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1

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DE-AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Stress Engineering Services SCNGO FY13-1424 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Deepwater Permanent Subsea Pressure Compensated Chemical Reservoir...

2

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Houston Offshore Engineering SCNGO FY14-1524 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters...

3

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DE-AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE University of Oklahoma SCNGO FY1224 months Gary Covatch Norman, OK Reduction of Uncertainty in Surfactant-Flooding Pilot Design using Multiple Single...

4

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Brine Chemistry SCNGO 2012; FY1236 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Corrosion and Scale at Extreme Temperature and Pressure Theory and Practical Testing of...

5

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Significant progress has been made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. RPSEA has concluded an industry-wide collaborative effort to identify focus areas for research awards under this program. This effort is summarized in the RPSEA Draft Annual Plan, which is currently under review by committees established by the Secretary of Energy.

Russell E. Fray

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Progress continues to be made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. Significant progress was made in development of the draft program solicitations. In addition, RPSEA personnel continued an aggressive program of outreach to engage the industry and ensure wide industry participation in the research award solicitation process.

Russell E. Fray

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote:BEAMENV-39658RPSEA Final Report

8

rpsea | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgram Consortium - RPSEA Publications KMD

9

RPSEA Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote:BEAMENV-39658RPSEA Final

10

FinalTechnicalReport_15U5O2I-11_RPSEA.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Report RPSEA - Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America Report No.: 15U502I-11, Rev. 2 Document No.: 15U5O2I-11 Date: 2014-12-30 DNV GL - Report No....

11

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inc (CTI) was contracted to perform both single-well chemical tracer tests and Praxair was contracted to perform the CO 2 injection. In the single well tracer test, a...

12

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

produced water samples from active well sites without any pretreatment for organic removal. Both the PEE and CTA membranes displayed excellent salt rejection capabilities...

13

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.OfficeNote:BEAMENV-39658

14

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RPSEA FE University of Connecticut SCNGO FY14-16 30 months Richard Baker Storrs, CT Subsea High Voltage Direct Current Connectors for Environmentally Safe and Reliable Powering...

15

42677RPSEA | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICS H.CarbonMarch Value4 3.P D ATFOR

16

RPSEA Phase 2 Final Report: MSDC Electrical System for Deepwater...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the seafloor. It is projected that more subsea production will be moving towards more remote areas (>100 km) from land. In the context of such a trend, the delivery of electric...

17

Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America RPSEA | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge AndREII JumpInformation to Secure Energy for

18

RPSEA Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems, composition, structural development, ground-water flow history, and uranium distribution: The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology Report...

19

RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery and Salt Production - Jim Silva, GE Oil & Gas 9:30 a.m. Appalachian Shale and Barnett Area Water Shale Coalition 8:30 a.m. Meeting Overview & Agenda - Kent Perry, Vice President, Onshore Programs Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production - Yongchun Tang, PEER Institute Shale Gas

Yener, Aylin

20

Masses of Fe-61 and Fe-62  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL RKVIK% C VO LUMK 15, N UMBKB, 5 Masses of 'Fe and Fef MA Y 1977 J. D. Cossairt, R. E. Tribble, * and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute, Texas A AM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 4 October 1976) The mass excesses... of 'Fe and Fe have been measured using the Ni(a, Be) 'Fe and Ni("B,"N) Fe reactions. The mass excesses obtained are M( 'Fe) = ?58.92 ~ 0.02 MeV and M("Fe) = ?58.85 + 0.07 MeV. The results are consistent with recent predictions from two different mass...

Cossairt, J. D.; Tribble, Robert E.; Kenefick, R. A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Getting to Santa Fe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capital City Cab (Santa Fe taxi company) - 50 each way. Reservation not required Hertz car rental (LANL discount code 72120) National car rental (in town location) - (LANL...

22

Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

Liu, Tianbiao

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

RPSEA awards a major research grant to Rubin's research group (January 2004)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in gas sands present in deep and ultra-deep water in the Gulf of Mexico. The project is tied to potential. This number represents only three to four dry holes drilled for gas in deep water which could be avoided, production and transportation of natural gas resources) is funding the project called "Combined Use

Rubin, Yoram

24

FinalTechnicalReport_15U5O2I-11_RPSEA.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tank Closure and

25

Theoretical study of the interaction of Fe, Fe/sup +/, and FeCO with Ar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab initio Hartree--Fock calculations were performed on FeAr and FeAr/sup +/ in order to determine the interaction of both neutral and singly-ionized Fe atoms trapped in Ar, and on ArFeCO and FeCOAr in order to ascertain the effect of an Ar matrix on the FeCO molecule. Quadrupole splittings and isomer shifts are computed using ab initio orbital populations and charge densities scaled by a relativistic factor. Good agreement between calculated and experimental hyperfine parameters is found in each case. The interaction energy for Fe/sup +/--Ar has been computed by ab initio Hartree--Fock and effective-core potential (ECP) methods. Both approaches yield a minimum between Fe/sup +/ and Ar at approximately 7.6 bohr.

Braga, M.; Almeida, A.L.; Taft, C.A.; Hammond, B.L.; Lester W.A. Jr.

1988-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Relative g-factor measurements in {sup 54}Fe, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 58}Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The g factors of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in {sup 54}Fe and {sup 58}Fe have been measured relative to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state g factor of {sup 56}Fe using the transient-field technique in inverse kinematics. The results are in satisfactory agreement with recent shell model calculations in the fp model space. For {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Fe the g factors approach Z/A and are therefore also consistent with collective interpretations of these 2{sup +} states.

East, M. C.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Chamoli, S. K.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Pinter, J. S.; Crawford, H. L.; Mantica, P. F. [NSCL and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wilson, A. N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

FE Transition Deliverables  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCity ofAugust 31,April 9,FE Transition

29

miniFE Benchmark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNLBuildings andExternal Links ExternalmdtestminiFE

30

Fe(A)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFast pandemicODU)Fe(A)

31

DE-FE0005958  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/136P2DOE/NETL MethaneFE0005958

32

Ion irradiation of Fe-Fe oxide core-shell nanocluster films:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

irradiation of Fe-Fe oxide core-shell nanocluster films: Effect of interface on stability of magnetic properties. Ion irradiation of Fe-Fe oxide core-shell nanocluster films:...

33

SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School 1501 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87505 P.O. Box 5340 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Main: (505) 989-6300 www.sfindianschool.org Main and only Entrance...

34

Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an -(Fe,Cr Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO...

35

Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (?-Fe2O3). Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (?-Fe2O3)....

36

Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reach the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Fick’s laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.

KUn Shao; Di Chen; Chaochen Wei; Michael S. Martin; Xuemei Wang; Youngjoo Park; Ed Dein; Kevin R. Coffey; b , Yongho Sohn; Bulent H. Sencer; J. Rory Kennedy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Interstitial Fe in MgO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isolated {sup 57}Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of {sup 57}Mn decaying to {sup 57}Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

Mølholt, T. E., E-mail: tem4@hi.is; Gislason, H. P.; Ólafsson, S. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20846 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Weyer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050 (South Africa); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Durban University of Technology, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20846 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Langouche, G. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralings fysika, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sielemann, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

Dilnesa, B.Z., E-mail: belay.dilnesa@gmail.com [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Wieland, E. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Waste Management, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lothenbach, B. [Empa, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Dähn, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Waste Management, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Scrivener, K.L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratory for Construction Materials, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fe/Au Multilayers: Structure and Magnetoresistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the magnetoresistance (MR) in two sets of Fe/Au multilayers, with varying (1) Fe layer thickness, t{sub Fe} = 3-10 nm, and (2) Au layer thickness t{sub Au} = 5-15 nm, grown on Si substrates by sputtering. The multilayer interface structure and magnetic properties were studied by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). The study was undertaken to understand the correlation between structure of these multilayers and their magneto-transport properties.

Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, D. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prajapat, C. L. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

FE Blog | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department of9ofDepartment ofatBlog FE Blog RSS

42

Electronic behavior of three oxygen non-stoichiometric Fe4+/Fe3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

r(T), thermoelectric power a(T), and magnetic susceptibility w(T). Oxidation of Ca 2 Fe 2 O 5 by annealing in ozone progresses by oxygen insertion to give conductive CaFeO...

43

fe0013723-UTA | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams To Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing Last Reviewed 1292014 DE-FE0013723 Goal The overall objective of this...

44

fe0024314-swri | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Natural Gas Surface Process Equipment for Replacement of Water as Primary Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Last Reviewed 1272015 DE-FE0024314 Goal The goal is to develop...

45

Fe-V redox flow batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A redox flow battery having a supporting solution that includes Cl.sup.- anions is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, a catholyte having Fe.sup.2+ and Fe.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, and a membrane separating the anolyte and the catholyte. The anolyte and catholyte can have V cations and Fe cations, respectively, or the anolyte and catholyte can each contain both V and Fe cations in a mixture. Furthermore, the supporting solution can contain a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- anions.

Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

fe0024293-geglobal | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unconventional Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate nXis Well Integrity Inspection in Unconventional Wells Last Reviewed January 2015 DE-FE0024293...

47

fe0024271-utaustin | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fracture Diagnostics Using Low Frequency Electromagnetic Induction and Electrically Conductive Proppants Last Reviewed January 2015 DE-FE0024271 Goal The goal of this project is to...

48

Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

FE Petroleum Reserves News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Petroleum Reserves News FE Petroleum Reserves News RSS June 30, 2011 Department of Energy Update on Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sale On June 23, 2011, the International Energy...

50

Structural and magnetic properties of the ordered FePt{sub 3}, FePt and Fe{sub 3}Pt nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fe{sub x}Pt{sub 100?x} nanoparticles (NPs) with different nominal atomic rations (30?x?80) were synthesized at 700 °C by the sol–gel method. The structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the samples were investigated. When the Fe content in the Fe–Pt alloy NPs was 30 at%, FePt{sub 3} NPs were successfully synthesized. With the increase in Fe content up to 50 at%, it was found that the superlattice reflections (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) appeared, which indicated the formation of the L1{sub 0}-FePt phase. Meanwhile, the FePt{sub 3} fraction was reduced. When the Fe content increased to 60 at%, single-phase L1{sub 0}-FePt NPs were synthesized. The coercivity (Hc), saturation magnetization (Ms) and chemical order parameter S for Fe{sub 60}Pt{sub 40} NPs were as high as 10,200 Oe, 17.567 emu/g and 0.928, respectively. With the further increase of the Fe content to 80 at%, only Fe{sub 3}Pt phase existed and the Hc of the Fe{sub 3}Pt NPs decreased drastically to 360 Oe. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}Pt, FePt and FePt{sub 3} nanoparticles was obtained by sol–gel method. The effect of iron and platinum content on structural and magnetic properties of the FePt nanoparticles was investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • L1{sub 2}-FePt{sub 3}, L1{sub 0}-FePt and L1{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}Pt NPs were synthesized by sol–gel method. • The chemical order parameter S affects the magnetic properties of the Fe–Pt alloy. • Structural and magnetic properties of the Fe–Pt alloy NPs were studied. • The synthetic route in this study will open up the possibilities of practical use.

Liu, Yang [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiang, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Yaxin; Zhang, Yongjun; Liu, Huilian; Zhai, Hongju; Liu, Yanqing [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Yang, Jinghai, E-mail: jhyang1@jlnu.edu.cn [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education, Siping 136000 (China); Yan, Yongsheng, E-mail: yanyongsheng215@126.com [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide...

52

Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purification and Characterization of NiFe-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Purification and Characterization of NiFe-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1....

53

Study of Fe-Co Nanocomposite Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moessbauer study of nanogranular ferromagnetic FeCo films is presented. Two ways of production of nanocomposite systems were employed: (i) hollow cathode plasma jet deposition process, and (ii) laser ablation from Fe-Co metallic targets by means of a KrF excimer laser and r.f. magnetron sputtering. Complementary information on the composition of the samples were obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance of {sup 57}Fe and {sup 59}Co nuclei, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The films contain crystalline nanoparticles, 5-20 nm in size, embedded in an amorphous matrix.

Lancok, A.; Klementova, M. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Rez 1001 (Czech Republic); Kohout, J. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics. Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Miglierini, M. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Rez 1001 (Czech Republic); Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Fendrych, F.; Lancok, J. [Institute of Physics AS CR, v. v. i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

FE0005889_UTPermian | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Case Studies of the ROZ CO2 Flood and the Combined ROZMPZ CO2 Flood at the Goldsmith Landreth Unit, Ector County, Texas Last Reviewed 12162014 DE-FE0005889 Goal The goal of this...

55

fe0024311-ttu | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maximize Liquid Oil Production from Shale Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs by Cyclic Gas Injection Last Reviewed 12102014 DE-FE0024311 Goal The goal is to evaluate the oil...

56

Thermodynamics of the Magnetite-Ulvöspinel (Fe3O4-Fe2TiO4) Solid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Magnetite-Ulvspinel (Fe3O4-Fe2TiO4) Solid Solution. Thermodynamics of the Magnetite-Ulvspinel (Fe3O4-Fe2TiO4) Solid Solution. Abstract: The thermodynamics of mixing and its...

57

Underwater Explosive Shock Consolidation of Nanocomposite Pr2Fe14B/-Fe Magnetic Powders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance permanent magnets has focused attention on exchange-coupled nanocomposites because of their low to fabricate exchange-coupled Pr2Fe14B/-Fe nanocomposite bulk magnets, using explosively generated shock waves, ensured exchange coupling between the hard and soft phases, resulting in magnetic properties better than

Liu, J. Ping

58

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ ­Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets Z.Q. Jin between neigh- boring magnetic phases.1,2 The prerequisite for effective exchange coupling is a small are usually used to produce single-phase microcrystalline permanent magnets, are not favored in making bulk

Liu, J. Ping

59

The mechanical properties of FeAl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Only in the last few years has progress been made in obtaining reproducible mechanical properties data for FeAl. Two sets of observations are the foundation of this progress. The first is that the large vacancy concentrations that exist in FeAl at high temperature are easily retained at low temperature and that these strongly affect the low-temperature mechanical properties. The second is that RT ductility is adversely affected by water vapor. Purpose of this paper is not to present a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of FeAl but rather to highlight our understanding of key phenomena and to show how an understanding of the factors which control the yield strength and fracture behavior has followed the discovery of the above two effects. 87 refs, 9 figs.

Baker, I. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States); George, E.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evidence for weak electronic correlations in Fe-pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, charge dynamics at and near the Fe L edges is investigated in Fe pnictide materials, and contrasted to that measured in other Fe compounds. It is shown that the XAS and RIXS spectra for 122 and 1111 Fe pnictides are each qualitatively similar to Fe metal. Cluster diagonalization, multiplet, and density-functional calculations show that Coulomb correlations are much smaller than in the cuprates, highlighting the role of Fe metallicity and strong covalency in these materials. Best agreement with experiment is obtained using Hubbard parameters U {approx}< 2eV and J {approx} 0.8eV.

Yang, W.L.

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evidence for weak electronic correlations in Fe-Pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, charge dynamics at and near the Fe L edges is investigated in Fe pnictide materials, and contrasted tothat measured in other Fe compounds. It is shown that the XAS and RIXS spectra for 122 and 1111 Fe pnictides are each qualitatively similar to Fe metal. Cluster diagonalization, multiplet, and density-functional calculations show that Coulomb correlations are much smaller than in the cuprates, highlighting the role of Fe metallicity and strong covalency in these materials. Best agreement with experiment is obtained using Hubbard parameters U<~;; 2eV and J ~;; 0.8eV.

Yang, W. L.; Sorini, A. P.; Chen, C-C.; Moritz, B.; Lee, W.-S.; Vernay, F.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Denlinger, J. D.; Delley, B.; Chu, J.-H.; Analytis, J.G.; Fisher, I. R.; Ren, Z. A.; Yang, J.; Lu, W.; Zhao, Z. X.; van den Brink, J.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T. P.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Magnetic interaction in oxygenated alpha Fe-phthalocyanines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alpha iron phthalocyanines (?-FePc) oxygenated at low temperatures were investigated with the help of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements (SQUID) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that upon oxygenation of ?-FePc, new species were formed which could be associated with Fe{sup III}Pc oxygen adducts. Unexpectedly, magnetically split spectrum of oxygenated ?-FePc was observed below 20 K. In-field Mössbauer spectra in a 5 T external magnetic field at 5K and magnetization measurements indicate antiferromagnetic coupling in oxygenated ?-FePc.

Kuzmann, Ern?, E-mail: kuzmann@caesar.elte.hu; Homonnay, Zoltán; Horváth, Attila [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, 1512 Budapest (Hungary); Pechousek, Jiri; Cuda, Jan; Machala, Libor; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Zboril, Radek [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Experimental Physics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science Palacky University, 17. Listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Yin, Houping; Wei, Yen [Department of Chemistry, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Klencsár, Zoltán [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Kubuki, Shiro [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Nath, Amar [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Asheville, NC 28804 (United States)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Membrane separation advances in FE hydrogen program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its inception in Fiscal Year 2003 the US Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Hydrogen from Coal Program has sponsored more than 60 projects and made advances in the science of separating out pure hydrogen from syngas produced through coal gasification. The Program is focusing on advanced hydrogen separation technologies, which include membranes, and combining the WGS reaction and hydrogen separation in a single operation known as process intensification. The article explains the technologies and describes some key FE membrane projects. More details are available from http://www.fossil.energy.gov. 1 fig.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei, E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hydrocarbon Inhibition and HC Storage Modeling in Fe-Zeolite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inhibition and HC Storage Modeling in Fe-Zeolite Catalysts for HD Diesel Engines Hydrocarbon Inhibition and HC Storage Modeling in Fe-Zeolite Catalysts for HD Diesel Engines...

66

Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates...

67

Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: Evidence of photoinduced isomerisation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model ({mu}-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}S)Fe{sub 2}(CO){sub 4}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds.

Kania, Rafal; Hunt, Neil T. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, SUPA, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Frederix, Pim W. J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, SUPA, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Wright, Joseph A.; Pickett, Christopher J. [Energy Materials Laboratory, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Ulijn, Rein V. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom)

2012-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Design of FePd spring actuators Taishi Wada*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The coil spring made by a FSMA is activated by the attractive magnetic force produced by electromagnets on the above principle by using polycrystalline FePd alloy. Since the stiffness of the FePd coil spring become actuation. Keywords: actuator, coil spring, FePd, wire, ferromagnetic shape memory alloy, superelasticity

Taya, Minoru

69

Low 60Fe abundance in Semarkona and Sahara 99555  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron-60 (t1/2=2.62 Myr) is a short-lived nuclide that can help constrain the astrophysical context of solar system formation and date early solar system events. A high abundance of 60Fe (60Fe/56Fe= 4x10-7) was reported by in situ techniques in some chondrules from the LL3.00 Semarkona meteorite, which was taken as evidence that a supernova exploded in the vicinity of the birthplace of the Sun. However, our previous MC-ICPMS measurements of a wide range of meteoritic materials, including chondrules, showed that 60Fe was present in the early solar system at a much lower level (60Fe/56Fe=10-8). The reason for the discrepancy is unknown but only two Semarkona chondrules were measured by MC-ICPMS and these had Fe/Ni ratios below ~2x chondritic. Here, we show that the initial 60Fe/56Fe ratio in Semarkona chondrules with Fe/Ni ratios up to ~24x chondritic is 5.4x10-9. We also establish the initial 60Fe/56Fe ratio at the time of crystallization of the Sahara 99555 angrite, a chronological anchor, to be 1.97x10-9. The...

Tang, Haolan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Multiferroicity and spiral magnetism in FeVO{sub 4} with quenched Fe orbital moments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FeVO{sub 4} has been studied by heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, electric polarization and single-crystal neutron-diffraction experiments. The triclinic crystal structure is made of S-shaped clusters of six Fe{sup 3+} ions, linked by VO{sub 4}{sup 3-} groups. Two long-range magnetic ordering transitions occur at T{sub N1}=22 K and T{sub N2}=15 K. Both magnetic structures are incommensurate and below T{sub N2}, FeVO{sub 4} becomes weakly ferroelectric coincidentally with the loss of the collinearity of the magnetic structure in a very similar fashion than in the classical TbMnO{sub 3} multiferroic material. However we argue that the symmetry considerations and the mechanisms invoked to explain these properties in TbMnO{sub 3} do not straightforwardly apply to FeVO{sub 4}. First, the magnetic structures, even the collinear structure, are all acentric so that ferroelectricity in FeVO{sub 4} is not correlated with the fact magnetic ordering is breaking inversion symmetry. Regarding the mechanism, FeVO{sub 4} has quenched orbital moments that questions the exact role of the spin-orbit interactions.

Daoud-Aladine, A.; Chapon, L. C. [ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kundys, B.; Martin, C.; Simon, C. [Laboratoire CRISMAT-UMR, 6508 ENSI CAEN, 6, Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Radaelli, P. G. [ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Brown, P. J. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Corrosion performance of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe aluminide alloys in complex gas environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alumina-forming structural alloys can offer superior resistance to corrosion in the presence of sulfur-containing environments, which are prevalent in coal-fired fossil energy systems. Further, Fe aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in these systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. In addition, surface coatings of Fe aluminide are being developed to impart corrosion resistance to structural alloys. This paper describes results from an ongoing program that is evaluating the corrosion performance of alumina-forming structural alloys, Fe-Al and Fe aluminide bulk alloys, and Fe aluminide coatings in environments typical of coal-gasification and combustion atmospheres. Experiments were conducted at 650-1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HCl-containing gases. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales and to determine the modes of corrosion degradation that occur in the materials when they are exposed to S/Cl-containing gaseous environments.

Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

In-field {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy below spin-flop transition in powdered troilite (FeS) mineral  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powdered troilite (FeS), extracted from the Cape York IIIA octahedrite meteorite, was investigated employing in-field {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The study identified a typical behavior of polycrystalline antiferromagnetic material under external magnetic fields. The in-field evolution of the {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra showed that the spin-flop transition in the FeS system occurs at a field higher than 5 T.

Cuda, Jan, E-mail: jan.cuda@upol.cz; Tucek, Jiri; Filip, Jan; Malina, Ondrej; Krizek, Michal; Zboril, Radek [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Experimental Physics and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University in Olomouc, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kohout, Tomas [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki University, Finland and Institute of Geology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Controlled oxidation of FeCo magnetic nanoparticles to produce faceted FeCo/ferrite nanocomposites for rf heating applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled oxidation of FeCo magnetic nanoparticles to produce faceted FeCo/ferrite nanocomposites XRD and TEM showed MNPs to have a thin ferrite shell. Nanopowders were isochronally annealed and oxidation products in FeCo/ferrite nanocomposite materials and their influence on applications.4 We report

Laughlin, David E.

74

Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

Siefert, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effect of nitrogen upon structural and magnetic properties of FePt in FePt/AlN multilayer structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of the addition of nitrogen in FePt layers for ultrathin FePt/AlN multilayer structures. X-ray diffraction results reveal that a compressive stress relaxation occurs after annealing owing to the release of interstitial nitrogen atoms in the FePt layers. The introduction of nitrogen also induces a large in-plane compressive strain during grain growth not seen in FePt deposited without nitrogen. This strain is considered to decrease the driving force for (111) grain growth and FePt ordering.

Gao, Tenghua, E-mail: gao.t.ab@m.titech.ac.jp; Zhang, Cong; Sannomiya, Takumi; Muraishi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Activation of the S-H Group in Fe(µ2-SH)Fe Clusters: S-H Bond Strengths and Free Radical Reactivity of the Fe(µ2-SH)Fe Cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants were determined for the abstraction of hydrogen atom from (OC)3Fe(?-SH)2Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2H2) and (OC)3Fe(?-SCH3)(?-SH)Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2MeH) by benzyl radical in benzene. From the temperature dependent rate data for Fe2S2H2, ?H‡ and ?S‡ were determined to be 2.03 ? 0.56 kcal/mol and 19.3 ? 1.7 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 1.2 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. For Fe2S2MeH, ?H‡ and ?S‡ were determined to be 1.97 ? 0.46 kcal/mol and 18.1 ? 1.5 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 2.3 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. Temperature dependent rate data are also reported for hydrogen atom abstraction by benzyl radical from thiophenol (?H‡ = 3.62 ? 0.43 kcal/mol, ?S‡ = 21.7 ? 1.3 cal/mol K) and H2S (?H‡ = 5.13 ? 0.99 kcal/mol, ?S‡ = 24.8 ? 3.2 cal/mol K), giving kabs at 25?C of 2.5 ? 105 and 4.2 ? 103 M 1 s 1, respectively. DFT calculations predict S-H bond strengths of 73.1 and 73.2 kcal/mol for Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH, respectively. Free energy and NMR chemical shift calculations confirm the NMR assignments and populations of Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH isomers. Derived radicals Fe2S2H• and Fe2S2Me• exhibit singly occupied HOMOs with unpaired spin density distributed between the two Fe atoms, a bridging sulfur, and d?-bonding between Fe centers. The S-H solution bond dissociation free energy (SBDFE) of Fe2S2MeH was found to be 69.4 ± 1.7 kcal/mol by determination of its pKa (16.0 ± 0.4) and the potential for the oxidation of the anion, Fe2S2Me- of 0.26 ± 0.05 V vs. ferrocene in acetonitrile (corrected for dimerization of Fe2S2Me•). This SBDFE for Fe2S2MeH corresponds to a gas phase bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of 74.2 kcal/mol, in satisfactory agreement with the DFT value of 73.2 kcal/mol. Replacement of the Fe-Fe bond in Fe2S2MeH with bridging ?-S (Fe2S3MeH) or ?-CO (Fe2S2(CO)MeH) groups leads to (DFT) BDEs of 72.8 and 66.2 kcal/mol, the latter indicating dramatic effects of choice of bridge structure on S-H bond strengths. These results provide a model for the reactivity of hydrosulfido sites of low-valent heterogeneous FeS catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Franz, James A.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Bowden, Thomas A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Appel, Aaron M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Bitterwolf, Thomas E.; Dupuis, Michel

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

MAS NMR Study of the Metastable Solid Solutions Found in the LiFePO4/FePO4 System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared to the lithium-electron interaction in x Li FeP04 (by Fermi contact interactions between the lithium ions andlithium ions in LiFePC^ suggests a modification of the Fe -O-P interaction.

Cabana, Jordi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Interfacial electronic transport phenomena in single crystalline Fe-MgO-Fe thin barrier junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin filtering effects in nano-pillars of Fe-MgO-Fe single crystalline magnetic tunnel junctions are explored with two different sample architectures and thin MgO barriers (thickness: 3–8 monolayers). The two architectures, with different growth and annealing conditions of the bottom electrode, allow tuning the quality of the bottom Fe/MgO interface. As a result, an interfacial resonance states (IRS) is observed or not depending on this interface quality. The IRS contribution, observed by spin polarized tunnel spectroscopy, is analyzed as a function of the MgO barrier thickness. Our experimental findings agree with theoretical predictions concerning the symmetry of the low energy (0.2?eV) interfacial resonance states: a mixture of ?{sub 1}-like and ?{sub 5}-like symmetries.

Gangineni, R. B., E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Bellouard, C., E-mail: christine.bellouard@ijl.nancy-universite.fr; Duluard, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Negulescu, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); UFR de Sciences et Techniques, Matériaux, microélectronique, acoustique, nanotechnologies (GREMAN), University François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Baraduc, C.; Gaudin, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Tiusan, C., E-mail: coriolan.tiusan@phys.utcluj.ro [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Center of Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28, RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Photo- and thermal-induced antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling in Fe/(Fe-Si) superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have grown via sputtering, Fe - iron silicide superlattices that exhibit novel thermal and photomagnetic effects. For {approximately}15 {Angstrom} nominal thickness of the silicide layer the superlattices are antiferromagnetically (AF) coupled at room temperature. Upon cooling below 100K, they gradually revert to ferromagnetic alignment, but the AF coupling is restored at low temperature by exposure to visible light off sufficient intensity (> 10 mW/mm{sup 2}). These effects are due to charge carriers in the silicide spacer layer which, when thermally or photo-generated, are capable of communicating spin information between the Fe layers.

Mattson, J.E.; Fullerton, E.E.; Kumar, S.; Lee, S.R.; Sowers, C.H.; Grimsditch, M.; Bader, S.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parker, F.T. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Center for Magnetic Recording Research

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Overview of the development of FeAl intermetallic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

B2-phase FeAl ordered intermetallic alloys based on an Fe-36 at.% Al composition are being developed to optimize a combination of properties that includes high-temperature strength, room-temperature ductility, and weldability. Microalloying with boron and proper processing are very important for FeAl properties optimization. These alloys also have the good to outstanding resistance to oxidation, sulfidation, and corrosion in molten salts or chlorides at elevated temperatures, characteristic of FeAl with 30--40 at.% Al. Ingot- and powder-metallurgy (IM and PM, respectively) processing both produce good properties, including strength above 400 MPa up to about 750 C. Technology development to produce FeAl components for industry testing is in progress. In parallel, weld-overlay cladding and powder coating technologies are also being developed to take immediate advantage of the high-temperature corrosion/oxidation and erosion/wear resistance of FeAl.

Maziasz, P.J.; Liu, C.T.; Goodwin, G.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

XANES study of Fe-implanted strontium titanate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of strontium titanate SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) depend to a great extent on the substitutional dopants and defects of crystal structure. The ion beam implantation method was used for doping STO (001) crystals with Fe at different doses. Implanted samples were then annealed at 350°C in oxygen to induce recrystallization and remove oxygen vacancies produced during ion implantation process. The effect of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing was studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) method and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). XANES allowed to monitor the change in structure of STO crystals and in the local environment of Fe following the implantation and annealing steps. SQUID measurements revealed correlation between magnetic moment and Fe implantation dose. Ferromagnetic hysteresis was observed on selected Fe-implanted STO at 5 K. The observed magnetic properties can be correlated with the several Fe oxide phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies.

Lobacheva, O.; Goncharova, L. V.; Chavarha, M.; Sham, T. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

FE Speeches and Testimony | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department of9ofDepartment ofatBlog FE

84

FE Petroleum Reserves News | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOEElectricalonJusticeEnergy7249 FederalandFAR27.pdfEnclosure (1)FE

85

Microsoft Word - FeV.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWER MEETING Tulsa16, 20138,AprilF F Fig. 1.Fe

86

Microsoft Word - FeVI.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWER MEETING Tulsa16, 20138,AprilF F Fig. 1.Fe6

87

FE Clean Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4Evendale,OpenFAOSTAT Jump to:FE Clean

88

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical...

89

Spin glass behavior in FeAl2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature.10 For higher Al concen- trations, Fe12xAlx alloys form a series of complex ordered crystal structures, generally with weak magnetic behavior. While no magnetic or spin-glass transitions have been iden- tified in these alloys, a recent site...-diluted Ising model has suggested the existence of a spin-glass phase in disordered alloys of this type.11 In the dilute Fe limit, Fe-Al alloys are nonmagnetic, and there is some uncertainty as to whether the Fe ions lose their moment through spin...

Lue, CS; Oner, Y.; Naugle, Donald G.; Ross, JH.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Structure and Properties of Magnetic (Co, Fe, Fe{sub 3}C and Ni) Carbon Beads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical properties due to the surface or quantum-size effects. Particular attention has been focused on magnetic nanoparticles and substantial progress has been done in this field. In this work magnetic composites, consisting of elementary metals or carbides nanocrystallites, stabilized in carbon matrix, were prepared by the procedure comprising formation of appropriate metal acrylamide complexes, followed by frontal polymerization and pyrolysis of the polymer at various temperatures. Application of frontal polymerization and further pyrolysis enables formation of composite beads consisting of Co, Fe, Fe{sub 3}C or Ni nanocrystallites stabilized in carbon matrix. It was found that the lowest pyrolysis temperature, which enables the production of metallic nanocrystallites, was 673 K for Co and Ni, and 773 K for Fe. The magnetic properties of the beads, percentage of the metallic component, their composition and shape depended on the pyrolysis temperature. Extracts on the basis of composites containing Fe{sub 3}C showed no cytotoxicity, whereas those containing Co and Ni exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to concentrations of 6.25 mg/ml.

Leonowicz, Marcin; Izydorzak, Marta [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Pomogailo, Anatolii D.; Dzhardimalieva, Gulzhian I. [Institute of Chemical Physics RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

RDX degradation using an integrated Fe(0)-microbial treatment approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remediation challenge at numerous munitions manufacturing and load-assemblage-package facilities. This work was enhanced by anaerobic bacteria that feed on cathodic hydrogen (i.e., H2 produced during anaerobic Fe(0) corrosion by water). Apparently, the hydrogenotrophic consortium that exploits Fe(0) corrosion

Alvarez, Pedro J.

92

Hydrogen decrepitation of sintered NdFeB magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of a NdFeB sintered magnet is studied. Hydrogenation at temperatures above 200 C is used to crumble the Nd-enriched phase. The grains of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase remain undamaged. Hydrogen desorption occurs in several stages and is complete at approximately 400 C.

Stiller, C.; Roth, S.; Binner, A. [Inst. fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)] [Inst. fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Synthesis and Characterization of Ferroferriborate (Fe3BO5) Nanorods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a number of interesting properties, including its catalytic oxidation of ethyl acetate and methanol[5] and Fe3BO5 and GdBO3 particles produced from interface diffusion between Fe­Gd particle cores and B2O3/H3) could be used as a weak reducing agent for producing Au and Pd nanoparticles in the presence of oleyl

Wang, Zhong L.

94

Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering March 22, 2013 #12;Morning (Fluid Mechanics) A. Flow measurement B. Fluid properties C. Fluid, and compressors K. Non-Newtonian flow L. Flow through packed beds Fluids and FE #12;#12;#12;Fluids § Fluids

Provancher, William

95

Synthesis and properties of titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties of titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles: A tunable solid-state Fe(IIIII) redox system. Synthesis and properties of titanomagnetite (Fe3-xTixO4) nanoparticles: A...

96

Synthesis and Photoexcited Charge Carrier Dynamics of beta-FeOOH...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photoexcited Charge Carrier Dynamics of beta-FeOOH Nanorods. Synthesis and Photoexcited Charge Carrier Dynamics of beta-FeOOH Nanorods. Abstract: Akaganeite(B-FeOOH) nanorods of...

97

Anharmonic phonons and magnons in BiFeO3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phonon density of states (DOS) and magnetic excitation spectrum of polycrystalline BiFeO3 were measured for temperatures 200 < T < 750K , using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Our results indicate that the magnetic spectrum of BiFeO3 closely resembles that of similar Fe perovskites, such as LaFeO3, despite the cycloid modulation in BiFeO3. We do not find any evidence for a spin gap. A strong T-dependence of the phonon DOS was found, with a marked broadening of the whole spectrum, providing evidence of strong anharmonicity. This anharmonicity is corroborated by large amplitude motions of Bi and O ions observed with neutron diffraction. These results highlight the importance of spin-phonon coupling in this material.

Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Huq, Ashfia [ORNL; Gout, Delphine J [ORNL; Brown, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Wang, Kefeng [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing; Ren, Zhifeng [Boston College, Chestnut Hill

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Physica B 322 (2002) 236247 The electronic properties of FeCo, Ni3Mn and Ni3Fe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Introduction The Fe- and Mn-based transition metal (TM) alloys possess a number of unusual with the local-density functional method. It is shown that the value of the magnetic moment is insensitive- stant and magnetization of Fe­Co alloys depend non-monotonically on Co concentration, and change

Kim, Jai Sam

99

Interface structures in FePtFe3Pt hard-soft exchange-coupled magnetic nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interface structures in FePtÃ?Fe3Pt hard-soft exchange-coupled magnetic nanocomposites Jing Li with sizes 10 nm. This ensures the effective exchange coupling of magnetically hard and soft phases. High magnetic materials, the performance of conventional bulk permanent magnetic ma- terials is limited by its

Liu, J. Ping

100

Enhanced coercivity in thermally processed ,,Nd,Dy...,,Fe,Co,Nb,B...5.5/ -Fe nanoscale multilayer magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and theoretical research has been done on exchange-coupled hard-soft1­14 permanent magnets. However, up to now, ex, the addition of the soft phase to the hard phase enhances the remanence but deteriorates the permanent-magnet,10 exchange-coupled -Fe/Nd­Fe­B multilayer magnets as investigated by Shindo et al.11 the Nd

Liu, J. Ping

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Rauchfuss Group Prep of Fe2S2(CO)6 Large Scale Synthesis of Fe2S2(CO)6.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rauchfuss Group Prep of Fe2S2(CO)6 Large Scale Synthesis of Fe2S2(CO)6. A three neck, 5-liter round was filtered though a small plug of Celite to remove elemental sulfur. Solvent was removed, and the solid and reduced pressure. We do not recommend sublimation as a method of purification. IR (pentanes): 2084 (s

Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

102

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

104

Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments. Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments....

105

Physical Properties of Intermetallic FE2VA1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe{sub 2}VAl has recently been discovered to have a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity, moderately enhanced specific heat coefficient, and a large DOS at the Fermi level by photoemission. This triggered a round of heated research to understand the ground state of this material, both theoretically and experimentally. here they report a comprehensive characterization of Fe{sub 2}VAl. X-ray diffraction exhibited appreciable antisite disorder in all of our samples. FTIR spectroscopy measurements showed that the carrier density and scattering time had little sample-to-sample variation or temperature dependence for near-stoichiometric samples. FTIR and DC resistivity suggest that the transport properties of Fe{sub 2}VAl are influenced by both localized and delocalized carriers, with the former primarily responsible for the negative temperature coefficient of resistivity. Magnetization measurements reveal that near-stoichiometric samples have superparamagnetic clusters with at least two sizes of moments. X-ray photoemission from Fe core level showed localized magnetic moments on site-exchanged Fe. They conclude that in Fe{sub 2}VAl, antisite disorder causes significant modification to the semi-metallic band structure proposed by LDA calculations. With antisite disorder considered, they are now able to explain most of the physical properties of Fe{sub 2}VAl.

Ye Feng

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere. 2 figs.

Pal, U.B.; Sadoway, D.R.

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere.

Pal, Uday B. (Needham, MA); Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fluorescence of [Fe II] in H II regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of [Fe II] lines at various positions within the H II regions M42 and M43 is presented. The relative intensities of selected optical [Fe II] lines are shown to be correlated with the intensity of the apparent nebular continuous spectrum. Since the continuum of H II regions is known to be mostly stellar radiation scattered by dust intermixed with the emitting gas, these correlations provide direct evidence for the existence of fluorescent excitation in the formation process of the [Fe II] lines, irrespective of the prevailing physical state.

M. Rodriguez

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pulsed-electron-beam melting of Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed (50 nsec) electron beams with deposited energies of 1.1 to 2.3 J/cm/sup 2/ have been used to rapidly melt a surface layer of Fe. Calculations show that this range of energies produces melt depths from 0.4 to 1.2 ..mu..m and melt times of 100 to 500 nsec. Optical microscopy and SEM of pulse treated polycrystalline foils show slip traces, as well as a general smoothing of surface features which shows that melting has occurred. TEM shows that the resolidified material is bcc, and that the material within a grain is epitaxial with the substrate. TEM also shows slip traces along (110) planes, as well as a high density of dislocations, both extended and loop. At the highest energy, subgrain boundaries are observed. Some samples were implanted with 1 x 10/sup 16/ Sn/cm/sup 2/ at 150 keV. After pulse treatment, the Sn depth profile was observed to have broadened, consistent with liquid phase diffusion. The Sn had the unexpected effect of suppressing slip at the sample surface.

Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Clean Energy- FE Dkt No. 14-54-LNG (FTA)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application filed on March 18, 2014, by Clean Energy, requesting blanket authorization to engage in...

111

fe0013531-Oregon-State | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing the Response of Methane Hydrates to Environmental Change at the Svalbad Continental Margin Last Reviewed 152015 DE-FE0013531 Goal The goal of this project is to study...

112

Hydrogen-Vacancy Interactions in Fe-C Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics and concentrations of hydrogen-containing point defect clusters (PDCs) in Fe-C alloys are calculated and cast into a PDC dominance diagram. Because of the strong binding effects of iron vacancies on the stability ...

Yip, Sidney

113

A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

Chi, Ji

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Determination of the stellar (n,$\\gamma$) cross section of $^{54}Fe$ with accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the stellar (n,$\\gamma$) cross section of $^{54}Fe$ with accelerator mass spectrometry

Coquard, L; Dillmann, I; Wallner, A; Knie, K; Kutschera, W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Demonstration of Security Benefits of Renewable Generation at FE Warren Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report detailing field demonstration of security benefits of renewable generation at FE Warren Air Force Base.

Warwick, William M.; Myers, Kurt; Seifert, Gary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mössbauer investigations of hyperfine interactions features of {sup 57}Fe nuclei in BiFeO{sub 3} ferrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New results of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer studies on BiFeO{sub 3} powder sample performed at various temperatures above and below magnetic phase transitions point T{sub N} ? 640K are reported. We have performed self-consistent calculations of the lattice contributions to the EFG tensor, taking into account dipole moments of the O{sup 2?} and Bi{sup 3+} ions. Low-temperature {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at T < T{sub N} were analyzed assuming an anharmonic cycloidal modulation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. The cycloidal modulation of the iron spin was described with the elliptic Jacobi function sn[(±4K(m)/?)x,m]. The good fit of the experimental spectra was obtained for the anharmonicity m = 0.44 ± 0.04 (T = 4.9K) resulting from the easy-axis magnetic anisotropy.

Sobolev, Alexey, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Presniakov, Igor, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Rusakov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: salex12@rambler.ru; Matsnev, Mikhail; Gorchakov, Dmitry; Glazkova, Iana [Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belik, Alexey [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan)

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

Atom probe: a direct technique for kinetic measurements. [Fe-24Cr; Fe-32Cr; Fe-28. 5Cr-10. 6Co  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atom probe has been used to study the phase transformations occurring within the low-temperature miscibility gaps in Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Co alloys. The morphology of the two-phase microstructure resulting from phase separation deep within the miscibility gaps was found to be highly interconnected and charactristic of an isotropic spinodal reaction. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructure and the changes in composition were measured as a function of aging. The coarsening of the network structures could be fitted with a power law with time exponents that were significantly less than the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner value of one-third.

Miller, M.K.; Brenner, S.S.; Camus, P.P.; Soffa, W.A.

1984-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Structure and critical function of Fe and acid sites in Fe-ZSM-5 in propane oxidative dehydrogenation with N2O and N2O decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and critical function of Fe and acid sites in Fe-ZSM-5 in propane oxidative species Steamed Fe-zeolites Mössbauer spectroscopy UV­Vis FTIR H2-TPR N2O decomposition Propane oxidative of propane to propene with N2O. The evacuated non-steamed FeH-ZSM-5 contained high concentration of Brønsted

Sklenak, Stepan

119

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 104526 (2011) Fe Mossbauer study of magnetic ordering in superconducting K0.80Fe1.76Se2.00 single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 104526 (2011) 57 Fe M¨ossbauer study of magnetic ordering in superconducting 31 March 2011) The magnetic ordering of superconducting single crystals of K0.80Fe1.76Se2.00 has been studied between 10 and 550 K using 57 Fe M¨ossbauer spectroscopy. Despite being superconducting below Tsc

Ryan, Dominic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

N2s2 chelating agents as cys-x-cys biomimics for fe(no) and fe(no)2 complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model complexes I have examined the fundamental properties of a dithiolato-Fe(NO)2 complex, bismercaptoethandiazacyclooctane iron dinitrosyl or (H+bme-daco)Fe(NO)2 as a biomimic of dicysteinate coordination of [Fe(NO)2]. This complex was prepared...

Chiang, Chao-Yi

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 ?mol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 ?mol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 ?mol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 ?mol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 ?mol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Anomalous codeposition of Fe-Ni alloys and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} composites under potentiostatic conditions: Experimental study and mathematical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been developed to describe the electrodeposition of Fe-Ni alloys and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} composites under potentiostatic conditions. This model can be used to predict the polarization behavior, partial current densities, and alloy composition of each of the components as a function of the applied potential. Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} samples were deposited on platinum rotating disk electrodes from sulfate electrolytes under potentiostatic conditions, and the results obtained were compared to the model. The model predictions were found to agree well with the experimental observations for the Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} systems.

Ramasubramanian, M.; Popova, S.N.; Popov, B.N.; White, R.E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Yin, K.M. [Yuan-Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Single-crystal epitaxial thin films of SrFeO{sub 2} with FeO{sub 2} 'infinite layers'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-crystal thin films of SrFeO{sub 2}, which is an oxygen-deficient perovskite with ''infinite layers'' of Fe{sup 2+}O{sub 2}, were prepared by using CaH{sub 2} for low-temperature reduction of epitaxial SrFeO{sub 2.5} single-crystal films deposited on KTaO{sub 3} substrates. This reduction process, removing oxygen ions from the perovskite structure framework and causing rearrangements of oxygen ions, topotactically transforms the brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} to the c-axis oriented SrFeO{sub 2}.

Inoue, Satoru; Kawai, Masanori; Shimakawa, Yuichi [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Kawamura, Naomi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Watanabe, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bimetallic Fe-Ni Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative abundance, low cost, and low toxicity of iron make Fe-based oxygen carriers of great interest for chemical looping combustion (CLC), an emerging technology for clean and efficient combustion of fossil and renewable fuels. However, Fe also shows much lower reactivity than other metals (such as Ni and Cu). Here, we demonstrate strong improvement of Fe-based carriers by alloying the metal phase with Ni. Through a combination of carrier synthesis and characterization with thermogravimetric and fixed-bed reactor studies, we demonstrate that the addition of Ni results in a significant enhancement in activity as well as an increase in selectivity for total oxidation. Furthermore, comparing alumina and ceria as support materials highlights the fact that reducible supports can result in a strong increase in oxygen carrier utilization.

Bhavsar, Saurabh; Veser, Goetz

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 Hata mm/10 min  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 () () () () () () () * () 1. (SWNT) SWNT (CVD) (CNT)[1] Hata mm/10 min SWNT (Super Growth)[2]Al2O3 Fe C2H4 SWNT Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 CVD SWNT CNT CNT 2 SiO2 Al2O3 20 (RBM) 1350 cm-1 (D-Band)Fe G/D RBM Fe SWNT Al 15 nm Fe 0.6 nm CVD TEM Fig. 3 3 nm SWNT

Maruyama, Shigeo

127

Iron-phosphorus relationships in Fe chlorisis of sorghum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRON-PHOSPHORUS RELATIONSHIPS IN FE CHLOROSIS OF SORGHUM A Thesis by DENNIS A. MORALES-VARGAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASl'ER OF SCIENCE December... 1979 Major Subject: Soil Science IRON-PHOSPHORUS RELATIONSHIPS IN FE CHLOROSI OF SORGHUM A Thesis by DENNIS A. MORALES-VARGAS Approved as to style and content by: \\ J(c'w"H~. v& 4 Cc ~. r&'4 wc' c "&"~ / ~Chairman of Committee ! ~Co-' hai...

Morales-Vargas, Dennis A

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Magnetism of NiMn2O4-Fe3O4 spinel interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism of NiMn 2 O 4 –Fe 3 O 4 spinel interfaces B. B.2. Element-specific magnetism of Fe 3 O 4 /NMO interface inin these structures, 6 the magnetism near the isostructural

Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

UV spectra of iron-doped carbon clusters FeC_n n = 3-6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic transitions of jet-cooled FeC$_n$ clusters ($n = 3 - 6$) were measured between 230 and 300 nm by a mass-resolved 1+1 resonant two-photon ionization technique. Rotational profiles were simulated based on previous calculations of ground state geometries and compared to experimental observations. Reasonable agreement is found for the planar fan-like structure of FeC$_3$. The FeC$_4$ data indicate a shorter distance between the Fe atom and the bent C$_4$ unit of the fan. The transitions are suggested to be $^{3}$A$_{2} \\leftarrow ^{3}$B$_{1}$ for FeC$_3$ and $^{5}$A$_{1} \\leftarrow ^{5}$A$_{1}$ for FeC$_4$. In contrast to the predicted C$_{\\infty \\text{v}}$ geometry, non-linear FeC$_5$ is apparently observed. Line width broadening prevents analysis of the FeC$_6$ spectrum.

Steglich, Mathias; Johnson, Anatoly; Maier, John P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application...

131

Analysis of Fe Nanoparticles Using XPS Measurements Under D.C...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe Nanoparticles Using XPS Measurements Under D.C. or Pulsed-Voltage Bias. Analysis of Fe Nanoparticles Using XPS Measurements Under D.C. or Pulsed-Voltage Bias. Abstract: The...

132

Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA...

133

A MOSSBAUER STUDY OF AUSTENITE STABILITY AND IMPACT FRACTURE IN Fe - 6 Ni STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT FRACTURE IN Fe-6Ni STEEL Brent Thomas Fultz Materialscommercial cryogenic alloy steel was studied with regard toThe Experiments Fe-6Ni-lMn steel plate was received from the

Fultz, Brent

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

WELDABILITY OF GRAIN-REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Cryogenic Nickel Steels, WRC Bull, 205, May, 1975.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.E.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.

Morris Jr., J.W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Co-synthesis of LiFePO4 and Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of LiFePO 4 and carbon nanotubes potentially bypassessynthesis of LiFePO 4 and Carbon Nanotubes James Wilcox* ,†that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Figure 1) and

Wilcox, James; Doeff, Marca M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral sheet. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral...

137

An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. Abstract: Transport of...

138

Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach This...

139

Heterogeneous Reduction of U6+ by Structural Fe2+ From Theory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

single crystals of magnetite with different initial Fe2+Fe3+ ratios were exposed to uranyl-nitrate solution (pH 4) for 90 hours. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy and...

140

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG - ORDER 3324 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LAKE CHARLES EXPORTS, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 11-59-LNG - ORDER 3324 October 2013 April 2014...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG The Office of...

142

CE FLNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-123-LNG - ORDER 3193 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CE FLNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-123-LNG - ORDER 3193 CE FLNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-123-LNG - ORDER 3193 No reports submitted for this docket. More Documents & Publications...

143

Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions: A first-principles study. Optical absorption and band gap reduction in (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 solid solutions: A...

144

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3/?-Fe2O3 Core...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanostructures. Abstract: In this work ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 core-shell polycrystalline...

145

Electronic Structure and Fragmentation Properties of[Fe4S4(SEt...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: A limited exposure of (n-Bu4N)2Fe4S4(SEt)4 solutions in acetonitrile to air was found to produce a new series of 4Fe-4S cluster complexes,...

146

Carrier Dynamics in a-Fe2O3 (0001) Thin Films and Single Crystals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carrier Dynamics in a-Fe2O3 (0001) Thin Films and Single Crystals Probed by Femtosecond Transient Absorption and Reflectivity. Carrier Dynamics in a-Fe2O3 (0001) Thin Films and...

147

Effects of Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4 Using Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography. Effects of Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4 Using Laser...

148

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phasehydrodeoxy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of...

149

Important role of the non-uniform Fe distribution for the ferromagnetism in group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor GeFe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the growth-temperature dependence of the properties of the group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x} films (x?=?6.5% and 10.5%), and reveal the correlation of the magnetic properties with the lattice constant, Curie temperature (T{sub C}), non-uniformity of Fe atoms, stacking-fault defects, and Fe-atom locations. While T{sub C} strongly depends on the growth temperature, we find a universal relationship between T{sub C} and the lattice constant, which does not depend on the Fe content x. By using the spatially resolved transmission-electron diffractions combined with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we find that the density of the stacking-fault defects and the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration are correlated with T{sub C}. Meanwhile, by using the channeling Rutherford backscattering and particle-induced X-ray emission measurements, we clarify that about 15% of the Fe atoms exist on the tetrahedral interstitial sites in the Ge{sub 0.935}Fe{sub 0.065} lattice and that the substitutional Fe concentration is not correlated with T{sub C}. Considering these results, we conclude that the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration plays an important role in determining the ferromagnetic properties of GeFe.

Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Ohya, Shinobu; Ban, Yoshisuke; Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS SOURCES OF {sup 60}Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide {sup 60}Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). {sup 60}Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live {sup 60}Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 107}Pd, whose association with {sup 60}Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Effects of Fe3+ Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Fe3+ and Mn3+ on Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in North-Central New Mexico, U, New Mexico 87131 (Received 28 November 1983; in revised form 2 October 1984) ABSTRACT Aluminum, then their equilibrium coexistence is invariant. However, the aluminum silicate minerals are not pure in highly oxidized

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

152

Equation of state and phase diagram of FeO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wuestite, Fe{sub 1-x}O, is an important component in the mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle and may also be a component in the core. Therefore the high pressure, high temperature behavior of FeO, including its phase diagram and equation of state, is essential knowledge for understanding the properties and evolution of Earth's deep interior. We performed X-ray diffraction measurements using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to achieve simultaneous high pressures and temperatures. Wuestite was mixed with iron metal, which served as our pressure standard, under the assumption that negligible oxygen dissolved into the iron. Our data show a positive slope for the subsolidus phase boundary between the B1 and B8 structures, indicating that the B1 phase is stable at the P-T conditions of the lower mantle and core. We have determined the thermal equation of state of B1 FeO to 156 GPa and 3100 K, finding an isothermal bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 149.4 {+-} 1.0 GPa and its pressure derivative K'{sub 0} = 3.60 {+-} 0.4. This implies that 7.7 {+-} 1.1 wt.% oxygen is required in the outer core to match the seismologically-determined density, under the simplifying assumption of a purely Fe-O outer core.

Fischer, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Shofner, Gregory A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (Bristol); (Maryland); (UC)

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

Structural and Mössbauer spectroscopic study of Fe-Ni alloy nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nano-crystalline Fe-Ni alloys have been synthesized in ethylene glycol medium. Based on XRD studies it is confirmed that, in these alloys Fe atoms are incorporated at Ni site to form Ni-Fe solid solutions. Mössbauer studies have established that for alloy particles having smaller size there is significant concentration of two different types of paramagnetic Fe species and their relative concentration decreased with increase in particle size.

Kumar, Asheesh; Banerjee, S., E-mail: vsudar@barc.gov.in; Sudarsan, V., E-mail: vsudar@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Meena, S. S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

High strength-high conductivity Cu--Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an "in-situ" Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite.

Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Spitzig, William A. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

High-pressure phases of FeTiO3 from first principles N. C. Wilson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005; published 19 July 2005 The structural, elastic, and electronic properties of the high-pressure Fe and their interaction with the structural degrees of freedom. Ilmenite, the mineral form of FeTiO3, is commonly found of diamond deposits.2 In addition to ilmenite, two other polymorphs of FeTiO3 are known,3 namely, the lithium

156

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions Mainak Mookherjee,1 Yoichi at high pressures have demonstrated that Fe7C3 iron carbide is a likely candidate for the Earth's inner behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B04201, doi:10

Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

157

Hydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sized Fe3O4 have been prepared by various methods such as sol­ gel processing, hydrothermal synthesisHydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles Jülich, Germany. Abstract. The hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) (

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

158

Characterization of Zr-Fe-Cu Alloys for an Inert Matrix Fuel for Nuclear Energy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cu had the largest melting temperature (886.3°C) while Zr-12Fe-10Cu had the smallest melting temperature (870°C). The third alloy, Zr-12Fe-15Cu, had a melting point just below that of Zr-12Fe-5Cu at 882.7°C. Light Flash Analysis (LFA...

Barnhart, Brian A.

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

A synthesis of LiFePO{sub 4} starting from FePO{sub 4} under reducing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fast and easy way to produce LiFePO{sub 4} starting from FePO{sub 4}, used as iron and phosphorus source, is proposed. 5% hydrogen is employed as a reducing agent and various compounds containing lithium as lithiation agents. The selected lithiation agents included: LiCl, CH{sub 3}COOLi, LiOH, Li{sub 2}S, LiH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Solid state synthesis is used for the LiFePO{sub 4} preparation and the so obtained materials are structurally characterized by XRD. The materials are used to fabricate composite electrode and their specific capacity is evaluated by low rate galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles (C/10 rate). Among the various lithium salts, the acetate give rise to the LiFePO{sub 4} with the best electrochemical performance. The morphology of this material is further investigated by SEM microscopy and the specific capacity is evaluated as a function of the discharge rate and the cycle number.

Prosini, Pier Paolo [ENEA, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome, Italy and DInESto, Drive the Innovation in Energy Storage, Via Provin (Italy); Cento, Cinzia; Masci, Amedeo; Carewska, Maria; Gislon, Paola [ENEA, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

The importance of holes in aluminium tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq{sub 3}) devices with Fe and NiFe contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the dominant charge carrier polarity in aluminium tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq{sub 3}) based spin valves, single Alq{sub 3} layer devices with NiFe, ITO, Fe, and aluminium electrodes were fabricated and characterised by Time of Flight (ToF) and Dark Injection (DI) techniques, yielding a lower hole mobility compared to electron mobility. We compare the mobility measured by DI for the dominant carrier injected from NiFe and Fe electrodes into Alq{sub 3}, to that of holes measured by ToF. This comparison leads us to conclude that the dominant charge carriers in Alq{sub 3} based spin valves with NiFe or Fe electrodes are holes.

Zhang, Hongtao; Desai, P.; Kreouzis, T. [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)] [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zhan, Y. Q. [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom) [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, SIST, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Drew, A. J. [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom) [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Gillin, W. P. [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom) [Materials Research Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, SIST, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Identification of an incommensurate FeAl{sub 2} overlayer on FeAl(110) using x-ray diffraction and reflectivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FeAl, like NiAl, crystallizes in the CsCl structure. Consequently the (110) planes contain equal amounts of Fe and Al distributed as interlocking rectangles. Unlike the NiAI(110) surface, which retains the (1{times}l) in-plane symmetry of the bulk, FeAl(l10) reconstructs to form an ordered, incommensurate overlayer. The reconstructed layer introduces x-ray diffraction rods at half-order positions along the [1{bar 1}0] direction, and displaced {plus_minus}0.2905 from integer positions along the [001] direction. Peak widths reveal excellent long range order. Specular reflectivity measurements above and below the Fe K{alpha} edge can be reproduced using a model containing a single reconstructed overlayer with an Fe:Al ratio of 1:2, consistent with FeA{sub I}2.

Baddorf, A.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chandavarkar, S.S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

0 1 2 3 4 5 Fig. S1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-19 from Lake Zurich recovered in 135 m water depth (2 m above counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-21 from Lake Zurich recovered in 123

Gilli, Adrian

163

g factor of the first excited state in {sup 56}Fe and implications for transient-field calibration in the Fe region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transient-field technique has been used to measure the g factor of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state in {sup 56}Fe relative to the independently determined g factor of the first 5/2{sup -} state in {sup 57}Fe. The new result for {sup 56}Fe agrees with previous measurements but is more precise. Implications for calibrating the transient field and g-factor measurements in the fp region are discussed.

East, M. C.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Chamoli, S. K.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Wilson, A. N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Crawford, H. L.; Pinter, J. S.; Mantica, P. F. [NSCL and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

XAS Characterization of a Nitridoiron(IV) Complex with a Very Short Fe-N Bond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to characterize the novel nitridoiron(IV) units in two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes (R = iPr and CyCH{sub 2}) and obtain direct spectroscopic evidence for a very short Fe-N distance. The distance of 1.51-1.55 {angstrom} reflects the presence of an Fe{triple_bond}N triple bond in accord with the observed Fe{triple_bond}N vibration observed for one of these species ({nu}{sub FeN} = 1034 cm{sup -1}). This highly covalent bonding interaction results in the appearance of an unusually intense pre-edge peak, whose estimated area of 100(20) units is much larger than those of the related tetrahedral complexes with Fe{sup I}-N{sub 2}-Fe{sup I}, Fe{sup II}-NPh{sub 2}, and Fe{sup III}NAd motifs, and those of recently described six-coordinate Fe{sup V}{triple_bond}N and Fe{sup VI}{triple_bond}N complexes. The observation that the Fe{sup IV}-N distances of two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes are shorter than the Fe{sup IV}-O bond lengths of oxoiron(IV) complexes may be rationalized on the basis of the greater {pi} basicity of the nitrido ligand than the oxo ligand and a lower metal coordination number for the Fe(N) complex.

Rohde,J.; Betley, T.; Jackson, T.; Saouma, C.; Peters, J.; Que, Jr., L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

XAS Characterization of a Nitridoiron(IV) Complex With a Very Short Fe-N Bond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to characterize the novel nitridoiron(IV) units in two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes (R = iPr and CyCH{sub 2}) and obtain direct spectroscopic evidence for a very short Fe-N distance. The distance of 1.51--1.55 {angstrom} reflects the presence of an Fe{triple_bond}N triple bond in accord with the observed Fe{triple_bond}N vibration observed for one of these species (v{sub FeN}=1034 cm{sup -1}). This highly covalent bonding interaction results in the appearance of an unusually intense pre-edge peak, whose estimated area of 100(20) units is much larger than those of the related tetrahedral complexes with Fe{sup I}-N{sub 2}-Fe{sup I}, Fe{sup II}-NPh{sub 2}, and Fe{sup III}{triple_bond}NAd motifs, and those of recently described six-coordinate Fe{sup V}{triple_bond}N and Fe{sup VI}{triple_bond}N complexes. The observation that the Fe{sup IV}-N distances of two [PhBP{sup R}{sub 3}]Fe(N) complexes are shorter than the Fe{sup IV}-O bond lengths of oxoiron(IV) complexes may be rationalized on the basis of the greater ? basicity of the nitrido ligand than the oxo ligand and a lower metal coordination number for the Fe(N) complex.

Rohde, J.-U.; Betley, T.A.; Jackson, T.A.; Saouma, C.T.; Peters, J.C.; Que, L.; Jr.

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Interface magnetism of Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and magnetoresistance of Co{sub 2}FeGe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interface magnetism between Co{sub 2}FeGe Heusler alloy layers and MgO layers was investigated using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Interface-sensitive samples, where the {sup 57}Fe isotope was used only for the interfacial atomic layer of the Co{sub 2}FeGe layer on the MgO layer, were prepared using atomically controlled alternate deposition. The {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of the interface-sensitive samples at room temperature were found similar to those of the bulk-sensitive Co{sub 2}FeGe films in which the {sup 57}Fe isotope was distributed throughout the films. On the other hand, the tunnel magnetoresistance effect of magnetic tunnel junctions with Co{sub 2}FeGe layers as the ferromagnetic electrodes showed strong reduction at room temperature. These results indicate that the strong temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrodes cannot be attributed simply to the reduction of the magnetization at the interfaces between the Heusler alloy and insulator layers.

Tanaka, M. A., E-mail: mtanaka@nitech.ac.jp; Maezaki, D.; Ishii, T.; Okubo, A.; Mibu, K. [Department of Engineering Physics, Electronics and Mechanics, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan); Hiramatsu, R.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Morphology and crystallographic orientation relationship in isothermally transformed Fe–N austenite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 225 °C isothermal transformation of a high-nitrogen austenite with Fe–2.71 wt.% N was investigated by means of electron microscopy. It was found that the transformation products were composed of ultrafine ?-Fe and ??-Fe{sub 4}N plus retained austenite ?, which were in two types of morphologies, namely, (i) with the retained austenite patches dispersed among the (?-Fe + ??-Fe{sub 4}N) packets and (ii) with the ultrafine ?-Fe and ?/??-Fe{sub 4}N laths interwoven with each other within a single bainitic packet. A cube–cube orientation relationship between the ? (austenite) and ??-Fe{sub 4}N, and a near Greninger–Troiano (G–T) one between the ? (austenite) and the bainitic ?-ferrite were detected. The morphology, orientation relationship and high hardness (> 1000 HV) of the transformation products indicated that the isothermal transformation of the high nitrogen austenite was analogous to a bainitic one. - Highlights: • Isothermal transformation products consisted of nano-sized ?-Fe + ?? + ? (retained). • The hardness of transformation product exceeded 1000 HV. • The ?-Fe and ?/??-Fe{sub 4}N kept a near G-T OR in the grain interior.

Jiao, Dongling, E-mail: dljiao@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Luo, Chengping; Liu, Jiangwen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Guoqing [Science and Technology on Advanced High Temperature Structural Materials Laboratory, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Oxide shell reduction and magnetic property changes in core-shell Fe nanoclusters under ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion irradiation effects are studied on the Fe-based core-shell nanocluster (NC) films with core as Fe and shell as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}N. These NC films were deposited on Si substrates to thickness of ?0.5 ?m using a NC deposition system. The films were irradiated at room temperature with 5.5?MeV Si{sup 2+} ions to ion fluences of 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. It is found that the irradiation induces grain growth, Fe valence reduction in the shell, and crystallization or growth of Fe{sub 3}N. The film retained its Fe-core and its ferromagnetic properties after irradiation. The nature and mechanism of oxide shell reduction and composition dependence after irradiation were studied by synthesizing additional NC films of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeO?+?Fe{sub 3}N and irradiating them under the same conditions. The presence of nanocrystalline Fe is found to be a major factor for the oxide shell reduction. The surface morphologies of these films show dramatic changes in the microstructures due to cluster growth and agglomeration as a result of ion irradiation.

Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You, E-mail: youqiang@uidaho.edu [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Jiang, Weilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); McCloy, John S. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Phase formation in Zr/Fe multilayers during Kr ion irradiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed study has been conducted of the effect of Kr ion irradiation on phase formation in Zr-Fe metallic multilayers, using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Metallic multilayers were prepared with different overall compositions (near 50-50 and Fe-rich), and with different wavelengths (repetition thicknesses). These samples were irradiated with 300 keV Kr ions at various temperatures to investigate the final products, as well as the kinetics of phase formation. For the shorter wavelength samples, the final product was in all cases an amorphous Zr-Fe phase, in combination with Fe, while specially for the larger wavelength samples, in the Fe-rich samples the intermetallic compounds ZrFe{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Fe were formed in addition to the amorphous phase. The dose to full reaction decreases with temperature, and with wavelength in a manner consistent with a diffusion-controlled reaction.

Motta, A. T.

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effect of tungsten addition on the toughness and hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in wear-resistant Fe-B-C cast alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of tungsten additions of 0%, 1.12%, 2.04%, and 3.17% (in wt.%) on the morphology, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in Fe-B-C cast alloy were investigated. The results indicate that, with the increase of tungsten addition, the morphology and distribution of Fe{sub 2}B have no change and a new W-containing phase, except the (Fe, W){sub 2}B with a certain tungsten solution, does not form, and that the fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B increases first and then decreases, while the hardness increases first and then has a little change. Compared with the fracture toughness (3.8 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}) of Fe{sub 2}B without tungsten addition, the toughness at 2.04 wt.% tungsten can be improved by about above 80% and achieves about 6.9 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, and variation characteristics of hardness and toughness of Fe{sub 2}B were also testified by viewing the indentation marks and cracks on the Fe{sub 2}B, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Poor toughness of Fe2B decreases obviously the wear resistance of the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's toughness increases first and then decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's hardness first increases and then has little change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The toughness at 2.04 % W can be improved by above 80% more than that at 0% W.

Huang, Zhifu, E-mail: hzf@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xing, Jiandong; Lv, Liangliang

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tensile properties of Fe-16 at. % Al alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A newly developed melting method for Fe-16 at. % Al alloy (FAPY) is described. Tensile data on the air-induction-melted (AIM) and vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) heats of FAPY after identical processing are presented. Optical, scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and microprobe analysis were carried out to explain the lower room-temperature ductility and more scatter in the data for the AIM material as opposed to the VIM material.

Sikka, V.K.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Average Fe K-alpha emission from distant AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important parameters in the XRB (X-ray background) synthesis models is the average efficiency of accretion onto SMBH (super-massive black holes). This can be inferred from the shape of broad relativistic Fe lines seen in X-ray spectra of AGN (active galactic nuclei). Several studies have tried to measure the mean Fe emission properties of AGN at different depths with very different results. We compute the mean Fe emission from a large and representative sample of AGN X-ray spectra up to redshift ~ 3.5. We developed a method of computing the rest-frame X-ray average spectrum and applied it to a large sample (more than 600 objects) of type 1 AGN from two complementary medium sensitivity surveys based on XMM-Newton data, the AXIS and XWAS samples. This method makes use of medium-to-low quality spectra without needing to fit complex models to the individual spectra but with computing a mean spectrum for the whole sample. Extensive quality tests were performed by comparing real to simulated data, and a significance for the detection of any feature over an underlying continuum was derived. We detect with a 99.9% significance an unresolved Fe K-alpha emission line around 6.4 keV with an EW ~ 90 eV, but we find no compelling evidence of any significant broad relativistic emission line in the final average spectrum. Deviations from a power law around the narrow line are best represented by a reflection component arising from cold or low-ionization material. We estimate an upper limit for the EW of any relativistic line of 400 eV at a 3 sigma confidence level. We also marginally detect the so-called Iwasawa-Taniguchi effect on the EW for the unresolved emission line, which appears weaker for higher luminosity AGN.

A. Corral; M. J. Page; F. J. Carrera; X. Barcons; S. Mateos; J. Ebrero; M. Krumpe; A. Schwope; J. A. Tedds; M. G. Watson

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Santa Fe Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI SolarisSanduskyClarita,Fe Springs, California:

174

Santa Fe, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI SolarisSanduskyClarita,Fe Springs,

175

Rancho Santa Fe, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosource HistoryRaftRamsey, NewRancho Santa Fe, California:

176

Average Fe K-alpha emission from distant AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important parameters in the XRB (X-ray background) synthesis models is the average efficiency of accretion onto SMBH (super-massive black holes). This can be inferred from the shape of broad relativistic Fe lines seen in X-ray spectra of AGN (active galactic nuclei). Several studies have tried to measure the mean Fe emission properties of AGN at different depths with very different results. We compute the mean Fe emission from a large and representative sample of AGN X-ray spectra up to redshift ~ 3.5. We developed a method of computing the rest-frame X-ray average spectrum and applied it to a large sample (more than 600 objects) of type 1 AGN from two complementary medium sensitivity surveys based on XMM-Newton data, the AXIS and XWAS samples. This method makes use of medium-to-low quality spectra without needing to fit complex models to the individual spectra but with computing a mean spectrum for the whole sample. Extensive quality tests were performed by comparing real to simulated data, a...

Corral, A; Carrera, F J; Barcons, X; Mateos, S; Ebrero, J; Krumpe, M; Schwope, A; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

AlN/Fe/AlN nanostructures for magnetooptic magnetometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu nanostructures with ultrathin Fe grown by sputtering on Si substrates are evaluated as probes for magnetooptical (MO) mapping of weak currents. They are considered for a laser wavelength of ??=?410?nm (3.02?eV) and operate at oblique light incidence angles, ?{sup (0)}, to enable detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization. Their performance is evaluated in terms of MO reflected wave electric field amplitudes. The maximal MO amplitudes in AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu are achieved by a proper choice of layer thicknesses. The nanostructures were characterized by MO polar Kerr effect at ?{sup (0)}???5° and longitudinal Kerr effect spectra (?{sup (0)}?=?45°) at photon energies between 1 and 5?eV. The nominal profiles were refined using a model-based analysis of the spectra. Closed form analytical expressions are provided, which are useful in the search for maximal MO amplitudes.

Lišková-Jakubisová, E., E-mail: liskova@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Viš?ovský, Š. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J. [Nanotechnology Center, Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15/2172, 70833 Ostrava Poruba (Czech Republic); Harward, I.; Celinski, Z. [Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Pkwy., Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

134 Inorg. Chem. 1995, 34, 134-139 Structural and Spectroscopic Properties of Antiferromagnetically Coupled FeUIMnUand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

homodinuclear active sites involving first row transition metals like Fe (hemerythrin,2ribonucleotide redu

Hendrich, Mike

179

Tunneling conductance studies in the ion-beam sputtered CoFe/Mg/MgO/NiFe magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions consisting of CoFe(10 nm)/Mg(1 nm)/MgO(3.5 nm)/NiFe(10 nm) are grown at room temperature using dual ion beam sputtering via in-situ shadow masking. The effective barrier thickness and average barrier height are estimated to be 3.5 nm (2.9 nm) and 0.69 eV (1.09 eV) at 290 K (70 K), respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance value of 0.2 % and 2.3 % was observed at 290 K and 60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of tunneling conductance revealed the presence of localized states present within the forbidden gap of the MgO barrier leading to finite inelastic spin independent tunneling contributions, which degrade the TMR value.

Singh, Braj Bhusan; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Magnetoelectric nano-Fe3O4?CoFe2O4?PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3 composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new magnetoelectric hybrid device composed of a nanoparticulate magnetostrictive iron oxide-cobalt ferritefilm on a piezoelectric lead zirconic titanate crystal serving as both substrate and straining medium is described. Nano-Fe3O4?CoFe2O4...

Ren, Shenqiang; Wuttig, Manfred

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Focus on superconductivity in Fe-based systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past four years of incredibly intense research into Fe-based superconductors have brought about many unexpected surprises. Our understanding of their behavior and physical properties is constantly evolving. Unlike any other superconductors, those containing iron span diverse groups of materials: pnictides, chalcogenides, intermetallics and oxides. Some major properties of the materials are quite similar, yet each group has its own distinct features. Significant effort has been put into identifying new superconducting compositions, modifying the existing ones with new dopants and treatments, and producing single crystals, thin films, wires and polycrystalline bulk material. A wide array of experimental techniques was applied to study Fe-based superconductors and the result is a tremendous amount of data collected over a period of less than four years. Theoretical debates are still lively, and there is an ongoing search for possible universalities and commonalities with other unconventional superconductors, like high-Tc cuprates or heavy fermion materials. The three-dimensional electronic structures of Fe-based superconductors, as well as their extreme sensitivity to disorder, present serious challenges for both theoretical analysis and the interpretation of experiments. However, some key properties emerge from multiple studies. Unconventional, multiband superconductivity originating from an electronic mechanism has found both experimental and theoretical support. There has been great progress in the understanding of various anisotropies of superconducting gap structures, including the possibility of gap nodes even if the gap symmetry is s-wave. Similar to high-Tc cuprates, the superconducting phase has a dome-like shape on T-doping or T-pressure phase diagrams. The anisotropy of the superconducting gap evolves with doping and is likely to become stronger at the dome's edge. In many Fe-based superconductors there is a range where superconductivity coexists and competes with long-range magnetic order, and magnetic fluctuations are considered by some to be of the utmost importance for the pairing mechanism. Others argue that orbital fluctuations, possibly in combination with phonons, are crucial for the pairing. Fe-based superconductors show extremely large upper critical fields and relatively low electronic anisotropy, which are crucial aspects for power applications. The expectations are high, though it remains unclear what maximal current densities can be supported by a properly designed bulk material with optimal pinning centers. This focus issue of Superconductor Science and Technology is a snapshot of some of the recent progress in materials preparation, experiments and theory. It includes articles on the search for new Fe-based superconductors and on the search for superconductivity at extreme conditions. Particular attention is devoted to: the effects of chemical substitutions; the development of thin films; the introduction of artificial defects to increase critical current density; and a general analysis of vortex physics. The articles on fundamental aspects of superconductivity include: the discussion of various experimental problems; an in-depth analysis of the nodal and nodeless pairing states; the discussion of the pairing mechanism; and the effects of pair-breaking due to disorder. Also discussed are nematic correlations and the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity. The papers collected in this issue present a detailed review of the accomplishments of the last four years of research into Fe-based superconductors, up to and including last-minute developments. We hope that this combination will make this special section of Superconductor Science and Technology both interesting and useful to a broad spectrum of physicists and materials scientists.

Prozorov, Ruslan; Chubukov, Andrey; Meingast, Christoph; Putti, Marina

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0??{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33?meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

Benecha, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, UNISA 0003 Pretoria (South Africa); Lombardi, E. B., E-mail: lombaeb@unisa.ac.za [College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, UNISA 0003 Pretoria (South Africa)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

STORAGE RING CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT SINGLE AND DOUBLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 13+} AND SINGLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 16+} AND Fe{sup 17+}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of electron impact ionization for Fe{sup 13+}, Fe{sup 16+}, and Fe{sup 17+} over collision energies from below threshold to above 3000 eV. The ions were recirculated using an ion storage ring. Data were collected after a sufficiently long time that essentially all the ions had relaxed radiatively to their ground state. For single ionization of Fe{sup 13+}, we find that previous single pass experiments are more than 40% larger than our results. Compared to our work, the theoretical cross section recommended by Arnaud and Raymond is more than 30% larger, while that of Dere is about 20% greater. Much of the discrepancy with Dere is due to the theory overestimating the contribution of excitation-autoionization via n = 2 excitations. Double ionization of Fe{sup 13+} is dominated by direct ionization of an inner shell electron accompanied by autoionization of a second electron. Our results for single ionization of Fe{sup 16+} and Fe{sup 17+} agree with theoretical calculations to within the experimental uncertainties.

Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K. [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Leihgesterner Weg 217, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Leihgesterner Weg 217, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Lestinsky, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Search for supernova-produced 60Fe in a marine sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An 60Fe peak in a deep-sea FeMn crust has been interpreted as due to the signature left by the ejecta of a supernova explosion close to the solar system 2.8 +/- 0.4 Myr ago [Knie et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 171103 (2004)]. To confirm this interpretation with better time resolution and obtain a more direct flux estimate, we measured 60Fe concentrations along a dated marine sediment. We find no 60Fe peak at the expected level from 1.7 to 3.2 Myr ago. However, applying the same chemistry used for the sediment, we confirm the 60Fe signal in the FeMn crust. The cause of the discrepancy is discussed.

C. Fitoussi; G. M. Raisbeck; K. Knie; G. Korschinek; T. Faestermann; S. Goriely; D. Lunney; M. Poutivtsev; G. Rugel; C. Waelbroeck; A. Wallner

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cation self-diffusion in Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-diffusion of /sup 59/Fe in single crystals of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ parallel to the c-axis has been measured as a function of temperature (1150 to 1340/sup 0/C) and oxygen partial pressure (2 x 10/sup -3/) less than or equal to Po/sub 2/ less than or equal to 1 atm). The oxygen partial pressure dependence of the diffusivity indicates that cation self-diffusion occurs by an interstitial-type mechanism. The simultaneous diffusion of /sup 52/Fe and /sup 59/Fe has been measured in Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at 1251/sup 0/C and Po/sub 2/ = 1.91 x 10/sup -2/ atm. The small value of the isotope effect (f..delta..K = 0.067 +- 0.016) is consistent with diffusion of Fe ions by an interstitially mechanism.

Hoshino, K.; Peterson, N.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Magnetism of NiMn2O4-Fe3O4 spinel interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the magnetic properties of the isostructural spinel-spinel interface of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}(NMO)-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Although the magnetic transition temperature of the NMO film is preserved, both bulk and interface sensitive measurements demonstrate that the interface exhibits strong interfacial magnetic coupling up to room temperature. While NMO thin films have a ferrimagnetic transition temperature of 60 K, both NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} are ferrimagnetic at room temperature. Our experimental results suggest that these magnetic properties arise from a thin interdiffused region of (Fe,Mn,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} at the interface, leading to Mn and Ni magnetic properties similar to those of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

Arenholz, Elke; Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Bettinger, J. S.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

Engelhardt, Larry [Francis Marion University; Demmel, Franz [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Luban, Marshall [Ames Laboratory; Timco, Grigore A [The University of Manchester; Tuna, Floriana [The University of Manchester; Winpenny, Richard E [The University of Manchester

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Corrosion behavior of newly developed TiAgFe dental alloys in neutral saline solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion behavior of newly developed Ti­Ag­Fe dental alloys in neutral saline solution B. B. Zhang, B. L. Wang, L. Li and Y. F. Zheng* The corrosion behavior of Ti­5Ag­xFe alloys (x ¼ 1, 2.5, 5 wt) Ti,Ti­ 5Ag­xFe alloys exhibited higher corrosion potentials, lower current densities, and larger

Zheng, Yufeng

190

Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determined the total equilibrium metal solubility ([Fe2+ ]T and [Mg2+ ]T) in 20­90 wt % sulfuric acidSolubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper solutions over the temperature range 200­300 K. We have measured solubilities using samples of MgSO4, FeSO4Á

191

The impact of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks on the ages of elliptical galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We complement our study of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar population models of Lick absorption indices (Thomas et al. 2003) by comparing two sets of alpha/Fe enhanced models. In both models the impact on Lick indices due to alpha/Fe enhancement is accounted for through a modification of the stellar absorption line-strengths using the response functions of Tripicco & Bell (1995). One set of models, however, uses solar-scaled, the other alpha/Fe enhanced stellar evolutionary tracks. Since the alpha/Fe enhanced tracks are hotter than the solar-scaled ones (Salasnich et al. 2000), the correspondent stellar population models have slightly weaker metallic indices (i.e. Mgb, etc.) and stronger Balmer line indices (Hbeta) (Maraston et al 2003). Here we explore quantitatively the impact of this effect on the alpha/Fe ratios, metallicities and ages that are derived for elliptical galaxies. We find that the modest decrease of the metallic indices Mgb and balance each other, such that fully consistent alpha/Fe ratios are derived for stellar systems using alpha/Fe enhanced models with either solar-scaled or alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks. The decrease of the metallic indices and the increase of Hbeta conspire in a way that also consistent metallicities are obtained. The derived ages, instead, are significantly different. The inclusion of alpha/Fe enhanced stellar tracks leads to the derivation of ages as high as 30 Gyr for elliptical galaxies. For the same objects, ages not older than 15 Gyr are obtained, if alpha/Fe enhanced models using solar-scaled tracks are adopted. This may indicate that current stellar evolutionary models overestimate the bluing of stellar evolutionary tracks due to alpha/Fe enhanced chemical mixtures at super-solar metallicities.

Daniel Thomas; Claudia Maraston

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Controlling ferromagnetism of (In,Fe)As semiconductors by electron doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on experimental results, using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method and Monte Carlo simulation, we study the mechanism of ferromagnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As. We show that with doped Be atoms occupying in interstitial sites, chemical pair interactions between atoms and magnetic exchange interactions between Fe atoms change due to electron concentration. Therefore, by controlling the doping process, magnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As is controlled and ferromagnetism is observed in this semiconductor.

Dang Vu, Nguyen; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sato, Kazunori [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nonlinear FE analysis of cracks in tension and shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon FRP Shear Reinforcement. PhD thesis, University of Cambridge, UK, 2003. 3. Bazant Z. P. and Planas J. Fracture and Size Effect in Con- crete and Other Quasibrittle Materials. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, 1998. Nonlinear FE analysis of cracks... of plain concrete to cyclic tension. ACI Materials Journal, 1987, 84, No. 5, 365–373. 9. Paulay T. and Loeber P. J. Shear transfer by aggregate inter- lock. ACI Special Publication, SP-42, 1974, 1, 1–14. 10. Houde J. and Mirza M. S. A finite element...

Kesse, G.; Lees, Janet M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic scattering of fast neutrons from $^{56}$Fe was studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The neutron energies were determined on the basis of a timeof- flight measurement. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. The total scattering cross sections deduced from the present experiment in an energy range from 0.8 to 9.6 MeV agree within 15% with earlier data and with predictions of the statistical-reaction code Talys.

Beyer, R; Hannaske, R; Junghans, A R; Massarczyk, R; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Ferrari, A; Kögler, T; Röder, M; Schmidt, K; Wagner, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

FE Press Releases and Techlines | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department of9ofDepartment ofatBlog FE Blog

198

SF 6432-FE Fixed Price Contracts Outside the US  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDN forAA7/31/13 Page 1 of 16FE

199

Santa Fe, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI SolarisSanduskyClarita,Fe Springs, California:NM)

200

Los Alamos National Security invests in Santa Fe Community College  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclearandplants willows forinvests in Santa Fe

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201

Santa Fe Community College offers new welding program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systemsis aSecurity AdministrationSanketSanta Fe

202

AgFe Management Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowatt Energies Jump to:Africa-EconomicAfricanLtdAgFe

203

DE-FE0009897 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/136P2DOE/NETL MethaneFE0005958

204

DE-FE0009904 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/136P2DOE/NETL MethaneFE0005958

205

Structural Insights into FeMo Cofactor Biosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodologyInsights into FeMo

206

Balmer Absorption Lines in FeLoBALs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discovered non-stellar Balmer absorption lines in two many-narrow-trough FeLoBALs (mntBALs) by the near-infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/CISCO. Presence of the non-stellar Balmer absorption lines is known to date only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, thus our discovery is the first cases for quasars. Since all known active galactic nuclei with Balmer absorption lines share characteristics, it is suggested that there is a population of BAL quasars which have unique structures at their nuclei or unique evolutionary phase.

K. Aoki; I. Iwata; K. Ohta; N. Tamura; M. Ando; M. Akiyama; G. Kiuchi; K. Nakanishi

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Magnetic structures and interplay between rare-earth Ce and Fe magnetism in single-crystal CeFeAsO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron and synchrotron resonant x-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) complemented by heat capacity and resistivity measurements reveal the evolution of the magnetic structures of Fe and Ce sublattices in a CeFeAsO single crystal. The RXMS of magnetic reflections at the Ce LII edge shows a magnetic transition that is specific to the Ce antiferromagnetic long-range ordering at TCe? 4 K with short-range Ce ordering above TCe, whereas neutron diffraction measurements of a few magnetic reflections indicate a transition at T?? 12 K with an unusual order parameter. Detailed order-parameter measurements on several magnetic reflections by neutrons show a weak anomaly at 4 K that we associate with the Ce ordering. The successive transitions at TCe and T? can also be clearly identified by two anomalies in heat capacity and resistivity measurements. The higher transition temperature at T?? 12 K is mainly ascribed to Fe spin reorientation transition, below which Fe spins rotate uniformly and gradually in the ab plane. The Fe spin reorientation transition and short-range Ce ordering above TCe reflect the strong Fe-Ce couplings prior to long-range ordering of the Ce. The evolution of the intricate magnetic structures in CeFeAsO going through T? and TCe is proposed.

Zhang, Qiang [Ames Laboratory; Tian, Wei [Ames Laboratory; Li, Haifeng [Ames Laboratory; Kim, Jong-Woo [Argonne Naitonal Laboratory; Yan, Jiaqiang [Ames Laboratory; McCallum, Robert William [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A. [Ames Laboratory; Zarestky, Jerel L. [Ames Laboratory; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; McQueeney, Robert J. [Ames Laboratory; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microsoft Word - 10121-4903-02 Final Technical Report 11-18-14...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Report documentation in accordance with Phase IV Task 8.0 "Conduct Local Offshore Testing Prototype Field Test" and deliverable D.14 of RPSEA subcontract...

209

Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering were used to determine the phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys. Increasing Fe concentration results in an average softening of the phonon modes. Chemical ordering of the Ni0.72Fe0.28 alloy results in a reduction of the partial vibrational entropy of the Fe atoms but does not significantly change the partial vibrational entropy of the Ni atoms. Changes in the phonon densities of states with composition and chemical ordering are discussed and analyzed with a cluster expansion method.

Lucas, Matthew [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Mauger, L [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena; Munoz, Jorge A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Halevy, I [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Horwath, J [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Semiatin, S L [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Leontsev, S. O. [University of Kentucky, Lexington] [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Xiao, Yuming [Carnegie Institution of Washington] [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Chow, P [HPCAT Geophysical Lab, Argonne, IL] [HPCAT Geophysical Lab, Argonne, IL; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - al si fe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

morphology... -section of a strut showing the microstructure. Dendrites of -Al and eutectic structure of Al-Si with needles of - AlFeSi... . ... Source: Groningen,...

212

Structural, thermodynamic, mechanical, and magnetic properties of FeW system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fe-W system is systematically investigated through a combined use of first-principles calculation, cluster expansion, special quasirandom structures, and experiments. It is revealed that the ferromagnetic state of BCC Fe-W solid solution has lower heat of formation than its nonmagnetic state within the entire composition range, and intermetallic ?-Fe{sub 2}W and ?-Fe{sub 7}W{sub 6} phases are energetically favorable with negative heats of formation. Calculations also show that the Fe-W solid solution has much lower coefficient of thermal expansion than its mechanical mixture, and that the descending sequence of temperature-dependent elastic moduli of each Fe-W solid solution is E?>?G?>?B. Moreover, magnetic state should have an important effect on mechanical properties of Fe-W phases, and electronic structures can provide a deeper understanding of various properties of Fe-W. The derived results agree well with experimental observations, and can clarify two experimental controversies regarding structural stability and magnetic property of Fe-W phases in the literature.

Ren, Q. Q.; Fan, J. L.; Han, Y.; Gong, H. R., E-mail: gonghr@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Microsoft Word - santa-fe-county-fact-sheet-2013-2014.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Santa Fe County participated in one or more of LANL's regional education programs. * Academy for Technology and the Classics * Acequia Madre Elementary * Capital High School *...

214

validation_inv_qs55_fe_and_analytical_dry.eps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1. 0. 50. 100. 150. 2. Frequency (Hz). 0. 50. 100. 150. 200. 1000/Q. FE values. analytical values. 55.

santos

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied zn fe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on bulk samples indicated that ZnS and Zn-Fe (oxyhydr) oxides amounted... in the sediment, and from their further oxidative dissolution and ... Source: Lawrence Berkeley...

216

Nanostructure evolution in joining of Al and Fe nanoparticles with femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The joining of Al-Fe nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation is reported in this paper. Fe and Al NPs were deposited on a carbon film in vacuum via fs laser ablation. Particles were then exposed to multiple fs laser pulses at fluences between 0.5 and 1.3?mJ/cm{sup 2}. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Diffraction X-ray observations indicate that Al and Fe NPs bond to each other under these conditions. For comparison, bonding of Al to Al and Fe to Fe NPs was also investigated. The nanostructure, as observed using TEM, showed that individual Al NPs were monocrystalline while individual Fe NPs were polycrystalline prior to joining and that these structures are retained after the formation of Al-Al and Fe-Fe NPs. Al-Fe NPs produced by fs laser joining exhibited a mixed amorphous and crystalline phase at the interface. Bonding is suggested to originate from intermixing within a region of high field intensity between particles.

Jiao, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Huang, H.; Zhou, Y., E-mail: hepeng@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Liu, L. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hu, A. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37916 (United States); Duley, W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); He, P., E-mail: hepeng@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

SciTech Connect: A Solution for Solution-Produced [beta]-FeSe...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A Solution for Solution-Produced beta-FeSe: Elucidating and Overcoming Factors that Prevent Superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Solution for...

218

Origin of room temperature ferromagnetic moment in Rh-rich Rh/Fe multilayer thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

films of FeRh was done by electron beam melting on amorphous substrates3 but the low extent of ordering

Laughlin, David E.

219

Fe and Al Abundances for 180 Red Giants in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present radial velocities, Fe, and Al abundances for 180 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster Omega Centauri ($\\omega$ Cen). The majority of our data lie in the range 11.0$Al/Fe] ratios exhibit large star--to--star scatter for all populations, with the more than 1.0 dex range of [Al/Fe] decreasing for stars more metal--rich than [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4. The minimum [Al/Fe] abundance observed for all metallicity populations is [Al/Fe]$\\sim$+0.15. The maximum abundance of log $\\epsilon$(Al) is reached for stars with [Fe/H]$\\sim$--1.4 and does not increase further with stellar metallicity. We interpret these results as evidence for type II SNe providing the minimum [Al/Fe] ratio and a mass spectrum of intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars causing the majority of the [Al/Fe] scatter. These results seem to fit in the adopted scheme that star formation occurred in $\\omega$ Cen over $>$1 Gyr.

Christian I. Johnson; Catherine A. Pilachowski; Jennifer Simmerer; Dustin Schwenk

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated 56fe particles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accelerated 56fe particles Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RADIATION RESEARCH 162, 655659 (2004)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Structure of epitaxial (Fe,N) codoped rutile TiO2 thin films...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No evidence of structural disorder associated with a high concentration of oxygen vacancies is observed. Substitution of Fe for Ti could not be confirmed, although secondary...

222

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off-gas from a typical gasifier contains large percentagesIOAl-Cr alloys at coal-gasifier This FeS and CaS0 operating

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Search for Resonant Absorption of Solar Axions Emitted in M1 Transition in $^{57}$Fe Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for resonant absorbtion of 14.4 keV solar axions by $^{57}$Fe target was performed. The Si(Li) detector placed inside the low-background setup was used to detect the $\\gamma$-quanta appearing in the deexcitation of 14.4 keV nuclear level: $A+\\rm{^{57}Fe} \\to \\rm{^{57}Fe^{*}} \\to \\rm{^{57}Fe} + \\gamma$. The new upper limit for the hadronic axion mass have been obtained: $m_{A} \\leq 151$ eV (90% C.L.) ($S$=0.5, $z$=0.56).

A. V. Derbin; A. I. Egorov; I. A. Mitropol'sky; V. N. Muratova; D. A. Semenov; E. V. Unzhakov

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Proton spectroscopy of 48Ni, 46Fe, and 44Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \\b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \\b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.

M. Pomorski; M. Pfützner; W. Dominik; R. Grzywacz; A. Stolz; T. Baumann; J. S. Berryman; H. Czyrkowski; R. D?browski; A. Fija?kowska; T. Ginter; J. Johnson; G. Kami?ski; N. Larson; S. N. Liddick; M. Madurga; C. Mazzocchi; S. Mianowski; K. Miernik; D. Miller; S. Paulauskas; J. Pereira; K. P. Rykaczewski; S. Suchyta

2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Postirradiation deformation of ferritic Fe-Cr binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six binary Fe-Cr alloys ranging from 3 to 18% chromium were irradiated in the form of miniature tensile specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility and tested at room temperature. The irradiation conditions produced 7 to 30 dpa at 365 to 574{degrees}C. The major purpose of the experiment was to compare the behavior of these simple alloys with that of more complex commercial alloys, The tensile data obtained on these specimens at room temperature are discussed with appropriate fractographic and microstructural support. Previous studies on similar materials had revealed the presence of a feature typically exhibited in channel fractures: elongated voids were evident in shear bands of an irradiated and deformed TEM disk of a binary Fe-6Cr alloy. An additional purpose of the experiment was therefore to provide a better understanding of the potential contribution of channel fracture to deformation in ferritic alloys. No evidence for channel fracture was found, however. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interdiffusion Behavior of Aluminide Coatings on Fe-Base Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the potential degradation modes of oxidation-resistant iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coatings into Fe-base substrate alloys that typically contain no Al. To address this issue, interdiffusion between aluminide coatings and steel substrates was studied for times up to 10,000 h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized in a laboratory chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor on representative commercial ferritic alloy Fe-9Cr-1Mo and type 304L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructural and compositional changes after diffusion anneals were examined in detail. An initial attempt to model the interdiffusion behavior was carried out by applying an existing software program COSIM (coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model). Complementary work was conducted using a simple mathematic model developed by Heckel et al. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles for the aluminide coatings on ferritic alloys. Model results were then applied to predict coating lifetime.

Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Liu, A. P. [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Magnetization dynamics and interface studies in ion-beam sputtered Si/CoFeB(8)/MgO(4)/CoFeB(8)/Ta(5) structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interface roughness, Boron distribution in bulk CoFeB and at interface, Gilbert damping constant (?), and inhomogeneous broadening in ion-beam sputtered Si/CoFeB(8)/MgO(4)/CoFeB(8)/Ta(5) structures are found to be sensitive to the MgO growth process. The ion-assist and reactive growth processes that result in sharper interfaces of width ?0.5?nm lead to smaller ? of 0.0050?±?0.0003 and 0.0060?±?0.0002 and inhomogeneous broadening ?H{sub 0} of 3?±?0.3 and 1?±?0.3?Oe, respectively. On the other hand, the post-oxidation method results in rough interface and higher retention of Boron in CoFeB leading to higher values for ? and ?H{sub 0} as 0.0080?±?0.0006 and 5?±?0.3?Oe, respectively.

Raju, M.; Behera, Nilamani; Pandya, Dinesh K., E-mail: dkpandya@physics.iitd.ac.in; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Role of cross-shell excitations in the reaction 54Fe(d_pol,p)55Fe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction 54Fe(d_pol,p)55Fe was studied at the Munich Q3D spectrograph with a 14 MeV polarized deuteron beam. Excitation energies, angular distributions and analyzing powers were measured for 39 states up to 4.5 MeV excitation energy. Spin and parity assignments were made and spectroscopic factors deduced by comparison to DWBA calculations. The results were compared to predictions by large scale shell model calculations in the full pf-shell and it was found that reasonable agreement for energies and spectroscopic factors below 2.5 MeV could only be obtained if up to 6 particles were allowed to be excited from the f_7/2 orbital into p_3/2, f_5/2, and p_1/2 orbitals across the N=28 gap. For levels above 2.5 MeV the experimental strength distribution was found to be significantly more fragmented than predicted by the shell model calculations.

M. Mahgoub; R. Kruecken; Th. Faestermann; A. Bergmaier; D. Bucurescu; R. Hertenberger; Th. Kroell; H. -F. Wirth; A. F. Lisetskiy

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Twisted Ladder: Relating the Fe Superconductors to the High Tc Cuprates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct a 2-leg ladder model of an Fe-pnictide superconductor and discuss its properties and relationship with the familiar 2-leg cuprate model. Our results suggest that the underlying pairing mechanism for the Fe-pnictide superconductors is similar to that for the cuprates.

Berg, E.

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mapping magnetic fields of Fe3O4 nanosphere assemblies by electron holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals have attracted much attention due to their unique magnetic properties, and bio-separation.1­3 Fe3O4 has also been demonstrated as an excellent storage material for lithium and mesocrystals, where magnetic interactions deter- mine the morphology.3 It is of great importance to identify

Rubloff, Gary W.

232

Large pyramid shaped single crystals of BiFeO{sub 3} by solvothermal synthesis method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis parameters are optimized in order to grow single crystals of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}. 2 to 3 mm size pyramid (tetrahedron) shaped single crystals were successfully obtained by solvothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy with EDAX confirmed the phase formation. Raman scattering spectra of bulk BiFeO3 single crystals have been measured which match well with reported spectra.

Sornadurai, D.; Ravindran, T. R.; Paul, V. Thomas; Sastry, V. Sankara [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

INVESTIGATION OF THE ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL/PYRITE (FeS2) JUNCTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost was a factor and the unconventional solar cell candidates included: FeS2, CuO, and Zn3P2 (Wadia et al 2009:2702). For high volume production of solar panels, cheaper material for commercial use The nontoxic semiconductor pyrite FeS2 appeals to us as a good candidate for solar cells because it has a small

Hall, Sharon J.

234

High temperature magnetic properties of SmCo5/-Fe(Co) bulk nanocomposite magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-compaction route. Up to 30% of the Fe soft magnetic phase has been added to the composites with grain size (!150 C) are needed for applica- tions in advanced power systems, including electric vehicles and wind mill turbines.1,2 Nd2Fe14B-based magnets are the material of choice in systems where weight or size

Liu, J. Ping

235

FE Electrical Report 2005-2006 By: Chris Dudasik, Tianyi Li, and Jeff Schvey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, batteries, or general electrical theory, please see the Fe Electrical Team Report ­ Spring 2005 or the Fe the ground, the metal strip connected to the lever of the limit switch presses up against the case; this causes the signal wire to read +0v. When the foot is in the air, the strip is depressed and the signal

Ruina, Andy L.

236

NICKEL-FREE Fe-12Mn-0.2Ti ALLOY STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parr, J. Gordon, J. Iron and Steel Inst. B, vol. 283,137 (Properties of Fe-12Mn-0.2Ti Steel at -196°C Yield Stress (FREE Fe-12Mn-O. 2Ti ALLOY STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS

Hwang, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Exchange bias and blocking temperature distribution of Fe-film/CoO-nanoparticle hybrid bilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relaxation in a Fe-film/CoO-nanoparticle hybrid system Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 132401 (2012); 10 anisotropy energy per unit volume and V is the grain volume. Therefore, hybrid EB bilayers with the AF layer beExchange bias and blocking temperature distribution of Fe-film/CoO-nanoparticle hybrid bilayers Wei

Krishnan, Kannan M.

238

SCT&E LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 14-98-LNG | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FE Dkt. No. 14-98-LNG SCT&E LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 14-98-LNG The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed July 24, 2014, by SCT&E LNG, LLC (SCT&E),...

239

Building the Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market Blake LeBaron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building the Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market Blake LeBaron Brandeis University June 2002 Abstract This short summary presents an insider's look at the construction of the Santa Fe artificial stock of the directions that researchers have been taking is the use of agent-based financial markets. These "bottom- up

Tesfatsion, Leigh

240

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong S.; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Controllable synthesis, magnetic and biocompatible properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron oxide nanocrystals (NCs) with a series of well-controlled morphologies (octahedron, rod, wire, cube and plate) and compositions (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal process. The morphological and compositional control of various iron oxide NCs was based on the regulations of precursor thermolysis kinetics and surfactants. The obtained samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, SQUID and cytotoxicity test. These as-prepared iron oxide NCs showed excellent magnetic properties and good biocompatibility, paving the way for their high-efficiency bio-separation and bio-detection applications. - Graphical Abstract: Schematic illustration for the formation of iron oxide NCs (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with different controlled morphologies and compositions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron oxide NCs with a series of well-controlled morphologies (octahedron, rod, wire, cube, and plate) and compositions (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of the morphological and compositional control process is directly related to precursor thermolysis kinetics and surfactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These iron oxide NCs exhibited excellent magnetic response and good biocompatibility, which should have great applications in the cell separation and biodetection.

Zhou, Xi, E-mail: xizhou@xmu.edu.cn [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Shi, Yanfeng; Ren, Lei [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Bao, Shixiong [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Han, Yu; Wu, Shichao; Zhang, Honggang; Zhong, Lubin [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@xmu.edu.cn [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Tuning exchange bias in Fe/?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core-shell nanoparticles: Impacts of interface and surface spins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative study has been performed of the exchange bias (EB) effect in Fe/?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core-shell nanoparticles with the same thickness of the ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell (?2?nm) and the diameter of the Fe core varying from 4?nm to 11?nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM confirmed the high quality of the core-shell nanostructures. A systematic analysis of magnetization versus magnetic field measurements under zero-field-cooled and field-cooled regimes using the Meiklejohn-Bean model and deconvoluting superparamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the total magnetic moment Langevin function shows that there exists a critical particle size (?10?nm), above which the spins at the interface between Fe and ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contribute primarily to the EB, but below which the surface spin effect is dominant. Our finding yields deeper insight into the collective contributions of interface and surface spins to the EB in core-shell nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is the key to manipulating EB in magnetic nanostructures for spintronics applications.

Khurshid, Hafsa, E-mail: hkhurshi@usf.edu, E-mail: phanm@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Phan, Manh-Huong, E-mail: hkhurshi@usf.edu, E-mail: phanm@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Mukherjee, Pritish; Srikanth, Hariharan, E-mail: hkhurshi@usf.edu, E-mail: phanm@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Nebular spectra and abundance tomography of the type Ia supernova SN 2011fe: a normal SN Ia with a stable Fe core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of optical and one near-infrared nebular spectra covering the first year of the Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe are presented and modelled. The density profile that proved best for the early optical/ultraviolet spectra, "rho-11fe", was extended to lower velocities to include the regions that emit at nebular epochs. Model rho-11fe is intermediate between the fast deflagration model W7 and a low-energy delayed-detonation. Good fits to the nebular spectra are obtained if the innermost ejecta are dominated by neutron-rich, stable Fe-group species, which contribute to cooling but not to heating. The correct thermal balance can thus be reached for the strongest [FeII] and [FeIII] lines to be reproduced with the observed ratio. The 56Ni mass thus obtained is 0.47 +/- 0.05 Mo. The bulk of 56Ni has an outermost velocity of ~8500 km/s. The mass of stable iron is 0.23 +/- 0.03 Mo. Stable Ni has low abundance, ~10^{-2} Mo. This is sufficient to reproduce an observed emission line near 7400 A. A sub-Chandrasekhar exp...

Mazzali, P A; Filippenko, A V; Garnavich, P M; Clubb, K I; Maguire, K; Pan, Y -C; Shappee, R; Silverman, J M; Benetti, S; Hachinger, S; Nomoto, K; Pian, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

STORAGE RING CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT SINGLE AND DOUBLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 9+} AND SINGLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 10+}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured electron impact ionization from the ground state of Fe{sup 9+} and Fe{sup 10+} over the relative electron-ion collision energy ranges 200-1900 eV and 250-1800 eV, respectively. The ions were confined in an ion storage ring long enough for essentially all metastable levels to radiatively relax to the ground state. For single ionization, we find a number of discrepancies between the existing theoretical cross sections and our results. The calculations appear to neglect some excitation-autoionization (EA) channels, particularly from n = 3 to n' excitations, which are important near threshold, and those from n = 2 {yields} 3 excitations, which contribute at about 650 eV. Conversely, at higher energies the calculations appear to overestimate the importance of EA channels due to excitation into levels where n {>=} 4. The resulting experimental rate coefficients agree with the most recent theory for Fe{sup 9+} to within 16% and for Fe{sup 10+} to within 19% at temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in collisional ionization equilibrium. We have also measured double ionization of Fe{sup 9+} forming Fe{sup 11+} in the energy range 450-3000 eV and found that although there is an appreciable cross section for direct double ionization, the dominant mechanism appears to be through direct ionization of an inner shell electron producing an excited state that subsequently stabilizes through autoionization.

Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lestinsky, M.; Repnow, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K. [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Leihgesterner Weg 217, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Intrinsic magnetic properties of hexagonal LuFeO{sub 3} and the effects of nonstoichiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used oxide molecular-beam epitaxy in a composition-spread geometry to deposit hexagonal LuFeO{sub 3} (h-LuFeO{sub 3}) thin films with a monotonic variation in the Lu/Fe cation ratio, creating a mosaic of samples that ranged from iron rich to lutetium rich. We characterized the effects of composition variation with x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. After identifying growth conditions leading to stoichiometric film growth, an additional sample was grown with a rotating sample stage. From this stoichiometric sample, we determined stoichiometric h-LuFeO{sub 3} to have a T{sub N} = 147 K and M{sub s} = 0.018 ?{sub B}/Fe.

Moyer, Jarrett A., E-mail: moyerja@illinois.edu, E-mail: schlom@cornell.edu; Schiffer, Peter [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Misra, Rajiv [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mundy, Julia A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Brooks, Charles M.; Heron, John T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G., E-mail: moyerja@illinois.edu, E-mail: schlom@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Spreading of Sn-Ag solders on FeNi alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spreading of Sn-3Ag-xBi solders on Fe-42Ni has been studied using a drop transfer setup. Initial spreading velocities as fast as {approx}0.5 m/s have been recorded. The results are consistent with a liquid front moving on a metastable, flat, unreacted substrate and can be described by using a modified molecular-kinetic model for which the rate controlling step is the movement of one atom from the liquid to the surface of the solid substrate. Although the phase diagram predicts the formation of two Fe-Sn intermetallics at the solder/substrate interface in samples heated at temperatures lower than 513 C, after spreading at 250 C only a thin FeSn reaction layer could be observed. Two interfacial layers (FeSn and FeSn2) were found after spreading at 450 C.

Saiz, Eduardo; Hwang, C-W.; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

FePt-based exchange-coupled composite perpendicular recording media.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to demonstrate the strong and proper exchange coupling between bottom magnetic layer and capping magnetic layer in FePt-based exchange-coupled composite (ECC) perpendicular recording media, we have investigated the thermal stability, writability, degree of exchange coupling, and ECC gain factor of FePt-based ECC media as a function of the thickness of the capping FePt layer. With increasing the thickness of capping FePt layer, both thermal stability and media writability increase simultaneously as a result of the change from strong exchange coupling to proper exchange coupling. The proper exchange-coupled FePt ECC is a promising candidate for future high-density perpendicular recording.

Sun, C.; Stafford, D.; Acharya, R.; X-Ray Science Division; Western Digital Media

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work hardening exponent. The work hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low temperature irradiation ({le}420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ({le} 420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420[degrees]C, whereas irradiation at 574[degrees]C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ([le] 420[degrees]C) but increased after irradiation at 574[degrees]C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Gardner, P.L. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB foils of 25-30 {mu}m thickness with the composition of Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of {approx}3 {mu}m thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am{sup -1}. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

Liang Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen Long; Kosel, Jurgen [Computer Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal 23955 (Saudi Arabia); Gianchandani, Yogesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1301 Beal Ave., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) under construction at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) of the Australian National University (ANU) for the ANU 2.3m telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory. WiFeS is a powerful integral field, double-beam, concentric, image-slicing spectrograph designed to deliver excellent thoughput, wavelength stability, spectrophotometric performance and superb image quality along with wide spectral coverage throughout the 320-950 nm wavelength region. It provides a 25x38 arcsec. field with 0.5 arcsec. sampling along each of twenty five 38X1 arcsec slitlets. The output format is optimized to match the 4096x4096 pixel CCD detectors in each of two cameras individually optimized for the blue and the red ends of the spectrum, respectively. A process of "interleaved nod-and-shuffle" will be applied to permit quantum noise-limited sky subtraction. Using VPH gratings, spectral resolutions of 3000 and 7000 are provided. The full spectral range is covered in a single exposure at R=3000, and in two exposures in the R=7000 mode. The use of transmissive coated optics, VPH gratings and optimized mirror coatings ensures a throughput (including telescope atmosphere and detector) > 30% over a wide spectral range. The concentric image-slicer design ensures an excellent and uniform image quality across the full field. To maximize scientific return, the whole instrument is configured for remote observing, pipeline data reduction, and the accumulation of calibration image libraries.

Michael Dopita; John Hart; Peter McGregor; Patrick Oates; Gabe Bloxham; Damien Jones

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Synthesis and magnetic properties of the double layer perovskite CeBaFe2O5+w  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis and magnetic properties of the double layer perovskite CeBaFe2O5+w R. L. de Almeida,1 O The synthesis, crystallographic structure, and magnetic properties of polycrystalline single-phase samples of CeBaFe results on the successful prepara- tion and characterization of polycrystalline CeBaFe2O5+w samples. Ideal

de Lima, Oscar Ferreira

254

Removal of arsenic from effluents - a comparison between the FeSO{sub 4}/Air and FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of kinetic studies involving the precipitation of arsenic from aqueous solutions as FeAsO{sub 4} / Fe(OH){sub 3}, using FeSO{sub 4} as source of Fe ions, and Air or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidizing agents. Both systems lead to an efficient removal of arsenic. The differences in oxidants performances are in the precipitation reaction rate - much faster using hydrogen peroxide. Mechanisms of reactions were suggested based on the following main steps: Fe(II) oxidation: 2 Fe{sup 2+} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + 2 H{sup +} 2 Fe{sup 3+} + H{sub 2}O 2 Fe{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + 2 H{sup +}= 2 Fe{sup 3+} + 2 H{sub 2}O As(III) oxidation: HAsO{sub 2} + 2 Fe {sup 3+} + 2 H{sub 2}O = 2 Fe{sup 2+} + H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} + 2H{sup +} HAsO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} = H{sub 3}ASO{sub 4} Precipitation: Fe{sup 3+} + H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} = FeASO{sub 4} (s) + 3 H{sup +} H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} + n Fe(OH){sub 3} (s) = H{sub 3}ASO{sub 4} (ads) [Fe(OH){sub 3}]{sub n} (s). 15 refs., 7 figs.

Teixeira, L.A.; Kohler, H.M. [Catholic Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); [Peroxidos do Brasil Ltda, S. Paulo (Brazil); Kohler, H.M. [Catholic Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Monteiro, A.G. [BHP Minerals, Reno, NV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hardness of FeB{sub 4}: Density functional theory investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent experimental study reported the successful synthesis of an orthorhombic FeB{sub 4} with a high hardness of 62(5) GPa [H. Gou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157002 (2013)], which has reignited extensive interests on whether transition-metal borides compounds will become superhard materials. However, it is contradicted with some theoretical studies suggesting transition-metal boron compounds are unlikely to become superhard materials. Here, we examined structural and electronic properties of FeB{sub 4} using density functional theory. The electronic calculations show the good metallicity and covalent Fe–B bonding. Meanwhile, we extensively investigated stress-strain relations of FeB{sub 4} under various tensile and shear loading directions. The calculated weakest tensile and shear stresses are 40 GPa and 25 GPa, respectively. Further simulations (e.g., electron localization function and bond length along the weakest loading direction) on FeB{sub 4} show the weak Fe–B bonding is responsible for this low hardness. Moreover, these results are consistent with the value of Vickers hardness (11.7–32.3 GPa) by employing different empirical hardness models and below the superhardness threshold of 40 GPa. Our current results suggest FeB{sub 4} is a hard material and unlikely to become superhard (>40 GPa)

Zhang, Miao; Du, Yonghui; Gao, Lili [Department of Physics, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China)] [Department of Physics, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China); Lu, Mingchun [Department of Aeronautical Engineering Professional Technology, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132102 (China)] [Department of Aeronautical Engineering Professional Technology, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132102 (China); Lu, Cheng [Department of Physics, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China)] [Department of Physics, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China); Liu, Hanyu, E-mail: hal420@mail.usask.ca [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} and steric effect of Nd on valence mixing and ordering of Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} above and below Verwey transition is studied by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy and compared with GdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} that adopts a higher-symmetry charge-ordered structure typical of the Sm-Ho variants of the title phase. Differences are investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy accounting for iron valence states at their local magnetic and ionic environments. In the charge-ordered state, the orientation of the electric-field gradient (EFG) versus the internal magnetic field (B) agrees with experiment only when contribution from charges of the ordered d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup 2+} is included, proving thus the orbital ordering. The EFG magnitude indicates that only some 60% of the orbital order occurring in the Sm-Ho variants is achieved in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The consequent diminishing of the orbit contribution (of opposite sign) to the field B at the Fe{sup 2+} nucleus explains why B is larger than for the Sm-Ho variants. The decreased orbital ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5} causes a corresponding decrease in charge ordering, which is achieved by decreasing both the amount of the charge-ordered iron states in the sample and their fractional valence separation as seen by the Moessbauer isomer shift. The charge ordering in NdBaFe{sub 2}O{sub 5+w} is more easily suppressed by the oxygen nonstoichiometry (w) than in the Sm-Ho variants. Also the valence mixing into Fe{sup 2.5+} is destabilized by the large size of Nd. The orientation of the EFG around this valence-mixed iron can only be accounted for when the valence-mixing electron is included in the electrostatic ligand field. This proves that the valence mixing occurs between the two iron atoms facing each other across the structural plane of the rare-earth atoms. -- Graphical Abstract: Moessbauer spectrum detects ordering of d{sub xz} orbitals of Fe{sup II}O{sub 5} via the electric-field gradient (EFG) of the orbital, which makes the main component of the total EFG parallel with the magnetic moment B. Display Omitted

Linden, J. [Department of Physics, AAbo Akademi, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Karen, P., E-mail: pavel.karen@kjemi.uio.n [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O.Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Size dependent structural, vibrational and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} and core-shell structured BiFeO{sub 3}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk BiFeO{sub 3}, BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles and core-shell structured BiFeO{sub 3}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by solid state reaction method, sol-gel and Stöber process (SiO{sub 2} shell) respectively. Transmission electron microscopy image confirmed the core-shell structure of BiFeO{sub 3}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with BiFeO3 core ?50-90 nm and SiO{sub 2} shell ?16 nm. X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy results showed the presence of distorted rhombohedral structure with R3c space group in all three samples. The magnetic measurement indicated the existence of room-temperature weak ferromagnetism in core-shell BiFeO{sub 3}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and BiFeO3 nanoparticles, whereas bulk BiFeO{sub 3} showed antiferromagnteic nature. Electron Spin Resonance results confirmed the enhancement in magnetic properties of coreshell structured BiFeO{sub 3}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in comparison with BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles and bulk BiFeO{sub 3}.

Chauhan, Sunil, E-mail: sunilchauhanjiit@gmail.com; Kumar, Manoj, E-mail: sunilchauhanjiit@gmail.com; Chhoker, Sandeep, E-mail: sunilchauhanjiit@gmail.com; Katyal, S. C., E-mail: sunilchauhanjiit@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida- 201307 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Enhancement of exchange bias and training effect in ion-beam sputtered Fe{sub 46}Mn{sub 54}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a remarkable enhancement by 300% of the exchange-bias field at room temperature, without affecting the coercivity value, via optimum magnetic annealing (250?°C/3 kOe) in ion-beam sputtered FeMn(30?nm)/NiFe(10?nm) bilayers. This specific behavior has been attributed to a higher degree of ?-FeMn(111) orientation that offers more interfacial FeMn moments to get pinned with the moments of the adjacent NiFe layer. Unlike the absence of training effect at room temperature, a pronounced training effect and an accompanying magnetization reversal asymmetry are evidenced upon field cooling below 50?K due to the presence of biaxial exchange induced anisotropy across the interdiffused FeMn/NiFe interface. The present findings not only have technological significance but also are of relevance to the understanding of interfacial spin disorder and frustration in these exchange-biased systems.

Fulara, Himanshu; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in; Kashyap, Subhash C. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Granville, Simon [Callaghan Innovation, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Minimal Two-band Model for the Superconducting Fe-pnictides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the discovery of the Fe-pnictide superconductors, LDA band structure calculations showed that the dominant contributions to the spectral weight near the Fermi energy came from the Fe 3d orbitals. The Fermi surface is characterized by two hole surfaces around the {Lambda} point and two electron surfaces around the M point of the 2 Fe/cell Brillouin zone. Here, we describe a 2-band model that reproduces the topology of the LDA Fermi surface and exhibits both ferromagnetic and q = ({pi}, 0) spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We argue that this minimal model contains the essential low energy physics of these materials.

Raghu, S.

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

A theoretical study of the electronic structure of Invar Fe*3Pt and related materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Full Potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FPLAPW or FLAPW) method is used for a spin-polarized band calculation for ordered Fe{sub 3}Pt. As major purpose, the momentum distributions of the spin-polarized electrons are calculated and compared with results from a magnetic Compton scattering measurement. To get related information, the electronic behavior is also analyzed by examining the partial densities of states and the spatial electron distributions; the role of alloying effects is then explored by studying the electrons in some related alloys: Fe{sub 3}Ni, Fe{sub 3}Pd, Ni{sub 3}Pt and Co{sub 3}Pt.

Zuo, Zhiqi

1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Cyclic voltammetric study of Co-Ni-Fe alloys electrodeposition in sulfate medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical technique has been used to study the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. To obtain the nucleation mechanism, cyclic voltammetry is used to characterize the Co-Ni-Fe system. The scanning rate effect on the deposition process was investigated. Deposition of single metal occurs at potential values more positive than that estimated stability potential. Based on the cyclic voltammetry results, the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy clearly show that the process of diffusion occurs is controlled by the typical nucleation mechanism.

Hanafi, I.; Daud, A. R.; Radiman, S. [Material Science Program, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Influence of surface segregation on magnetic properties of FePt nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface segregation leads to chemical disordering in magnetic alloy nanostructures and thus could have profound impact upon the magnetic properties of these nanostructures. In this study, we used the first-principles density functional theory calculation method to determine how Pt surface segregation (exchanging interior Pt with surface Fe atoms) would affect the magnetic properties of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt nanoparticles. For both cuboid and cuboctahedral FePt nanoparticles, we predicted that the Pt surface segregation process could cause a decrease in total magnetic moments, a change in (easy and/or hard) magnetization axes, and a reduction in magnetic anisotropy.

Lv, Hongyan [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States) [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Lei, Yinkai; Datta, Aditi; Wang, Guofeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nickel recovery from electronic waste II Electrodeposition of Ni and Ni–Fe alloys from diluted sulfate solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Ni can be recovered from EG wastes as pure Ni or as Ni–Fe alloys. • The control of the experimental conditions gives a certain alloy composition. • Unusual deposits morphology shows different nucleation mechanisms for Ni vs Fe. • The nucleation mechanism was progressive for Ni and instantaneous for Fe and Ni–Fe. - Abstract: This study focuses on the electrodeposition of Ni and Ni–Fe alloys from synthetic solutions similar to those obtained by the dissolution of electron gun (an electrical component of cathode ray tubes) waste. The influence of various parameters (pH, electrolyte composition, Ni{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio, current density) on the electrodeposition process was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) were used to provide information about the obtained deposits’ thickness, morphology, and elemental composition. By controlling the experimental parameters, the composition of the Ni–Fe alloys can be tailored towards specific applications. Complementarily, the differences in the nucleation mechanisms for Ni, Fe and Ni–Fe deposition from sulfate solutions have been evaluated and discussed using cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry. The obtained results suggest a progressive nucleation mechanism for Ni, while for Fe and Ni–Fe, the obtained data points are best fitted to an instantaneous nucleation model.

Robotin, B. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos Street, RO-400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ispas, A. [Fachgebiet Elektrochemie und Galvanotechnik II, Technische Universität Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Coman, V. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos Street, RO-400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bund, A. [Fachgebiet Elektrochemie und Galvanotechnik II, Technische Universität Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Ilea, P., E-mail: pilea@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos Street, RO-400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

High temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic catalytic converters for automotive emission control is becoming an important application for heat resistant alloys as more design opportunities are realized. The service conditions and design of metallic catalytic converters require the alloy to be highly oxidation resistant at gauges typically at 50 microns or less. For conventional heat resistant alloy design the goal is to form a well adherent scale on the alloy surface to protect the alloy matrix from being oxidized. However, the thin gauge results in a limited supply of alloying elements that can form the protective scale on the surface. The alloy chemistry has to be optimized to have the minimum oxidation while maintaining processing characteristics. Furthermore, the ratio of scale thickness to foil gauge is significant and the stress state between them introduces measurable permanent distortion of the foil. In this study, the effect of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of commonly used Fe-Cr-Al alloys was quantified by the oxidation weight gain and length change measurements.

Chang, C.S.; Jha, B. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Air Flow North America Corp. – FE Dkt. No. 14-53-LNG (Re-export)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application filed on March 25, 2014, by Air Flow North America Corp. (AIR FLOW) requesting short...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic 3d fe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

under FT3 4 conditions... and is rapidly converted to -Fe C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas2.2 with low ... Source: Kentucky, University of - Center for Applied Energy...

268

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned rights. LBL-6946 Corrosion of Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys byOctober, 1977 Abstract Corrosion of iron-base alloys at 982°high-temperature induced corrosion are probably sulfides and

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

FE's Advanced Combustion R&D Seeks Innovative Ways to Lower Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

capture is a key to the commercial deployment of CCS. Housed under the multi-pronged Carbon Capture and Storage and Power Systems program, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - austenitic fe-cr-ni alloys Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than at 650C. Therefore, for these Fe-Cr-Ni model alloys, increasing... Figure 5 shows LM of the samples after 100x1h cycles at 650C for representative ... Source: Pint, Bruce...

271

Evaluation of Quasicrystal Al-Cu-Fe Alloys for Tribological Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigated the tribological performance of a composite material, formed from an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix and quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders. An evaluation was conducted for the microstructure...

Nabelsi, Nezar

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Co-synthesis of LiFePO4 and Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as low as 0.1% have been reported for nanotubes in epoxy. 8of LiFePO 4 and carbon nanotubes potentially bypassesthat multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Figure 1) and

Wilcox, James; Doeff, Marca M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pressure tuning of competing magnetic interactions in intermetallic CeFe2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use high-pressure magnetic x-ray diffraction and numerical simulation to determine the low-temperature magnetic phase diagram of stoichiometric CeFe2. Near 1.5 GPa we find a transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism, accompanied by a rhombohedral distortion of the cubic Laves crystal lattice. By comparing pressure and chemical substitution we find that the phase transition is controlled by a shift of magnetic frustration from the Ce-Ce to the Fe-Fe sublattice. Notably the dominant Ce-Fe magnetic interaction, which sets the temperature scale for the onset of long-range order, remains satisfied throughout the phase diagram but does not determine the magnetic ground state. Our results illustrate the complexity of a system with multiple competing magnetic energy scales and lead to a general model for magnetism in cubic Laves phase intermetallic compounds.

Wang, Jiyang; Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R.; van Wezel, Jasper; Canfield, Paul C.; Rosenbaum, T.F.

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reactivity of nanocolloidal particles -Fe2O3 at charged interfaces: 2-Electrochemical conversion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, convection, migration, and the charge transfer depending on the redox potential of the species by methyl viologen), nanoparticles of hematite and goethite (-FeOOH: d = 50 nm) are invo

Boyer, Edmond

275

Mass Measurements of Proton-Rich Nuclei Fe-50 and Ni-54  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and target thicknesses determined the Q-value scales shown in Fig. 2. The resulting Q values and mass excesses (all in MeV) are Q("Fe) =-50..95+0.06, M(SOFe) =-34.48+0.06 and Q("Ni) = -50.19+0.05, M("Ni) =-39.21 +0.05, with the mass results based on a... Station, Texas 77843 {Received 6 December 1976) The reactions "Fe{'He,'He)' Fe and "Ni{'He,'He)"Ni have been observed at an incident a energy of 110 MeV. The reaction Q values are found to be Q{ Fe) = ?50.95 + 0.06 MeV and Q{' Ni) = ?50.19 + 0.05 Me...

Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; May, D. P.; Kenefick, R. A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlas fe-i4 pixel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pixel Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atlas fe-i4 pixel Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Joint ATLASCMS SLHC Opto WG 1 March 5, 2010...

277

Cheniere Marketing, LLC – FE Dkt. No. 14-31-LNG (Re-export)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an Application filed on March 7, 2014, by Cheniere Marketing, LLC (CMI), requesting blanket...

278

A Biophysical Approach to Investigate the Human Fe-S Cluster Assembly Pathway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors that function in electron transport, catalyzing substrate turnover, environmental sensing, and initiating radical chemistry. Elaborate multi-component systems have evolved to protect organisms from...

Fox, Nicholas G

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

Shu, Yi

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - al mg fe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mg2+ . Experiments on phyllosilicates have... -rich specimens. Muller et al. (1997) observed that Mg and Fe form clusters that segregate fromAl in the Camp... that ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-based Systems Approach Poster P Poster P - - 2 2, Wednesday Bruce Bunting and Todd Toops Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

282

Charge transfer in Fe-doped GaN: The role of the donor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several nitride-based device structures would benefit from the availability of high quality, large-area, freestanding semi-insulating GaN substrates. Due to the intrinsic n-type nature of GaN, however, the incorporation of compensating centers such as Fe is necessary to achieve the high resistivity required. We are using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to explore charge transfer in 450 um thick GaN:Fe plates to understand the basic mechanisms related to compensation so that the material may be optimized for device applications. The results suggest that the simple model based on one shallow donor and a single Fe level is insufficient to describe compensation. Rather, the observation of the neutral donor and Fe3+ indicates that either the two species are spatially segregated or additional compensating and donor defects must be present.

Sunay, Ustun; Dashdorj, J.; Zvanut, M. E.; Harrison, J. G. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1300 University Blvd., CH 310, Birmingham, Alabama 35294-1170 (United States); Leach, J. H.; Udwary, K. [Kyma Technologies, 8829 Midway West Rd., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

111-LNG - ORDER 2961 & 2961-A SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-111-LNG - ORDER 2961 & 2961-A April 2011 October 2011 April 2012 October 2012...

284

Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG On November 15, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOEFE)...

285

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

85-LNG - ORDER 2833 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG - ORDER 2833 April 2011 October 2011 April 2012 October 2012 April 2013 October...

286

Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOEFE) issued...

287

Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in...

288

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as 'high-entropy alloys,' where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here, we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi{sub 3} was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of long-range chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi{sub 3} sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, M. S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UTC Inc., 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Wilks, G. B.; Senkov, O. N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Mauger, L.; Munoz, J. A. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Michel, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Horwath, J.; Semiatin, S. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Karapetrova, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as high-entropy alloys, where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi3 was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of longrange chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi3 sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, Matthew [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Wilks, G B [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Mauger, L [W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Munoz, Jorge A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Senkov, Oleg [ORNL; Michel, E [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Horwath, J [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Semiatin, S L [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evgenia [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Fe IN DRINKING WATER Background Reading: Harris, 7th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Fe IN DRINKING WATER Background Reading: Harris, 7th ed., Chap contaminants in drinking water can be determined spectrophotometrically, including iron. Although iron the iron content of drinking water to

Weston, Ken

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - al cr fe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 43, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 Valence States of Transition-Metal Ions and Electronic Summary: -Metal Ions and Electronic Structures of Spinel Fe1 Cu...

292

Geochemical Behaviour of S, Cl and Fe in Silicate Melts/Glasses...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical Behaviour of S, Cl and Fe in Silicate MeltsGlasses Simulating Natural Magmas Monday, March 26, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 G. Giuli, R. Alonso-Mori, E....

293

2002 Blackwell Science Ltd Reduction of Fe(III) oxide by methanogens in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons to extracellular quinones such as humic acids and the humic acid analogue anthraquinone- 2 anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS). Two species (M. barkeri and M. voltaei) reduced significant amounts of Fe

Lovley, Derek

294

Bioreduction of Fe-bearing clay minerals and their reactivity toward pertechnetate (Tc-99)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

99Technetium (99Tc) is a fission product of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 and poses a high environmental hazard due to its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 x 105 y), abundance in nuclear wastes, and environmental mobility under oxidizing conditions [i.e., Tc(VII)]. Under reducing conditions, Tc(VII) can be reduced to insoluble Tc(IV). Ferrous iron [Fe(II)], either in aqueous form or in mineral form, has been used to reduce Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). However, the reactivity of Fe(II) from clay minerals, other than nontronite, toward immobilization of Tc(VII) and its role in retention of reduced Tc(IV) have not been investigated. In this study the reactivity of a suite of clay minerals toward Tc(VII) reduction and immobilization was evaluated. The clay minerals chosen for this study included five members in the smectite-illite (S-I) series, (montmorillonite, nontronite, rectorite, mixed layered I-S, and illite), chlorite, and palygorskite. Fe-oxides were removed from these minerals with a modified dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) procedure. The total Fe content of these clay minerals, after Fe-oxide removal, ranged from 0.7 to 30.4% by weight, and the Fe(III)/Fe(total) ratio ranged from 44.9 to 98.5%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that after Fe oxide removal the clay minerals were free of Fe-oxides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that little dissolution occurred during the DCB treatment. Bioreduction experiments were performed in bicarbonate buffer (pH-7) with Fe(III) in the clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor, lactate as the sole electron donor, and Shewanella Putrifaciens CN32 cells as mediators. In select tubes, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) was added as electron shuttle to facilitate electron transfer. The extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was the highest for chlorite (~43 wt%) and the lowest for palygorskite (~4.17 wt%). In the S-I series, NAu-2 was the most reducible (~31 %) and illite the least (~0.4 %). The extent and initial rate of bioreduction were positively correlated with the percent smectite in the S-I series (i.e., layer expandability). Fe(II) in the bioreduced clay minerals subsequently was used to reduce Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) in PIPES buffer. Similar to the trend of bioreduction, in the S-I series, reduced smectite showed the highest reactivity toward Tc(VII), and reduced illite exhibited the least. The initial rate of Tc(VII) reduction, after normalization to clay and Fe(II) concentrations, was positively correlated with the percent smectite in the S-I series. Fe(II) in chlorite and palygorskite was also reactive toward Tc(VII) reduction. These data demonstrate that crystal chemical parameters (layer expandability, Fe and Fe(II) contents, and surface area etc.) play important roles in controlling the extent and rate of bioreduction and the reactivity toward Tc(VII) reduction. Reduced Tc(IV) resides within clay mineral matrix, and this association could minimize any potential of reoxidation over long term.

Bishop, Michael E.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Liu, Chongxuan; Edelmann, Richard E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Strain relaxation and enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (BFO:CFO) vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films have been fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The strain relaxation mechanism between BFO and CFO with a large lattice mismatch has been studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanocomposite films exhibit enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the BFO composition increases. Different anisotropy sources have been investigated, suggesting that spin-flop coupling between antiferromagnetic BFO and ferrimagnetic CFO plays a dominant role in enhancing the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

Zhang, Wenrui; Jiao, Liang; Li, Leigang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Jian, Jie; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chu, Frank [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Aiping [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of optical Fe II emission in 302 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We group the strongest Fe II multiplets into three groups according to the lower term of the transition (b{sup 4} F, a{sup 6} S, and a{sup 4} G terms). These approximately correspond to the blue, central, and red parts, respectively, of the 'iron shelf' around H{beta}. We calculate an Fe II template that takes into account transitions into these three terms and an additional group of lines, based on a reconstruction of the spectrum of I Zw 1. This Fe II template gives a more precise fit of the Fe II lines in broad-line AGNs than other templates. We extract Fe II, H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III], and [N II] emission parameters and investigate correlations between them. We find that Fe II lines probably originate in an intermediate line region. We note that the blue, red, and central parts of the iron shelf have different relative intensities in different objects. Their ratios depend on continuum luminosity, FWHM H{beta}, the velocity shift of Fe II, and the H{alpha}/H{beta} flux ratio. We examine the dependence of the well-known anti-correlation between the equivalent widths of Fe II and [O III] on continuum luminosity. We find that there is a Baldwin effect for [O III] but an inverse Baldwin effect for the Fe II emission. The [O III]/Fe II ratio thus decreases with L {sub {lambda}5100}. Since the ratio is a major component of the Boroson and Green Eigenvector 1 (EV1), this implies a connection between the Baldwin effect and EV1 and could be connected with AGN evolution. We find that spectra are different for H{beta} FWHMs greater and less than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, and that there are different correlation coefficients between the parameters.

Kovacevic, Jelena; Popovic, Luka C.; Dimitrijevic, Milan S., E-mail: jkovacevic@aob.bg.ac.r [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Single crystal growth and superconductivity of Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the single crystal growth of Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (0 <= x <= 0.082) from Sn flux. The temperature-composition phase diagram is mapped out based on the magnetic susceptibility and electrical transport measurements. Phase diagram of Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 is qualitatively different from those of Sr and Ba, it could be due to both the charge doping and structural tuning effects associated with Co substitution.

Hu, Rongwei; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Serguei; Straszheim, Warren E.; Canfield, Paul C.

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lifshitz Transition and Chemical Instabilities in Ba1 xKxFe2As2 Superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forsolid-solutionBa1 xKxFe2As2FermisurfaceevolutionismappedviaBlochspectralfunctionscalculatedusingdensityfunctionaltheoryimplementedinKorringa-Kohn-Rostokermultiplescatteringtheorywiththecoherent-potentialapproximation.Spectralfunctionsrevealelectronicdispersion,topology,orbitalcharacter,andbroadening(electron-lifetimeeffects)duetochemicaldisorder.Dissolutionofelectroncylindersoccursnearx 0.9withanonuniform,topological(Lifshitz)transition,reducingtheinterbandinteractions;yetthedispersionmaintainsitsdxzordyzcharacter.Formationenergiesindicatealloyingatx 0.35,asobserved,andatendencyforsegregationontheK-rich(x>0.6)side,explainingthedifficultyofcontrollingsamplequalityandtheconflictingresultsbetweencharacterizedelectronicstructures.OurresultsrevealFermisurfacetransitionsinalloyedsamplesthatinfluencestonodalsuperconductivityandsuggesttheoriginfordeviationsofcommontrendsinFe-basedsuperconductors,suchasBud ko-Ni-Canfieldscaling.

Khan, Suffian N. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Johnson, Duane D. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of an Fe efficiency screening procedure for sorghum based on realistic soil parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUH BASED ON REAl ISTIC SOIL PARAHETERS A Thesis by FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of HASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Hajor Subject: Agronomy DEVELOPMENT OF AN FE EFFICIENCY SCREENING PROCEDURE FOR SORGHUM BASED ON REALISTIC SOIL PARAMETERS A Thesis by Francisco Hernandez Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Hernandez, Francisco

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Screening peach rootstocks for tolerance to iron deficiency stress: mechanisms of Fe?p3+ ?sreduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCREENING PEACH ROOTSTOCKS FOR TOLERANCE TO IRON DEFICIENCY STRESS: MECHANISMS OF FE REDUCTION A Thesis by JONATHAN NDA A. EGILLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Horticulture SCREENING PEACH ROOTSTOCKS FOR TOLERANCE TO IRON DEFICIENCY STRESS: MECHANISMS OF FE REDUCTION A Thesis by JONATHAN NDA A. EGILLA Approved as to style and content by: . H...

Egilla, Jonathan Nda

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Single crystal growth and characterization of ilmenite, FeTiO?, for electronic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SINGLE CRYSTAL GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ILMENITE, FeTi03, FOR ELECTRONIC APPUCATIONS A Thesis by BRIAN LEONARD GRIES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering SINGLE CRYSTAL GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ILMENITE, FeT)Oq, FOR ELECTRONIC APPLICATIONS A Thesis by BRIAN LEONARD GRIES Approved as to style and content by...

Gries, Brian Leonard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Magnetic Properties of Fe Ions in a Silicate Glass and Ceramic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Properties of Fe Ions in a Silicate Glass and Ceramic A. Mekki1 ) Department of Physics of sodium iron silicate glasses, namely (0.70­­x)SiO2­0.30Na2O­xFe2O3, where x ¼ 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0 of the present study is to compare the magnetic properties of the so- dium silicate glass and the crystallized

Mekki, Abdelkarim

306

Microstructure and Mechanical Property Studies on Neutron-Irradiated Ferritic Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model Fe, Fe-10Cr and Fe-14Cr alloys were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor at 300°C and 450°C to target doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. The microstructure and the mechanical property of irradiated specimens were investigated using TEM, APT and hardness measurements. The irradiation-induced hardening was consistent with the observed microstructures. For lower doses of 0.01 and 0.1 dpa, the formation of dislocation loops was the primarily contributor to the hardening; no a’ precipitates of resolvable sizes were observed. By 1 dpa, additional increase in hardening were attributed to the formation of a high density of 1-2 nm a' precipitates. In Fe, the hardness increased less as a function of irradiation dose compared to Fe-Cr alloys because of the lack of a' precipitation and differences in loop structures. Three single-parameter effects have been studied: the Cr content, the irradiation temperature and the grain size. The addition of Cr reduced the mobility of both ½<111> and <100> dislocation loops, leading to a smaller loop size and higher loop density. Also, the Cr contents were positively correlated to the density of a' precipitates, but were less relevant to the precipitate size. Higher irradiation temperature of 450°C resulted in a preferential production of the immobile <100> loops over the mobile ½<111> loops (ex. a ratio of 8:1 in Fe-10Cr irradiated 450°C to 0.01 dpa). At lower temperature of 300°C, heterogeneous formation of dislocation loops at the vicinity of line dislocations frequently. In Fe, the development of dislocation loops was suppressed (compared to Fe-Cr alloys) due to a combination of smaller grain size, high initial dislocation density and high defect mobility.

Jian Gan; Maria Okuniewski; Wei-Ying Chen; Yinbin Miao; Carolyn A. Tomchik; James F. Stubbins; Y. Q. Wu; Stu A. Maloy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Magnetron-sputter epitaxy of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(220)/Si(111) and {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(431)/Si(001) thin films at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{beta}-FeSi{sub 2} thin films have been grown on Si(111) and Si(001) substrates by magnetron-sputter epitaxy at 700 Degree-Sign C. On Si(111), the growth is consistent with the commonly observed orientation of [001]{beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(220)//[1-10]Si(111) having three variants, in-plane rotated 120 Degree-Sign with respect to one another. However, on Si(001), under the same growth conditions, the growth is dominated by [-111]{beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(431)//[110]Si(001) with four variants, which is hitherto unknown for growing {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}. Photoelectron spectra reveal negligible differences in the valance-band and Fe2p core-level between {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} grown on Si(111) and Si(001) but an apparent increased Si-oxidization on the surface of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}/Si(001). This phenomenon is discussed and attributed to the Si-surface termination effect, which also suggests that the Si/Fe ratio on the surface of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(431)/Si(001) is larger than that on the surface of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}(220)/Si(111).

Liu Hongfei; Tan Chengcheh; Chi Dongzhi [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Transmission electron microscopy investigation of acicular ferrite precipitation in {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acicular-shaped crystals precipitate from {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as {alpha}-ferrite. Acicular ferrite develops both the Nishiyama-Wassermann and the Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationships with {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride. These orientation relationships were discussed in terms of the symmetry theory. The driving force for acicular ferrite formation was related to the increasing nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with {alpha}-ferrite, with decreasing temperature. The passage from lamellar to acicular structure in Fe-N system was proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields} Acicular crystals precipitate from pearlitic{gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as acicular ferrite. {yields} The crystal structure, orientation relationships with the matrix and morphologies of acicular ferrite, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. {yields} The driving force for the formation of acicular ferrite is related to the temperature dependence of nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with ferrite. {yields} The passage from the pearlitic structure to the acicular structure in the present iron-nitrogen alloy was proposed.

Xiong, X.C., E-mail: xiaochuan.xiong@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Redjaimia, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Goune, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); ArcelorMittal SA, Voie Romaine, BP 30320, F-57283 Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Magnetic excitations and anomalous spin-wave broadening in multiferroic FeV2O4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the different roles of two orbital-active Fe2+ at the A site and V3+ at the B site in the magnetic excitations and on the anomalous spin-wave broadening in FeV2O4. FeV2O4 exhibits three structural transitions and successive paramagnetic (PM)–collinear ferrimagnetic (CFI)–noncollinear ferrimagnetic (NCFI)/ferroelectric transitions. The high-temperature tetragonal/PM–orthorhombic/CFI transition is accompanied by the appearance of a large energy gap in the magnetic excitations due to strong spin-orbit-coupling-induced anisotropy at the Fe2+ site. While there is no measurable increase in the energy gap from the orbital ordering of V3+ at the orthorhombic/CFI–tetragonal/NCFI transition, anomalous spin-wave broadening is observed in the orthorhombic/CFI state due to V3+ spin fluctuations at the B site. The spin-wave broadening is also observed at the zone boundary without softening in the NCFI/ferroelectric phase, which is discussed in terms of magnon-phonon coupling. Our study also indicates that the Fe2+ spins without the frustration at the A site may not play an important role in inducing ferroelectricity in the tetragonal/NCFI phase of FeV2O4.

Zhang, Qiang [Ames Laboratory; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet [Ames Laboratory; Chi, Songxue [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Liu, Yong [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A. [Ames Laboratory; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Precessional magnetization induced spin current from CoFeB into Ta  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin dynamics at the interface between the CoFeB and Ta layer has been studied using spin pumping and spin wave characterizations. The spin pumping driven by the ferromagnetic resonance in the CoFeB layer injects a spin current into Ta layer which results in an electromotive force across the Ta layer due to the inverse spin Hall effect. Upon changing the polarity of the bias magnetic field, the polarity of the output voltage inverts and the output voltage increases linearly in respect to the microwave signal power which are consistent with the spin pumping characteristics. The effect of the in-plane magnetization angle on the output voltage has been studied. Furthermore, it is found that the frequency spectrum of the spin Hall voltage is modified by the annealing temperature and the full width at half maximum of the spin pumping increases by more than 40% with the increase of the annealing temperature from 200?°C to 300?°C. The spin Hall angle at the Ta-CoFeB interface is determined to be 0.014, and the damping constant of the CoFeB increases from 0.006 in pure CoFeB to 0.015 in Ta/CoFeB film.

Jamali, Mahdi; Klemm, Angeline; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, 4-174 200 Union Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, 4-174 200 Union Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electronic structure and vibrational entropies of fcc Au-Fe alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phonon density of states (DOS) curves were measured on alloys of face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au-Fe using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The NRIXS and INS results were combined to obtain the total phonon DOS and the partial phonon DOS curves of Au and Fe atoms. The 57Fe partial phonon DOS of the dilute alloy Au0.97 57Fe0.03 shows a localized mode centered 4.3% above the cutoff energy of the phonons in pure Au. The Mannheim model for impurity modes accurately reproduced this partial phonon DOS using the fcc Au phonon DOS with a ratio of host-host to impurity-host force constants of 1.55. First-principles calculations validated the assumption of first-nearest-neighbor forces in the Mannheim model and gave a similar ratio of force constants. The high energy local mode broadens with increasing Fe composition, but this has a small effect on the composition dependence of the vibrational entropy. The main effect on the vibrational entropy of alloying comes from a stiffening of the Au partial phonon DOS with Fe concentration. This stiffening is attributed to two main effects: 1) an increase in electron density in the free-electron-like states, and 2) stronger sd-hybridization. These two effects are comparable in magnitude.

Munoz, Jorge A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Lucas, Matthew [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Mauger, L [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena; Halevy, I [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Horwath, J [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Semiatin, S L [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Xiao, Yuming [Carnegie Institution of Washington] [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Epitaxial growth of metastable multiferroic AlFeO{sub 3} film on SrTiO{sub 3} (111) substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaFeO{sub 3}-type AlFeO{sub 3} is consisted of oxygen octahedra and tetrahedra containing Al and Fe ions and is known to have a non-centrosymmetric polar structure with space group Pna2{sub 1}. We tried to grow epitaxial GaFeO{sub 3}-type AlFeO{sub 3} films on SrTiO{sub 3} (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique. Both the atomic arrangement of close-packed and the atomic distance of the substrate surface played important roles in stabilizing GaFeO{sub 3}-type AlFeO{sub 3} on the substrate. Piezoresponse force microscopy measurements clearly showed that GaFeO{sub 3}-type AlFeO{sub 3} films have ferroelectricity at room temperature. In addition, AlFeO{sub 3} film also showed pinched-like hysteresis loop with T{sub N}???317?K.

Hamasaki, Yosuke; Shimizu, Takao; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Taniyama, Tomoyasu; Yasui, Shintaro; Itoh, Mitsuru, E-mail: itoh.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J2-19 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dopant spin states and magnetism of Sn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work reports detailed investigations of a series of ?2.6?nm sized, Sn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} crystallites with x?=?0–0.10 using Mossbauer spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), and magnetometry to determine the oxidation state of Fe dopants and their role in the observed magnetic properties. The magnetic moment per Fe ion ? was the largest ?6.48?×?10{sup ?3} ?{sub B} for the sample with the lowest (0.001%) Fe doping, and it showed a rapid downward trend with increasing Fe doping. Majority of the Fe ions are in 3+ oxidation state occupying octahedral sites. Another significant fraction of Fe dopant ions is in 4+ oxidation state and a still smaller fraction might be existing as Fe{sup 2+} ions, both occupying distorted sites, presumably in the surface regions of the nanocrystals, near oxygen vacancies. These studies also suggest that the observed magnetism is not due to exchange coupling between Fe{sup 3+} spins. A more probable role for the multi-valent Fe ions may be to act as charge reservoirs, leading to charge transfer ferromagnetism.

Punnoose, A., E-mail: apunnoos@boisestate.edu; Dodge, Kelsey; Reddy, K. M.; Franco, Nevil; Chess, Jordan; Eixenberger, Josh [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725-1570 (United States); Beltrán, J. J. [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725-1570 (United States); Grupo de Estado Sólido, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Barrero, C. A. [Grupo de Estado Sólido, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Bacterial reduction of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in single phase suspensions and subsurface materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbiologic reduction of synthetic and geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides associated with four Pleistocene-age, Atlantic coastal plain sediments was investigated using a dissimilatory Fe reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32) in bicarbonate buffer. Experiments investigated whether phosphate and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, (AQDS, a humic acid analogue) influenced the extent of crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide bioreduction and whether crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxides in geologic materials are more or less reducible than comparable synthetic phases. Anaerobic incubations (10{sup 8} organisms/mL) were performed both with and without PO{sub 4} and AQDS that functions as an electron repository and shuttle. The production of Fe{sup 2+} (solid and aqueous) was followed with time, as was mineralogy by X-ray diffraction. The synthetic oxides were reduced in a qualitative trend consistent with their surface area and free energy: hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) > goethite > hematite. Bacterial reduction of the crystalline oxides was incomplete in spite of excess electron donor. Biogenic formation of vivianite [Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O] and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}) was observed; the conditions of their formation was consistent with their solubility. The geologic Fe{sup 3+} oxides showed a large range in reducibility, approaching 100% in some materials. The natural oxides were equally or more reducible than their synthetic counterparts, in spite of association with non-reducible mineral phases (e.g., kaolinite). The reducibility of the synthetic and geologic oxides was weakly effected by PO{sub 4}, but was accelerated by AQDS. CN32 produced the hydroquinone form of AQDS (AHDS), that, in turn, had thermodynamic power to reduce the Fe{sup 3+} oxides. As a chemical reductant, it could reach physical regions of the oxide not accessible by the organism. Electron microscopy showed that crystallite size was not the primary factor that caused differences in reducibility between natural and synthetic crystalline Fe{sup 3+} oxide phases. Crystalline disorder and microheterogeneities may be more important.

Zachara, J.M.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Li, S.M.; Kennedy, D.W.; Smith, S.C.; Gassman, P.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Inelastic tunneling conductance and magnetoresistance investigations in dual ion-beam sputtered CoFeB(110)/MgO/CoFeB (110) magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) comprising Ta(5)/NiFe(5)/IrMn(15)/CoFeB(5)/Mg(1)/MgO(3.5)/ CoFeB(5)/Ta(5)/Ag(20) (thickness in nm) with (110) oriented CoFeB layers are grown using dual ion beam sputtering. The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of MTJs is found to be significantly bias dependent and exhibits zero bias anomaly (ZBA) which is attributed to the presence of magnetic impurities or diffusion of Mn from antiferromagnetic IrMn in the barrier. Adjacent to the ZBA, two peaks at 24?±?3?mV and 34?±?3?mV are also observed, which differ both in intensity as well as their position in the antiparallel and parallel magnetic states, suggesting that they are due to magnon excitations. In addition to this, a phonon peak at 65?±?3?mV is also observed. The effect of temperature on the inelastic and elastic tunneling contributions is studied in detail in 25–300?K range using the Glazman and Matveev model. Ten series of localized states are found to be involved in hopping conduction in the forbidden gap of MgO barrier. The effect of presence of such inelastic channels is found to be insignificant at low temperatures yielding sizeable enhancement in TMR.

Bhusan Singh, Braj; Chaudhary, Sujeet, E-mail: sujeetc@physics.iitd.ac.in [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

Geiling, D.W. [ed.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Carbon atom adsorption on and diffusion into Fe(110) and Fe(100) from first principles D. E. Jiang and Emily A. Carter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(s): 68.43.Bc, 66.30.Jt, 68.47.De I. INTRODUCTION Iron as a cheap transition metal has been employed) subsurfaces goes through transition states where the carbon atom is coordinated to four Fe atoms. The barriers to form carbide. Another perspective of carbon-iron interactions is from materials science. When steels

Carter, Emily A.

320

Surface Patterns of Tetragonal Phase FePt Thin Films from Pt{at}Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanoparticles Using Combined Langmuir-Blodgett and Soft Lithographic Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B204 We present the fabrication of micron-sized patterns of FePt thin films from Pt{at}Fe2O3 core-shell nanoparticles. In a typical procedure, Pt@Fe2O3 core-shell nanoparticles were spread and formed a Langmuir film using water as the subphase. This film was lifted onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps with micron-sized patterns of lines, dots and wells, and transferred onto silicon wafers using microcontact printing (u-CP). The patterns of Pt@Fe2O3 core-shell nanoparticles were converted into face-centered tetragonal phase FePt alloy at enhanced temperatures in the presence of 5% hydrogen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer were used to characterize the patterns and the properties of the final FePt alloy films.

Guo, Q.; Teng, X.; Yang, H.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Structural and Raman scattering study of Ni-doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman scattering measurements were made on polycrystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrites as prepared by solid-state reaction route. Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of single-phase and both of the samples perfectly indexed in cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. Slight reduction in the lattice parameter of Co{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been observed as compared to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. From Raman scattering spectra, a shoulder like feature has been observed in both of the compounds reveals that octahedral site is occupied by Co, Ni and Fe ions and tetrahedral site is occupied by only Fe ion.

Kumar, Ashwini, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Dar, Mashkoor A., E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Poorva, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com; Varshney, Dinesh, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore-452001 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Stripe-to-bubble transition of magnetic domains at the spin reorientation of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic domain evolution at the spin reorientation transition (SRT) of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001) is investigated using photoemission electron microscopy. While the (Fe/Ni) layer exhibits the SRT, the interlayer coupling of the perpendicularly magnetized Ni layer to the (Fe/Ni) layer serves as a virtual perpendicular magnetic field exerted on the (Fe/Ni) layer. We find that the perpendicular virtual magnetic field breaks the up-down symmetry of the (Fe/Ni) stripe domains to induce a net magnetization in the normal direction of the film. Moreover, as the virtual magnetic field increases to exceed a critical field, the stripe domain phase evolves into a bubble domain phase. Although the critical field depends on the Fe film thickness, we show that the area fraction of the minority domain exhibits a universal value that determines the stripe-to-bubble phase transition.

Wu, J.; Choi, J.; Won, C.; Wu, Y. Z.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electronic Structure and Fragmentation Properties of [Fe4S4(SEt)4-X(SSEt)x]2-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A limited exposure of (n-Bu4N)2[Fe4S4(SEt)4] solutions in acetonitrile to air was found to produce a new series of [4Fe-4S] cluster complexes, [Fe4S4(SEt)4-x(SSEt)x]2- (x = 1-4), with the original –SEt ligands substituted by –SSEt di-sulfide ligands, which were formed due to partial decomposition of the [4Fe-4S] core in parent [Fe4S4(SEt)4]2-. The products were first observed in the experiments with an ESI-Ion Trap-TOF mass spectrometer and were further identified using high resolution FTICR (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance) mass spectrometer. Photoelectron spectra of the [Fe4S4(SEt)4-x(SSEt)x]2- dianions revealed that the –SSEt coordination induced little change in the electronic structure of the [4Fe-4S] cluster, but the electron binding energies of [Fe4S4(SEt)4-x(SSEt)x]2- increased from 0.52 to 0.73 eV with increase in x from 0 to 4, suggesting a greater electron withdrawing ability of –SSEt than -SEt. In high resolution MS/MS experiments on [Fe4S4(SEt)3(SSEt)]2-/1-, clusters with both charge states yielded fragment [Fe4S4(SEt)3]-, suggesting that –SSEt could be lost either as a negatively charged ion SSEt- from the doubly charged precursor, or as a radical •SSEt from the singly charged species. The biological implication of the interaction between [Fe4S4(SEt)4]2- and O2 is discussed in comparison to the air exposure of [4Fe-4S] proteins to the air.

Fu, Youjun; Laskin, Julia; Wang, Lai S.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fast magnetic response in gigahertz-band for columnar-structured Fe nanoparticle assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High density Fe-based ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) assembly is expected to have unique magnetic properties, such as superferromagnetism and super-spin-glass, different from magnetically isolated NP systems due to strong dipole interactions among the NPs. A high dipole interaction field, H{sub dip}, of ?3.5 kOe can result in a high effective internal field to the magnetic moment of the NP, expecting for ultra-fast magnetic response, that is, a high magnetic resonance frequency, f{sub r}, of ?10 GHz. However, for a simply molded Fe NP assembly, a low f{sub r} was observed due to inhomogeneous distribution of the internal field, implying the necessity of a unidirectional state of H{sub dip} for higher f{sub r}. In this study, we fabricated a columnar Fe NP assembly for realizing the unidirectional state of H{sub dip} by applying our uniquely developed external field-induced agglomeration method for monodispersed Fe NPs (13 nm in average size) as a function of the field (0–30 kOe) and volume fraction of the Fe NPs (0.5%–51%) in a polymer matrix with dimensions of 4 mm × 4 mm × 0.7 mm{sup t}. A columnar-structured Fe NP assembly was successfully achieved along an in-plane direction (defined as the x-axis) under optimized conditions. From static magnetization curves, induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy was observed according to the shape of the columnar structure of the Fe NP assembly, where easy and hard axes of magnetization were realized along the parallel (x-axis) and normal directions (in-plane y-axis and z-axis in the thickness direction) to the external field during the process, respectively. Interestingly, this fabricated columnar-structured Fe NP assembly exhibited very high f{sub r} in the range from 3 to 11 GHz judging from the complex susceptibility spectra obtained. The f{sub r} values were well-scaled by a modified Snoek's-limit-law using demagnetization factors quantitatively estimated from the static magnetization curves. Thus, shape-induced anisotropy originating from the unidirectional state of H{sub dip} in the columnar structure of the Fe NP assembly plays an important role for high frequency magnetic response in the GHz-band.

Ogawa, T., E-mail: tomoyuki@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Tate, R. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kura, H. [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Oikawa, T.; Hata, K. [Samsung R and D Institute Japan Co., Ltd., 2-7 Sugasawa-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0027 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

Sorour, A.A., E-mail: ahmad.sorour@mail.mcgill.ca; Chromik, R.R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca; Gauvin, R., E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca; Jung, I.-H., E-mail: in-ho.jung@mcgill.ca; Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Lattice distortion and stripelike antiferromagnetic order in Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 is the parent compound for a class of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors where superconductivity with transition temperatures up to 30 K can be introduced by partial element substitution. We present a combined high-resolution high-energy x-ray diffraction and elastic neutron scattering study on a Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 single crystal. This study reveals the microscopic nature of two distinct and continuous phase transitions to be very similar to other Fe-based high-temperature superconductors: an orthorhombic distortion of the high-temperature tetragonal Fe-As lattice below TS=110(2) K followed by stripelike antiferromagnetic ordering of the Fe moments below TN=96(2) K. These findings demonstrate that major features of the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors are very robust against variations in chemical constitution as well as structural imperfection of the layers separating the Fe-As layers from each other and confirms that the Fe-As layers primarily determine the physics in this class of material.

Sapkota, Aashish [Ames Laboratory; Tucker, Gregory S [Ames Laboratory; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet [Ames Laboratory; Tian, Wei [Ames Laboratory; Ni, N [University of California; Cava, R. J.; McQueeney, Robert J [Princeton; Goldman, Alan I [Ames Laboratory; Kreyssig, Andreas [Ames Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Stress-induced large Curie temperature enhancement in Fe(sub 64)Ni(sub 36) Invar alloy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have succeeded in increasing up to 150 K the Curie temperature in the Fe{sub 64}N{sub 36}6 invar alloy by means of a severe mechanical treatment followed by a heating up to 1073 K. The invar behavior is still present as revealed by the combination of magnetic measurements with neutron and x-ray techniques under extreme conditions, such as high temperature and high pressure. The proposed explanation is based in a selective induced microstrain around the Fe atoms, which causes a slight increase in the Fe-Fe interatomic distances, thus reinforcing ferromagnetic interactions due to the strong magnetoelastic coupling in these invar compounds.

Gorria, P.; Martinez-Blanco, D.; Perez, M. J.; Blanco, J. A.; Hernando, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; Souza-Neto, N. M.; Xmith, R. I.; Marshall, W. G.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.; Chaboy, J.; Fernandez Barquin, L.; Rodriguez Castrillon, J. A.; Moldovan, M.; Garcia Alonso, J. I.; Zhang, J.; Llobet, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Univ. de Oviedo; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado; ISIS Facility; ESRF; Univ.Grenoble and CNRS; CSIC-Univ. de Zaragoza; Univ. de Cantabria; LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Basedusing a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray processstructure. [12] High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal

Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a new graded-porosity FeAl alloy by elemental reactive synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new graded-porosity FeAl alloy can be fabricated through Fe and Al elemental reactive synthesis. FeAl alloy with large connecting open pores and permeability were used as porous supports. The coating was obtained by spraying slurries consisting of mixtures of Fe powder and Al powder with 3 5 m diameter onto porous FeAl support and then sintered at 1100 C. The performances of the coating were compared in terms of thickness, pore diameter and permeability. With an increase in the coating thickness up to 200 m, the changes of maximum pore size decreased from 23.6 m to 5.9 m and the permeability decreased from 184.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1 to 76.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1, respectively, for a sintering temperature equal to 1100 C. The composite membranes have potential application for excellent filters in severe environments.

Shen, P Z [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; He, Y H [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Gao, H Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Zou, J [School of Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, QLD; Xu, N P [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009, C; Jiang, Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Huang, B [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Lui, C T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fe(II) adsorption onto natural polymers derived from low-grade lignites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In comparison with conventional chemical treatment methods for Fe(II) ions, adsorption and ion exchange are considered more easily applicable and economical, depending on the material used. Polymeric rnaterials are the examples used in these commonly applied removal processes. In this study, the adsorption of Fe(II) ions from aqueous solutions onto two different natural polymers, insoluble humic acids (IHAs) extracted from low-grade lignites from Beysehir and Ermenek (in the central Anatolia region, Konya, Turkey), was investigated. The IHAs were synthesized through a series of acid-base reactions, and the obtained precipitates were chemically stable and had about 40% humic matter together with functional carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. The effects of the time and initial metal concentration on the effectiveness of the IHAs for Fe(II) adsorption were determined through batch experiments; the adsorption isotherms and capacities were calculated. The IHAs were effective, with capacities of 59 mg/g for the Beysehir IHA and 57 mg/g for the Ermenek IHA, for Fe removal under neutral pH conditions. The adsorption followed mainly a Freundlich isotherm for both IHAs, and the calculated adsorption rates were 0.86 for the Beysehir IHA and 0.81 for the Ermenek IHA. This indicated that the effectiveness of the Beysehir IHA was slightly higher than that of the Ermenek IHA. The results confirmed the real possibility of the practical application of IHAs for the separation of Fe(II) in aqueous systems.

Tarlan, E.; Ahmetli, G. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural and Magnetic Properties of MCl2 (M = Fe, Mn, Co): Acetonitrile Solvates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M{sup II}Cl{sub 2} (M = Mn, Fe, Co) as their acetonitrile solvates were isolated, and their structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties were studied. MCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} (M = Fe, Mn) form 1-D chains of octahedral M{sup II} ions with four bridging chlorides and two axial MeCN's. The presence of an axial distortion for MFe causes a significant magnetic anisotropy that increases significantly below 150 K; however, {chi}{sub av} [=({chi}{sub {parallel}} + 2{chi}{sub {perpendicular}})/3] almost coincides with the value obtained on a polycrystalline sample. MnCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} is a paramagnet with a weak antiferromagnetic coupling. Annealing FeCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} at 55 {sup o}C forms the monosolvate of FeCl{sub 2}(NCMe) composition in which two chains collapse into a double chain with formation of Fe-Cl bonding such that half of the {mu}-Cl's becomes {mu}{sub 3}-Cl's. This material orders magnetically below {Tc} = 4.3 K. For M = Co, paramagnetic tetrahedral [CoCl{sub 3}(NCMe)]{sup -} anions are isolated.

Pokhodnya,K.; Bonner, M.; DiPasquale, A.; Rheingold, A.; Her, J.; Stephens, P.; Park, J.; Kennon, B.; Arif, A.; Miller, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

IMPLICATIONS OF INFALLING Fe II-EMITTING CLOUDS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANISOTROPIC PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate consequences of the discovery that Fe II emission in quasars, one of the spectroscopic signatures of 'Eigenvector 1', may originate in infalling clouds. Eigenvector 1 correlates with the Eddington ratio L/L {sub Edd} so that Fe II/Hbeta increases as L/L {sub Edd} increases. We show that the 'force multiplier', the ratio of gas opacity to electron scattering opacity, is approx10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} in Fe II-emitting gas. Such gas would be accelerated away from the central object if the radiation force is able to act on the entire cloud. As had previously been deduced, infall requires that the clouds have large column densities so that a substantial amount of shielded gas is present. The critical column density required for infall to occur depends on L/L {sub Edd}, establishing a link between Eigenvector 1 and the Fe II/Hbeta ratio. We see predominantly the shielded face of the infalling clouds rather than the symmetric distribution of emitters that has been assumed. The Fe II spectrum emitted by the shielded face is in good agreement with observations thus solving several long-standing mysteries in quasar emission lines.

Ferland, Gary J. [Department of Physics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Hu Chen; Wang Jianmin [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Baldwin, Jack A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI (United States); Porter, Ryan L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Van Hoof, Peter A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium); Williams, R. J. R. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

335

Surface transport properties of Fe-based superconductors: The influence of degradation and inhomogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface properties of Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} epitaxial superconducting thin films were inspected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM), and point contact spectroscopy (PCS). It has been shown that surface of Fe-based superconductors degrades rapidly if being exposed to air, what results in suppression of gap-like structure on PCS spectra. Moreover, SSRM measurements revealed inhomogeneous surface conductivity, what is consistent with strong dependence of PCS spectra on contact position. Presented results suggest that fresh surface and small probing area should be assured for surface sensitive measurements like PCS to obtain intrinsic properties of Fe-based superconductors.

Plecenik, T.; Gregor, M.; Sobota, R.; Truchly, M.; Satrapinskyy, L.; Kus, P.; Plecenik, A. [Department of Experimental Physics, FMPI, Comenius University, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)] [Department of Experimental Physics, FMPI, Comenius University, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kurth, F.; Holzapfel, B.; Iida, K. [Institute for Metallic Materials, IFW Dresden, P. O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute for Metallic Materials, IFW Dresden, P. O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Void swelling resistance in Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a serious of binary Fe-cr alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 425 C in a fast breeder reactor. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The internal-nitriding behavior of Co-Fe-Al alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-10Fe, Co-20Fe, and Co-40Fe alloys containing 3 at.% Al were internally nitrided in NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2} mixtures over the range 700--1000 C. The kinetics of thickening of the internal-reaction zone followed the parabolic rate law, suggesting that solid-state diffusion was rate controlling. Nitrogen permeabilities were obtained for each alloy. AlN was the only nitride to form for all materials and at all temperatures. At high temperature, the nitride precipitates formed hexagonal plates near the surface, the precipitates becoming more blocky near the reaction front. Precipitate size increased with increasing depth in the alloy and increasing temperature, because of competition between nucleation and growth processes. Increasing iron content increased the reaction kinetics due to increased nitrogen solubility with increasing iron content.

Chen, I.C. [Raytheon Systems Co., El Segundo, CA (United States). Sensors and Electronics Systems] [Raytheon Systems Co., El Segundo, CA (United States). Sensors and Electronics Systems; Douglass, D.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Materials Labs.] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Materials Labs.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Proceedings of the AD HOC Workshop on Ceramics for Li/FeS{sub 2} batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives from industry, the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), DOE, national laboratories, and other govt agencies met to develop recommendations and actions for accelerating the development of ceramic components critical to the successful introduction of the Li/FeS{sub 2} bipolar battery for electric vehicles. Most of the workshop is devoted to electrode materials, bipolar designs, separators, and bipolar plates. The bulk of this document is viewographs and is divided into: ceramics, USABC overview, SAFT`s Li/FeS{sub 2} USABC program, bipolar Li/FeS{sub 2} component development, design requirements for bipolar plates, separator design requirements, compatibility of ceramic insulators with lithium, characterization of MgO for use in separators, resistivity measurements of separators, sintered AlN separators for LiMS batteries, etc.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Line formation in solar granulation: III. The photospheric Si and meteoritic Fe abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using realistic hydrodynamical simulations of the solar surface convection as 3D, time-dependent, inhomogeneous model atmospheres, the solar photospheric Si abundance has been determined to be log Si = 7.51 +- 0.04. This constitutes a difference of 0.04 dex compared with previous estimates based on the 1D Holweger-M\\"uller (1974) model, of which half is attributable to the adopted model atmosphere and the remaining part to the improved quantum mechanical broadening treatment. As a consequence, all meteoritic abundances should be adjusted downwards by the same amount. In particular the meteoritic Fe abundance will be log Fe = 7.46 +- 0.01, in good agreement with the recently determined photospheric Fe abundance (Asplund et al. 2000b). The existing uncertainties unfortunately prevent an observational confirmation of the postulated effects of elemental migration of metals in the Sun.

M. Asplund

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Phase transition and metallization of FeO at high pressures and temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wuestite, Fe{sub 1-x}O, is an important component in the mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle and may also be a component of the core. Therefore its high pressure-temperature behavior, including its electronic structure, is essential to understanding the nature and evolution of Earth's deep interior. We performed X-ray diffraction and radiometric measurements on wuestite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell, finding an insulator-metal transition at high pressures and temperatures. Our data show a negative slope for this apparently isostructural phase boundary, which is characterized by a volume decrease and emissivity increase. The metallic phase of FeO is stable at conditions of the lower mantle and core, which has implications for the high P-T character of Fe-O bonds, magnetic field propagation, and lower mantle conductivity.

Fischer, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Andrew J.; Lord, Oliver T.; Shofner, Gregory A.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B. (Maryland); (UC); (UCL)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

New EUV Fe IX emission line identifications from Hinode/EIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four Fe IX transitions in the wavelength range 188--198 A are identified for the first time in spectra from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode satellite. In particular the emission line at 197.86 A is unblended and close to the peak of the EIS sensitivity curve, making it a valuable diagnostic of plasma at around 800,000 K - a critical temperature for studying the interface between the corona and transition region. Theoretical ratios amongst the four lines predicted from the CHIANTI database reveal weak sensitivity to density and temperature with observed values consistent with theory. The ratio of 197.86 relative to the 171.07 resonance line of Fe IX is found to be an excellent temperature diagnostic, independent of density, and the derived temperature in the analysed data set is log T=5.95, close to the predicted temperature of maximum ionization of Fe IX.

P. R. Young

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cation-Bonding and Protonation of the Fe[subscript 4]-Square Cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and characterization of discrete, molecular iron-oxo clusters is pursued in the interest of molecular magnets, bioinspired materials and models for the geochemical aqueous-mineral interface. Iron-oxo clusters are challenging to synthesize in water, due to the extremely acidic and reactive nature of dissolved iron species, and thus require chelating ligands to passivate and neutralize the cluster surface. The 2-hydroxy-1,3-N,N,N',N'-diamino-propanetetraacetic acid (HPDTA) ligand has been used to isolate several Al and Fe cluster geometries, including the square clusters Fe{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2} and Al{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2}. While prior reports on the Fe{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2} cluster have focused on the magnetic properties, no solution characterization has been carried out. Using electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS) we show this anionic Fe{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2} cluster can be dissolved intact in water, and recrystallized with virtually any metal as a countercation. The bonding of the metal cation to the square face of the cluster trends with ionic radii of the cations, as shown by structural characterization of Fe{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2} with Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, and Zn{sup 2+}. This trend is similar to that observed for association of cations on metal oxide surfaces in the environment. Furthermore, protonation of the bridging oxo ligands of this series of Fe{sub 4}(HPDTA){sub 2} clusters is variable (0, 1, or 2 protons), and structures as a function of protonation is discussed. This paper, largely structural in nature, sets the foundation for future aqueous phase studies of iron-oxo molecular clusters as models for the oxide-water interface in the natural aqueous environment.

Hou, Yu; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Nyman, May (Sandia)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Room-temperature ferromagnetism of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles driven by oxygen vacancy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: A series of Ti{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2??} (x ? 0.03) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by sol–gel route. The room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) has been explained in terms of vacancy induced bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model, where the Fe{sup 3+} ions ferromagnetically coupled mediated by oxygen vacancies. Display Omitted Highlights: ? The Fe-doped NPs have been synthesized by sol–gel method. ? Ferromagnetism of Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} NPs are intrinsic property. ? Room temperature ferromagnetism observed in all the Fe-doped samples. ? Variation in M{sub s} is attributed due to oxygen vacancies and defect formation. -- Abstract: A series of Ti{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2??} (0 ? x ? 0.03) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by sol–gel route. The NPs had a size distribution in the range of 15–40 nm and were identified as the anatase TiO{sub 2} by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman analysis. XRD, selected area electron diffraction, Raman and Mössbauer analysis ruled out the signature of Fe-cluster or any other oxides of Fe. The redshifting of the band edge emission peak observed in UV–vis absorption studies further confirmed the doping of Fe ions in the TiO{sub 2} lattice. Raman studies show the shifting and broadening in E{sub g}(1) and E{sub g}(3) modes with Fe doping. It suggested that the activation of ferromagnetism with increasing Fe doping concentration was related to the oxygen vacancy defects. The presence of such defects was further confirmed from electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The observed ferromagnetism is interpreted in terms of bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model.

Patel, Sandeep K.S.; Kurian, Sajith [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, 208016 (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, 208016 (India); Gajbhiye, Namdeo S., E-mail: gajbhiyens@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, 208016 (India)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Data:33db466d-20e7-4d4c-8fe8-57fe6694f5fd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffe No869d7ced0c4aa77f45ad4a No revisionc-a48386b08d41fe8-57fe6694f5fd No revision has

346

Transition from Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Spin Excitations to Two-Dimensional Spin Excitations by Electron Doping the FeAs-Based BaFe1:96Ni0:04As2 Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Electron Doping the FeAs-Based BaFe1:96Ni0:04As2 Superconductor Leland W. Harriger,1 Astrid Schneidewind,2 arsenides is important because high-transition temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity arises from electron optimal superconductivity [4­6], the gapped spin wave excitations were replaced by a gapless continuum

Hu, Jiangping

347

Neutron scattering investigation of the magnetic order in single crystalline BaFe2As2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic structure of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} was determined from polycrystalline neutron diffraction measurements soon after the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type FeAs-based superconductors were discovered. Both the moment direction and the in-plane antiferromagnetic wavevector are along the longer a-axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. There is only one combined magnetostructural transition at {approx}140 K. However, a later single-crystal neutron diffraction work reported contradicting results. Here, we show neutron diffraction results from a single-crystal sample, grown by a self-flux method, that support the original polycrystalline work.

Bao, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Qiu, Y [NIST; Kofu, M [UNIV OF VA; Lee, S - H [UNIV OF VA; Chang, S [NIST; Wu, T [HEFEI NAT. LAB.; Wu, G [HEFEI NAT. LAB; Chen, X H [HEFEI NAT. LAB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Structure and properties of bimetallic Ru-Fe/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors studied the influence of the composition of Ru-Fe-/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-catalysts on adsorption and interaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Moessbauer investigations were conducted. According to x-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) bimetallic Ru-Fe/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts contain ruthenium mainly in the form of Ru/sup 0/ (E/sub b/ = 280.8 eV). Adsorption of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and CO + H/sub 2/ mixture was studied by microcalorimetric and thermal-desorption methods.

Zakumbaeva, G.D.; Shapovalova, L.B.; Omarov, Zh.T.; Kuanyshev, A.Sh.; Yaskevich, V.I.

1988-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Structural changes in nano-crystalline mackinawite (FeS) at high - pressure.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure behavior of nanocrystalline mackinawite (FeS) with particle sizes of 6, 7 and 8 nm has been investigated by high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis. An irreversible first-order structural phase transition from tetragonal mackinawite to orthorhombic FeS-II was observed at about 3 GPa. The transition is induced by the closure of the van der Waals gap in the layered mackinawite structure. A grain size effect on the transition pressure and the compressibility was observed.

Ehm, L.; Michael, F. M.; Antao, S. M.; Martin, C. D.; Lee, P. L.; Shastri, S. D.; Chupas, P. J.; Parise, J. B.; Stony Brook Univ.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nano-magnetism of magnetostriction in Fe{sub 35}Co{sub 65}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature of the large magnetostriction in body-centered Fe-based solid solutions has been widely discussed in the literature. Here, we use a combination of magnetostriction, magnetization, torque, and transmission electron microscopy measurements of specially annealed Co{sub 65}Fe{sub 35} to show that the magnetostriction is caused by coherent uniaxial nano-precipitates. We show further that these nano-precipitates lower the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in these alloys to K{sub 1}?=??2.16?×?10{sup 4}?J/m{sup 3}.

Lisfi, A. [Department of Physics, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland 21251 (United States); Ren, T.; Wuttig, M., E-mail: wuttig@umd.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Khachaturyan, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Attempt to produce element 120 in the 244Pu + 58Fe reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment aimed at the synthesis of isotopes of element 120 has been performed using the {sup 244}Pu({sup 58}Fe,xn){sup 302-x} 120 reaction. No decay chains consistent with fusion-evaporation reaction products were observed during an irradiation with a beam dose of 7.1 x 10{sup 18} 330-MeV {sup 58}Fe projectiles. The sensitivity of the experiment corresponds to a cross section of 0.4 pb for the detection of one decay.

Oganessian, Y T; Utyonkov, V K; Lobanov, Y V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Sagaidak, R N; Shorokovsky, I V; Tsyganov, Y S; Voinov, A A; Mezentsev, A N; Subbotin, V G; Sukhov, A M; Subotic, K; Zagrebaev, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Henderson, R A; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M; Landrum, J H; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, M A; Stoyer, N J; Wilk, P A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

352

Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3 Films  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO3 films have been studied using x-ray, electron, and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO3 films are room-temperature multiferroics.

Wang, Wenbin; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wenbo; Gai, Zheng; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tian, Wei; Zhu, Leyi; Cheng, Xuemei; Keavney, David J.; Yi, Jieyu; Ward, Thomas Z.; Snijders, Paul C.; Christen, Hans M.; Wu, Weida; Shen, Jian; Xu, Xiaoshan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effect of ethylenediamine on the electrodeposition of Ni-Fe alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethylenediamine (EDA) greatly affects the phenomenon of anomalous codeposition observed in the nickel-iron electrodeposition system. EDA increases the Ni/Fe ratio of the deposit when the bath is chloride based and the pH is at least 5. Ion microprobe analysis indicates that EDA is incorporated in the deposit. It is hypothesized that EDA adsorbs on the deposit surface and serves as a bridge for Ni{sup 2+} deposition in preference to that for Fe{sup 2+}, which forms less stable complexes with EDA. Chloride ion in the bath is necessary for the adsorption of EDA, and thus the relative increase in the nickel deposition rate.

Harris, T.M.; Wilson, J.L.; Bleakley, M. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electrodeposition of Cu/Fe{sub 20}Ni{sub 80} magnetic multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposition conditions have been studied in order to prepare Cu/Fe{sub 20}Ni{sub 80} multilayers by the pulse potential method using a single electrolyte. Individual layer thicknesses ranged between 0.5 and 3 nm. Up to 40 bilayers were electrodeposited either on copper or glass plate substrates. Grazing angle X-ray diffraction showed good coherency between the layers. A magnetic coupling between FeNi layers has been observed with a magnetoresistance ratio of 2% at 2 kOe and 77 K.

Chassaing, E.; Nallet, P.; Trichet, M.F. [CNRS, Vitry-sur-Seine (France). Centre d`Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

El monólogo como acto de fe: Estreno en Broadway de Rodolfo Usigli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 1994 81 El monólogo como acto de fe: Estreno en Broadway de Rodolfo Usigli Ramón Layera El monólogo corto Estreno en Broadway de Rodolfo Usigli, como pieza inédita hasta hace pocos meses, representa un desafío a la crítica académica ya... circunstancias personales de su autor, se puede decir que se trata de un acto de fe en la capacidad sublimadora y redentora del arte dramático. Comenzando por el título, Usigli anuncia el carácter ficticio y metateatral del monólogo. Se trata de un estreno...

Layera, Ramó n

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Symmetry-Defying Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Nanocrystals through Oriented Attachment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

states, dislocations, twins, etc) of FeS2 nano- crystals dictate their optoelectronic and electrochemical applica- tions, therefore a strategy to achieve high quality crystalline FeS2 needs to be identified. Polycrystalline-to-monocrystalline conver- sion... in pyrite material is the limiting factor for performance of devices2,35–37. In this study, it is seen that the pyrite particles eventually reach a maximum size, and then begin to convert from poly-crystalline to mono-crystalline, which will reduce...

Gong, Maogang; Kirkeminde, Alec; Ren, Shenqiang

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Growth, Structure, and Magnetic Properties of CuFeTe{sub 2} Single Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuFeTe{sub 2} single crystals were grown and the temperature dependence of their magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range 1.8-400 K was investigated. It is found that the magnetic susceptibility shows anomalies at temperatures T{sub s} = 65 and T{sub N} = 125 K. At T > 125 K, the crystal is in the paramagnetic state controlled by Fe{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions with an effective magnetic moment of 1.44 {mu}B.

Dzhabbarov, A.I.; Orudzhev, S.K.; Guseinov, G.G.; Gakhramanov, N.F. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, pr. Dzhavida 33, Baku, 370143 (Azerbaijan)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Society Evaluation of point defect concentrations in B2-FeAl intermetallic compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal defects are studied for three compositions (49, 50 and 52 at.%Fe) of the intermetallic compound FeAl with B2 structure. Magnetic measurements are used to determine the thermal defect concentrations. These concentrations are determined from fitting the experimental curves of magnetic susceptibility, obtained during an isochronal annealing after a quench. Next we have evaluated theoretically the concentrations of different point defects that exist in this compound. The used model is based in the Bragg-Williams approximation assuming the nearest-neighbour interaction. The calculated concentrations describe well the experimental values. I.

S. Zaroual; O. Sassi; J. Aride; J. Bernardini; G. Moya; Supérieure Takaddoum; B. P. Rabat-morocco

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Delocalized Molecular Orbitals of the [6Fe-6S] Cluster of the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data FilesFeFe-Hydrogenase Delocalized Molecular

360

Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and vivianite formed. The results of this study suggest that Fe (III) in loess sediments represents a potentially important source of electron acceptors to support microbial activity in dry environments.

Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres have been successively synthesized via hydrothermal method. Structural, morphological and optical properties of the prepared nanopowder were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. The UV–Vis shows strong absorption at 475 nm which has excellent visible light absorption ability. Band gap energy of the prepared nanosphere was found to be 2.60 eV. The results indicate that the LaFeO{sub 3} nanospheres prepared by this method could be a kind of photocatalytic material.

Kumar, R. Dhinesh [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Jayavel, R., E-mail: rjvel@annauniv.edu [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025, India and Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Magnetic properties of HITPERM ,,Fe,Co...88Zr7B4Cu1 magnets M. A. Willard,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power applications requires new bulk soft magnetic materials that 1 are capable of operating at higher magnetization that persists to the phase transformation at 980 °C. Alternating current permeability experiments nanocrystalline Fe­Si­B­Nb­Cu alloys and nanocrystalline Fe­M­B­Cu M Zr, Nb, Hf, etc. alloys have been optimized

Laughlin, David E.

363

Highway Geology Symposium Santa Fe, 2008 HGS Session 5 -Paper 5.2 Page 1 of 21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

59th Highway Geology Symposium Santa Fe, 2008 HGS Session 5 - Paper 5.2 Page 1 of 21 59 TH HIGHWAY GEOLOGY SYMPOSIUM 2008 Santa Fe, New Mexico SESSION 5 PAPER #5.2 REVISITING AN OLD PROJECT WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY-- DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELING AND MULTI-LAYERED VIRTUAL GEOLOGIC HAZARD MAPPING ALONG A PROPOSED

Haneberg, William C.

364

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite NiFe2O4 obtained by reactive milling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite ­ NiFe2O4-Napoca, Romania Abstract Nanocrystalline nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) has been synthesized from a stoichiometric. The particles size distribution was analyzed using a laser particle size analyser. The nickel ferrite begins

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Corrosion resistance and friction of sintered NdFeB coated with Ti/TiN multilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion resistance and friction of sintered NdFeB coated with Ti/TiN multilayers Yuanyuan Cheng Polarization Fretting corrosion Ti/TiN multilayers were deposited on sintered NdFeB by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The film grain size decreased with the number of multilayers in the stack. Corrosion

Volinsky, Alex A.

366

Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome, 6 au 10 juillet 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome : Italy (2009)" #12;Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome, 6 au 10 juillet 2009 2 FFiigguurree 11

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

Characterization for strontium titinateFe3O4 and TiNFe3O4 interfaces A. Lussiera)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization for strontium titinateÃ?Fe3O4 and TiNÃ?Fe3O4 interfaces A. Lussiera) and Y. U The interface formation between different thicknesses of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) or titanium nitride Ti

Idzerda, Yves

368

Spin polarization at Fe/Cr interfaces L. Pizzagalli, M. Freyss, G. Moraitis, D. Stoeffler, C. Demangeat, and H. Dreysse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

configuration with zero net moment of a thin Fe layer on a Cr surface due to a high step density. © 1997.g., a zero net magnetic moment of a Cr layer grown on a stepped Fe surface.6 It will be shown below how some irregularities at the interfaces. The spin-polarized electronic charge distribution was calculated by using

Bayreuther, Günther

369

Synthesis of FeNi3 Alloyed Nanoparticles by Hydrothermal Reduction Qilong Liao,, Rina Tannenbaum, and Zhong Lin Wang*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method.12 The hydrothermal process appears to be a very effective method for preparing alloyedSynthesis of FeNi3 Alloyed Nanoparticles by Hydrothermal Reduction Qilong Liao,, Rina Tannenbaum paper presents a facile and low-cost hydrothermal method to synthesize stoichiometric FeNi3 alloy

Wang, Zhong L.

370

Triplet pair correlations and nonmonotonic supercurrent decay with Cr thickness in Nb/Cr/Fe/Nb Josephson devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughness and interdiffusion, an antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) state can still form in Cr close to the interface. Here, we show evidence for triplet pair correlations in Josephson junctions with Cr/Fe and Cr/Fe/Cr barriers. Although the exact...

Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Aluminum Triggers Decreased Aconitase Activity via Fe-S Cluster Disruption and the Overexpression of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Triggers Decreased Aconitase Activity via Fe-S Cluster Disruption and the Overexpression Research, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 6B4, Canada Although aluminum is known to be toxic to most or- ganisms, its that aluminum promotes the inhibition of aconitase (Acn) activity via the perturbation of the Fe-S cluster

Appanna, Vasu

372

Particle-size and morphology dependence of the preferred interface orientation in LiFePO4 nano-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle-size and morphology dependence of the preferred interface orientation in LiFePO4 nano insights into the equilibrium properties and potential two-phase lithiation mechanisms in LiFePO4 nano, if experimentally-relevant nano-particles were to (de)lithiate under a thermodynamic two-phase mechanism

Ceder, Gerbrand

373

A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries: Power of a commercial LiFePO4-graphite Li-ion battery. Compared to the isothermal reference, the mechanism of porosity;2 Due to their high power and energy densities, Li-ion technologies are the leading battery systems

374

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4- Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model of LiFePO4-graphite based Li-ion batteries is developed : 10.1149/2.064209jes #12;Over the past 15 years, Li-ion batteries have received much attention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

Materials Science and Engineering A 449451 (2007) 1217 Non-equilibrium solidification of concentrated FeGe alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the interface diffusive speed (VD) for diffusion-limited or speed of sound (Vs) for collision-limited growth phase change like peritectic reaction during liquid to solid transformation. The Fe-rich part of Fe-equilibrium conditions. The deviation of the chemical equilibrium at the solid­liquid interface and the kinetic

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

376

2598 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 38, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2002 Interparticle Interactions in Annealed FePt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are also known to be permanent magnetic materials [5]. The energy products of hard­soft exchange coupled Fe for producing hard magnetic nanocomposites. Index Terms--Exchange coupling, FePt nanoparticles, magneti- zation offer a novel and convenient approach for producing permanent magnetic materials. However, to reach

Wang, Zhong L.

377

Induction heating of FeCo nanoparticles for rapid rf curing of epoxy K. J. Miller,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and cracking of the polymer. An alternative curing process involves remote, noncontact rf heating of MNP loadedInduction heating of FeCo nanoparticles for rapid rf curing of epoxy composites K. J. Miller,1,a K epoxy composites through radio-frequency rf heating. The rf response of functionalized FeCo MNPs

McHenry, Michael E.

378

Importance of atmospheric inputs and Fe-oxides in controlling soil uranium budgets and behavior along a Hawaiian chronosequence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of atmospheric inputs and Fe-oxides in controlling soil uranium budgets and behavior: D. Rickard Abstract A long-term budget of uranium calculated for a chronosequence of Hawaiian soils extractions on the same soils shows a strong association between Fe-oxides and uranium, especially

Derry, Louis A.

379

Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetism of ?-Fe1.00(2)Se1.00(3) Single Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding iron-based superconductors requires high-quality impurity-free single crystals. So far they have been elusive for {beta}-FeSe and extraction of intrinsic materials properties has been compromised by several magnetic-impurity phases. Here, we report synchrotron-clean {beta}-FeSe superconducting single crystals grown via LiCl/CsCl flux method. Phase purity yields evidence for a defect-induced weak ferromagnetism that coexists with superconductivity below T{sub c}. In contrast to Fe{sub 1+y}Te-based superconductors, our results reveal that the interstitial Fe(2) site is not occupied and that all contribution to density of states at the Fermi level must come from in-plane Fe(1).

Petrovic, C.; Billinge, S.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microstructural evolution of Fe grown on a (001) Cu film and its implication to the elastic anomaly in metallic superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large softening of the shear modulus has been reported in metallic superlattices composed of insoluble bcc/fcc metals. In an attempt to understand this elastic anomaly, we have studied the microstructure of Fe/Cu bilayers as a function of the Fe thickness with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the moire fringes observed in plan-view TEM images revealed that the fcc Fe structure epitaxially grows on the (001) Cu up to a thickness of 2.0 nm. At 2.3 nm. At 2.3 nm, the bcc Fe structure nucleates, accompanying lattice rotation around the growth direction with respect to the underlying fcc structure. As the Fe thickness further increases, the submicron polycrystalline grains formed. Based on these results, the microstructure of the metallic superlattices and its relation to the softening of the shear modulus will be discussed. 22 refs., 2 figs

Koike, J.; Nastasi, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Photoluminescence and photothermal effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles for medical imaging and therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle was observed from the visible to near-infrared (NIR) range by laser irradiation at 407?nm. PL spectra of ?10?nm diameter Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles organized in different spatial configuration, showed characteristic emissions with a major peak near 560?nm, and two weak peaks near 690?nm and 840?nm. Different band gap energies were determined for these Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle samples corresponding to, respectively, the electron band structures of the octahedral site (2.2?eV) and the tetrahedral site (0.9?eV). Photothermal effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was found to be associated with the photoluminescence emissions in the NIR range. Also discussed is the mechanism responsible for the photothermal effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in medical therapy.

Sadat, M. E.; Kaveh Baghbador, Masoud; Wagner, H. P.; Mast, David B., E-mail: mastdb@ucmail.uc.edu, E-mail: donglu.shi@uc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Dunn, Andrew W. [The Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Ewing, Rodney C.; Zhang, Jiaming [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-2115 (United States); Xu, Hong [Med-X Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Pauletti, Giovanni M. [James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45267 (United States); Shi, Donglu, E-mail: mastdb@ucmail.uc.edu, E-mail: donglu.shi@uc.edu [The Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Shanghai East Hospital, The Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nano Science, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Role of FeS in Initial Activation and Performance Degradation of Na-NiCl2 Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of iron sulfide (FeS) in initial cell activation and degradation in the Na-NiCl2 battery was investigated in this work. The research focused on identifying the effects of the FeS level on the electrochemical performance and morphological changes in the cathode. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study along with battery tests revealed that FeS plays a critical role in initial battery activation by removing passivation layers on Ni particles. It was also found that the optimum level of FeS in the cathode resulted in minimum Ni particle growth and improved battery cycling performance. The results of electrochemical characterization indicated that sulfur species generated in situ during initial charging, such as polysulfide and sulfur, are responsible for removing the passivation layer. Consequently, the cells containing elemental sulfur in the cathode exhibited similar electrochemical behavior during initial charging compared to that of the cells containing FeS.

Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

2014-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6}: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6}, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900?°C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6} is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6} at moderate pressures. Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6} can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li{sub 4}FeH{sub 6} is metastable.

Saitoh, Hiroyuki, E-mail: cyto@spring8.or.jp [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takagi, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Aoki, Katsutoshi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Iijima, Yuki [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Endo, Naruki [Renewable Energy Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Fukushima 963-0215 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Neutron Scattering Study of Charge-Ordering in R1/3Sr2/3FeO3(R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Y).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The series of compounds R1/3Sr2/3FeO3 (R = La, Pr, Nd, and Sm) undergo a Verwey transition along with an antiferromagnetic ordering of Fe spins as… (more)

Ma, Jie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Time-dependent release of iron from soot particles by acid extraction and the reduction of fe3+ by elemental carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elemental carbon reduces Fe3+ to Fe2+ in aqueous solutions. This process has potential implications in the adverse health effects of fine particles in air pollution, because both elemental carbon and iron are major components in atmospheric...

Drake, Stephen James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Synthesis and Characterization of Piezo-Magneto (PVDF-Fe3O4) Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transform Infra-Red. X-ray diffraction and Atomic force microscopy showed that the presence of the Fe3O4 particles have no effect on the crystallinity of the polymer matrix, therefore allowing for the incorporation of inclusions without directly affecting...

Mulamba, Oliver Kasongo

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk December 2011 Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Bulk metallic glass Corrosion Biocompatibility Electrochemical characterization Biomedical applications The aim of this work is to investigate the corrosion

Zheng, Yufeng

388

Structural and thermodynamic properties of Fe{sub 1.12}Te with multiple phase transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parent compound of iron chalcogenide superconductors, Fe{sub 1+y}Te, with a range of excess Fe concentrations exhibits intriguing structural and magnetic properties. Here, the interplay of magnetic and structural properties of Fe{sub 1.12}Te single crystals have been probed by low-temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements. Thermodynamic measurements reveal two distinct phase transitions, considered unique to samples possessing excess Fe content in the range of 0.11?y?0.13. On cooling, an antiferromagnetic transition, T{sub N}?57?K is observed. A closer examination of powder diffraction data suggests that the transition at T{sub N} is not purely magnetic, but accompanied by the commencement of a structural phase transition from tetragonal to orthorhombic symmetry. This is followed by a second prominent first-order structural transition at T{sub S} with T{sub S}

Cherian, Dona, E-mail: donacherian@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Elizabeth, Suja [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Rößler, S.; Koz, C.; Schwarz, U.; Wirth, S. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Tsirlin, A. A. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Straße 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Resistive switching in doped BiFeO{sub 3} films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline Bi{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}FeO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} films (BXFO) were synthesized by sol-gel spin coating method. Local resistive switching behavior was investigated. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics were clearly observed in both two samples. However, for the Bi{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}FeO{sub 3} film, the switching from the low resistance (LRS) to the high resistance (HRS) occurred at positive bias and the switching from the HRS to the LRS at negative bias. On the contrary, the resistance of Bi{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} film was switched from the LRS to the HRS when a negative bias was applied. Possible mechanisms for both resistive switching forms were discussed on the basis of the Schottky-like barrier.

Wu, Lei; Jiang, Changjun, E-mail: jiangchj@lzu.edu.cn; Xue, Desheng [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of MOE, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Magnetic properties and switching volumes of nanocrystalline SmFeSiC films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systematic studies of the effects of Si addition on the magnetic and magnetization reversal properties of SmFeSiC films are presented. The magnetic switching volume and other magnetic parameters (e.g., coercivity) are strongly dependent upon the Si content. Correlations between switching volume, coercivity, and the intergrain interactions are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Zhang, S.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Peoples Republic of (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Peoples Republic of (China); Shan, Z.S.; Liu, Y. [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0113 (United States)] [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0113 (United States); Zhao, T.Y.; Zhao, J.G.; Shen, B.G.; Zhan, W.S. [Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, Peoples Republic of (China); Sellmyer, D.J. [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0113 (United States)] [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0113 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Santa Fe Institute Working Paper 06-12-055 arxiv.org/q-bio.PE/0612019  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1 Art and Science Laboratory, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 2 Center for Computational Science are key moderators of atmospheric gases. Trees exhaust oxygen and take up carbon dioxide in a pro- cess that sequesters in solid form carbon from the atmo- sphere. As plants and trees evolved, in fact, they altered

Crutchfield, Jim

392

Phase-Controlled Growth of Metastable Fe5Si3 Nanowires by a Vapor Transport Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce other metal-rich silicide nanostructures for future spintronic devices. Introduction Iron. Depending on the concentration ratio of FeI2(g) to SiI4(g), different phases of iron silicides are formed. The growth of nanowires is facilitated by the initial nucleation of silicide particles on the substrate

Kim, Bongsoo

393

Transition metal interaction and Ni-Fe-Cu-Si phases in silicon T. Buonassisi,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation may reduce the lattice mismatch compared to single-metal precipitates, rendering mixed-metal-silicide recombination activity of metal silicide clusters. Common solar cell materials are not contaminated with justTransition metal interaction and Ni-Fe-Cu-Si phases in silicon M. Heuer,a T. Buonassisi,b A. A

394

Nanostructured double-layer FeO as nanotemplate for tuning adsorption of titanyl phthalocyanine molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth, structure of Pt(111) supported double-layer FeO and the adsorption of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) molecules with tunable site and orientation were presented. According to the atomic-resolution STM image, the structure was rationalized as (8?3?×?8?3) R30°/Pt(111) nanostructure constructed by Fe species coordinated with different number of oxygen on top of non-rotated (8?×?8) FeO /Pt(111) structure. Due to the modulation of the stacking of Fe atoms in the second layer relative to the O atoms in the second layer and the underlying layer, the interface and total dipole moment periodically vary within (8?3?×?8?3) R30°/Pt(111) structure. The resulted periodically distributed dipole-dipole interaction benefits the growth of TiOPc molecules with area-selective sites and molecular orientations. Thus, this study provides a reliable method to govern the adsorption process of the polar molecules for potential applications in future functional molecular devices.

Lu, Shuangzan [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qin, Zhihui, E-mail: zhqin@wipm.ac.cn; Cao, Gengyu [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Self-nanoscaling of the soft magnetic phase in bulk SmCo/Fe nanocomposite magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in high power density applications, such as wind power turbines and electric motors in hybrid vehicles phase and a magneti- cally soft phase with desired nanoscale morphology and composition distribution has proven to be challenging. Here we demonstrate that SmCo/Fe(Co) hard/soft nano- composite materials can

Liu, J. Ping

396

http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc FE modeling of guided wave focusing in coated pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc FE modeling of guided wave focusing in coated pipes Dr. Joseph L. Rose in coated pipes. The process of modeling is discussed below. The modeled pipe is an 8 in. schedule 40 steel pipe with 1.5 mm thick bitumastic 50 coating. The focal distance is designed to be 5.6 m. The focusing

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

397

ORGANIC MASS SPECTROMETRY, VOL. 21, 193-195 (1986) Energy Deposition in [Fe(CO),] ''Upon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC MASS SPECTROMETRY, VOL. 21, 193-195 (1986) Energy Deposition in [Fe(CO),] ''Upon Collision distributions associated with gas-phase collisional activation using both low and high ion kinetic energies, and the high internal energies accessible, make the ionlsurface collision process superior to gas

Wysocki, Vicki H.

398

M4C3 precipitation in FeCMoV steels and relationship to hydrogen trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, UK Strong steels suffer from embrittlement due to dissolved hydrogenM4C3 precipitation in Fe­C­Mo­V steels and relationship to hydrogen trapping BY S. YAMASAKI AND H, a phenomenon which can be mitigated by trapping the hydrogen at carbide particles, where it is rendered benign

Cambridge, University of

399

Voltage control of magnetic anisotropy in Fe films with quantum well states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of a gate voltage on magnetic anisotropy is investigated in a thin Fe film epitaxially grown on a Ag(1,1,10) substrate and covered by MgO. Oscillations in step-induced magnetic anisotropy due to quantum well ...

Bauer, Uwe

400

On the Cosmic Evolution of Fe/Mg in QSO Absorption Line Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the variation of the ratio of the equivalent widths of the FeII$\\lambda$2600 line to the MgII$\\lambda\\lambda$2796,2803 doublet as a function of redshift in a large sample of absorption lines drawn from the JHU-SDSS Absorption Line Catalog. We find that despite large scatter, the observed ratio shows a trend where the equivalent width ratio $\\mathcal{R}\\equiv W_{\\rm FeII}/W_{\\rm MgII}$ decreases monotonically with increasing redshift $z$ over the range $0.55 \\le z \\le 1.90$. Selecting the subset of absorbers where the signal-to-noise ratio of the MgII equivalent width $W_{\\rm MgII}\\ge$3 and modeling the equivalent width ratio distribution as a gaussian, we find that the mean of the gaussian distribution varies as $\\mathcal{R}\\propto (-0.045\\pm0.005)z$. We discuss various possible reasons for the trend. A monotonic trend in the Fe/Mg abundance ratio is predicted by a simple model where the abundances of Mg and Fe in the absorbing clouds are assumed to be the result of supernova ejecta and where t...

Dey, Arjun; Rubin, Kate H R; Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Suresh, Joshua

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

FE Modeling and Experimental Verification of an FRP Strengthened Bridge Kasidit Chansawat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Damian I. Kachlakev 2 , Thomas H. Miller 1 , and Solomon C.S. Yim 1 1 Oregon State University Department methodology and the nonlinear analysis approach in ANSYS are presented. The results obtained from the FE and longitudinal beams versus various truck load locations on the bridge deck. 2. MODELING METHODOLOGY

Yim, Solomon C.

402

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Biology Biology and several local offices of the federal and state conservation agencies. These agencies often--Wildlife Diseases................................................................3 WLF F433--Conservation

Hartman, Chris

403

Ionic-passivated FeS2 photocapacitors for energy conversion and storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 49, 9260--9262 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013 Cite this: Chem. Commun.,2013, 49, 9260 Ionic-passivated FeS2 photocapacitors for energy conversion and storage† Maogang Gong,a Alec Kirkeminde,a Nardeep Kumar,b Hui Zhaob...

Gong, Maogang; Kirkeminde, Alec; Kumar, Nardeep; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Shenqiang

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Method for improving voltage regulation of batteries, particularly Li/FeS/sub 2/ thermal batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Batteries are improved, especially with respect to voltage regulation properties, by employing as anode and cathode compositions, those which fall in a thermodynamically invariant region of the metallurgical phase diagram of the combination of the constituent components. The invention is especially useful in the Li/FeS/sub 2/ system.

Godshall, N.A.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Structure-Induced Ferromagnetic Stabilization in Free-Standing Hexagonal Fe1.3Ge Nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of Si,4b the quantum size effect would be more prominent in transition-metal germanide NWs. Furthermore also modulate the composition ratio of as-grown iron germanide NWs by adjusting experimental conditions of nanospintronics.2,3 Ferromagnetic transition-metal and group IV semiconductor alloy NWs such as CoSi3a and Fe5Si3

Kim, Bongsoo

406

A STUDY OF FERRITIC WELD DEPOSITS IN Fe-9Ni STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Welding of 9% Nickel Steel: Research in the U.S. andWELD DEPOSITS IN Fe-9Ni STEEL K. W. Mahin and J. W. Morris,1977). F. H. lang: Ferritic Steel Welcl'ing 3,218,432 (

Mahin, K.W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamond’s extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

Benecha, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa); Lombardi, E. B. [College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

The vibrational spectrum of FeO{sub 2}{sup +} isomers—Theoretical benchmark and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared photodissociation is used to record the vibrational spectrum of FeO{sub 2}{sup +}(He){sub 2–4} which shows three bands at 1035, 980, and 506 cm{sup ?1}. Quantum chemical multi-reference configuration interaction calculations (MRCISD) of structures and harmonic frequencies show that these bands are due to two different isomers, an inserted dioxo complex with Fe in the +V oxidation state and a side-on superoxo complex with Fe in the +II oxidation state. These two are separated by a substantial barrier, 53 kJ/mol, whereas the third isomer, an end-on complex between Fe{sup +} and an O{sub 2} molecule, is easily converted into the side-on complex. For all three isomers, states of different spin multiplicity have been considered. Our best energies are computed at the MRCISD+Q level, including corrections for complete active space and basis set extension, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and zero-point vibrational energy. The average coupled pair functional (ACPF) yields very similar energies. Density functional theory (DFT) differs significantly from our best estimates for this system, with the TPSS functional yielding the best results. The other functionals tested are BP86, PBE, B3LYP, TPSSh, and B2PLYP. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) performs better than DFT, but less good than ACPF.

Maier, Toni M.; Boese, A. Daniel; Sauer, Joachim, E-mail: js@chemie.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, D 10099 Berlin (Germany); Wende, Torsten; Fagiani, Matias [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 14195 Berlin (Germany); Asmis, Knut R., E-mail: asmis@fhi-berlin.mpg.de [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstrasse 2, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ultrafast Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis of BiFeO3 Nanoplates Riad Nechache,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrothermal processes while requiring significantly less time and energy. In addition, we show that microwaveUltrafast Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis of BiFeO3 Nanoplates Shun Li, Riad Nechache,§ Ivan and very rapid (1­2 min) microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. We show that the microwave treatment

410

Logarithmic Fermi-liquid breakdown in NbFe2 M. Brando,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient = C/T of the specific heat capacity, C, over nearly two temperature dependences of the resistivity and of the heat capacity over extended ranges in temperatureLogarithmic Fermi-liquid breakdown in NbFe2 M. Brando,1, W. J. Duncan,1 D. Moroni-Klementowicz,1 C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Ferropnictide superconductors, i.e., superconductors that contain Fe and As, have superconducting transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ferropnictide superconductors, i.e., superconductors that contain Fe and As, have superconducting of these materials could not carry a large superconducting current because grain boundaries reduce the critical Hellstrom (DMR-Award 1006584) and Gregory S. Boebinger (DMR-Award 0654118) Applied Superconductivity Center

Weston, Ken

412

Chemical Engineering Journal 139 (2008) 208212 Electrodeposition of maghemite ( -Fe2O3) nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering Journal 139 (2008) 208­212 Electrodeposition of maghemite ( -Fe2O3. Myunga, a Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California nanoparticles have been utilized as fer- rofluids hyperthermia (MFM) in tumor treatment because of good chemical

413

SFU LiFeLong Learning 2011/2012 Community Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning 2 #12;Appendix 1: Organizational Structure [ 28 ] Appendix 2: Enrolment [ 29 ] Appendix 3: FinanceSFU LiFeLong Learning 2011/2012 Community Report #12;As part of the engaged university, SFU Lifelong Learning takes pride in helping people in our community enhance their lives through education. We

414

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field ZHEN Liang( )1 of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China; 2. Department 27599-3255, USA Received 29 June 2006; accepted 15 January 2007 Abstract: Structural and magnetic

Qin, Lu-Chang

415

Amorphous FeOOH Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalyst for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce H2 for industrial use. Currently steam reformation of natural gas, which generates CO2 (PEC) water splitting will likely require the combination of efficient solar absorbers with high, the a-FeOOH thin films absorb less than 3% of the solar photons (AM1.5G) with energy greater than 1.9 e

Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

416

Doped LiFePO? cathodes for high power density lithium ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olivine LiFePO4 has received much attention recently as a promising storage compound for cathodes in lithium ion batteries. It has an energy density similar to that of LiCoO 2, the current industry standard for cathode ...

Bloking, Jason T. (Jason Thompson), 1979-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(ii) in degradative solidification/stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................7 2.1 Degradative Solidification/Stabilization...................................................7 2.2 Cement Chemistry.....................................................................................8 2.2.1 Portland Cement... of typical cements . .........................9 Table 2.2 Portland cement compound transformation................................................15 Table 2.3 The oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides of Fe.....................................16 Table 2...

Jung, Bahng Mi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - al-fe alloys strukturnyj Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory NiAl CoAl FeAl CoGa PdIn VT,1 A Q M 1, 0 128, 0 144... , with transition-metal vacancies (VT) for T-deficient ... Source: Collins, Gary S. - Department of Physics...

419

SmCo5/Fe nanocomposites synthesized from reductive annealing of oxide nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmCo-based exchange-spring nanocomposites for high performance permanent magnet applications. © 2007 magnetic grains should be of the order of 10 nm.1­6 SmCo5/Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposites represent an important class of high performance permanent magnetic materials with SmCo5 offering large coercivity, high

Liu, J. Ping

420

Magnetic order tuned by Cu substitution in Fe1.1–zCuzTe  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We study the effects of Cu substitution in Fe?.?Te, the nonsuperconducting parent compound of the iron-based superconductor, Fe??yTe??xSex, utilizing neutron scattering techniques. It is found that the structural and magnetic transitions, which occur at ~60 K without Cu, are monotonically depressed with increasing Cu content. By 10% Cu for Fe, the structural transition is hardly detectable, and the system becomes a spin glass below 22 K, with a slightly incommensurate ordering wave vector of (0.5–?, 0, 0.5) with ? being the incommensurability of 0.02, and correlation length of 12 Å along the a axis and 9 Å along the c axis. With 4% Cu, both transition temperatures are at 41 K, though short-range incommensurate order at (0.42, 0, 0.5) is present at 60 K. With further cooling, the incommensurability decreases linearly with temperature down to 37 K, below which there is a first-order transition to a long-range almost-commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. A spin anisotropy gap of 4.5 meV is also observed in this compound. Our results show that the weakly magnetic Cu has a large effect on the magnetic correlations; it is suggested that this is caused by the frustration of the exchange interactions between the coupled Fe spins.

Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Zhijun; Xu, Guangyong; Lumsden, M. D.; Valdivia, P. N.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Gu, Genda; Lee, Dung-Hai; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. DOE FE Fuel Cell Program DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vision 21 fuel cell /turbine hybrids and V21 zero emissions concepts; and conduct system studies material Total, FE 51,274 56,678 60,603 44,500 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Crosscut (dollars in thousands Electrical Efficiency (LHV) 3000 hrs.3000 hrs.Maintenance Interval turbine)

422

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract By fitting a potential of modified Finnis­Sinclair type to the thermal

423

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

424

Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of complex processes (such as advective flow) present in the natural environment are unknown. The objective of the current studies was to address some of these short-comings in an attempt to develop this bioremediative strategy into a robust, field applicable technology. This objective was approached by both pure culture studies investigating the mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate reducing bacteria and examining the flow dynamics and microbial processes in advective flow columns amended with Fe(II) and nitrate over an extended period.

Coates, John D.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

A high temperature diffraction-resistance study of chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical, magnetic and structural properties of synthetic chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}, have been studied up to 873 K using DC resistance measurements performed in-situ during neutron powder diffraction experiments. Under ambient conditions the material adopts the accepted structural model for CuFeS{sub 2} in the space group I4-bar 2d, with the magnetic moment of the Fe{sup 3+} cations aligned along [001]. The electrical resistivity is around 0.3 {Omega} cm under ambient conditions, consistent with semiconductor character, and decreases slightly with increase in temperature until a more abrupt fall occurs in the region 750-800 K. This abrupt change in resistivity is accompanied by a structural transition to a cubic zinc blende structured phase (space group F4-bar 3m) in which Cu{sup +} and Fe{sup 3+} cations are disordered over the same tetrahedral crystallographic sites and by a simultaneous loss of long-range magnetic order. The implications of these results are discussed in the context of previous studies of the chalcopyrite system. - Graphical abstract: Structural, magnetic and electrical properties of CuFeS{sub 2} to 873 K have been investigated using DC resistance measurements, performed in-situ during the collection of powder neutron diffraction data. Highlights: > Structural, magnetic and electronic properties are probed simultaneously. > A fall in resistivity at high temperatures is associated with cation disorder. > The order-disorder transition is accompanied by the loss of magnetic order. > The structural and magnetic phase transition is preceded by a 2-phase region. > Sulphur loss at high temperatures causes the phase transitions to be irreversible.

Engin, T.E. [Department of Chemistry, Perkin Building, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Powell, A.V., E-mail: a.v.powell@hw.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Perkin Building, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Hull, S. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

K(alpha) X-ray Emission Spectra from Highly Charged Fe Ions in EBIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed spectral model has been developed for the computer simulation of the 2p {yields} 1s K{alpha} X-ray emission from highly charged Fe ions in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The spectral features of interest occur in the range from 1.84 {angstrom} to 1.94 {angstrom}. The fundamental radiative emission processes associated with radiationless electron capture or dielectronic recombination, inner-shell electron collisional excitation, and inner-shell electron collisional ionization are taken in account. For comparison, spectral observations and simulations for high-temperature magnetic-fusion (Tokamak) plasmas are reviewed. In these plasmas, small departures from steady-state corona-model charge-state distributions can occur due to ion transport processes, while the assumption of equilibrium (Maxwellian) electron energy distributions is expected to be valid. Our investigations for EBIT have been directed at the identification of spectral features that can serve as diagnostics of extreme non-equilibrium or transient-ionization conditions, and allowance has been made for general (non-Maxwellian) electron energy distributions. For the precise interpretation of the high-resolution X-ray observations, which may involve the analysis of blended spectral features composed of many lines, it has been necessary to take into account the multitude of individual fine-structure components of the K{alpha} radiative transitions in the ions from Fe XVIII to Fe XXV. At electron densities higher than the validity range of the corona-model approximation, collisionally induced transitions among low-lying excited states can play an important role. It is found that inner-shell electron excitation and ionization processes involving the complex intermediate ions from Fe XVIII to Fe XXI produce spectral features, in the wavelength range from 1.89 {angstrom} to 1.94 {angstrom}, which are particularly sensitive to density variations and transient ionization conditions.

Jacobs, V; Beiersdorfer, P

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Optimization of High Temperature Hoop Creep Response in ODS-Fe3Al Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe3Al alloys are currently being developed for heat-exchanger tubes for eventual use at operating temperatures of up to 1100 C in the power generation industry. The development challenges include (a) efforts to produce thin walled ODS-Fe3Al tubes, employing powder extrusion methodologies, with (b) adequate increased strength for service at operating temperatures to (c) mitigate creep failures by enhancing the as-processed grain size. A detailed and comprehensive research and development methodology is prescribed to produce ODS-Fe3Al thin walled tubes. Current single step extrusion consolidation methodologies typically yield 8ft. lengths of 1-3/8 inch diameter, 1/8 inch wall thickness ODS-Fe3Al tubes. The process parameters for such consolidation methodologies have been prescribed and evaluated as being routinely reproducible. Recrystallization treatments at 1200 C produce elongated grains (with their long axis parallel to the extrusion axis), typically 200-2000 {micro}m in diameter, and several millimeters long. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloys requires an understanding and manipulating the factors that control grain alignment and recrystallization behavior. Current efforts are focused on examining the processing dependent longitudinal vs. transverse creep anisotropy, and exploring post-extrusion methods to improve hoop creep response in ODS-Fe3Al alloy tubes. In this report we examine the mechanisms of hoop creep failure and describe our efforts to improve creep performance via variations in thermal-mechanical treatments.

Kad, B.K.; Heatherington, J.H.; McKamey, C.; Wright, I.; Sikka, V.; Judkins, R.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nonequilibrium quasiparticle relaxation dynamics in single crystals of hole- and electron-doped BaFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the nonequilibrium quasiparticle dynamics in BaFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] on both the hole-doped (Ba[subscript 1?x]K[subscript x]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2]) and electron-doped (BaFe[subscript ...

Torchinsky, Darius Hosseinzadeh

430

Effects of solute and vacancy segregation on antiphase boundary migration in stoichiometric and Al-rich Fe?Al: a phase-field simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of segregation of solute atoms and vacancies on migration of antiphase boundaries (APBs) in stoichiometric (Fe-25 at%Al) and Al-rich (Fe-28 at%Al) Fe?Al at 673 K have been studied using a phase-field method in which ...

Koizumi, Yuichiro

431

Tetragonal YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7.0}: A stoichiometric polymorph of the '114' ferrite family  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exploration of the phase diagram of the ferrite YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+{delta}} versus the oxygen content {delta} and temperature shows the complex crystal chemistry of this system. Besides the cubic form (F4 Macron 3m), which is observed up to 600 Degree-Sign C and for 0<{delta}{<=}0.65, a stoichiometric tetragonal form ({delta}=0) is isolated below 300 Degree-Sign C that is stable only in the absence of oxidizing atmosphere. The resolution of the structure of this new YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7.0} form, from combined neutron and synchrotron data, in the space group I4 Macron , shows significant displacements of the atoms with respect to the cubic form, especially concerning the oxygen atoms surrounding the barium cations. The decrease of several Ba-O distances around the underbonded barium cations is explained by the existence of hybridized Ba{sup (2-{delta})+}-O{sup 2-}-Fe{sup (2+{delta})+} bonds, in agreement with Moessbauer spectroscopy. The role of coulombic repulsions in the [Fe{sub 4}O] and [Fe{sub 4}] tetrahedra of the [Fe{sub 4}]{sub {infinity}} sublattice on the structural transition is also discussed. - Graphical abstract: A new form of YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7} '114' ferrite which is only stable in oxygen free atmosphere, even at room temperature has been prepared. This new ferrite has its structure closely related to the cubic form YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+{delta}} but differently from the latter which is stable for 0<{delta}<0.65, it requires a rigorous oxygen 'O{sub 7}' stoichiometry, i.e., {delta}=0. We describe herein the phase diagram of the oxides YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+{delta}} and we determine the structure of this new YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7.0} form, from combined neutron and synchrotron data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen stoichiometry control in '114' YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+d} ferrites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new structural transition leading to a new form of YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+d} '114' ferrite for d=0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural resolution from combined neutron and synchrotron data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase diagram of the oxides YBaFe{sub 4}O{sub 7+d}.

Duffort, V.; Caignaert, V. [CRISMAT, CNRS-ENSICAEN 6 Bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Pralong, V., E-mail: valerie.pralong@ensicaen.fr [CRISMAT, CNRS-ENSICAEN 6 Bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Barrier, N.; Raveau, B. [CRISMAT, CNRS-ENSICAEN 6 Bd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Avdeev, M. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

The influence of microstructure on magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe-Pt-Nb-B permanent magnet ribbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A FePt-based hard-magnetic nanocomposite of exchange spring type was prepared by isothermal annealing of melt-spun Fe{sub 52}Pt{sub 28}Nb{sub 2}B{sub 18} (atomic percent) ribbons. The relationship between microstructure and magnetic properties was investigated by qualitative and quantitative structural analysis based on the x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectrometry on one hand and the superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry on the other hand. The microstructure consists of L1{sub 0}-FePt hard-magnetic grains (15-45 nm in diameter) dispersed in a soft magnetic medium composed by A1 FePt, Fe{sub 2}B, and boron-rich (FeB)PtNb remainder phase. The ribbons annealed at 700 deg. C for 1 h exhibit promising hard-magnetic properties at room temperature: M{sub r}/M{sub s}=0.69; H{sub c}=820 kA/m and (BH){sub max}=70 kJ/m{sup 3}. Strong exchange coupling between hard and soft magnetic phases was demonstrated by a smooth demagnetizing curve and positive {delta}M-peak in the Henkel plot. The magnetic properties measured from 5 to 750 K reveals that the hard characteristics remains rather stable up to 550 K, indicating a good prospect for the use of these permanent magnets in a wide temperature range.

Randrianantoandro, N.; Greneche, J. M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, UMR CNRS 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Crisan, A. D. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Etat Condense, UMR CNRS 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 76900 Bucharest (Romania); Crisan, O. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 76900 Bucharest (Romania); Marcin, J.; Kovac, J.; Hanko, J.; Skorvanek, I. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Svec, P. [Institute of Physics, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 84228 Bratislava (Slovakia); Chrobak, A. [August Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Data:28f46846-fe31-4929-b9da-46fe9fb19b1e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffe No revision has been approved7af2e2cf0e85488a7fe3a3badf5e-962ef23bfcdafb19b1e No

435

Data:B371708b-2fe6-4b1f-b485-a01fe16f8aaa | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revision has been28a07c58 No revisionaf48efbe-5d09160ec277 No-a01fe16f8aaa No

436

Data:B6995793-7bbe-4717-8b8a-7fe99c1fe735 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revisionb6dbbdc091c No47e8-8abc-986cbbaae197 Noa07f-4a1381e9d1f8 No9c1fe735

437

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fully fluorinated compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compound 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F (P6{sub 3}/mmc) was synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. Structural characterisation by XRD and NPD suggests that the local positions of the oxygen and fluorine atoms vary with no evidence for ordering on the anion sites. This compound shows antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature with antiparallel alignment of the magnetic moments along the c-axis. The use of PVDF also allows the possibility of tuning the fluorine content in materials of composition 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} to any value of 0FeO{sub 2}F. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the hexagonal perovskite phase 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 6H-BaFeO{sub 3-d}F{sub y} were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This analysis suggests differences for the local coordination of O{sup 2-} and F{sup -} anions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic moments align parallel to the a-axis.

Clemens, Oliver, E-mail: oliverclemens@online.de [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Wright, Adrian J.; Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Diffusional Interaction between U – 10wt.% Zr and Fe at 903K, 923K and 953K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U-Zr metallic fuels cladded in Fe-alloys are being considered for application in an advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) that can recycle the U-Zr fuels and minimize the long-lived actinide waste. To understand the complex fuel-cladding chemical interaction between the U-Zr metallic fuel with Fe-alloys, a systematic multicomponent diffusion study was carried out using solid-to-solid diffusion couples. The U-10 wt.% Zr vs. pure Fe diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at temperatures, 903, 923 and 953K for 96 hours. Development of microstructure, phase constituents, and compositions developed during the thermal anneals were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Complex microstructure consisting of several layers that include phases such as U6Fe, UFe2, ZrFe2, alpha-U, betha-U, Zr-precipitates, ?, e and ? were observed. Multi-phase layers were grouped based on phase constituents and microstructure, and the layer thicknesses were measured to calculate the growth constant and activation energy. The local average compositions through the interaction layer were systematically determined, and employed to construct semi-quantitative diffusion paths on isothermal U-Zr-Fe ternary phase diagrams at respective temperatures. The diffusion paths were examined to qualitatively estimate the diffusional behavior of individual components and their interactions. Furthermore, selected area diffraction analyses were carried out to determine, for the first time, the exact crystal structure and composition of ?, e and ?-phases. The ?, e and ?-phases were identified as Pnma(62) Fe(Zr,U), I4/mcm(140) Fe(Zr,U)2, and I4/mcm(140) U3(Zr,Fe), respectively.

K Y. Park; K. Huang; A. Ewh; Y.H. Sohn; B. H. Sencer; J. R. Kennedy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of the fluorinated compound 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compounds 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5} have been synthesised by the low temperature fluorination of 15R-BaFeO{sub 3?d}F{sub 0.2} using polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) as a fluorination agent. The materials have been structurally characterised by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray- and HRPD-powder neutron diffraction data. A detailed analysis of bond valence sums suggests that the oxide and fluoride ions order on the different anion sites. A reinvestigation of our recently published structure (Clemens et al., 2013) [34] of 6H-BaFeO{sub 2}F is also reported and incorporation of fluoride in h-type layers is also confirmed in this compound. The magnetic moments for 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.25}F{sub 0.5} align in the a/b-plane with antiferromagnetic alignment of the moments between adjacent layers, and are flipped by 90° as compared to the precursor compound. 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F exhibits very robust antiferromagnetism with a Néel temperature between 300 and 400 °C. - Graphical abstract: The crystal and magnetic structure of the perovskite phase 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F. - Highlights: • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F and 15R-BaFeO{sub 2.27}F{sub 0.5}were prepared via low temperature fluorination using PVDF. • A structural investigation of the compounds BaFeO{sub 2}F is presented in detail. • This analysis suggests ordering of O{sup 2?} and F{sup ?} anions between different layers. • 15R-BaFeO{sub 2}F shows antiferromagnetic ordering at 300 K with T{sub N} ?300–400 °C. • The magnetic moments align in the a/b-plane.

Clemens, Oliver, E-mail: oliverclemens@online.de [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bauer, Jessica [Anorganische Festkörperchemie, Universität des Saarlandes, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbrücken (Germany); Wright, Adrian J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Knight, Kevin S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R. [School of Chemistry, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

55Fe effect on enhancing ferritic steel He/dpa ratio in fission reactor irradiations to simulate fusion conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How to increase the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio in a fission reactor neutron spectrum is an important question for fusion reactor material testing. An early experiment showed that the accelerated He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 2.3 was achieved for 96% enriched 54Fe in iron with 458.2 effective full power days (EFPD) irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL. Greenwood suggested that the transmutation produced 55Fe has a thermal neutron helium production cross section which may have an effect on this result. In the current work, the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio is studied in the neutron spectrum of HFIR with 55Fe thermal neutron helium production taken into account. The available ENDF-b format 55Fe incident neutron cross section file from TENDL, Netherlands, is first input into the calculation model. A benchmark calculation for the same sample as used in the aforementioned experiment was used to adjust and evaluate the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section values. The analysis shows a decrease of a factor of 6700 for the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section in the intermediate and low energy regions is required in order to fit the experimental results. The best fit to the cross section value at thermal neutron energy is about 27 mb. With the adjusted 55Fe (n, a) cross sections, calculation show that the 54Fe and 55Fe isotopes can be enriched by the isotopic tailoring technique in a ferritic steel sample irradiated in HFIR to significantly enhance the helium production rate. The results show that a 70% enriched 54Fe and 30% enriched 55Fe ferritic steel sample would produce a He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 13 initially in the HFIR peripheral target position (PTP). After one year irradiation, the ratio decreases to about 10. This new calculation can be used to guide future isotopic tailoring experiments designed to increase the He(appm)/dpa ratio in fission reactors. A benchmark experiment is suggested to be performed to evaluate the 55Fe (n, a) cross section at thermal energy.

Liu, Haibo; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Graphene as a surfactant for metal growth on solid surfaces: Fe on graphene/SiC(0001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and scanning tunneling microscopic results demonstrate that annealing of Fe/carbon-rich 6H-SiC(0001) surface between 650 and 750?°C leads to Fe intercalation under the surface carbon layer. Accompanied with the metal intercalation, the carbon nanomesh surface was transformed into a graphene surface. Moreover, the formed graphene layers always float out to the topmost surface even after deposition of more than 10 monolayer Fe, acting as a surfactant. Using graphene as the surfactant may not only promote the 2D growth but also can improve the film performance considering that graphene is stable and robust.

Wang, Zhou-jun; Dong, Aiyi; Wei, Mingming; Fu, Qiang, E-mail: qfu@dicp.ac.cn; Bao, Xinhe [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

Investigation into the growth and structure of thin-film solid solutions of iron-based superconductors in the FeSe{sub 0.92}-FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of FeSe{sub 0.92} and FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} iron chalcogenide superconductors and solid solutions containing these components in different ratios have been grown on the surface of LaAlO{sub 3} (10 1-bar 2) crystals by pulsed laser deposition. Films of solid solutions have been deposited by simultaneous laser ablation from two targets of the FeSe{sub 0.92} and FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} stoichiometric compositions onto one substrate. An X-ray diffraction study of the film structure shows that the films grown are epitaxial and their lattice parameters regularly vary with the ratio of the deposited components, which was controllably varied by changing the ablation intensities from the targets.

Stepantsov, E. A., E-mail: stepantsov@ns.cryst.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Kazakov, S. M.; Belikov, V. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)] [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Makarova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Arpaia, R.; Gunnarsson, R.; Lombardi, F. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience (Sweden)] [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience (Sweden)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Interaction Of Helium Atoms With Screw Dislocations In Alpha-Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation energies, binding energies, and migration energies of interstitial He atoms in and near the core of an a/2<111> screw dislocation in alpha-Fe are determined in atomistic simulations using conjugate gradient relaxation and the Dimer method for determining saddle point energies. Results are compared as a function of the proximity of the He to the dislocation core and the excess interstitial volume in regions around the dislocation. Interstitial He atoms have binding energies to the screw dislocation that are about half the magnitude of binding energies to the a/2<111>{110} edge dislocation in alpha-Fe. Migration energies of interstitial He atoms for diffusion toward the dislocation and for pipe diffusion along the dislocation are about the same magnitude for the screw and edge dislocations, despite a significant difference in their migration mechanisms. Interstitial He atoms diffuse along the dislocation cores with a migration energy of 0.4-0.5 eV

Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effect of 3d doping on the electronic structure of BaFe2As2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of BaFe2As2 doped with Co, Ni and Cu has been studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, but a clear picture of the dopant 3d states has not yet emerged. Herein we provide experimental evidence of the distribution of Co, Ni and Cu 3d states in the valence band. We conclude that the Co and Ni 3d states provide additional free carriers to the Fermi level, while the Cu 3d states are found at the bottom of the valence band in a localized 3d10 shell. These findings help shed light on why superconductivity can occur in BaFe2As2 doped with Co and Ni but not Cu.

McLeod, John A.; Buling, A.; Green, R.J.; Boyko, T.D.; Skorikov, N.A.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Neumann, M.; Finkelstein, L.D.; Ni, Ni; Thaler, Alexander; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul; Moewes, A.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Surface driven effects on magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic LaFeO{sub 3} nanocrystalline ferrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LaFeO{sub 3} nanocrystalline ferrites were synthesized through sol-gel method in different size distributions and the effect of finite size on magnetic properties is investigated. Results of magnetization and Mössbauer measurements show that superparamagnetism and weak ferromagnetic behavior in some of the size distributions. The origin of the superparamagnetism is from fine particles similar to ferromagnetic single domains and the weak ferromagnetism comes from surface spin disorder caused by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. The magnetic ground state of LaFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles differs from that of bulk, and the ground state is dictated by the finite size effect because density of states depends on the dimensionality of the sample.

Sendil Kumar, A., E-mail: sendilphy@gmail.com, E-mail: anilb42@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana 500 046 (India); Manivel Raja, M. [Advanced Magnetics Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad, Telangana 500 058 (India); Bhatnagar, Anil K., E-mail: sendilphy@gmail.com, E-mail: anilb42@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana 500 046 (India); School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana 500 046 (India)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

La(Sr)FeO3 SOFC Cathodes with Marginal Copper Doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract (La0.8Sr0.2)0.98Fe0.98Cu0.02O3-? can be sintered directly onto YSZ (without the need for a protective ceria interlayer to prevent inter-diffusion). Though subject to an extended “burn-in” period (~200 hours), anode-supported YSZ cells utilizing the Cu-doped LSF achieve power densities ranging from 1.3-1.7 W/cm2 at 750ºC and 0.7V. These cells have also demonstrated 500 hours of stable performance. The results are somewhat surprising given that XRD indicates an interaction between (La0.8Sr0.2)0.98Fe0.98Cu0.02O3-? and YSZ resulting in the formation of strontium zirconate and/or monoclinic zirconia. The amount and type of reaction product was found to be dependent on cathode and electrolyte powder pre-calcination temperatures.

Simner, Steve P.; Anderson, Michael D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Effect of FeO-content and potentials for quality improvements of iron ore pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FeO-content strongly influences the physical and metallurgical properties of iron ore pellets. A wide range of FeO-contents within the pellet deliveries to the Germany market is evaluated. Investigations include the effect of pellet size. The paper concludes potentials for quality improvement of iron ore pellets. Most of the German blast furnaces are operated with high injection rates either of oil or of coal resulting in a decrease of coke consumption down to a level of about 300 kg/t hot metal. As the retention time of the burden increases, blast furnace operators demand higher quality burden material, basically with respect to strength before and during reduction.

Kortmann, H.A.; Mertins, E.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

First Observation of Beta-Delayed Three-Proton Emission in 45Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay of extremely neutron deficient 45Fe has been studied by means of a new type of a gaseous detector in which a technique of digital imaging was used to record tracks of charged particles. The + decay channels accompanied by proton emission were clearly identified. In addition to -delayed one-proton and -delayed two-proton decays, -delayed three-proton emission was recorded which represents the first direct and unambiguous observation of this decay channel. The branching ratio for the decay of 45Fe and the corresponding partial half-life are found to be 0.30 0.04 and T1/2( ) = 8.7 1.3 ms, respectively.

Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, Wojciech [Warsaw University; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, Henryk [Warsaw University; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Djbrowski, R. [University of Warsaw; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, Mustafa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

First observation of {beta}-delayed three-proton emission in {sup 45}Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay of extremely neutron deficient {sup 45}Fe has been studied by means of a new type of a gaseous detector in which a technique of digital imaging was used to record tracks of charged particles. The {beta}{sup +} decay channels accompanied by proton emission were clearly identified. In addition to {beta}-delayed one-proton and {beta}-delayed two-proton decays, {beta}-delayed three-proton emission was recorded which represents the first direct and unambiguous observation of this decay channel. The branching ratio for the {beta} decay of {sup 45}Fe and the corresponding partial half-life are found to be 0.30{+-}0.04 and T{sub 1/2}({beta})=8.7{+-}1.3 ms, respectively.

Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfuetzner, M.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, M.; DaPbrowski, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Bingham, C. R.; Darby, I. G.; Liddick, S. N.; Rajabali, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Ginter, T.; Stolz, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Grzywacz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Rykaczewski, K. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical studies of chemically synthesized NaFePO{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NaFePO{sub 4} is a naturally occurring mineral known as maricite. This compound has not been well characterized or examined for its potential use in battery applications. In the present study, NaFePO{sub 4} has been synthesized via the Pechini process with the resulting sample being characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Electrochemical properties have been investigated for possible application as a cathode in sodium-ion batteries. Electrodes of these materials were tested in coin cells using LiPF{sub 6} as the electrolyte and lithium metal as the counter electrode. Constant current cycling, cyclic voltammetry, and in situ frequency response analyses were performed. The results obtained demonstrate constant capacity or progressive increase in capacity with the consistently low internal resistance exhibited over consecutive cycles indicating possible application as a lithium analog in Na-ion batteries.

Sun, Ann; Beck, Faith R.; Haynes, Daniel; Poston, James A. Jr.; Narayanana, S.R.; Kumta, Prashant N.; A. Manivannan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Crystal structure dependence of antiferromagnetic coupling in Fe/Si multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent reports of temperature dependent antiferromagnetic coupling in Fe/Si multilayers have motivated the generalization of models describing magnetic coupling in metal/metal multilayers to metal/insulator and metal/semiconductor layered systems. Interesting dependence of the magnetic properties on layer thickness and temperature are predicted. We report measurements that show the antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling observed in Fe/Si multilayers is strongly dependent on the crystalline coherence of the silicide interlayer. Electron diffraction images show the silicide interlayer has a CsCl structure. It is not clear at this time whether the interlayer is a poor metallic conductor or a semiconductor so the relevance of generalized coupling theories is unclear.

Michel, R.P.; Chaiken, A.; Wall, M.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Crystal structure and thermal expansion of (Mg,Fe)SiO sub 3 perovskite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution x-ray diffraction data were collected from 10 to 433K on a homogeneous polycrystalline specimen of Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}SiO{sub 3}-perovskite. Rietveld structural refinement and x-ray absorption fluorescence measurements demonstrate that Fe substitutes for Mg and not Si. The thermal expansion behavior is anisotropic, with the orthorhombic distortion becoming less with increasing temperature. The volumetric thermal expansion, which is dominated by the decrease in octahedral tilts, is 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} K{sup {minus}1} between 150 and 373K. No evidence of conversion to enstatite could be found up to 873 K.

Parise, J.B.; Wang, Y.; Yenganeh-Haeri, A. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA)); Cox, D.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Fei, Y. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Combustion of Bulk 84% Fe/16% KCIO{sub 4} heat powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe/KClO{sub 4} pyrotechnic mixtures are used in thermal batteries to provide the heat necessary to bring the battery stack to operating temperatures of 550 to 600 C. This heat source is normally used as discs pressed from bulk powder. To evaluate the consequences associated with unexpected ignition of large amounts of heat powder, combustion of 84% Fe/16% KClO{sub 4} heat powders was conducted for various scenarios under controlled conditions and the response documented. Increasing amounts of heat powder--up to 8 lbs--were ignited in both unconfined and confined (sealed) containers in a remote area. The containers were thermocoupled and the resulting burning filmed with a standard video camera, high-speed (1,000 frames/s) film and video cameras, and an infrared video camera. A 20- minute video of the burning under the various conditions is presented.

Nissen, M.; Guidotti, R.A.; Berry, B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Internal Oxidation-Nitridation of Ferritic Fe(Al) Alloys in Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure of undoped Fe(Al) and Fe(Al)+Cr ferritic alloys in laboratory air at 900-1,000 C resulted in significant internal attack after 5,000 h, including oxides and underlying nitrides. In the most severely attacked alloys, kinetics based on mass gain and maximum penetration depth were linear; also, the deepest penetrations were a significant fraction of the specimen thickness, and were thickness-dependent. Little internal attack was observed at 700-800 C where these compositions may be used as coatings. The extent of internal attack did not decrease with increasing Al or Cr content which may indicate that rather than classical internal oxidation this attack is related to the permeation of N through a defective external scale. No internal attack was observed in alloys doped with Y, Zr, Hf or Ti where the substrate-alumina scale interface was flatter.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Dwyer, Matthew J [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Deacon, Ryan M [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Comparison of observed and theoretical Fe L emission from CIE plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze data from the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that simulates a CIE plasma by sweeping the electron beam to approximate a Maxwellian velocity distribution. These results are compared to spectra of confirmed astronomical CIE plasmas (e.g. outer regions of x-ray clusters) observed by XMM/RGS. We utilize the Photon Clean Method (PCM) to quantify these spectra (EBIT and XMM/RGS) in the form of ratios of Fe L lines in the emission complex near 1 keV. The variances of line fluxes are measured with bootstrap methods (Efron 1979). Both of these observations are further compared with theoretical predictions of Fe L line fluxes from APED and similar atomic databases.

Carpenter, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Chen, H C; Gu, M F; Jernigan, J G

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

Growth and crystal structure of binary molybdate CsFe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CsFe(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} single crystals have been grown by solution-melt crystallization with a charge-to-solvent ratio of 1: 3 (with Cs{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 10} used as a solvent). The crystal structure of this compound has been refined by X-ray diffraction (X8 APEX automatic diffractometer, MoK{sub {alpha}} radiation, 356 F(hkl), R = 0.0178). The trigonal unit cell has the following parameters: a = b = 5.6051(2) A, c = 8.0118(4) A, V = 217.985(15) A{sup 3}, Z = 1, {rho}{sub calc} = 3.875 g/cm{sup 3}, and sp. gr. P3-barm1. The structure is composed of alternating layers of FeO{sub 6} octahedra (with MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra attached by sharing vertices) and CsO{sub 12} icosahedra.

Bazarov, B. G., E-mail: jbaz@binm.bscnet.ru; Namsaraeva, T. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikal Institute of Nature Management, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Klevtsova, R. F., E-mail: klev@che.nsk.su; Anshits, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Vereshchagina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Glinskaya, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Fedorov, K. N.; Bazarova, Zh. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikal Institute of Nature Management, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Heat flow of the Earth and resonant capture of solar 57-Fe axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a very conservative approach, supposing that total heat flow of the Earth is exclusively due to resonant capture inside the Earth of axions, emitted by 57-Fe nuclei on Sun, we obtain limit on mass of hadronic axion: m_aEarth, this estimation could be improved to the value: m_a<1.6 keV. Both the values are less restrictive than limits set in devoted experiments to search for 57-Fe axions (m_a<216-745 eV), but are much better than limits obtained in experiments with 83-Kr (m_a<5.5 keV) and 7-Li (m_a<13.9-32 keV).

F. A. Danevich; A. V. Ivanov; V. V. Kobychev; V. I. Tretyak

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Microscopic structure and magnetic behavior of arrays of electrodeposited Ni and Fe nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arrays of Ni and Fe nanowires with length up to 6 {mu}m were fabricated by voltage controlled electrodeposition within track etched polycarbonate membranes with nominal pore diameter 50 nm, using dc or pulsed voltage. Magnetostatic interactions between wires are found to be important in determining magnetic properties and switching processes. Ni arrays switch by quasicoherent rotation when the magnetic field is applied near to the average wire axis, and by curling at large angles. The importance of curling processes increases with wire length, due to the larger demagnetizing field. The properties of Fe wires are dominated by magnetostatic interactions; these arrays switch by curling and no definite easy axis is observed in pulse-plated, amorphous wires.

Xu, X.; Zangari, G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, 102 Engineer's Way, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 116 Engineer's Way, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Strain-modulated antiferromagnetic spin orientation and exchange coupling in Fe/CoO(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of CoO spin orientation on exchange coupling was investigated in single-crystalline Fe/CoO/MnO/MgO(001) systems. An antiferromagnetic CoO spin reorientation transition from the in-plane direction to the out-of-plane direction was found to be associated with the in-plane strain transition in CoO film from compression to expansion. The induced uniaxial anisotropies by exchange coupling at the Fe/CoO interface are significantly stronger for the in-plane CoO spin orientation than for the out-of-plane CoO spin orientation. Our study provides a way to modify the exchange coupling in the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer by modulating the strain in the AFM film.

Zhu, J.; Li, Q.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z., E-mail: wuyizheng@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hua, C. Y.; Huang, M. J.; Lin, H.-J. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center and Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China); Hu, Z. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Won, C. [Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ac26-07nt42677 rpsea fe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Soil and Mold Influences on Fe and Zn Concentrations of Sorghum Grain in Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ from soil and DTPA similarly complexes these labile forms. Several recent studies involving crops other than sorghum have shown that the concentration of Fe and Zn in the grain does not always consistently reflect DTPA- extractable Fe and Zn...) 22.6 (18.4) 6.60 (3.99) 2.16 (1.20) 15-30 5.96 (0.54) 0.13 (0.13) 0.69 (0.15) 533 (89.9) -- 5.43 (1.44) 0.95 (0.55) Tiguere Field 1 0-15 6.24 (0.58) -- 1.33 (0.08) 590 (54.6) 12.8 (5.7) 7.75 (4.28) 2.78 (1.77) 15-30 5.61 (0...

Verbree, Cheryl

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Characterization of ternary compounds in the BaO:Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}:TiO{sub 2} system: Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} and BaFe{sub 11}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 23}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystals of Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} and BaFe{sub 11}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 23} were obtained as major and minor coproducts, respectively, by slow-cooling an off-stoichiometric BaO:Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}:TiO{sub 2} melt. The former compound exhibits variable stoichiometry, Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 48{minus}x}Ti{sub 14+x}O{sub 106}, with the Fe:Ti ratio dependent upon the partial pressure of oxygen. The value of x corresponds to the equivalents of reduction that occur to maintain electroneutrality as the Ti-content increases. When prepared in air, this phase occurs at x = 3 with the stoichiometry Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106}, while in 100% oxygen the x-value approaches zero with the resulting stoichiometry Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 48}Ti{sub 14}O{sub 106} (all Fe{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+}). The structures of Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} and BaFe{sub 11}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 23} were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} was prepared in polycrystalline form, and further structural details, including accurate Fe/Ti occupancy factors, were determined by a combined refinement using neutron and synchrotron powder diffraction data. (Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106}: Space group C2/m (No 12); a = 19.390(1) {angstrom}, b = 20.260(1) {angstrom}, c = 10.076(1) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.27(1){degree}; V = 3818.5(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}; Z = 2; {rho}{sub calc} = 5.08 g/cm{sup 3}. Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 11}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 23}: Space group C2/c (No 15); a = 19.56(1) {angstrom}, b = 8.6614(7) {angstrom}, c = 10.120(1) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.62(1){degree}; V = 1651.1(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}; Z = 4; {rho}{sub calc} = 5.08 g/cm{sup 3}.) The magnetic behavior of Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} above room temperature up to 1073 K was found to obey the Curie-Weiss law, which indicated a small effective magnetic moment (34 {mu}{sub B} per mole Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106}) and a large negative temperature intercept ({minus}806 K). Electrical resistivity measurements between room temperature and 120 K revealed nonmetallic behavior with an activation energy on the order of 0.17 eV. At 347 MHz under ambient conditions, Ba{sub 6}Fe{sub 45}Ti{sub 17}O{sub 106} exhibited a relative permittivity of 24 and a dielectric loss tangent of 0.10.

Vanderah, T.A.; Wong-Ng, W.; Toby, B.H.; Shull, R.D.; Roth, R.S. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.; Browning, V.M. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Geyer, R.G. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Propagating spectroscopy of backward volume spin waves in a metallic FeNi film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a propagating spin wave spectroscopy for a magnetostatic backward volume spin wave in a metallic Fe{sub 19}Ni{sub 81} film. We show that the mutual-inductance between two independent antennas detects a small but clear propagation signal of backward volume spin waves. All experimental data are consistent with the time-domain propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The control of propagating backward spin wave enables to realize the miniaturize spin-wave circuit.

Sato, N.; Ishida, N.; Kawakami, T. [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Sekiguchi, K., E-mail: koji-s@phys.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, Gobancho 7, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of Ni?Fe?Cr alloy libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

Rar, A.; Frafjord, J.J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E.D.; Rack, P.D.; Santella, M.L.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Pharr, G.M. (Tennessee-K); (Tennessee-K); (ORNL)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effect of grain orientation on ductility in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of columnar grain geometry on mechanical property was studied in an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy. The compressive results show that the strength is independent of grain orientation. However, the plastic strain increased remarkably when the loading axis is parallel to the direction of grain columns, which is due to the enhanced grain boundary and dislocation activities. The significance of the current study is that a new strategy was developed to improve the ductility of nanocrystalline materials.

Li, Hongqi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liaw, Peter K [UNIV OF TENN; Choo, Hahn [UNIV OF TENN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Three dimensional simulation of the microstructure development in Ni-20%Fe nanocrystalline deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Monte-Carlo computer model was applied to simulate a development of the three dimensional microstructure during electrodeposition of nanocrystalline alloys. The driving force for this process was the minimization of free energy of the system. For a particular deposit of Ni-20%Fe, the influence of the overpotential and current density on the grain size was tested. A strong decrease in grain size with increasing overpotential and current density obtained from the simulation is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

Li, H.; Czerwinski, F.; Szpunar, J.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Al-Ca and Al-Fe metal-metal composite strength, conductivity, and microstructure relationships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deformation processed metal-metal composites (DMMC’s) are composites formed by mechanical working (i.e., rolling, swaging, or wire drawing) of two-phase, ductile metal mixtures. Since both the matrix and reinforcing phase are ductile metals, the composites can be heavily deformed to reduce the thickness and spacing of the two phases. Recent studies have shown that heavily drawn DMMCs can achieve anomalously high strength and outstanding combinations of strength and conductivity. In this study, Al-Fe wire composite with 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 volume fractions of Fe filaments and Al-Ca wire composite with 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 volume fractions of Ca filaments were produced in situ, and their mechanical properties were measured as a function of deformation true strain. The Al-Fe composites displayed limited deformation of the Fe phase even at high true strains, resulting in little strengthening effect in those composites. Al-9vol%Ca wire was deformed to a deformation true strain of 13.76. The resulting Ca second-phase filaments were deformed to thicknesses on the order of one micrometer. The ultimate tensile strength increased exponentially with increasing deformation true strain, reaching a value of 197 MPa at a true strain of 13.76. This value is 2.5 times higher than the value predicted by the rule of mixtures. A quantitative relationship between UTS and deformation true strain was determined. X-ray diffraction data on transformation of Al + Ca microstructures to Al + various Al-Ca intermetallic compounds were obtained at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Electrical conductivity was measured over a range of true strains and post-deformation heat treatment schedules.

Kim, Hyong June

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

ABUNDANCE OF {sup 26}Al AND {sup 60}Fe IN EVOLVING GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleosynthesis and ejection of radioactive {sup 26}Al (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.72 Myr) and {sup 60}Fe, (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 2.5 Myr) into the interstellar medium is dominated by the stellar winds of massive stars and supernova type II explosions. Studies of meteorites and their components indicate that the initial abundances of these short-lived radionuclides in the solar protoplanetary disk were higher than the background levels of the galaxy inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy and models of the galactic chemical evolution. This observation has been used to argue for a late-stage addition of stellar debris to the solar system's parental molecular cloud or, alternatively, the solar protoplanetary disk, thereby requiring a special scenario for the formation of our solar system. Here, we use supercomputers to model-from first principles-the production, transport, and admixing of freshly synthesized {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe in star-forming regions within giant molecular clouds. Under typical star formation conditions, the levels of {sup 26}Al in most star-forming regions are comparable to that deduced from meteorites, suggesting that the presence of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system is a generic feature of the chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds. The {sup 60}Fe/{sup 26}Al yield ratio of Almost-Equal-To 0.2 calculated from our simulations is consistent with the galactic value of 0.15 {+-} 0.06 inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy but is significantly higher than most current solar system measurements indicate. We suggest that estimates based on differentiated meteorites and some chondritic components may not be representative of the initial {sup 60}Fe abundance of the bulk solar system.

Vasileiadis, Aristodimos; Nordlund, Ake; Bizzarro, Martin [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Ostervoldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

EffectsofTransitionMetalSubstitutionsontheIncommensurabilityandSpinFluctuationsinBaFe2As2byElasticandInelasticNeutronScattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thespin uctuationspectrafromnonsuperconductingCu-substituted,andsuperconductingCo-substituted,BaFe2As2arecomparedquantitativelybyinelasticneutronscatteringmeasurementsandarefoundtobeindistinguishable.Whereasdiffractionstudiesshowtheappearanceofincommensu-ratespin-densitywaveorderinCoandNisubstitutedsamples,themagneticphasediagramforCusubstitutiondoesnotdisplayincommensurateorder,demonstratingthatsimpleelectroncountingbasedonrigid-bandconceptsisinvalid.Theseresults,supportedbytheoreticalcalculations,suggestthatsubstitu-tionalimpurityeffectsintheFeplaneplayasigni cantroleincontrollingmagnetismandtheappearanceofsuperconductivity,withCudistinguishedbyenhancedimpurityscatteringandsplit-bandbehavior.

Kim, M. G. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Lamsal, J. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Heitmann, T. W. [University of Missouri; Tucker, G. S. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Pratt, Daniel [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Khan, S. N. [Ames Laboratory; Lee, Y. B. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Alam, A. [Ames Laboratory; Thaler, A. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Ni, N [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Ran, S. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Budko, S L [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Marty, Karol J [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Canfield, Paul [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Harmon, B. N. [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, D. D. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Kreyssig, A. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Mcqueeney, R J [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Goldman, A. I. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nmr Study of Thiocarbonyl Derivatives of Fe and Mn were made with solutions of the tungsten and molybdenum species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nmr Study of Thiocarbonyl Derivatives of Fe and Mn were made with solutions of the tungsten.g.. the tungsten ion readily oxidizes in aqueous acid [A. Samotus and B. Kosowicz-Czajkowska, Rocz. Chem., 45, 1623

Bodner, George M.

472

Functional Characterization and Surface Mapping of Frataxin (FXN) Interactions with the Fe-S Cluster Assembly Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the protein. Kinetic and analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed a complex heterogeneous mixture of species some of which can activate the Fe-S assembly complex. A previously identified acetylation site was also tested using mutants that mimic...

Thorstad, Melissa

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

DsrR, a Novel IscA-like Protein Lacking Iron- and Fe-S-Binding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scaffolds. However, DsrR does not retain the Fe-S- or the iron-binding ability of these proteins, which is due to the lack of all three highly conserved cysteine residues of...

474

OFF-THE-RECORD COMMUNICATION FOR JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT, L.P., FE DKT. NO. 12-32-LNG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Posting of Off-the-Record CommunicationThe documents linked below were sent to the Department of Energy (DOE) in reference to the Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P., FE Dkt. No. 12-32-LNG proceeding....

475

Designing materials for energy storage with high power and energy density : LiFePO? cathode material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiFePO? has drawn a lot of attention as a cathode material in lithium rechargeable batteries because its structural and thermal stability, its inexpensive cost, and environmental friendliness meet the requirements of power ...

Kang, Byoungwoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Analysis of Reductive [2Fe-2S] Cluster Degradation in Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Succinate:Caldariellaquinone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Analysis of Reductive [2Fe-2S] Cluster Degradation, but moderately sensitive to reduction with excess dithionite. We used iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

Scott, Robert A.

477

Magnetic switching behaviors of orbital states with different magnetic quantum numbers in Au/Fe/MgO multilayer system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spin specific magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curve and an orbital specific magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curve are obtained for Fe/Au/Fe/MgO multilayers by magnetic Compton scattering and SQUID magnetometer measurements. The SSMH curve with each contribution of magnetic quantum number |m|?=?0, 1, and 2 states is obtained by decomposition analyses of magnetic Compton profiles. Residual magnetization is observed for the SSMH curve with magnetic quantum number |m|?=?0, 2 and the OSMH curve. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the present Fe/Au/Fe/MgO multilayer film, the SSMH curve with magnetic quantum number |m|?=?0, 2 and OSMH curve show switching behaviors of PMA.

Suzuki, Kosuke, E-mail: kosuzuki@gunma-u.ac.jp; Takubo, Shota; Kato, Tadashi; Yamazoe, Masatoshi; Hoshi, Kazushi; Sakurai, Hiroshi [Department of Electronics and Informatics, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Homma, Yoshiya [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2145-2 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

478

X-ray Microdiffraction from ?-Ti0.04Fe1.96O3 (0001) Epitaxial...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(0001) Epitaxial Film Grown Over ?-Cr2O3 Buffer Layer Boundary. X-ray Microdiffraction from ?-Ti0.04Fe1.96O3 (0001) Epitaxial Film Grown Over...

479

Paramagnetic Spin Correlations in CaFe2As2 Single Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of CaFe2As2(TN=172 K) have been examined by means of inelastic neutron scattering from 180 K ( 1.05TN) up to 300 K (1.8TN). Despite the first-order nature of the magnetic ordering, strong but short-ranged antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations are clearly observed. These correlations, which consist of quasielastic scattering centered at the wave vector QAFM of the low-temperature AFM structure, are observed up to the highest measured temperature of 300 K and at high energy transfer ( >60 meV). The L dependence of the scattering implies rather weak interlayer coupling in the tetragonal c direction corresponding to nearly two-dimensional fluctuations in the (ab) plane. The spin correlation lengths within the Fe layer are found to be anisotropic, consistent with underlying fluctuations of the AFM stripe structure. Similar to the cobalt-doped superconducting BaFe2As2 compounds, these experimental features can be adequately reproduced by a scattering model that describes short-ranged and anisotropic spin correlations with overdamped dynamics.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Pratt, Daniel [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Fernandes, Rafael [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Tian, Wei [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Zarestky, J. L. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Perring, T. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Broholm, C. [Johns Hopkins University; Ni, Ni [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Budko, S L [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Canfield, Paul [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Li, Haifeng [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Vaknin, D [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Kreyssig, A. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Goldman, A. I. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Mcqueeney, R J [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Structural phase transition in CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A structural transition with a reduction in symmetry of the high temperature cubic phase (sp. gr. Fd3m) to the tetragonal phase (sp. gr. I4{sub 1}/amd) and the appearance of a ferrimagnetic structure occur in CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} copper ferrite at T Almost-Equal-To 440 Degree-Sign C. It is established by an experiment on a high-resolution neutron diffractometer that the temperature at which long-range magnetic order occurs is higher than that of tetragonal phase formation. When cooling CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel from 500 Degree-Sign C, the equilibrium coexistence of both phases is observed in a fairly wide temperature range ({approx}40 Degree-Sign C). The composition studied is a completely inverse spinel in the cubic phase, and in the tetragonal phase the inversion parameter does not exceed few percent (x = 0.06 {+-} 0.04). At the same time, the phase formed upon cooling has a classical value of tetragonal distortion ({gamma} Almost-Equal-To 1.06). The character of temperature changes in the structural parameters during the transition from cubic to tetragonal phase indicates that this transition is based on the Jahn-Teller distortion of (Cu,Fe)O{sub 6} octahedra rather than the mutual migration of copper and iron atoms.

Balagurov, A. M., E-mail: bala@nf.jinr.ru; Bobrikov, I. A.; Maschenko, M. S.; Sangaa, D.; Simkin, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Microstructural refinement and enhanced transport properties in binary doped NdFeAsO superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of Nd{sub 1?x}Ca{sub x}FeAsO{sub 1?2x}F{sub 2x} superconductors using CaF{sub 2} as a binary dopant that provides both holes and electrons by simultaneous substitution of Ca{sup 2+} ions and F{sup ?} ions at Nd{sup 3+} and O{sup 2?} sites, respectively. The sample with x?=?0.2 exhibits a maximum critical temperature (T{sub C}) of 52.3?K and transport critical current density (J{sub C}) of 1240?A/cm{sup 2} at 12?K. An interesting feature observed for binary doped samples is the preferential alignment of (00l) planes and the refinement of microstructure both in terms of grain size and grain connectivity. NdFeAsO based superconductors are already known for their very high critical fields and field independent J