutton, Stephen; Smith, Susan; Jamison, James; Boase, Sue; Mason, Dan; Prevost, A Toby; Brimicombe, James; Sloan, Melanie; Gilbert, Hazel; Naughton, Felix

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

This Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This Study Several studies demonstrated aerosol indirect e ect such as modi cations of cloud properties due to aerosols and corresponding changes in shortwave and longwave radiative uxes. Some recent studies indicated aerosol indirect e ects may not be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. They implied other processes were impacting the cloud optical properties (Kim et al., JGR 2003). To study these other impacts, we extend a previous study to investigate the role of adiabaticity facilitated by mixing in modulating cloud optical properties. We quantify the e ects of mixing by measuring the ratio of the observed cloud water path to its adiabatic value, (adiabaticity, α). The screening criteria for relatively homogeneous stratus

330

Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies  

SciTech Connect

After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments on the flow loop are continuing. Improvements to the software for data acquisition are being made as additional experience with three-phase flow is gained. Modifications are being made to the Cuttings Injection System in order to improve control and the precision of cuttings injection. The design details for a drill-pipe Rotation System have been completed. A US Patent was filed on October 28, 2002 for a new design for an instrument that can generate a variety of foams under elevated pressures and temperatures and then transfer the test foam to a viscometer for measurements of viscosity. Theoretical analyses of cuttings transport phenomena based on a layered model is under development. Calibrations of two nuclear densitometers have been completed. Baseline tests have been run to determine wall roughness in the 4 different tests sections (i.e. 2-in, 3-in, 4-in pipes and 5.76-in by 3.5-in annulus) of the flow loop. Tests have also been conducted with aerated fluids at EPET conditions. Preliminary experiments on the two candidate aqueous foam formulations were conducted which included rheological tests of the base fluid and foam stability reports. These were conducted after acceptance of the proposal on the Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature Conditions. Preparation of a test matrix for cuttings-transport experiments with foam in the ACTF is also under way. A controller for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration and distribution has been designed that can control four transceivers at a time. A prototype of the control circuit board was built and tested. Tests showed that there was a problem with radiated noise. AN improved circuit board was designed and sent to an external expert to verify the new design. The new board is being fabricated and will first be tested with static water and gravel in an annulus at elevated temperatures. A series of viscometer tests to measure foam properties have begun using foam generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF). Investigation of techniques to measure foam quality and size, size distribution and shape of bubbles is continuing.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Furnaces and Boilers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pilot light) Compact size and lighter weight to reduce cycling losses Small-diameter flue pipe 80% to 83% AFUE. High-efficiency heating systems: Condensing flue gases in a second...

333

New Mexico renewable development study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has applied electric grid models and simulation software to problems of national significance. This effort continues with a variety of other projects funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), other federal and state agencies and private companies. Critical to the success of these programs is the ability to integrate regional-scale models of the electric grid, to assess the propagation of grid impacts, and to present interactively the effect of potential mitigating actions required to stabilize the grid. All of these capabilities are applied in this study, to accomplish the following goals and objectives: (1) Develop an AC power flow model representing future conditions within New Mexico's electric grid, using commercial tools accepted by the utility industry; (2) Conduct a 'screening' analysis of options for accelerating potential renewable energy development through the addition of a statewide transmission collector system; (3) Estimate total revenue needed, jobs created (temporary and permanent) plus indirect and direct impacts to the state's economy; (4) Evaluate potential cost allocation methodology; and (5) Issue a project report that will provide information for policy direction by state regulators, project developers, and legislators.

Toole, Gasper [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ewers, Mary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose Malin Bergenstråhle a , Jakob Wohlert a, , Michael E. Himmel b , John W. Brady a, * a Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 February 2010 Received in revised form 5 June 2010 Accepted 25 June 2010 Available online 6 July 2010 Keywords: Cellulase Cellobiohydrolase I Cellulose Computer modeling Molecular dynamics a b s t r a c t Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potentials of mean force for separating short cellooligomers in aqueous solution as a means of estimating the contributions of hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonding to the insolubility of crystalline cellulose. A series of four potential of mean force (pmf) calculations

336

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homes End-Use Equipment Type Equipment Market Shares Index Heating ElecFurnace Gas Furnace LPG Furnace OilHomes (millions) End-Use Equipment Type Appliance stock in millions of units Index Heating FJec Furnace Gas Furnace L P G Furnace OilHomes End-Use Equipment Type Units Efficiency for Stock Equipment Index Heating Elec Furnace Btu.out/Wh.in Gas Furnace AFUE LPG Furnace AFUE Oil

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Higgins coal gasification/repowering study, feasibility study for alternate fuels. Vol. 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Florida Power has completed a study to determine the feasibility of repowering 138 MW gross of oil-fired steam-generating capacity at its A.W. Higgins power station (Pinellas Co., Fla.) by utilizing coal-gasification combined-cycle (CGCC) technology. The repowering would add approximately 320 MW of gross electrical generation to the Higgins station through the use of combustion turbines and heat recovery equipment. This study provided Florida Power with the technical, environmental, and economic information necessary to determine the viability of using CGCC at the Higgins station. The plant would use BGC/Lurgi slagging gasifiers and the Selexol acid-gas removal system. Although this new technology represents an acceptable level of risk for the proposed project to be considered technically feasible, the capital-cost estimates were much higher than expected. Florida Power plans to continue further economic evaluations of this CGCC repowering option.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

VALUE STUDY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARED FOR: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CONTRACT RESOURCES AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SEPTEMBER 2008 UPDATE BY: AON CONSULTING INC. FEBRUARY 1999 UPDATED SEPTEMBER 29, 2008 VALUE STUDY DESK MANUAL Prepared for: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY By: BUCK CONSULTANTS Under DE-AC01-96AD38107 Update Prepared for: DOE By: AON CONSULTING, INC. Under Delivery Order DE-BP01-08MA345678, Contract No. DE-AB01-08-ME11881 Contents PART I Overview of Value Study Illustrative Flow Charts...................................................................................................................................... 1 1. Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 4

339

Studies of spin-orbit correlations at JLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of single spin asymmetries for pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented using the polarized \\sim6 GeV electrons from at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) with the Inner Calorimeter. The cross section versus the azimuthal angle {\\phi}_h of the produced neutral pion has a substantial sin {\\phi}_h amplitude. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x_B and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted and compared with published data.

Mher Aghasyan, Harut Avakian

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Feasibility Study of Biomass Electrical Generation on Tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the St. Croix Tribe are to develop economically viable energy production facilities using readily available renewable biomass fuel sources at an acceptable cost per kilowatt hour ($/kWh), to provide new and meaningful permanent employment, retain and expand existing employment (logging) and provide revenues for both producers and sellers of the finished product. This is a feasibility study including an assessment of available biomass fuel, technology assessment, site selection, economics viability given the foreseeable fuel and generation costs, as well as an assessment of the potential markets for renewable energy.

Tom Roche; Richard Hartmann; Joohn Luton; Warren Hudelson; Roger Blomguist; Jan Hacker; Colene Frye

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies  

SciTech Connect

Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dry Storage Demonstration for High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initially, casks for dry storage of spent fuel were licensed for assembly-average burnup of about 35 GWd/MTU. Over the last two decades, the discharge burnup of fuel has increased steadily and now routinely exceeds 45 GWd/MTU. This feasibility study examines the options available for conducting a confirmatory experimental program supporting regulatory acceptance of practical approaches for storing, and later transporting, spent fuel with burnup well in excess of 45 GWd/MTU under a dry, inert atmosphere.

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Effects of consumers' attitudes and knowledge on the acceptance and utilization of time-of-use rates: Edmond, Oklahoma. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Edmond, Oklahoma, Time-of-use (TOU) Rate Demonstration Project was concerned with the effects of various TOU rate schedules on consumers' electrical usage. Both total usage and temporal patterns of electric consumption were studied in this demonstration. This report summarizes the results of a series of secondary analyses of data based on exit and followup surveys. These analyses were focused principally on the effects of consumers' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the TOU rate structure to which they were assigned, and the impact of these reactions on their electric usage, relative to that of a comparable group of consumers.

Crano, W.D.; Messe, L.A.; Buldain, R.W.; Johnson, C.D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study M2M Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 An irrigation pump connected to a web---to---wireless controller designed by M2M Communications. Agricultural Demand Response Program in California Helps Farmers Reduce Peak Electricity Usage, Operate More Efficiently Year---Round The development of a two---way, web---to---wireless controller for irrigation pumps is the foundation for an agricultural demand response program in California. Designed by M2M Communications of Boise, Idaho, the controller is part of an irrigation load control system that also includes sensors, smart meters, and other monitoring equipment. Partially funded with $2.2 million in Recovery Act stimulus funds awarded by the U.S. Department of

346

THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST L Received 2002 January 16; accepted 2002 June 8 ABSTRACT The gamma-ray burst GRB 000210 had the highest: observations -- gamma-rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION It is observationally well established that about half

Fynbo, Johan

347

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

Frank Macri

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fundamental Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Support of GEO-SEQ LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Tom Daley Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of Fundamental Studies * Technical Status - Petrophysical Relationships - Geochemical Processes - Monitoring Instrumentation * Accomplishments and Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness

350

Residential photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-Cost Solar Array Project engineering area. Final report appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices to a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Appendices include: (1) codes, standards, and manuals of accepted practice-definition and importance; (2) regional code variations-impact; (3) model and city codes-review; (4) National Electric Code (NEC)-review; (5) types of standards-definition and importance; (6) federal standards-review; (7) standards review method; (8) manuals of accepted practice; (9) codes and referenced standards-summary; (10) public safety testing laboratories; (11) insurance review; (12) studies approach; (13) mounting configurations; (14) module/panel size and shape cost analysis; (15) grounding, wiring, terminal and voltage studies; (16) array installation cost summary; (17) photovoltaic shingle/module comparison; (18) retrofit application; (19) residential photovoltaic module performance criteria; (20) critique of JPL's solar cell module design and test specifications for residential applications; and (21) CSI format specification. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Systems Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

Graham, R.L.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Environmental concerns influencing the future development of energy material transportation systems: the year 2000 study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents results of studies conducted to assess the potentially longer-range problems which could hinder the future development of safe and environmentally-acceptable energy material transportation systems. The purpose of this effort is to recommend appropriate action that contributes to the anticipatory management of possible future problems before they can have serious effects on the adequacy or acceptability of the system. Most significant future concerns in energy material transportation relate to potential institutional, legal, political and social problems. Environmental issues are involved in many of these concerns. Selected environmental concerns are discussed that may influence the future development of transportation systems for fossil and nuclear energy materials during the balance of this century. A distinction between potentially real and perceived concerns is made to emphasize basic differences in the recommended approach to solutions of the respective type of potential problem.

DeSteese, J. G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fuel Reliability Program: Proposed RIA Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC is in the process of finalizing the interim RIA failure criteria published in NUREG-0800, Standard Review Plan, Section 4.2, Fuel System Design, Revision 3. A technical evaluation of the RIA issue has been conducted under the auspices of the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program with the objective of proposing a final version of the interim RIA failure criteria for PCMI processes. The approach used in the technical evaluation combined experimental data from a variety of sources, including integral RIA-si...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

EV Everywhere ? Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Workshop David Sandalow Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S. Department of Energy Los Angeles July 30...

357

When to accept no to yesterdays solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will signifi cantly impact commercial practices. Likewise, in the past, the conversion of biomass to biofuels by the biological route yielded a lignin-rich process stream that was...

358

SUPPORTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND ACCEPTABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles increased between 1976 and 1992 from virtually 0 to 80% of new passenger cars. Compared to other two scenarios, the "Mid" scenario is even less aggressive than the...

359

AN EXAMINATION OF PROPOSED ACCEPTANCE TESTING METHODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements are defined by local, State, and Fed eral agencies. It is intended that new HRI's meet stip ulated

Columbia University

360

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Situ Recovery Uranium Mine based on a statistical analysis of data publicly available to help determine with in-situ uranium mining is the potential for spreading groundwater contamination. There is a dearth of detailed analysis and information regarding the outcome10 of in-situ uranium mine remediation to ascertain

Borch, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are 44 experiments with data that the public can freely access.

None

362

Registered Charity Number 207890 Accepted Manuscript  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility

Kumar, Sanjay

363

SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM : Acceptance Checklist...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Software Design Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Project Tracking Checklist Energy.gov Careers & Internships Policy &...

364

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http:www.ornl.govscieesetsd...

365

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 ...

367

Now Accepting Applications for Alvarez Fellowship!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Sciences Directorate. Researchers in computer science, applied mathematics or any computational science discipline who have received their Ph.D. within the...

368

NIST Accepting Proposals for Fundamental Measurement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and other research laboratories and to ... Visit the Physical Measurement Laboratory Web pages ... institutions of higher education; hospitals; nonprofit ...

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

LHC Dipole Acceptance | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet Division designed, constructed and tested dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Each of the BNL-built dipole magnets was tested at the Lab's...

370

ccsd00002956, The Astrophysical Journal, accepted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they compare to atomic di#11;usion coeÃ?cients are shown in Figure 6 of Richard et al. (2002b). Series isochrones for models with atomic di#11;usion and di#11;erent series of models with turbulence are shown for exotic physics as suggested by some authors. Instead, there is a need for a better understanding

371

COMPACT GANTRY WITH LA RGE ENERGY ACCEPTANCE*  

house them. Pioneering work by Trbojevic et al [1] using fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) gantry concept demonstrated the potential of both reducing the size ...

372

federal lab accredit accept and recog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Health Information Technology This temporary ... National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (NELAP ... ENERGY STAR Program EPA ...

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation.

Wu, C.F.; Ward, T.R.; Gregory, P.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Studies in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis: A Personal Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By the early 1970s it had became apparent that the solid phase synthesis of ribonuclease A could not be generalized. Consequently, virtually every aspect of solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) was reexamined and improved during the decade of the 1970s. The sensitive detection and elimination of possible side reactions (amino acid insertion, N{sup {alpha}}-trifluoroacetylation, N{sup {alpha}{var_epsilon}}-alkylation) was examined. The quantitation of coupling efficiency in SPPS as a function of chain length was studied. A new and improved support for SPPS, the 'PAM-resin', was prepared and evaluated. These and many other studies from the Merrifield laboratory and elsewhere increased the general acceptance of SPPS leading to the 1984 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Bruce Merrifield.

Mitchell, A R

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Case Study of Energy Diagnose and Re-commissioning in a Green Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building progress consists of master planning, design detail, construction, acceptance and management phases. Due to lack of communication, there are many gaps between the adjacent phases in building progress, such as, the big gap between construction and acceptance phase. The gaps lead to miss part of design intent when buildings were functioned. Although many prevailing evaluation systems like GOBAS or LEED mean to cover a whole building progress, in reality, they only pay much attention to design phase and generally ignore commissioning phase after construction. It leads an inefficiently facility management of HVAC systems and components. Energy diagnose and re-commissioning by on-site measurement can solve these problems, to improve systems' efficiency and bridge the gap between acceptance and management phase, finally realize a real green building. In this paper, it presents a case study result of applying this approach in a green office building in Beijing and shows how re-commissioning and energy diagnose contribute significantly to reach a real green building for long-term functioning. That Green Office Building was certified as Golden Level by LEED, and evaluated as Level B by GOBAS. All these evaluation did before construction phase. But the actual power consumption, 74kWh/m2.a, is twice as the designed consumption, and is only a bit less than other common office building. One month on-site measurement and half a year of data collected after acceptance phase show that some energy-efficient equipment do not run in a proper way. By re-commissioning, most of the systems in the Green Building work well.

Zhang, Y.; Wei, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

Rigdon, L.

1980-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cannabis sativa : an optimization study for ROI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite hemp's multifarious uses in over 30 countries ranging from the manufacture of paper to specialty textiles, construction, animal feed, and fuel, its acceptance in the US has been shunned because of its association ...

Esmail, Adnan M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Feasibility study of burning waste paper in coal-fired boilers on Air Force installations. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis examined the feasibility of using waste paper derived fuel in coal-fired boilers on Air Force installations in an attempt to help solve air pollution and solid waste disposal problems. The implementation of waste paper derived fuel was examined from both a technical acceptability and an economic feasibility viewpoint. The majority of data for this study was obtained through literature reviews and personal interviews. Waste paper was found to be technically acceptable for use as fuel. However, waste paper has certain characteristics that may create problems during combustion and therefore further research is required. These problems included the possibility of increased nitrous oxide emissions, increased volatile emissions, dioxin and furan emissions, formation of hydrochloric acid, and the presence of heavy metals in emissions and ash.

Smith, K.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Baldrige Stock Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baldrige Stock Studies. From 1994 through 2004, the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program conducted studies around ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O' Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Aging Studies of VCE Dismantlement Returns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VCE is an ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymer binder for filled elastomers which is designed to accept high filler loadings. Filled elastomer parts consist of the binder (VCE), a curing agent (Hylene MP, diphenol-4-4{prime}-methylenebis(phenylcarbamate)), a processing aid (LS, lithium stearate), and filler particles (typically 70% fraction by weight). The curing of the filled elastomer parts occurs from the heat-activated reaction between the hydroxyl groups of VCE with the Hylene MP curing agent, resulting in a cross-linked network. The final vinyl acetate content is typically between 34.9 and 37.9%, while the vinyl alcohol content is typically between 1.27 and 1.78%. Surveillance data for this material is both scarce and scattered, complicating the assessment of any aging trends in systems. In addition, most of the initial surveillance efforts focused on mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and chemical information is therefore lacking. Material characterization and aging studies had been performed on previous formulations of the VCE material but the Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) starting copolymer is no longer commercially available. New formulations with replacement EVA materials are currently being established and will require characterization as well as updated aging models.

Letant, S; Alviso, C; Pearson, M; Albo, R; Small, W; Wilson, T; Chinn, S; Maxwell, R

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t < 1sec., 1sec < t < 10secs., 10secs < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an energy of 1 GeV, and the target material will be natural lead, which will also be the coolant for the reactor assembly. Three proton beam arrangements will be considered, first a single beam (the traditional arrangement) with an entry at the assembly center, two more options will consist of three and six entry locations. The reactor fuel assembly parameters will be based on those of the S-PRISM fast reactor proposed by GE, and the fuel composition and type will be based on that proposed by Aker Solutions for use in their accelerator driven thorium reactor. The following table summarizes the parameters to be used in this study. The isotopic composition of the fertile material is 100% Th-232, and the plutonium isotopic distribution corresponds to that characteristic of the discharge from a typical LWR, following five years of decay. Thus, the isotopic distribution for the plutonium is; Pu-238 2.5%, Pu-239 53.3%, Pu-240 25.1%, Pu-241 11.8%, and Pu-242 7.3%.

Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Performance study of the level-1 di-muon trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An event with two muons in the final state is a distinctive signal and can be triggered efficiently with the use of the level-1 di-muon trigger. Nevertheless triggering is still an issue if these muon tracks are fairly soft and fake di-muon triggers originating from muons that traverse more than one region of the trigger chambers increase the trigger rate. It is important to provide an acceptable trigger rate, while keeping high trigger efficiency to study low-pt $B$-physics such as rare $B$ hadron decays or CP violation in the $B$-events, especially in a multi-purpose experiment like ATLAS. In this note, the level-1 di-muon trigger and its expected performance are described.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Reverse Auction Bidding - Multiple Group Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reverse Auction Bidding is a recently developed auction method. In this form of bidding process, the roles of the bidders and the owner are interchanged in terms of the form of the economic transaction. The owner's objective is to drive the unit rates down and the bidder's objective is to maintain an acceptable profit level. A study into Reverse Auction Bidding commenced at Texas A&M University in 2004 and continues to this time, with this the eighteenth study in the series. This study is the second multi-group study in the research. In this study, a multiple group comparison was made between different numbers of bidders, with Games One, Two and Three having three, four and ten bidders respectively. All participants were faculty and students from the Department of Construction Science. The critical requirement for the participants is that they should have no prior experience using the Reverse Auction Bidding system. The eighteen studies have concentrated on new players, with future studies planned for repeat participants. A number of the recent case studies have shown personality has an impact on the performance of the bidders. However, this work was not controlled for personality, as the research objective was to determine the impact of a different number of bidders in a game. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter test was completed by all participants so that the results could be understood in terms of personality impact on the level of return to each participant. The results showed the number of bidders has a significant impact on the individual returns confirming the earlier work on varying the number of bidders. An increase in the number of bidders was shown to lead to a more competitive economic environment, which given usual economic circumstances lead to a reduction in the number of firms interested in bidding, for the self-evident economic reasons. This work points to the need to investigate a bidding group size of five or six, which is likely to be the self-constrained upper limit in a real economic system. Some interesting observations on the personality types suggest that further work is required in this area.

Zhou, Xun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Optimization Online - A Computational Study of the Cutting Plane ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citation: Research report, Data Driven Decisions Lab, The Ohio State University. Download: Entry Submitted: 09/16/2010. Entry Accepted: 09/16/2010

389

Pharmacokinetic study and effects on growth hormone secretion in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5 Department of Endocrinology, Hippocration Hospital, Athens, Greece. Received: March 17,1992/Accepted in revised form: March 9,1993. Summary. We have ...

390

Studies of 3D structure of the nucleon with CLAS at Jlab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of single-spin asymmetries in pions electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized and polarized targets, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, are presented. A substantial sin phih amplitude has been measured in the the cross section as a function of the azimuthal angle phih of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum has been extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

Mher Aghasyan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Studies of 3D structure of the nucleon with CLAS at JLab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of single-spin asymmetries in pions electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized and polarized targets, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, are presented. A substantial sin {phi}{sub h} amplitude has been measured in the the cross section as a function of the azimuthal angle {phi}{sub h} of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum has been extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

Aghasyan, Mher [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Collaboration: CLAS Collaboration

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electrical Signal Path Study and Component Assay for the MAJORANA N-Type Segmented Contact Detector  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present electrical signal path study is to explore the various issues related to the deployment of highly-segmented low-background Ge detectors for the MAJORANA double-beta decay experiment. A significant challenge is to simultaneously satisfy competing requirements for the mechanical design, electrical readout performance, and radiopurity specifications from the MAJORANA project. Common to all rare search experiments, there is a very stringent limit on the acceptable radioactivity level of all the electronics components involved. Some of the findings are summarized in this report.

Amman, Mark; Bergevin, Marc; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Brian .; Lesko, Kevin T.; Luke, Paul N.; Prior, Gersende; Poon, Alan W.; Smith, Alan R.; Vetter, Kai; Yaver, Harold; Zimmermann, Sergio

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Influence of Defect Kind and Size on Margins With Respect to Fast Fracture of Irradiated PWR Vessels: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI RPV Embrittl ement Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the effects of improved analysis techniques on the calculated margins against crack initiation and fast fracture in PWR vessels. A comparison of this work with previous studies showed that use of more in-depth analytic techniques may lead to more-realistic treatment of surface flaws. Such findings are particularly valuable to utilities developing nondestructive inspection techniques and evaluation methods for demonstrating the acceptability of an irradiated PWR vessel.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Performance Evaluation (Impact Studies)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST-EEEL: Laser and Fiberoptic Power and Energy Calibration Services ... Also available are Strategic Planning Studies and Policy Studies. ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE LTG-3A Automatic Daylighting Control Acceptance Document (Page 1 of 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for buildings with > 5 daylight control systems, sample group glazing must be the same orientation) Control-meter or amp-meter measurement Applicable Control SystemComplete all tests on pages 5 & 6 (No Daylight Test, Full Daylight Test, and Partial Daylight Test) and fill out Pass/Fail section on Page 6 A B C System

397

Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Authoritative discourse in the middle school mathematics classroom: a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standard of communication, ??Instructional programs from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to...communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others?? and students need to learn ??what is acceptable as evidence in mathematics?? (NCTM, 2000, p. 60). But do teachers have a clear understanding of what is acceptable or do they believe that the only acceptable explanations are the ones that they themselves gave to the students? Can teachers accept alternative forms of explanation and methods of solution as mathematically accurate or do they want students to simply restate the teachers?? understandings of mathematics and the problem? The focus of this dissertation is the authoritative discourse practices of classroom teachers as they relate to individual students and large and small groups of students. In this case study, I examine the interactions in one eighth-grade mathematics classroom and the possible sharing of mathematical authority and development of mathematical agency that take place via the teacher??s uses of authoritative discourse. A guiding objective of this research was to examine the ways a teacher??s discursive practices were aligned with her pedagogical intentions. The teacher for this study was an experienced eighth-grade mathematics teacher at a rural Central Texas middle school. The teacher was a participant in the Middle School Mathematics Project at Texas A&M University. Results of an analysis of the discourse of six selected classes were combined with interview and observation data and curriculum materials to inform the research questions. I found that through the teacher??s regular use of authoritative discursive devices, mathematical authority was infrequently shared. Also the teacher??s uses of authoritative discourse helped create an environment where mathematical agency was not encouraged or supported. The teacher??s use of various discursive devices helped establish and maintain a hierarchy of mathematical authority with students at the lowest level reliant on others for various mathematical decisions.

Harbaugh, Adam Paul

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORISE: Worker Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Worker Health Studies Capabilities Overview Illness and Injury Surveillance Worker Health Research Medical Data Management Beryllium Exposure Studies and Testing Radiation Exposure...

402

Underwater Glider System Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leonard, N. E. , “ONR Underwater Glider Systems Study GliderDavis. The Autonomous Underwater Glider Spray. IEEE Journalto the ONR Committee for Underwater Glider Systems Study,

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wind/Hydro Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

404

NP Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BES) Biological and Environmental Science (BER) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Agenda Hotel Case Studies Case Study Worksheets...

405

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) Systems Study Task 1 report: Waste management system reliability analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study evaluates the relative reliabilities of systems with and without an MRS facility using current facility design bases. The principal finding of this report is that the MRS system has several operational advantages that enhance system reliability. These are: (1) the MRS system is likely to encounter fewer technical issues, (2) the MRS would assure adequate system surface storage capacity to accommodate repository construction and startup delays of up to five years or longer if the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) were amended, (3) the system with an MRS has two federal acceptance facilities with parallel transportation routing and surface storage capacity, and (4) the MRS system would allow continued waste acceptance for up to a year after a major disruption of emplacement operations at the repository.

Clark, L.L.; Myers, R.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lessons Learned from JTA Tester Safety Studies  

SciTech Connect

EP401575, Issue C, calls out a requirement to perform safety studies for testers that are used to accept Joint Test Assembly (JTA) product at Pantex (Reference 1). The underlying motivation is to ensure that personnel hazards due to inadvertent initiation of electro-explosive devices (EEDs) during JTA testing are understood and minimized. Studies have been performed on the B61-7/11 JTA, B61-3/4/10 JTA, B83 JTA, and W76 Type 2F testers at Pantex (References 2-5). Each of these studies includes an examination of the relevant Pantex tester as well as the instrumentation and War Reserve (WR) hardware. In performing these analyses, several themes have emerged that could be useful for the Phase 6.3 design efforts for the weapons, the associated instrumentation, and the JTA testers. This report summarizes the lessons learned from these studies. Note that in some cases, the recommendations provided below to enhance safety during JTA testing operations (e.g., adding isolation resistors in the monitoring lines) may result in a reliability degradation or other surety impact. Thus it is important to consider these lessons learned in the context of the overall design and to make tradeoffs in light of the integrated surety objectives. The lessons learned are listed in five different categories, summarized as: (1) Instrumentation considerations; (2) WR design considerations; (3) Tester considerations; (4) Administrative procedures during JTA assembly; and (5) Administrative procedures prior to and during JTA testing. The first three focus on minimizing the probability of inadvertent application of power to EED initiation lines due to component, connector, and assembly failures. The last two describe procedural steps that can be taken at Pantex to either minimize the risk (e.g., by ensuring that tester power supplies cannot supply excessive power to the unit under test) or to mitigate the consequences of unexpected EED initiation (e.g., by instructing test operators to avoid standing in areas where they could be at risk in the event of EED initiation).

R. L. Bierbaum

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Conclusions of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Program and its results and applications have been examined in the previous 13 articles of this special issue. This paper summarizes the results and discusses its successes and lessons learned. The robust data from the Capstone DU Aerosol Study have provided a sound basis for assessing the inhalation exposure to DU aerosols and the dose and risk to personnel in combat vehicles at the time of perforation and to those entering immediately after perforation. The Human Health Risk Assessment provided a technically sound process for evaluating chemical and radiological doses and risks from DU aerosol exposure using well-accepted biokinetic and dosimetric models innovatively applied. An independent review of the study process and results is summarized, and recommendations for possible avenues of future study by the authors and by other major reviews of DU health hazards are provided.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Trap characterization by gate-drain conductance and capacitance dispersion studies of an AlGaNGaN heterostructure field-effect transistor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Redwing Epitronics/ATMI, Phoenix, Arizona 85027 Received 14 December 1999; accepted for publication 21

Yu, Edward T.

410

A Study of Adaptive and Optimizing Behavior for Electric Vehicles Based on Interactive Simulation Games and Revealed Behavior of Electric Vehicle Owners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incentives and Acceptance Electric, Hybridand Other Alternative of Vehicles, Report for United States Department Energy,

Turrentine, Thomas; Lee-Gosselin, Martin; Kurani, Kenneth; Sperling, Daniel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB8  

SciTech Connect

Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected during SME processing. Mercury behavior was consistent with that seen in previous SRAT runs. Mercury was stripped below the DWPF limit on 0.8 wt% for all runs. Rheology yield stress fell within or below the design basis of 1-5 Pa. The low acid Tank 40 run (106% acid stoichiometry) had the highest yield stress at 3.78 Pa.

Newell, J.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Attic and Wall Insulation: $1000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Construction: $600-$3500/home Home Energy Audit: Free Boilers: $150 or $400 depending on AFUE Furnaces: $250 or $400 depending on AFUE Programmable Thermostats: $25

413

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Appliance Program Efficient Appliance Program Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Smart Strip: $30 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces (AFUE 92% or higher): $300 Boilers (AFUE 92% or higher): $500 Dishwashers: $100 Clothes Washers: $75 Refrigerators: $100 Smart Strip: $15 Programmable thermostats: $15 Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who install energy

414

National Transmission Grid Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grid Study Grid Study U.S. Department of Energy The Honorable Spencer Abraham Secretary of Energy May 2002 ii National Transmission Grid Study National Transmission Grid Study i ii National Transmission Grid Study National Transmission Grid Study iii How This Study Was Conducted The National Energy Policy Plan directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to address them. DOE began by conducting an independent analysis of U.S. electricity markets and identifying transmission system bottlenecks using DOE's Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS). DOE's analysis, presented in Section 2, confirms the central role of the nation's transmission

415

WTC Disaster Study Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Technical aspects of evacuation and emergency response procedures; Specific ... resulting from the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster study impact ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing recommendations for DWPF along with some data related to Safety Class documentation at DWPF. Some significant observations regarding SB8 follow: Reduced washing in Tank 51 led to an increase in the wt.% soluble solids of the DWPF feed. If wt.% total solids for the SRAT and SME product weren’t adjusted upward to maintain insoluble solids levels similar to past sludge batches, then the rheological properties of the slurry went below the low end of the DWPF design bases for the SRAT and SME. Much higher levels of dissolved manganese were found in the SRAT and SME products than in recent sludge batches. Closed crucible melts were more reduced than expected. The working hypothesis is that the soluble Mn is less oxidizing than assumed in the REDOX calculations. A change in the coefficient for Mn in the REDOX equation was recommended in a separate report. The DWPF (Hsu) stoichiometric acid equation was examined in detail to better evaluate how to control acid in DWPF. The existing DWPF equation can likely be improved without changing the required sample analyses through a paper study using existing data. The recommended acid stoichiometry for initial SB8 SRAT batches is 115-120% stoichiometry until some processing experience is gained. The conservative range (based on feed properties) of stoichiometric factors derived in this study was from 110-147%, but SRNL recommends using only the lower half of this range, 110-126% even after initial batches provide processing experience. The stoichiometric range for sludge-only processing appears to be suitable for coupled operation based on results from the run in the middle of the range. Catalytic hydrogen was detectable (>0.005 vol%) in all SRAT and SME cycles. Hydrogen reached 30-35% of the SRAT and SME limits at the mid-point of the stoichiometry window (bounding noble metals and acid demand).

Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Reorientation Mechanism of Hydroxide Ions in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

simulations with polarizable potential models. Two major solvation structures of OH- were suggested by our study. One of which has four accepted hydrogen bonds from water and the other has five accepted hydrogen bonds. A weak hydrogen bond donated by the hydroxide ion was observed in our simulations. The simulated reorientation relaxation times of OH- are in qualitative agreement with CTTS experiments. We propose a two-step mechanism for the reorientation of hydroxide ions in water. First, the reorientation of OH- is initiated by the coupled translation with water molecules in its first solvation shell. Second, the OH- hydrogen relaxes to the minimum energy state. The rate-limiting step in this mechanism is the first step, translation diffusion of the first solvation shell water molecules. The activation energies of reorientation of OH- and translation of H2O determined from our simulations are 22.5 and 18.5 kJ/mol, respectively. These values fall in the range of the measured data. This work was supported by the US Department of energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest national Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Sun, Xiuquan; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Dang, Liem X.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

ttbar+large missing energy from top-quark partners: a comprehensive study at NLO QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a detailed study of top-quark partner production in the ttbar plus large missing energy final-state at the LHC, presenting results for both scalar and fermionic top-quark partners in the semi-leptonic and dileptonic decay modes of the top quarks. We compare the results of several simulation tools: leading-order matrix elements, next-to-leading order matrix elements, leading-order plus parton shower simulations, and merged samples that contain the signal process with an additional hard jet radiated. We find that predictions from leading-order plus parton shower simulations can significantly deviate from NLO QCD or LO merged samples and do not correctly model the kinematics of the ttbar + ETmiss signature. They are therefore not a good framework for modeling this new physics signature. On the other hand, the acceptances obtained with a merged sample of the leading-order process together with the radiation of an additional hard jet are in agreement with the NLO predictions. We also demonstrate that the scale variation of the inclusive cross section, plus that of the acceptance, does not accurately reflect the uncertainty of the cross section after cuts, which is typically larger. We show the importance of including higher-order QCD corrections when using kinematic distributions to determine the spin of the top-quark partner.

Radja Boughezal; Markus Schulze

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Photovoltaics as a worldwide energy option: A case study in development strategy  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy technologies, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaics (PV), and wind energy have made significant gains in cost and performance in the past decades. As a result, there have been high expectations on the part of the public for these sources to play a major role in future energy supply, especially as environmental concerns about conventional sources increase. Despite these past gains and high expectations, the global potential of renewable energy technologies still remains largely untapped, principally because of issues of industrialization and user acceptance. There is increasing recognition that government energy programs must incorporate a broader strategy than the traditional basic research role if they are to address these issues. Essential elements of this strategy are affordable technology, a healthy industry, sustained market growth, user acceptance, and equitable policy and financial environments. The US Department of Energy (DOE) programs in solar electric conversion have already started the development of the required broader-based effort. This paper presents the status of that work, utilizing the US National Photovoltaic Program as a case study.

Jones, G.; Pate, R.; Hill, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 510 TO SUPPORT A SECOND TANK 40 DECANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) is currently being processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using Frit 510. The slurry pumps in Tank 40 are experiencing in-leakage of bearing water, which is causing the sludge slurry in Tank 40 to become dilute at a rapid rate. Currently, the DWPF is removing this dilution water by performing caustic boiling during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle. In order to alleviate prolonged SRAT cycle times, which may eventually impact canister production rates, the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) performed a 100K gallon supernate decant of Tank 40 in April 2008. SRNL performed a supplemental glass variability study to support the April 2008 100K gallon decant incorporating the impact of coupled operations (addition of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) stream). Recently LWO requested that SRNL assess the impact of a second decant (up to 100K gallon) to the Frit 510-SB4 system. This second decant occurred in June 2008. LWO provided nominal compositions on May 6, 2008 representing Tank 40 prior to the second decant, following the second decant, and the SB4 Heel prior to blending with Tank 51 to constitute SB5. Paper study assessments were performed for these options based on sludge-only and coupled operations processing (ARP addition), as well as possible Na{sub 2}O additions (via NaOH additions) to both flowsheets. A review of the ComProTM database relative to the compositional region defined by the projections after the second decant coupled with Frit 510 identified only a few glasses with similar glass compositions. These glasses were acceptable from a durability perspective, but did not sufficiently cover the new glass compositional region. Therefore, SRNL recommended that a supplemental variability study be performed to support the June 2008 Tank 40 decant. Glasses were selected for the variability study based on three sludge compositional projections (sludge-only, coupled and coupled + 2 wt% Na{sub 2}O) at waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF (32%, 35% and 38%). These nine glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All of the glasses that were selected for this study satisfy the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) criteria and are deemed processable and acceptable for the DWPF, except for the SB4VS2-03 (sludge-only at 38% WL) target composition. This glass fails the T{sub L} criterion and would not be considered processable based on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The durabilities of all of the study glasses (both quenched and ccc) are well below that of the normalized leachate for boron (NL [B]) of the reference EA glass (16.695 g/L) and are predictable using the current PCCS models. Very little variation exists between the NL [B] of the quenched and ccc versions of the glasses. There is some evidence of a trend toward a less durable glass as WL increases for some of the sludge projections. Frit 510 is a viable option for the processing of SB4 after a second Tank 40 decant with or without the addition of products from the ARP stream as well as the 2 wt% Na{sub 2}O addition. The addition of ARP had no negative impacts on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Thermodynamic Modeling Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Studies Modeling Studies J. Lindner, L. T. Smith, J. C. Luthe, L. Pearson. R. K. Toghiani, Y. Xia, and P. Naik Institute for Clean Energy Technology Mississippi State University May 20,2009 Initial Tank Composition Remove liquid to reflect undrained saltcake Stage 1 Dissolution Remove transfer stream 1 liquids transfer stream 0 liquids recycle solids liquids transfer stream 1 liquids recycle solids Next Stage of Dissolution DWPF recycle Thermodynamic Modeling Studies 2 Overview of Presentation * Database Activities and Needs * C farm retrievals and neural network development * Thermodynamic data and computational methods for liquid waste flowsheet modeling (SRS) * Aluminum solubility studies Thermodynamic Modeling Studies 3 Database Activities and Needs * Earlier a mid-term study addressed the solubility of a number of systems if

424

Science DMZ Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ Case Studies Developed by ESnet engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance problems encountered at any institution by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high performance science

425

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final design of the mast was completed (Task 5). The mast is consisting of two welded plate girders, set next to each other, and spaced 14-inches apart. Fabrication of the boom will be completed in two parts solely for ease of transportation. The end pivot connection will be made through a single 2-inch diameter x 4 feet-8 inch long 316 SS bar. During installation, hard piping make-ups using Chiksan joints will connect the annular section and 4-inch return line to allow full movement of the mast from horizontal to vertical. Additionally, flexible hoses and piping will be installed to isolate both towers from piping loads and allow recycling operations respectively. Calibration of the prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed and experiments are now being conducted. We were able to generate up to 95% quality foam. Work is currently underway to attach the Thermo-Haake RS300 viscometer and install a view port with a microscope to measure foam bubble size and bubble size distribution. Foam rheology tests (Task 13) were carried out to evaluate the rheological properties of the proposed foam formulation. After successful completion of the first foam test, two sets of rheological tests were conducted at different foam flow rates while keeping other parameters constant (100 psig, 70F, 80% quality). The results from these tests are generally in agreement with the previous foam tests done previously during Task 9. However, an unanticipated observation during these tests was that in both cases, the frictional pressure drop in 2 inch pipe was lower than that in the 3 inch and 4 inch pipes. We also conducted the first foam cuttings transport test during this quarter. Experiments on aerated fluids without cuttings have been completed in ACTF (Task 10). Gas and liquid were injected at different flow rates. Two different sets of experiments were carried out, where the only difference was the temperature. Another set of tests was performed, which covered a wide range of pressure and temperature. Several parameters were measured during these tests including differential pressure and mixture density in the annulus. Flow patterns during the aerated fluids test have been observed through the view port in the annulus and recorded by a video camera. Most of the flow patterns were slug flow. Further increase in gas flow rate changed the wavy flow pattern to slug flow. At this stage, all of the planned cuttings transport tests have been completed. The results clearly show that temperature significantly affects the cuttings transport efficiency of aerated muds, in addition to the liquid flow rate and gas liquid ratio (GLR). Since the printed circuit board is functioning (Task 11) with acceptable noise level we were able to conduct several tests. We used the newly designed pipe test section to conduct tests. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand in the pipe section. The results indicated that we can distinguish between different sand levels. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications (installation of magnetic flow meter, pipe fittings and pipelines) to the dynamic bubble characterization facility (DTF, Task 12) were completed. An Excel program that allows obtaining the desired foam quality in DTF was developed. The program predicts the foam quality by recording the time it takes to pressurize the loop with nitrogen.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Documents: Engineering Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Depleted UF6 99 KB details HTML Icon Preconceptual Design Studies and Cost Data of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants 4 KB details Engineering Analysis Report...

427

OSCARS Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback: info@es.net OSCARS Case Study OSCARS Virtual Circuits Extend JGI Network Capacity The Challenge In February 2010, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) at Lawrence Berkeley...

428

Supplying Water Social Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects SUPPLYING OUR WATER NEEDS: Africa Project Summary Scenario Student Pages References Index SubjectContent Area: World CulturesSocial Studies...

429

International Energy Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phadke AAPhadke@lbl.gov (510) 486-6855 Links International Energy Studies Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

430

Firefighter Fatality & Injury Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Firefighter Fatality & Injury Studies. Wind-Driven Fire in a Ranch-Style House in Texas, 2009. On April 12, 2009, a fire in ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Molecular Simulation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced CO2 Adsorption in Ti-exchanged Zirconium Organic Frameworks – A Molecular Simulation Study. Author(s), Ravichandar Babarao ...

432

Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Witherell's Letter (Postscript) Final Version of the Neutrino Source Study Report (PDF) Organization Chart (Postscript) Two Day Meeting at Fermilab on February 15-16, 2000...

433

3D Microstructure Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2012 ... 2012 Summer School on 3D Microstructure Studies ... analysis of serial section data and synthetic microstructure generation, executables are.

434

Front End StudiesFront End Studies--International Design StudyInternational Design Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/MC Concepts developed during study 2A Concern on Vrf' as function of Bsol Need baseline design for IDS need optimize with lower fields · V'rf

McDonald, Kirk

435

Institute for Advanced Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies NMC leverages the strengths of three research universities to build joint programs, develop strategic partnerships, provide common organization and facilities. Contact Leader TBD LANL Program Administrator Pam Hundley (505) 663-5453 Email Building regional partnerships in education, leveraging strengths of three research universities The Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) works with the three New Mexico research universities (University of New Mexico, New Mexico Tech, and New Mexico State University) to develop research and educational collaborations and partnerships. To facilitate interactions between the universities and LANL, the three New Mexico schools established the New Mexico Consortium (NMC), a nonprofit

436

VALUE STUDY | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home VALUE STUDY VALUE STUDY VALUE STUDY More Documents & Publications VALUE STUDY...

437

Contemporary China Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary China Studies Postgraduate #12;Programme: Contemporary China Studies Postgraduate1 Chinese - Level 2 5 2 · Basic vocabulary & grammar Dealing with China: 3 1 Intercultural management · China's political constellation and its impact on business life · Human resources issues for China

Steels, Luc

438

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

439

Geysers reservoir studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Decontamination solution development studies  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement.

Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Independent Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Health Studies Independent Health Studies A study of cancer rates within a 15-mile radius of Brookhaven National Laboratory found no relationship between Brookhaven Lab and cancer. Suffolk County Task Force Report (PDF) New York State Department of Health Cancer Registry Report (PDF) Report of the Rhabdomyosarcoma Task Force (PDF) According to a 1998 report by the Suffolk County Environmental Task Force on the Laboratory, "cancer rates of all types of cancers [the task force] studied are not elevated near BNL" for the years 1979-93. Task Force Chair Roger Grimson, a biostatistician and an associate professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, concluded in a Newsday article at that time, "There is no link between Brookhaven National Lab and

442

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Front End StudiesFront End Studies International Design StudyInternational Design Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/MC Concepts developed during study 2A Concern on Vrf' as function of Bsol Need baseline design for IDS need longer than nB = 10 optimize with lower fields · V'rf

McDonald, Kirk

444

Front End StudiesFront End Studies--International Design StudyInternational Design Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed during study 2A Concern on Vrf' as function of Bsol Need baseline design for IDS need baseline longer than nB = 10 optimize with lower fields · V'rf

McDonald, Kirk

445

IGCC system studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems studies are performed on both the currently available, but not fully demonstrated, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies and the future technologies. The objective of these studies is to support and guide the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s METC Strategic Product Planning efforts. Through these efforts, the research, development and demonstration needs of various alternative gasification and power island components can be quantified and factored into the overall planning processes.

Rath, L.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

PFBC system studies  

SciTech Connect

System studies of PFBC systems are summarized in this paper. These studies include: thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} stochastic analysis; dynamic modeling; scoping studies; and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) studies. These studies are being used for various reasons: to validate the economic and environmental benefits that this technology offers the country, to identify issues associated with the commercialization of PFBC technology, and to help the DOE and its industrial partners focus on those RD&D activities which produce the biggest bang for the buck, an increasingly important goal in the present climate of increasingly tight Federal and corporate budgets. This year, the conclusion that NO{sub x} generation in the solids combustor is the most important factor in determining NO{sub x} production in an uncontrolled system was of particular significance. The initial assessment of HAP`s, showing a possible reduction in HAPs emissions if the barrier filter is operated below 600 C in a first-generation PFBC, was the first time this type of data was produced on the ability of PFBC systems to be a low HAP`s emission technology. Work will continue to improve these analytic tools used in these system studies useful for both DOE and its industrial partners.

Reed, M.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Feasibility Study of Fuel Cell Cogeneration in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Up until now, most of the literature on fuel cell cogeneration describes cogeneration at commercial sites. In this study, a PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell cogeneration system was designed for an industrial facility and an economic analysis was performed. The US DOE Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database was examined to determine what industry considers a good investment for energy saving measures. Finally, the results of the cogeneration analysis and database investigation were used to project the conditions in which the PC25C might be accepted by industry. Analysis of IAC database revealed that energy conservation recommendations with simple paybacks as high as five years have a 40% implementation rate; however, using current prices the simple payback of the PC25C fuel cell exceeds the likely lifetime of the machine. One drawback of the PC25C for industrial cogeneration is that the temperature of heat delivered is not sufficient to produce steam, which severely limits its usefulness in many industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of the system is highly dependent on energy prices. A five year simple payback can be achieved if the cost of electricity is $0.10/kWh or greater, or if the cost of the fuel cell decreases from about $3,500/kW to $950/kW. On the other hand, increasing prices of natural gas make the PC25C less economically attractive.

Phelps, S. B.; Kissock, J. K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Mini-Brayton economic RTG study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of a radioisotope heated Mini-Brayton power system to the 1973 USAF/AEC requirements established for the SURVSATCOM Mission. The principal requiremenets of the power system, are: 400 We power level; maximum weight 205 lbs.; $1.2 to 2.0 million per unit cost; and 5y mission duration. A radioisotope heat source that meets the ACE Nuclear Safety Criteria is presented. The major aspects of the Reference Design MB-ERTG are summarized. The Reference Design, utilizes a flexible Brayton rotating unit (BRU), a /sup 244/Cm heat source with ceramic clad fuel cylinders and an aluminum radiator. The flexible BRU has a variable power output capability, from 400 We to 3000 We, and is an important factor in the formulation of a cost effective development plan. The system weight is 186 lb and unit cost, including the /sup 244/Cm fuel, acceptance testing and delivery is $748,000. The total development cost for the 5-yr program is estimated at $16.4M with an additional $6.5M required for /sup 244/Cm heat source development support, /sup 244/Cm fuel, heat source fabrication and capital equipment expenditures. (LCL)

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Empirical Study of MacroBIM and Conceptual Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) has set up a mark in the construction industry over a decade. In order to gain benefit of BIM in estimating the project cost at the early stage of construction with the limited data available, a new concept of MacroBIM has been introduced in the industry. However, limited amount of research has been implemented to determine how MacroBIM has been accepted in the construction industry. Most research was focused on the accuracy of the conceptual estimation. This research attempted to determine the effectiveness of MacroBIM process applied at early stages of construction for conceptual cost estimation. Experts from the discipline of architecture, contractor and owners were interviewed and their professional opinions on MacroBIM were analyzed using grounded theory. The results show that, compared to the traditional conceptual estimating process, MacroBIM is an effective method for 1) saving labor hours, 2) conveying assumptions with the help of its visualization capabilities, 3) enhancing the collaboration among the project participants, and 4) evaluating multiple design scenarios. However, fear of using MacroBIM and trust in its outcome existed among some contractors, architects, and owners because this technology has not matured yet. Moreover, the need of interoperability between the MacroBIM tools and MicroBIM tools, such as Revit, has also surfaced in the study.

Gajbhiye, Anand Dhanraj

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Research foci for career and technical education: findings from a national Delphi study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying a research agenda and critical research activities is crucial for continuous development of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs that meet the needs of students, industry, and society. Previous studies have expressed a need for relevant and focused research for the CTE profession. The primary purpose of this study was to identify consensus among CTE experts using a Delphi technique regarding problems, objectives, and activities that serve as a research agenda for CTE. The study panel was composed of experts from 25 states in the United States and represented 57 affiliations and organizations with direct ties to CTE. The Delphi process for this study was conducted in three rounds. Data were collected using the online survey collector, Survey Monkey™. The qualitative data were analyzed using the Affinity Diagram method of data analysis. At the conclusion of the data analysis from the Delphi rounds, the basic structure for the National CTE Research Agenda was developed. Rounds Four and Five served as validation rounds for the findings from the Delphi process. Data collection methods included online instruments using an internet-based survey tool. Data analysis revealed five research problem areas, 15 research objectives and 53 research activities which were organized into the National CTE Research Agenda structure. Findings from this study also revealed a CTE Research Agenda Logic Model which illustrated a systematic form of the research structure developed from this study. The National CTE Research Agenda is further defined in a color model which included the five research problem areas and 15 CTE research objectives identified in this study. At the conclusion of the validation rounds, the National CTE Research Agenda Logic Model was developed and the National CTE Research Agenda structure was accepted by the expert panel with a 97% acceptance rate. Based on the findings of this study, a sustained effort for research in CTE should be made by scholars in collaboration with national and international associations and organizations. The results of this study suggest a structure in which researchers should engage in focused and meaningful research in CTE. Future research is recommended to examine the issues identified by this expert panel.

Lambeth, Jeanea Marie

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Power of a Question: A Case Study of Two Organizational Knowledge Capture Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designers have many options for how to encode knowledge, although most are based on declarative representations. This paper explores the use of questions to represent knowledge. Practioner experiences implementing two knowledge resources using a question-based representation are described. In both resources, the use of "questions" was chosen as both a nonthreatening way of engaging users and for its value in initiating thinking processes. Both systems have succeeded in capturing the interest of users and serve as valuable components of the organization's knowledge capture program. This paper describes the systems, the underlying design approach, and results from system evaluation. Since the goal of any knowledge resource is to facilitate the reuse of knowledge, it is important to understand the impact that different knowledge representations could have on system acceptance. This study raises several research issues based on experiences using the unusual representation of "questions." 1.

Lynne P. Cooper

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

McMillan, J. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Economic feasibility study of a wood gasification-based methanol plant: A subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an economic feasibility study for a wood-gasification-based methanol plant. The objectives were to evaluate the current commercial potential of a small-scale, wood-fed methanol plant using the SERI oxygen-blown, pressurized, down-draft gasifier technology and to identify areas requiring further R and D. The gasifier gas composition and material balance were based on a computer model of the SERI gasifier since acceptable test data were not available. The estimated capital cost was based on the Nth plant constructed. Given the small size and commercial nature of most of the equipment, N was assumed to be between 5 and 10. Only large discrepancies in gasifier output would result in significant charges in capital costs. 47 figs., 55 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Municipal solid wastes contain numerous substances of potential environmental concern. While some understanding of the composition of raw municipal waste and its leachate products is available, no information regarding characteristics of solid, liquid and gaseous outputs from anaerobic digestion exists. If centralized anaerobic digestion plants are to be environmentally viable, the characteristics and environmental effects of effluents from these plants must be acceptable. The environmental concerns are particularly acute where ground water supplies are precariously low and the water table is high, South Florida is such a location. A characterization and environmental study was initiated by the Resource Recovery Group on August 1978. The specific objectives are: (1) systematic characterization of solid, liquid and gaseous inputs and outputs; (2) investigations of leaching characteristic of output solid and liquid effluents, and the transport of pollutants to and through ground water systems; and (3) analysis of environmental and process parameters to obtain causal relationships.

Sengupta, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Nemerow, N; Daly, Jr, E L; Farooq, S; Chriswell, C

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) system studies digest  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has sponsored system studies to support the evaluation of alternative configurations and operations for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) and the development of system requirements and design specifications. These studies are generally directed toward evaluating the impacts of alternatives to the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and fuel rod consolidation, waste form and characteristics sequences, cask and canister concepts, allocation of waste acceptance rights, and system throughput rates. The objectives of this document are: To present major system issues and related system element issues in a structured manner; to discuss key results of major system studies and explain the basis for certain current system assumptions; to summarize the scope and results of completed system studies that are still relevant at the time this document is published; and to provide the background needed for identifying and prioritizing system issues to be resolved. Consistent with the objectives, the document does not include low-level subsystem studies addressing system element issues that do not interact with overall system issues. The document is expected to be updated as major new system studies are completed and significant new results are available.

McLeod, N.B. (Johnson and Associates Inc., Fairfax, Virginia (United States)); Nguyen, T.D.; Drexelius, R. (USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)); McKee, R.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Structural studies of bacteriophage Hong Kong 97 Prohead I and development of nano-particle applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fischer, R. ; Manchester, M. Nano Lett 2010, 10, (1), 305-These efforts produced a nano machine reprogrammed to be ainto tumor cells. Nano Medicine 2010. Manuscript Accepted.

Huang, Rick Kuo-Jui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acceptability study afue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Study on Thermal Aging Effect on the Microstructure of 316 and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CF3M cast stainless steels, currently under development at ORNL, meet ITER acceptance criteria in terms of a variety of properties such as mechanical ...

462

A Comparative Study of the Environmental Impact of Online and Offline Movie Rental Businesses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis contains two papers, recently presented at international conferences and accepted for publication in recognized journals. The purpose of this thesis is to assess… (more)

Velásquez, Marcelo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Operations Information for Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Information for Studies Operations Information for Studies This page contains historical information about hydropower operations. Reclamation UC Region 24-Month Studies FY2009 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2009 (Oct, 2008-Sept, 2009) FY2010 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2010 (Oct, 2009-Sept, 2010) FY2011 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct, 2010-Sept, 2011) FY2012 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2012 (Oct, 2011-Sept, 2012) FY2013 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2013 (Oct, 2012-Sept, 2013) CRSP Projected Power Releases From USBR (Excel) The most recent file of projected future power releases from CRSP Dams, median projection

464

Seal design alternatives study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

Van Sambeek, L.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (US); Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

How We Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How We Study How We Study Make Observations Develop and Apply Models Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally How We Study Print E-mail No single scientific discipline or research method can address the full range of questions related to global change. Physical, geological, chemical, biological, ecological, social, behavioral, and economic processes interact with each other in various ways-with changes to one system inevitably affecting many others. Understanding the full picture of complex interactions requires diverse expertise, capabilities, and scientific approaches-ranging from controlled