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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

All Green Residential Solar Energy to Heat Absorption Cooling / Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all-green residential solar to heat absorption cooling / heating system system is designed. It describes the components of the system and working principle, and analyze the prospects of the system and academic value. Finally, To Changsha, for example, ... Keywords: solar, ground-source heat pump, absorption, heat tube

Xu Feng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy Basics: Absorption Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption...

3

Absorption cooling in district heating network: Temperature difference examination in hot water circuit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Absorption cooling system driven by district heating network is relized as a smart strategy in Sweden. During summer time when the heating demand is… (more)

Yuwardi, Yuwardi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Use of an open-cycle absorption system for heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar cooling for commercial applications using open-cycle absorption refrigeration systems has been investigated and found to be feasible. If an open-cycle absorption system can be operated as a chemical heat pump for winter heating operation, the system would offer year-round operation that could make the system economically viable for many regions of the US. An analysis of heating operation for the open-cycle system is presented using a computer program that simulates heat and mass transfer processes for any environmental condition. The open-cycle absorption refrigeration system can be operated as a chemical heat pump. Simulations for winter heating operation were run for five US cities, with solar COP's in the range of .06 to .16. At these levels, the OCAR system can provide full heating and cooling operation for office buildings in many southern US cities.

Schlepp, D. R.; Collier, R. K.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy Basics: Absorption Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

6

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Basics Cooling Basics Absorption Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three basic principles: When a liquid is heated it boils (vaporizes) and when a gas is cooled it condenses Lowering the pressure above a liquid reduces its boiling point Heat flows from warmer to cooler surfaces.

8

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Evaluation and Analysis of an Integrated PEM Fuel Cell with Absorption Cooling and Water Heating System for Sustainable Building Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a parametric study of a PEM fuel cell integrated with a double effect absorption system is carried out in order to study the effect of different operating conditions on the efficiency of the PEM fuel cell, utilization factor of the over all system, COPs of the double effect cooling and heating system, and power and heat output of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that the efficiency of the cell decreases, ranging from 46.2% to 24.4% with increase in membrane thickness and current density, and at the same time the COP increases ranging from 0.65 to 1.52. The heat and power output of the fuel cell decreases from 10.54 kW to 5.12 kW, and 9.12 kW to 6.99 kW, respectively for the increase in membrane thickness. However, when the temperature of the cell is increased the heat and power output increases from 5.12 kW to 10.54 kW, and 6.9 kW to 7.02 kW, respectively. The COP is found to be decreasing ranging from 1.53 to 0.33 with the increase in temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. As for the utilization factor, it increases ranging from 17% to 87% with increase in the temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. This study reveals that an integrated PEM fuel cell with a double effect absorption cooling systems has a very high potential to be an economical and environmental solution as compared with conventional systems of high electricity and natural gas prices which emit lots of harmful gasses and are not that efficient.

Gadalla, M.; Ratlamwala, T.; Dincer, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices provide supporting information on: properties of a chemical system for solar fired, air-cooled absorption equipment, air-side performance of a one-inch tube, absorber plate-fin coil, listings of the programs used for simulation and data reduction, and evaluation of the Carrier 3-ton chiller in an integrated heating and cooling system. (LEW)

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Absorption Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 2:11pm Addthis Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps. There are also absorption (or gas-fired) coolers available that work on the same principle. Unlike some absorption heat pumps, however, these are not reversible and cannot serve as a heat source. Residential absorption heat pumps use an ammonia-water absorption cycle to provide heating and cooling. As in a standard heat pump, the refrigerant (in this case, ammonia) is condensed in one coil to release its heat; its

13

Absorption Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pump Basics Absorption Heat Pump Basics Absorption Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps. There are also absorption coolers available that work on the same principal, but are not reversible and cannot serve as a heat source. These are also called gas-fired coolers. How Absorption Heat Pumps Work Residential absorption heat pumps use an ammonia-water absorption cycle to provide heating and cooling. As in a standard heat pump, the refrigerant (in this case, ammonia) is condensed in one coil to release its heat; its

14

Absorption Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 2:11pm Addthis Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps. There are also absorption (or gas-fired) coolers available that work on the same principle. Unlike some absorption heat pumps, however, these are not reversible and cannot serve as a heat source. Residential absorption heat pumps use an ammonia-water absorption cycle to provide heating and cooling. As in a standard heat pump, the refrigerant (in this case, ammonia) is condensed in one coil to release its heat; its

15

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

16

Absorption Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial...

17

Absorption Chillers and Heat Pumps - Technology, Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applications. The last decade saw intensive research and development efforts of gas-fired absorption systems for both heating and cooling applications in the USA, Europe and Japan....

18

Survey of absorption cooling technology in solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive survey of the current state of the absorption cooling technology has been conducted. This survey discusses the basic and applied absorption cooling/heating technology, analyses the current state of the art including the discussion of limitations and possible solutions, identifies areas where promising developments are indicated, lists the current products and activities of the absorption industry, and presents the current RD and D efforts of the U.S. government. The main subjects covered in the survey are as follows: Principles of absorption cooling technology (NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O cycle and H/sub 2/O-LiBr Cycle), Adaptation of absorption cooling technology for solar cooling applications, Thermal performance of absorption cooling units, Comparison of NH/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O absorption with H/sub 2/O-LiBr absorption, Commercially available solar absorption units, General trends of the absorption cooling industry toward solar application, Absorption cooling system performance in actual installations, Limitations of absorption cooling technology, Solar-powered absorption heat pumps, and U.S. ERDA activities relating to solar absorption cooling. The treatment of the subjects is intended to be basic and comprehensive in order that the general readers may understand the current aspects of absorption technology in solar cooling applications. 36 references.

Auh, P C

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Overview on absorption cooling technology in solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are reviewed briefly: chiller performance, commercial availability, system performance, internal energy storage, water-cooling limitation, COP limitation, absorption heat pump, and DOE activities. (MHR)

Auh, P.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, G.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

22

Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC we have detected strong absorption over energies ~0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central ~1 arcmin of the galaxy, NGC 1399, the group, NGC 5044, and the cluster, A1795. These systems have amongst the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below ~0.4 keV the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=10^{5-6} K where ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT, and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from HI, and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass drop-out in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

David A. Buote

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Solar absorption cooling plant in Seville  

SciTech Connect

A solar/gas cooling plant at the Engineering School of Seville (Spain) was tested during the period 2008-2009. The system is composed of a double-effect LiBr + water absorption chiller of 174 kW nominal cooling capacity, powered by: (1) a pressurized hot water flow delivered by mean of a 352 m{sup 2} solar field of a linear concentrating Fresnel collector and (2) a direct-fired natural gas burner. The objective of the project is to indentify design improvements for future plants and to serve as a guideline. We focused our attention on the solar collector size and dirtiness, climatology, piping heat losses, operation control and coupling between solar collector and chiller. The daily average Fresnel collector efficiency was 0.35 with a maximum of 0.4. The absorption chiller operated with a daily average coefficient of performance of 1.1-1.25, where the solar energy represented the 75% of generator's total heat input, and the solar cooling ratio (quotient between useful cooling and insolation incident on the solar field) was 0.44. (author)

Bermejo, Pablo; Pino, Francisco Javier; Rosa, Felipe [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimiento s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

26

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a hardware oriented project to demonstrate the feasibility of the solar fired, air cooled, absorption cooling of residential and commercial buildings. Beginning with design accuracy property data on a new chemical system applicable to air cooled absorption equipment, a breadboard machine was constructed in order to gain experience with system dynamics, chemical stability and overall performance. Employing heat transfer data and operating characteristics obtained from the breadboard an attempt was made to design and build a first generation prototype. A problem with the first heat transfer additive used caused the absorber to operate unsatisfactorily. A second, more refined, prototype was designed, constructed and tested incorporating the previous experience and heat transfer data as well as a new heat transfer additive. Although this prototype did not quite meet design capacity (85%), it surpassed design COP (0.75 vs 0.72) and performed stably without the signs of chemical degradation present in the previous prototype. Two more identical machines are being operated during field test in actual solar systems. After the successful operation of the 10 kW machine, it was decided to design and construct a larger scaled-up prototype for use in commercial applications. An appropriate size seemed to be about 70 kW. After considerable design effort a satisfactory size and design was achieved and constructed. In general, the 70 kW machine behaved much like the 10 kW, again producing about 80% of capacity but with varying COP's (probably due to the transient nature of the testing).

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy Basics: Absorption Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat...

29

Candidate chemical systems for air cooled, solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part II. Solid absorbents, high latent heat refrigerants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work done in attempting to qualify absorption refrigeration systems based on refrigerants with intermediate latent heats of vaporization is summarized. In practice, these comprise methanol, ammonia, and methylamine. A wide variety of organic substances, salts, and mixtures were evaluated in as systematic a manner as possible. Several systems of interest are described. The system, LiClO/sub 3/--LiBr--H/sub 2/O, is a good back up system to our first choice of an antifreeze additive system, and thermodynamically promising but subject to some inconvenient materials limitations. The system, LiBr/ZnBr/sub 2/--methanol, is thermodynamically promising but requires additional kinetic qualification. Chemical stability of the system, LiCNS--ammonia/methylamine with various other third components, does not appear to be adequate for a long-lived system.

Biermann, W. J.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The evaluation of a solar-driven aqua-ammonia diffusion absorption heating and cooling cycle / M.C. Potgieter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several steps are followed in order to evaluate the cycle as the title suggests. The diffusion absorption refrigerator (DAR) cycle performance is evaluated when using… (more)

Potgieter, Marthinus Christiaan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING PLANT Dr.sc.ing. Agnese Lickrastina M.Sc. Normunds European Heat Pump Summit 2013, Nuremberg, 15-16.10.2013 · Riga District Heating company · Operation #12;JSC RGAS SILTUMS · the biggest District Heating company in Latvia and in the Baltic states

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

32

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very-important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements Incorporating Solar Assisted Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery and absorption cooling are selected in allself- generated and absorption cooling displaces a further

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

36

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

37

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coil (G) of the absorption chiller (or boiler of a Rankineor heat input to the absorption chiller of approximately

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Absorption-heat-pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Performance comparison of absorption and desiccant solar cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling systems are required to operate over a wide range of outdoor and load conditions; however, the performance of solar cooling components is often specified and compared at a typical design point such as ARI conditions. A method is presented to directly compare the performance of different desiccant and absorption cooling systems by using psychrometric analysis of air distribution cycles under a range of outdoor conditions that systems encounter over a year. Using analysis of cooling load distributions for a small commercial office building in Miami and Phoenix a seasonal COP is calculated for each system. The heat input can be provided by solar or by an auxiliary heat source, such as natural gas.

Warren, M.L.; Wahlig, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

Wiltsee, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bartholomew Heating and Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating and Cooling Heating and Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Name Bartholomew Heating and Cooling Place Linwood, NJ Website http://bartholomewheatingandco References Bartholomew Heating and Cooling[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Bartholomew Heating and Cooling is a company located in Linwood, NJ. References ↑ "Bartholomew Heating and Cooling" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bartholomew_Heating_and_Cooling&oldid=381585" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

42

SIMULATION OF A SOLAR ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the dynamic modeling of a solar absorption cooling plant that will be built for both research and demonstration purposes by the end of 2007. The synchronizing of cooling loads with solar radiation intensity is an important advantage when utilizing solar energy in air conditioning in buildings. The first part of this work deals with the dynamic modeling of an evacuated tube collector. A field of these collectors feed a single-effect absorption chiller of 35 kW nominal cooling capacity. The simulation model has been done in a modular way under TRNSYS16. In a second part, simulation and optimization of the system has been investigated in order to determine the effect of several parameters (collector area, tank volume...) on chiller performance.

J. P. Praene; D. Morau; F. Lucas; F. Garde; H. Boyer; J. P. Praene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alternatives for metal hydride storage bed heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of hydrogen isotopes with the storage bed hydride material is exothermic during absorption and endothermic during desorption. Therefore, storage bed operation requires a cooling system to remove heat during absorption, and a heating system to add the heat needed for desorption. Three storage bed designs and their associated methods of heating and cooling and accountability are presented within. The first design is the current RTF (Replacement Tritium Facility) nitrogen heating and cooling system. The second design uses natural convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. This design is referred to as the Naturally Cooled/Electrically Heated (NCEH) design. The third design uses forced convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. The design is referred to as the Forced Convection Cooled/Electrically Heated (FCCEH) design. In this report the operation, storage bed design, and equipment required for heating, cooling, and accountability of each design are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each design are listed and discussed. Based on the information presented within, it is recommended that the NCEH design be selected for further development.

Fisher, I.A.; Ramirez, F.B.; Koonce, J.E.; Ward, D.E.; Heung, L.K.; Weimer, M.; Berkebile, W.; French, S.T.

1991-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation, Absorption Cooling, Space Cooling,use heat to drive an absorption cooling cycle, and the heatlargest drivers for absorption cooling technology adoption

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Heating & Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Did you know that heating and cooling accounts for more than half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes? Energy Saver shares tips and advice on ways you can reduce your heating and cooling costs, putting more money in your wallet.

47

Save by absorption heat pumping  

SciTech Connect

The author compares absorption heat pumping (AHP) to mechanical vapor compressor (MVC) heat pumping. The moving part of the AHP is a pump easy to maintain and inexpensive to spare. The mechanical component of the MVC is a vapor compressor which requires more maintenance and is cost-prohibitive to spare. Also, in the MVC system, a purified product stream is heat pumped in an open compressor, thus risking product contamination. In the AHP system, the cold and hot utilities are heat pumped. Therefore, product integrity with an AHP system is well protected as in a conventional fractionation column.

Davidson, W.F.; Campagne, W.V.L.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

Coleman, John H. (Salem Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two-stage absorption chillers of the type used at Rice University Cogen Plant offer the most attractive utilization of recoverable thermal energy. With a coefficient of performance (COP) up to 1.25, the two-stage, parallel flow absorption chiller can offer over fifty (50) percent more useful thermal energy from the same waste heat source--gas turbine exhaust, I.C. engine exhaust and jacketwater, incinerator exhaust, or steam turbine extraction.

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Study of Heat and Mass Transfer In The Generator For an Absorption Air Conditioning System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is aimed to study the heat and mass transfer performance of a generator for the absorption cooling system. Both aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr)… (more)

Hsu, Yu-lien

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Overview-absorption/Rankine solar cooling program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tasks being performed in the absorption and Rankine program areas run the gamut from basic work on fluids to development of chillers and chiller components, to field and reliability testing of complete cooling systems. In the absorption program, there are six current and five essentially completed projects. In the Rankine program, there are five current projects directly supported by DOE, and three projects funded through and managed by NASA/MSFC (Manned Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama). The basic features of these projects are discussed. The systems under development in five of these current projects have been selected for field testing in the new SOLERAS program, a joint US-Saudi Arabian enterprise. Some technical highlights of the program are presented.

Wahlig, M.; Heitz, A.; Boyce, B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

DEVELOPMENT OF SOLAR DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors'and Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors'refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling

Dao, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development of solar driven absorption air conditioners and heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of absorption refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling applications. The approaches being investigated are those using air-cooled condenser-absorbers and those leading to coefficient of performances (COP) that increase continuously with heat source temperature. This is primarily an experimental project, with the emphasis on designing, fabricating and testing absorption chillers in operating regimes that are particularly suited for solar energy applications. The first phase of this project has been concluded and has experimentally demonstrated that the conventional single-effect ammonia-water absorption cycle can be used (with minor modifications) for solar cooling. The second phase of this project explores the commercial potential of the single-effect (SE) NH/sub 3//H/sub 2/O absorption air conditioner. (WHK)

Dao, K.; Wahlig, M.; Wali, E.; Rasson, J.; Molishever, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experimental Study of Hybrid Cooled Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test system for a hybrid cooled heat exchanger was designed, and the test facility was constructed based on ASHRAE Standard 41.2-1987. A conventional air-cooled… (more)

Tsao, Han-Chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling Satellite District Heating and Cooling Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Satellite District Heating and Cooling (DHC) systems offer an alternative structure to conventional, centralized DHC networks. Both use a piping network carrying steam or water… (more)

Rulff, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Basics: Space Heating and Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in common, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for saving energy. Learn how these technologies and systems work. Learn about: Cooling Systems Heating...

58

Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

None,

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

Pendergrass, J.C.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

62

Space Heating and Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Water Heating Basics Heating and Cooling System Support...

63

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating...

64

Microelectronic chip cooling: an experimental assessment of a liquid-passing heat sink, a microchannel heat rejection module, and a microchannel-based recirculating-liquid cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of heat transfer testing of heat absorption modules (HAM), heat rejection modules (HRM), and a recirculating-liquid cooling system are reported. Low-profile, Cu-based, microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) were fabricated and used as the HAM as ...

Bin Lu; W. J. Meng; Fanghua Mei

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use advisability of heat pumps for building heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the actual economic and energetic juncture, the reduction of thermal energy consumption in buildings became a major, necessary and opportune problem, general significance. The heat pumps are alternative heating installations more energy efficiency ... Keywords: "Geoterm" system, building heating/cooling, energy and economic analysis, heat pump performances, heat pumps, renewable energy sources

Ioan Sârbu; C?lin Sebarchievici

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Control system for solar heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A control system is being developed that will be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systems covering a wide range of configurations, and using different operating strategies that may be optimal for different climatic regions. To insure widespread applicability of the control system, it is being designed to allow for modification for operating with essentially all practical heating and cooling system configurations and control algorithms simply by interchange of replaceable modules in the circuitry. An experimental heating and cooling system, the main purpose of which is to allow testing and exercise of the controller, was designed so that it could be operated in these various configurations.

Wahlig, M.; Binnall, E.; Dols, C.; Graven, R.; Selph, F.; Shaw, R.; Simmons, M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalwith absorption chillers that use waste heat for cooling (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingwater heating and for absorption cooling) in a day SHPricedisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle applies

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Optimizing the Low Temperature Cooling Energy Supply: Experimental Performance of an Absorption Chiller, a Compression Refrigeration Machine and Direct Cooling - a Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A strategy to optimize the low temperature cooling energy supply of a newly build office building is discussed against the background of a changing energy system. It is focused on, what production way - Direct Cooling, the Compression Refrigeration Machine or the Absorption Chiller provided with heat from Combined Heat and Power Plants - has the lowest primary energy consumption at what load level. For low levels this is direct cooling. If demand exceeds the capacity of direct cooling, the absorption chiller is the option to choose. However, in future the compression refrigeration machine is more efficient at providing high load levels than the Absorption Chiller. The operation analysis shows that flow rates are often held constant and the re-cooling temperatures are often above the ambient temperature. By the integration of automatic flow rate control and lowering the re-cooling temperature of the chillers, electricity consumption of pumps can be reduced and energy efficiency enhanced.

Uhrhan, S.; Gerber, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fundamental heat transfer experiments of heat pipes for turbine cooling  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental heat transfer experiments were carried out for three kinds of heat pipes that may be applied to turbine cooling in future aero-engines. In the turbine cooling system with a heat pipe, heat transfer rate and start-up time of the heat pipe are the most important performance criteria to evaluate and compare with conventional cooling methods. Three heat pipes are considered, called heat pipe A, B, and C, respectively. All heat pipes have a stainless steel shell and nickel sintered powder metal wick. Sodium (Na) was the working fluid for heat pipes A and B; heat pipe C used eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK). Heat pipes B and C included noncondensible gas for rapid start-up. There were fins on the cooling section of heat pipes. In the experiments, an infrared image furnace supplied heat to the heat pipe simulating turbine blade surface conditions. In the results, heat pipe B demonstrated the highest heat flux of 17 to 20 W/cm{sup 2}. The start-up time was about 6 minutes for heat pipe B and about 6 minutes for heat pipe A. Thus, adding noncondensible gas effectively reduced start-up time. Although NaK is a liquid phase at room temperature, the start-up time of heat pipe C (about 7 to 8 minutes) was not shorter than the heat pipe B. The effect of a gravitational force on heat pipe performance was also estimated by inclining the heat pipe at an angle of 90 deg. There was no significant gravitational dependence on heat transport for heat pipes including noncondensible gas.

Yamawaki, S. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, T.; Taki, M.; Mimura, F. [National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo...

74

Development of hardware simulators for tests of solar cooling/heating subsystems and systems. Phase II. Unsteady state hardware simulation of residential absorption chiller  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main work involves the experimental study to determine transient and cycling performance characteristics of an advanced solar absorption chiller. Laboratory tests of the second generation Arkla chiller (Solaire 36, model WF36), using the BNL simulator, have been performed. Chiller performance has also been measured against fast and slow cycling periods under both the conventional and modified control modes. The degree of performance improvement under the modified control mode, as a function of the cycle period and such effects on the integrated chiller performance, have been thoroughly investigated.

Auh, P.C.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy Basics: Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Heating and Cooling Systems Thermostats and ducts provide opportunities for saving energy. Dehumidifying heat pipes provide a way to help central air conditioners and heat...

77

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Heat...

78

Electronic thermostat with selectable mode to control heating only, cooling only or both heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a thermostat for use in a building having means for cooling the building and means for heating the building, the thermostat being connected to the cooling means and the heating means and operative to generate an energizing signal for only one of the heating means or cooling means at a given time, the thermostat comprising: means for measuring the ambient temperature within the building; manual data entry means; means for storing a program of desired heating temperatures over a repetitive time cycle, programmed by the manual data entry means; a clock operative to generate time signals within the repetitive time cycle; means for generating a signal representative of a desired heating temperature and a desired cooling temperature at the present time based upon the signals from the clock in the stored temperature program; means for placing the thermostat in either a first mode where control signals are generated only for the heating means as a function of the difference between the measured temperature within the building and the desired heating temperature signal. Control signals are generated for either the heating means or the cooling means based upon the measured temperature and the respective desired heating and cooling temperature signals.

Levine, M.R.

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

Rotating Heat Transfer in High Aspect Ratio Rectangular Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reynolds Number (Nu Nu o ) (f f o ) 24% Increase in Cooling Performance Rotating Heat Transfer in High Aspect Ratio Rectangular Cooling Passages with Shaped Turbulators...

80

Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$100­$200 per home in hardware, and less than $0.10 per square foot in office buildings. It will also a 28% reduction per household in the energy required for heating and cooling, at the cost of only $25. This energy savings is a low hanging fruit: a large amount of energy can be saved at a very low cost

Whitehouse, Kamin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM FOR CALUTRON  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is invented for heating or cooling the electrostatic liner conventionally disposed in a calutron tank. The apparatus is additionally arranged to mount the liner in its intended position in a readily detachable manner so as to facilitate disassembly of the calutron.

Starr, A.M.

1960-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief descriptive overviews are presented of the design and operating characteristics of all commercial and Federal residential solar heating and cooling systems and of the structures themselves. Also included are available pictures of the buildings and simplified solar system diagrams. A list of non-Federal residential installations is provided.

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A collection of quarterly reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company covering the period July 12, 1976, through December 31, 1977, is presented. AiResearch Manufacturing Company is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25 and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Jones-Onslow EMC - Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jones-Onslow EMC - Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program Jones-Onslow EMC - Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program Jones-Onslow EMC - Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC (15 SEER or greater): $35 Central AC (16 SEER or greater): $50 Heat Pump (15 SEER or greater): $250 Geothermal Heat Pump (19 EER or greater): $350 Provider Jones-Onslow EMC Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation offers rebates to residential members who install energy efficient heating and cooling equipment. Members can replace an existing central AC or heat pump, which does not have a SEER rating greater than 13, with a central AC, heat pump, or geothermal heat

85

Principles of Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Principles of Heating and Cooling Principles of Heating and Cooling Principles of Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:04pm Addthis To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. To heat and cool your house efficiently, it is important to know how heat transfers to and from objects. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kryzanek. Understanding how heat is transferred from the outdoors into your home and from your home to your body is important for understanding the challenge of keeping your house cool. Understanding the processes that help keep your body cool is important in understanding cooling strategies for your home. Principles of Heat Transfer Heat is transferred to and from objects -- such as you and your home -- via

86

Liquid metal heat pipe behavior under transient cooling and heating  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of the transient behavior of a liquid metal heat pipe. A 0.457 m long, screen-wick, sodium heat pipe with 0.0127 m outer diameter was tested in sodium loop facility. The heat pipe reversed under a pulse heat load applied at the condenser. The time at which the heat pipe reversed was dependent of the heat pipe properties, the sodium loop flow rate and heating conditions at the condenser. The start-up and the operational shut-down by forced cooling of the condenser were also studied. During the start-up process, at least part of the heat pipe was active. The active region extended gradually down to the end of the condenser until all working fluid in the heat pipe was molten. With forced cooling at the condenser, the heat pipe approached its heat transport limit before section of the condenser became frozen. The measured heat transport limit was in agreement with the theoretical value. 5 refs.

Nguyen, H.X.; Hahn, T.O.; Hahn, O.J.; Chow, L.C.; Tagavi, K.A.; Morgan, M.J. (Kentucky, University, Lexington (United States) USAF, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar Energy to Drive Absorption Cooling Systems Suitable for Small Building Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air conditioning systems have a major impact on energy demand. With fossil fuels fast depleting, it is imperative to look for cooling systems that require less high-grade energy for their operation. In this context, absorption cooling systems have become increasingly popular in recent years from the viewpoints of energy and environment. Two types of the absorption chillers, the single effect and the half-effect systems, can operate using low temperature hot water. This paper presents the simulation results and an overview of the performance of low capacity single stage and half-effect absorption cooling systems, suitable for residential and small building applications. The primary heat source is solar energy supplied from flat plate collectors. The complete systems (solar collectors and absorption cooling system) were simulated using a developed software program. The energy and exergy analysis is carried out for each component of the two systems. When evaporator temperature is maintained constant at 5 C and the condenser temperature is fixed at 28 C, 32 C and 36 C respectively the percentage of the used energy covered by solar collectors and the percentage of auxiliary heating load were calculated versus time of day.

Gomri, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature than the reboiler temperature, there is unused availability (ability to perform work) in the heat supplied to the reboiler. Similarly, if the reflux condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence, conserve) up to 50% of the required distillation energy. In contrast to compressor driven heat pumps, this savings is accomplished without need for a separate substantial input of mechanical power. A different AHP configuration is used depending on whether the excess availability is in the source heat or reject heat. In the excessive source temperature case, the higher temperature source heat is applied to the AHP, which then supplies the total reboiler requirement and recycles half the reject heat, with the remainder being rejected conventionally. In the excessive reject temperature case, all the reject heat is supplied to a reverse absorption heat pump (HAHP) which recycles half to reboiler temperature while reducing the remainder to ambient temperature.

Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

90

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can befrom solar thermal Total heat load Heat for cooling Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

COOLING AND HEATING FUNCTIONS OF PHOTOIONIZED GAS  

SciTech Connect

Cooling and heating functions of cosmic gas are crucial ingredients for any study of gas dynamics and thermodynamics in the interstellar and intergalactic media. As such, they have been studied extensively in the past under the assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium. However, for a wide range of applications, the local radiation field introduces a non-negligible, often dominant, modification to the cooling and heating functions. In the most general case, these modifications cannot be described in simple terms and would require a detailed calculation with a large set of chemical species using a radiative transfer code (the well-known code Cloudy, for example). We show, however, that for a sufficiently general variation in the spectral shape and intensity of the incident radiation field, the cooling and heating functions can be approximated as depending only on several photoionization rates, which can be thought of as representative samples of the overall radiation field. This dependence is easy to tabulate and implement in cosmological or galactic-scale simulations, thus economically accounting for an important but rarely included factor in the evolution of cosmic gas. We also show a few examples where the radiation environment has a large effect, the most spectacular of which is a quasar that suppresses gas cooling in its host halo without any mechanical or non-radiative thermal feedback.

Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hollon, Nicholas, E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

93

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

Jardine, D.M.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Near-Instantaneous Microwave Heating and Cooling for Microfluidic ...  

home \\ technologies \\ microwave heating of microfluidics. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: Near-Instantaneous Microwave Heating and Cooling ...

96

Active solar heating-and-cooling system-development projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) projects with industry and academic institutions directed toward the development of cost effective, reliable, and publically acceptable active solar heating and cooling systems are presented. A major emphasis of the program is to insure that the information derived from these projects is made available to all members of the solar community who will benefit from such knowledge. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief summary of each of the 214 projects that were active during Fiscal Year 1980, and to provide sufficient information to allow the reader to acquire further details on specific projects. For clarity and convenience, projects are organized by either the program element or technology group as follows: (1) Program elements - Rankine Solar Cooling Systems; Absorption Solar Cooling Systems; Desiccant Solar Cooling Systems; Solar Space Heating Systems; Solar Hot Water Systems; Special Projects; and (2) Technology Groups - Solar Collector Technology; Solar Storage Technology; Solar Controls Technology; Solar Analysis Technology; and Solar Materials Technology. For further convenience, this book contains three indices of contracts, with listings by (1) organization, (2) contract number and (3) state where the project is performed. A brief glossary of terms used is also included at the end of the book.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Energy Basics: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

98

Municipal District Heating and Cooling Co-generation System Feasibility Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In summer absorption refrigerating machines provide cold water using excess heat from municipal thermoelectric power plant through district heating pipelines, which reduces peak electric load from electricity networks in summer. The paper simulates annual dynamic load of a real project to calculate the first investments, annual operation cost and LCC (life cycle cost) of the four schemes, which are electric chillers, electric chillers with ice-storage system, absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant and absorption refrigerating machines using excess heat from power plant along with ice-storage system. On the basis of the results, the paper analyzes the prospect of the absorption refrigeration using municipal excess heat, as well as the reasonable heat price, which provides a theoretical basis for municipal heating and cooling co-generation development.

Zhang, W.; Guan, W.; Pan, Y.; Ding, G.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, Y.; Wei, H.; He, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS Gary C . V l i e t , Michael B . Lawson, and Rudolf0 A . Lithgow Center f o r Energy Studies The University of Texas a t Austin December 1980 Final Report f o r Contract: DE AC03-79SF10540 (Mu1 tiple-Effect Absorption Cycle Solar Cooling) with the U.S. Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An analysis of electrothermodynamic heating and cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current advances in semiconductor manufacturing have brought about an increasing use of thermoelectricity in a variety of applications. Most of these applications, however, have involved the steady state application of this phenomenon. As a result, few have considered the transient aspect of this field (Gray 1960). In recent years there has been an increasing demand to heat and cool objects very quickly. One particular proposal to use the transient nature of thermoelectricity was made by Lagoudas and Kinra (I 993) in regard to shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. In general, SMA actuators have been largely limited by the rate that heat may be extracted from the SMA. In their investigation, they proposed the concept of using the SMA directly as the cold junction of a thermocouple. By way of the Peltier effect, then, heat could be added or removed at the interfaces at a rate proportional to the current density and local temperature; by increasing the current, the rate of cooling would be increased, albeit at the expense of the Joule heating within the conductor. This investigation explores the dynamic nature of thermoelectrically cooled/heated regions in effort to gain a greater understanding of the transient application of thermoelectricity, including the role of the surrounding material properties. To this end, we consider a pair of semi-infinite rods of equal cross-sectional area in perfect thermoelectric contact. At time t = 0, a DC current begins to flow in the axial direction. The electrothermodynamic response of the composite rod at the interface is calculated. The transient interface temperature is completely described by a single dimensionless parameter called the MOET number (Modulus Of ElectroThermodynamics). Perhaps the most interesting result is that the minimum temperature at the interface is independent of the current density. Of course, the time required to reach this minimum temperature does depend on the current density; it varies as 1/J2.

Honea, Mark Stephen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

103

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

104

Assessment of solar heating and cooling techology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to assess in detail the state of the technology for solar heating and cooling of buildings, five 2-day meetings were held. The meeting subjects were solar collectors, thermal storage, air conditioning and heat pumps, systems and controls, and non-engineering aspects of solar energy. This is a condensation of these meetings, presenting for each topic discussed the details of the state of the art, the problem areas, and the objectives of necessary research and development. The existing state of technology for solar heating and cooling presents a mixed picture. Liquid-heating flat-plate solar collectors, for example, are in a rather mature stage, and there is a small, viable industry producing components. Even here, however, there are problems of materials which, if solved, can reduce collector cost, improve performance, or increase lifetime. In other areas such as, for example, desiccant chillers, passive concepts, and many of the systems categories, the technology is at an early stage of evolution, and much research and development remain to be done.

Balcomb, J.D.; Perry, J.E. Jr.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

500°F Absorption Heat Pump Under Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic industrial heat pumping to temperatures above 500°F (260°C) is promised in the near future. A new absorption fluid is the key. Tested under DOE sponsorship, the new fluid has proven to be thermally stable and noncorrosive to austenitic stainless steel up to 500°F, or mild steel up to 430°F. Heat transfer properties are comparable to those of the conventional LiBr-H20 system. Paired with water as the working fluid, laboratory tests have shown that useful temperature lifts of over 162°F (90°C) ?T can be achieved allowing 10°F heat exchangers. The fluid is nontoxic and noncombustible. Good economics for the system should stem from (1) high temperature capabilities for wider and more highly valued uses, (2) high internal temperature lifts for low heat exchanger surface areas, (3) predominantly carbon steel components, and (4) better COP in the heat amplifier mode than current absorption heat pumps. Recent laboratory results are presented including temperature applicability maps.

Davidson, W. F.; Erickson, D. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Property:Distributed Generation System Heating-Cooling Application | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating-Cooling Application Heating-Cooling Application Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Distributed Generation System Heating-Cooling Application" Showing 21 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Domestic Hot Water +, Space Heat and/or Cooling + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Domestic Hot Water + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Domestic Hot Water + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Space Heat and/or Cooling +, Other + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Space Heat and/or Cooling +, Domestic Hot Water + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Domestic Hot Water +, Process Heat and/or Cooling +

107

National solar heating and cooling programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of status reports on the national solar heating and cooling programs of seventeen countries participating in the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society's Solar Energy Pilot Study. These reports were presented in two special sessions of the 25th Congress of the International Solar Energy Society held in May 1979, in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. This information exchange activity was part of the two-year follow up (1978-1980) of the Solar Energy Pilot Study, which ended in October 1978.

Blum, S; Allen, J [eds.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Restaurateur designs and installs passive solar heating/cooling system  

SciTech Connect

An example of the use of passive solar heating and cooling systems by a Wisconsin restaurateur is discussed. The greenhouse effect is used on three sides of the restaurant's exterior walls. A dozen water-to-air electric heat pumps handle the restaurant's heating and cooling chores. The system doesn't require any fossil fuel for heating or cooling.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andby heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalheat activated absorption cooling (using waste or solar

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cooling by Heat Conduction Inside Magnetic Flux Loops and the Moderate Cluster Cooling Flow Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas via heat conduction along magnetic field lines inside magnetic flux loops in cooling flow clusters of galaxies. I find that such heat conduction can reduce the fraction of energy radiated in the X-ray band by a factor of 1.5-2. This non-radiative cooling joins two other proposed non-radiative cooling processes, which can be more efficient. These are mixing of cold and hot gas, and heat conduction initiated by magnetic fields reconnection between hot and cold gas. These processes when incorporated into the moderate cooling flow model lead to a general cooling flow model with the following ingredients. (1) Cooling flow does occur, but with a mass cooling rate about 10 times lower than in old versions of the cooling flow model. Namely, heating occurs such that the effective age of the cooling flow is much below the cluster age, but the heating can't prevent cooling altogether. (2) The cooling flow region is in a non-steady state evolution. (3) Non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas can bring the model to a much better agreement with observations. (4) The general behavior of the cooling flow gas, and in particular the role played by magnetic fields, make the intracluster medium in cooling flow clusters similar in some aspects to the active solar corona.

Noam Soker

2003-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating and Cooling Systems < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Program Info State Maryland Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Eligible property is assessed at no more than the value of a conventional system Provider Department of Assessments and Taxation Title 8 of Maryland's property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not more than the value of a conventional system for property tax purposes if no conventional system

114

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Heating and Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9. Heating and 9. Heating and Cooling Revised January 2008 9.1 Overview 2 9.2 Central Cooling Systems 3 Chiller Plant Operations and Maintenance 4 Chiller Plant Retrofits 6 9.3 Central Heating Systems 10 Boiler System Operations and Maintenance 11 Boiler System Retrofits 11 Improving Furnace Efficiency 13 9.4 Unitary Systems 14 Packaged Rooftop Units 16 Split-System Packaged Units 18 Air-Source Heat Pumps 18 Ground-Source, Closed-Loop Heat Pumps 19 9.5 Additional Strategies 20 Air-Side Economizer 20 Energy Recovery 20 Desiccant Dehumidification 20 Night Precooling 21 Cool Storage 22 Evaporative Cooling 22 9.6 Summary 22 Bibliography 23 Glossary G-1 1 ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual 9. Heating and Cooling 9.1 Overview Although heating and cooling systems provide a useful service by keeping occupants comfort-

115

Solar heating and cooling diode module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency solar heating system comprising a plurality of hollow modular units each for receiving a thermal storage mass, the units being arranged in stacked relation in the exterior frame of a building, each of the units including a port for filling the unit with the mass, a collector region and a storage region, each region having inner and outer walls, the outer wall of the collector region being oriented for exposure to sunlight for heating the thermal storage mass; the storage region having an opening therein and the collector region having a corresponding opening, the openings being joined for communicating the thermal storage mass between the storage and collector regions by thermosiphoning; the collector region being disposed substantially below and in parallel relation to the storage region in the modular unit; and the inner wall of the collector region of each successive modular unit in the stacked relation extending over the outer wall of the storage region of the next lower modular unit in the stacked relation for reducing heat loss from the system. Various modifications and alternatives are disclosed for both heating and cooling applications.

Maloney, Timothy J. (Winchester, VA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cool Roofs Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Resource assessment Website: eetd.lbl.gov/r-bldgsee-crhi.html References: [1] Logo: Cool Roofs "On warm summer days, a city can be 6 to 8°F warmer than its surrounding areas. This effect is called the urban heat island. Cool roof materials, pavements, and vegetation can reduce the heat island effect, save energy and reduce smog formation. The goal of this research is to develop cool materials to save energy and money." [1] The Cool Roof Calculator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a useful tool for exploring the benefits of cool materials.

117

Energy Basics: Air-Source Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

118

Heating and cooling of a two-dimensional electron gas by terahertz radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absorption of terahertz radiation by free charge carriers in n-type semiconductor quantum wells accompanied by the interaction of electrons with acoustic and optical phonons is studied. It is shown that intrasubband optical transitions can cause both heating and cooling of the electron gas. The cooling of charge carriers occurs in a certain temperature and radiation frequency region where light is most efficiently absorbed due to intrasubband transitions with emission of optical phonons. In GaAs quantum wells, the optical cooling of electrons occurs most efficiently at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while cooling is possible even at room temperature in GaN heterostructures.

Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A., E-mail: tarasenko@coherent.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read Energy Saver's article on solar heating systems to see whether see whether active solar heating is a good option for you. Most people are familiar with solar photovoltaic panels, but far fewer know about using solar as a source of heat in their homes. Active solar heating uses solar energy to heat fluid or air, which then transfers the solar heat

120

Compact Absorption Chiller - Energy Innovation Portal  

The Compact Absorption Chiller uses microchannel technologies in an absorption heat pump which produces cooling using heat as the primary energy source.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Solar heating and cooling. Research and development: project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conservation and Solar Applications Solar Heating and Cooling Research and Development Program is described. The evolution of the R and D program is described and the present program is outlined. A series of project descriptions summarizes the research and development presently supported for further development of collectors, thermal energy storage and heat exchangers, heat pumps, solar cooling, controls, and systems. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the fifth program quarter, 1 July 1977 to 30 September 1977.

Not Available

1977-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress of the program for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test is described for the period, 1 January 1978 through 31 March 1978. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences, and commercial applications.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

125

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

126

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

127

Performance Modeling of a Solar Driven Absorption Cooling System for Carnegie Mellon University's Intelligent Workplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace (IW) is a 650 m2 (7,000 ft2) living laboratory of office space at Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA). The IW is involved in a project to develop, install, and test an effective solar thermal system for space heating and cooling. The proposed energy supply system configuration includes integrated compound parabolic concentrator (ICPC), a hot storage tank, a gas fired auxiliary heater, a steam generator, a steam driven absorption chiller and fan coils. A TRNSYS predictive model has been programmed and used to evaluate the performance of the system throughout a summer season. The effects on performance and on costs have been explored for various design variables and operating conditions. The performance calculations indicate that: - the 16.17 kW (55.2 kBtu/hr, 4.5 tons) absorption chiller is adequate to meet the IW south cooling requirements - 30-40m2 collectors can supply from 55 to 65% of the heat required to drive the chiller - estimated heat losses from the system can reach about 20-30% of the total heat collected.

Masson, S. V.; Qu, M.; Archer, D. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity not supplied to the grid is analyzed in detail. Further, the new concept of CCHP system with cooling and heating network interconnecting is developed. Then, the Olympic Park energy system is presented to illustrate the advantage and improvement both in economy performance and energy efficiency.

Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Numerical investigations on the pressure wave absorption and the gas cooling interacting in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Numerical investigations on the pressure wave absorption and the gas cooling interacting understanding of the physical phenomena involved, as for example the cooling and the shock wave absorption volume method, variable porosity, arc cooling I. INTRODUCTION Medium voltage cells have to be designed

Sart, Remi

130

Lyman-alpha wing absorption in cool white dwarf stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kowalski & Saumon (2006) identified the missing absorption mechanism in the observed spectra of cool white dwarf stars as the Ly-alpha red wing formed by the collisions between atomic and molecular hydrogen and successfully explained entire spectra of many cool DA-type white dwarfs. Owing to the important astrophysical implications of this issue, we present here an independent assessment of the process. For this purpose, we compute free-free quasi-molecular absorption in Lyman-alpha due to collisions with H and H2 within the one-perturber, quasi-static approximation. Line cross-sections are obtained using theoretical molecular potentials to describe the interaction between the radiating atom and the perturber. The variation of the electric-dipole transition moment with the interparticle distance is also considered. Six and two allowed electric dipole transitions due to H-H and H-H2 collisions, respectively, are taken into account. The new theoretical Lyman-alpha line profiles are then incorporated in our ...

Rohrmann, R D; Kepler, S O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Space Heating & Cooling Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating & Cooling Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Space Heating & Cooling Research The Emerging Technology team conducts research in space heating and cooling technologies, with a goal of realizing aggregate energy savings of 20% relative to a 2010 baseline. In addition to work involving the development of products, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with industry partners and researchers, develops best practices, tests, and guides designed to reduce market barriers and increase public awareness of these energy saving technologies. Research is currently focusing on: Geothermal Heat Pumps Photo of a home with a geothermal heat pump, showing how it can regulate the temperature of a home using the temperature underground to cool warm air or heat cold air.

132

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling Upgrades The Building Upgrade...

134

CONTROLS FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING  

SciTech Connect

An experimental test facility for solar heating and cooling has been constructed to evaluate the operation and performance of an LBLdeveloped solar controller that has promising commercial potential. The LBL controller was designed to be intermediate in performance between a simple differential thermostat and an on-line microprocessor. The PROM~based controller operates the solar system according to a preprogrammed algorithm that translates operating state conditions (fluid temperatures, switch positions, comparator outputs) into a set of operating instructions (open or close valves, turn pumps on or off). The operating algorithm can be changed by reprogramming or exchanging the plug-in integrated circuit component, or by changing the sensors selected for comparison. The experimental solar heating system can be operated using different control algorithms, input meteorological conditions, and output load demands. In FY 1979 the test facility became operational and initial testing began. Emphasis has been on refinement of system instrumentation and the development of necessary computer software to run the facility and perform data analysis. Preliminary energy balance experiments with the load and collector loops under microcomputer control were successfully completed in November 1979. Experiment modifications have been completed to permit variable-flow and proportional-flow control of the collector loop. A series of experimental comparisons of proportional and on/off collector loop strategies are planned using typical meteorological year data. The evaluation of configurations for combined domestic hot water and heating systems has begun to determine necessary experiment modifications to test one and two tank domestic hot water systems in combination with hydronic space heating systems. Other work has included the application of theoretical models to describe dynamic collector operation and building temperature response. Theoretical analysis of the energy collection performance of on/off and proportional flow control collector loop strategies has been completed. Papers have been presented at the Second System Simulation and Economics Conference held in January 1980 in San Diego. Technical program support activities, in cooperation with SERI and SAN, are continuing.

Warren, Mashuri L.; Schiller, Steven R.; Wahlig, Michael

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House III at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller provided by Arkla Industries is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 300-l (80-gal) hot water tank. For solar heat supply to the cooling system, plastic thin film collectors developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory were installed on the roof of Solar House III. Failure to withstand stagnation temperatures forced replacement of solar energy with an electric heat source. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several US climates by use of the model.

Lof, G.O.G.; Westhoff, M.A.; Karaki, S.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Solar heating and cooling results for the Los Alamos study center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy system for the Study Center consists of an 8000 ft/sup 2/ array of selectively coated, single-glazed collectors, a 5000 gallon pressurized tank for hot storage in the cooling mode, and a 10,000 gallon tank, which is used for hot storage in the heating mode and cold storage in the cooling mode. Either of two chillers may be used in series with the cold storage tank, an 85 ton absorption unit, or a 77 ton Rankine cycle unit. Night evaporative cooling is also used to cool the 10,000 gallon tank. A heat recovery unit is used to preheat fresh air in the winter, and, by means of spraying the exhaust air, to pre-cool fresh air in the summer. Daily, monthly, and seasonal energy summaries are presented for the system. Performance data for the two chillers include tabulation of thermal and system coefficients of performance.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Murray, H.S.; Balcomb, J.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Simulation study for an absorption solar cooling system operated under Taiwan climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, solar energy is utilized as the driving energy for an absorption cooling system, and a TRNSYS computer code is employed to simulate… (more)

Chiu, Yi-ying

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Open-cycle absorption cooling using packed-bed absorbent reconcentration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of a lithium chloride open-cycle absorption air conditioner using solar-heated air for reconcentration of the absorbent solution is examined. In contrast to a successfully operating Soviet design (in which absorbent reconcentration is accomplished by trickling the solution across a sloping black roof exposed to the sun), this study involves a packed-bed concentrator. Solar-heated air reconcentrates the solution by vaporizing water (the refrigerant) from the solution in the packed bed, enabling the system to be incorporated into a conventional solar air heating system and avoiding numerous problems associated with the roof concentrator. A thermodynamic analysis provides the criteria for the design of the packed bed. Heat and mass transfer processes occurring simultaneously in the bed are modeled using an iterative technique with the aid of a digital computer. The size of the packed-bed required to reconcentrate the absorbent solution at a rate corresponding to 10,550 W of cooling is determined, using flow rates, temperatures, and humidities typical of residential solar air-heating systems. Based on these results, the system air conditioning capability with solar energy input is predicted over the course of a clear summer day for Fort Collins, Colorado, and St. Louis, Missouri. Sufficient cooling capacity to meet a 10,550 W peak load using a 70 m/sup 2/ flatplate collector array is predicted by the model for both locations.

Leboeuf, C. M.; Loef, G. O.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling  

SciTech Connect

The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Zacarias, A. [ESIME UPA, IPN, Av. de las Granjas 682, Col. Santa Catarina, 02550, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting August 14, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy bills for American families and businesses and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the Energy Department today announced 12 projects to develop innovative heating, cooling and insulation technologies as well as open source energy efficiency software to help homes and commercial buildings save energy and money. These projects will receive an approximately $11 million Energy Department investment, matched by about $1 million in private sector funding. "Energy efficient technologies - from improved heating and cooling

142

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the solar-heated hot water. This heater can be seen inwater (solar heated, boosted, or heated entirely in the auxiliary heater)

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Basics: Ductless, Mini-Split Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating...

144

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multiple-Family Residences (MFR), and commerical applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977. Sigma Research is developing and delivering three heat exchangers for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submersed electric water heating element.

Not Available

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of heat Heat exchangers between the collectors andlocated access hole. The heat exchanger for the domestic hotmains is preheated by a heat exchanger immersed in the main

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can bethe cooling offset by utilization of solar thermal heat,

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Numerical simulation of microwave absorption of regenerative heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regenerative heat exchanger has a good absorption when the mullite refractory .... Point Alloys and Refractory Compounds with Its Own Chemical Energy.

150

Energy Saving Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater - Energy ...  

ORNL’s new absorption heat pump and water heater technology offers substantial energy savings and can reduce the use of fossil fuels by buildings. While ...

151

Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Jacobsen, A.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program calls for the development and delivery of eight (was 12) prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two (was 6) heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences (SFR), multiple-family residences (MFR) and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the eighth program quarter, 1 April 1978 to 30 June 1978.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Maryvale Terrace: geothermal residential district space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating and cooling system is analyzed for the Maryvale Terrace residential subdevelopment in Phoenix, Arizona, consisting of 557 residential houses. The design heating load was estimated to be 16.77 million Btu/h and the design cooling load was estimated to be 14.65 million Btu/h. Average annual energy use for the development was estimated to be 5870 million Btu/y and 14,650 million Btu/y for heating and cooling, respectively. Competing fuels are natural gas for heating and electricity for cooling. A geothermal resource is assumed to exist beneath the site at a depth of 6000 feet. Five production wells producing 1000 gpm each of 220/sup 0/F geothermal fluid are required. Total estimated cost for installing the system is $5,079,300. First year system operations cost (including debt service) is $974,361. The average annual geothermal heating and cooling cost per home is estimated to be $1750 as compared to a conventional system annual cost of $1145. Further, the cost of geothermal heating and cooling is estimated to be $47.50 per million Btu when debt service is included and $6.14 per million Btu when only operating costs are included. Operating (or fuel) costs for conventional heating and cooling are estimated to be $15.55 per million Btu.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Heat Generated Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Generated Cooling Heat Generated Cooling A counterintuitive but promising path to reducing the loads imposed by automotive air conditioning systems is to use heat-specifically the waste heat generated by engines. This can be an abundant source of energy, since most light-duty vehicles with combustion engines are only about 30% efficient at best. With that degree of thermal efficiency, an engine releases 70% of its fuel energy as waste heat through the coolant, exhaust gases, and engine compartment warm-up. During much of a typical drive cycle, the engine efficiency is even lower than 30%. As efficiency decreases, the amount of waste heat increases, representing a larger potential energy source. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction (VALR) team is investigating a number of heat generated cooling technologies

155

Heat pipe cooling of metallurgical furnace equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current water-cooling technology used in the metallurgical industry poses a major safety concern. In addition, these systems are expensive to operate and result in significant… (more)

Navarra, Pietro, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. Th...

Wise, M W; Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DRAFT INTERIM REPORT: NATIONAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR PASSIVE AND HYBRID SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Involvement in Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Section C:performance of passive solar heating and cooling systems.the design of passive solar heating and cooling systems, J

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Choice in Home Heating and Cooling D.J. Wood, H. Ruderman,IN HOME HEATING AND COOLING* David J. Wood, Henry RudermanIN HOME HEATING AND COOLING David J. Wood, Henry Ruderman,

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

District heating and cooling market assessment  

SciTech Connect

For more than 10 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported research on and development of district steam, hot-water, and chilled-water systems in the residential and commercial sectors. In 1991, DOE sponsored a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to reestimate the national market for district heating and cooling (DHC) systems to the year 2010. ANL had previously developed a DHC market-penetration model and used it to project future market penetration. The first step in the project was to conduct a literature search to identify major data sources on historical DHC markets and any past studies on the future market potential of DHC systems. On the basis of an evaluation of the available data and methodologies for estimating market penetration of new technologies, it was concluded that ANL should develop a new econometric model for forecasting DHC markets. By using the 1989 DOE/Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) public-use-tape data, a model was estimated for steam, hot-water, and chilled-water demand in the buildings surveyed. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot-water, and chilled-water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. The analysis shows that the total U.S. market for district steam, hot water, and chilled water could grow from 0.8 quadrillion British thermal units (quad) in 1989 to 1.0 quad by 2000 and 1.25 quad by 2010. The demand for chilled water could nearly double in the forecast period, and its share could approach one-third of the total DHC market. This model, and the results, should be of use to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved in the planning and implementation of community-based, energy-conserving, and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

162

Heat and mass transfer in a falling film absorber of ammonia-water absorption systems  

SciTech Connect

For ammonia-water generator-absorber heat exchanger (GAX) systems to work at high coefficient of performance, the heat and mass transfer components have to operate at optimum performance within a narrow range of conditions for the recovery of internal energy. In the present work, an analysis is performed to study the absorption process of an ammonia-water vapor mixture by an aqueous solution of ammonia in a falling film absorber. The combined heat and mass transfer processes involved are analyzed through an integral formulation of the continuity, momentum, energy, and diffusion equations. The effects of vapor flow direction relative to the solution, cooling ability, ammonia concentration of solution and vapor, and interfacial momentum and heat transfer rate on absorption processes are investigated. The characteristics of the absorption process are found to be governed by the relative significance of the mass transfer resistance and the driving forces between the solution film and the vapor mixture.

Kim, B. [Hongik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Absorption Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most...

164

Modelling Alkali Line Absorption and Molecular Bands in Cool DAZs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two peculiar stars showing an apparent extremely broadened and strong NaI D absorption have been discovered in surveys for cool white dwarfs by Oppenheimer et al. (2001) and Harris et al. (SDSS, 2003). We discuss the nature of these objects using PHOENIX atmosphere models for metal-poor brown dwarfs/very low mass stars, and new white dwarf LTE and NLTE models for hydrogen- and helium-dominated atmospheres with metals. These include complete molecular formation in chemical equilibrium and a model for the alkali resonance line broadening based on the damping profiles of Allard et al. (2003), as well as new molecular line opacities for metal hydrides. First results of our calculations indicate good agreement with a hydrogen-dominated WD atmosphere with a Na abundance roughly consistent with a state of high accretion. We analyse deviations of the abundances of Na, K, Mg and Ca from the cosmic pattern and comment on implications of these results for standard accretion scenarios.

Derek Homeier; Nicole F. Allard; France Allard; Peter H. Hauschildt; Andreas Schweitzer; Phillip C. Stancil; Philippe F. Weck

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis Thermostats and ducts provide opportunities for saving energy. Dehumidifying heat pipes provide a way to help central air conditioners and heat pumps dehumidify air. Electric and gas meters allow users to track energy use. Thermostats Programmable thermostats can store and repeat multiple daily settings. Users can adjust the times heating or air-conditioning is activated according to a pre-set schedule. Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about thermostats and control systems in homes. Ducts Efficient and well-designed duct systems distribute air properly throughout a building, without leaking, to keep all rooms at a comfortable

166

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Cooling and Heating Loads | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling and Heating Loads Cooling and Heating Loads The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment should be calculated in accordance with generally accepted engineering standards and handbooks such as ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_cooling_and_heating_loads.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999

167

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling (Revised) (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Heating and Cooling with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Estimating Historical Heating and Cooling Needs. Per Capita Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of approximate United States average annual per capita heating and cooling degree days for the years 1895–1983 are presented. The data reflect the combined effects of climate fluctuations and population shifts, and can be used in ...

M. W. Downton; T. R. Stewart; K. A. Miller

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Special Property Assessment for Renewable Heating & Cooling Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Title 8 of Maryland’s property tax code includes a state-wide special assessment for solar and geothermal heating and cooling systems. Under this provision, such systems are to be assessed at not...

170

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Data Center Rack Cooling with Rear-door Heat Exchanger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

they can use treated water from a plate-and-frame heat exchanger connected to a cooling tower. These inherent features of a RDHx help reduce energy use while minimizing maintenance...

172

Heat pipe radiation cooling evaluation: Task 2 concept studies report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the result of Task 2, Concept Studies for Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC), which was performed for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract 9-XT1-U9567. Studies under a prior contract defined a reference HPRC conceptual design for hypersonic aircraft engines operating at Mach 5 and an altitude of 80,000 ft. Task 2 involves the further investigation of heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) systems for additional design and operating conditions.

Silverstein, C.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

FILM COOLING CALCULATIONS WITH AN ITERATIVE CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER APPROACH USING EMPIRICAL HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT CORRECTIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An iterative conjugate heat transfer technique was developed and automated to predict the temperatures on film cooled surfaces such as flat plates and turbine blades.… (more)

Dhiman, Sushant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermostats and ducts provide opportunities for saving energy. Dehumidifying heat pipes provide a way to help central air conditioners and heat pumps dehumidify air. Electric and gas meters allow users to track energy use.

175

Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down July 22, 2010 - 4:14pm Addthis Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Birmingham received a $2.4 million Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant under the Recovery Act. The HVAC system will use ground source heat pump technology. It seems like these days there's just no avoiding the heat. Whether we're in our homes, at our places of work, and certainly every time we

178

While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down July 22, 2010 - 4:14pm Addthis Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Birmingham received a $2.4 million Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant under the Recovery Act. The HVAC system will use ground source heat pump technology. It seems like these days there's just no avoiding the heat. Whether we're in our homes, at our places of work, and certainly every time we

179

Equilibrium Models of Galaxy Clusters with Cooling, Heating and Conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally argued that most clusters of galaxies host cooling flows in which radiative cooling in the centre causes a slow inflow. However, recent observations by Chandra and XMM conflict with the predicted cooling flow rates. Amongst other mechanisms, heating by a central active galactic nucleus and thermal conduction have been invoked in order to account for the small mass deposition rates. Here, we present a family of hydrostatic models for the intra-cluster medium where radiative losses are exactly balanced by thermal conduction and heating by a central source. We describe the features of this simple model and fit its parameters to the density and temperature profiles of Hydra A.

M. Bruggen

2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description - Improve the indoor air quality and lower the cost of cooling and heating the buildings that make up the campus of Cedarville High School, Middle School and Elementary School. - Provide jobs, and reduce requirements of funds for the capital budget of the School District, and thus give relief to taxpayers in this rural region during a period of economic recession. - The new Heat Pumps will be targeted to perform at very high efficiency with EER (energy efficiency ratios) of 22+/-. System capacity is planned at 610 tons. - Remove unusable antiquated existing equipment and systems from the campus heating and cooling system, but utilize ductwork, piping, etc. where feasible. The campus is served by antiquated air conditioning units combined with natural gas, and with very poor EER estimated at 6+/-. - Monitor for 3 years the performance of the new systems compared to benchmarks from the existing system, and provide data to the public to promote adoption of Geothermal technology. - The Geothermal installation contractor is able to provide financing for a significant portion of project funding with payments that fall within the energy savings resulting from the new high efficiency heating and cooling systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. These include a characteristic suppression of the continuum below ~2 keV, absorption features such as a redshifted O K-edge, and diminished intensity of resonance emission lines. Spectra including the effects of intrinsic absorption are not well fit by foreground absorbing models. Attempting to fit such models to the spatially resolved spectra can lead to underestimates of the true absorbing column by factors of 3-20. Fits to integrated spectra of the entire cooling flow region can either underestimate or overestimate the mass of the absorbing gas depending on the specifics of the model. We discuss the potential detection of these effects with AXAF, XMM, and Astro-E.

Michael W. Wise; Craig L. Sarazin

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Silicon heat pipes for cooling electronics  

SciTech Connect

The increasing power density of integrated circuits (ICs) is creating the need for improvements in systems for transferring heat away from the chip. In earlier investigations, diamond films were used to conduct heat from ICs and spread the energy across a heat sink. The authors` investigation has indicated that a 635 {mu}m (25 mil) thick silicon substrate with embedded heat pipes could perform this task better than a diamond film. From their study, it appears that the development of a heat-pipe heat-spreading system is both technically and commercially feasible. The major challenge for this heat-spreading system is to develop an effective wick structure to transport liquid to the heated area beneath the chip. This paper discusses the crucial design parameters for this heat-pipe system, such as the required wick properties, the material compatibility issues, and the thermal characteristics of the system. The paper also provides results from some recent experimental activities at Sandia to develop these heat-pipe heat spreader systems.

Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Palmer, D.W.; Tuck, M.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

SIMULATION OF A SOLAR ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEM J.P. Praene*, D. Morau, F. Lucas, F. Garde, H. Boyer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATION OF A SOLAR ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEM J.P. Praene*, D. Morau, F. Lucas, F. Garde, H; accepted: 15 Oct 2007 This paper describes the dynamic modeling of a solar absorption cooling plant collector. A field of these collectors feed a single-effect absorption chiller of 35 kW nominal cooling

184

Introduction to solar heating and cooling design and sizing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is designed to introduce the practical aspects of solar heating/cooling systems to HVAC contractors, architects, engineers, and other interested individuals. It is intended to enable readers to assess potential solar heating/cooling applications in specific geographical areas, and includes tools necessary to do a preliminary design of the system and to analyze its economic benefits. The following are included: the case for solar energy; solar radiation and weather; passive solar design; system characteristics and selection; component performance criteria; determining solar system thermal performance and economic feasibility; requirements, availability, and applications of solar heating systems; and sources of additional information. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Heat and Mass transfer in an absorption process with mixed absorbent solution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Falling film absorption process is studied for the simulation of the absorber of the absorption solar cooling system. In this study, we use different absorbents… (more)

Chi, Ten-yen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy Consumption and Demand as Affected by Heat Pumps that Cool, Heat and Heat Domestic Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products or systems that heat, cool and heat domestic water, which are also referred to as integrated systems, have been available for several years. The concept is simple and appeals to consumers. This paper presents methods for evaluating the potential savings by using an integrated system that heats water by desuperheating discharge gas in the refrigeration cycle. The methods may be applied for any specific location, and their accuracy will depend on the accuracy of building loads and water usage estimates. Power demand can also be affected by electric water heaters. The methods presented demonstrate how integrated systems can be of value in reducing daily summertime peaks.

Cawley, R.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Testing of Crystallization Temperature of a New Working Fluid for Absorption Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

Lithium bromide/water (LiBr/water) absorption systems are potential candidates for absorption heat pump water heating applications since they have been widely commercialized for cooling applications. One drawback to LiBr/water absorption water heater systems is that they are unable to operate at typical water heating temperatures due to solution crystallization hazards. Binary or ternary mixtures, serving as working fluids, were reported (Ally, 1988; Herold et al., 1991; Iyoki and Uemura, 1981; Yasuhide Nemoto et al., 2010; Zogg et al., 2005) to help improve the absorption performance or avoid crystallization of absorption heat pump systems. A recent development (De Lucas et al., 2007) investigated the use of a ternary mixture of aqueous mixture of lithium bromide and sodium formate (CHO2Na). The new working fluid composition maintains a ratio of LiBr/CHO2Na of 2 by weight. This new working fluid is a potential competitor to aqueous LiBr solution in absorption system due to higher water vapor absorption rates and lower generation temperature needed (De Lucas et al., 2004). There exists data on equilibrium performance and other physical properties of this new working fluid. However, there is no available data on crystallization behavior. Crystallization temperature is crucial for the design of absorption heat pump water heater in order to avoid crystallization hazards during operation. We have therefore conducted a systematic study to explore the crystallization temperature of LiBr/CHO2Na water solution and compared it against aqueous LiBr solutions. These results were then used to evaluate the feasibility of using the new working fluid in water heating applications showing limited potential.

Wang, Kai [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level, the choice alternatives are cooling and no cooling.to zero in central cooling alternative Income ($1000) in airalternatives are conventional air conditioning and heat pump, given the cooling

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Performance of residential solar heating and cooling system with flat-plate and evacuated tubular collectors: CSU Solar House I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements in Solar House I at Colorado State University have provided comparison data on space heating, water heating, and cooling by systems in which flat-plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors were used. Data were procured on 47 days during operation of the flat-plate collector and on 112 days when the house was heated or cooled by the evacuated tube collector system. It was concluded that the system comprising an evacuated tubular collector, lithium bromide absorption water chiller, and associated equipment is highly effective in providing space heating and cooling to a small building, that it can supply up to twice the space heating and several times the cooling obtainable from an equal occupied area of good quality flat-plate collectors, and that a greater fraction of the domestic hot water can be obtained by supplying its heat from main storage. The cost-effectiveness of the system, in comparison with one employing a good flat-plate collector, can be determined when commercial pricing data are made available. A summary of monthly and annual energy use for space heating, domestic hot water (DHW) heating, and space cooling is presented. The collector performance is presented. The first two months of data were obtained with the system employing flat-plate collectors, whereas heating and cooling during the following nine months were supplied by the evacuated tube collector system.

Duff, W.S.; Conway, T.M.; Loef, G.O.G.; Meredith, D.B.; Pratt, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An all-electric apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The resulting system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. With support from the State of Texas Energy Development Fund and the Department of Energy the system was fully instrumented for monitoring.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An all-electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions are given of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 1; Model description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation-mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in this paper.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 2; Annual simulation results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in a companion paper. This paper presents the application of this method to annual simulations of cooling system performance in five cities.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR THE COMMON PASSIVE AND HYBRID HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXAMPLES OF PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS {CONVECTIVE SPACEbeen supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andinteraction. Passive solar heating systems use elements of

Holtz, Michael J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Saving Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

energy savings and can reduce the use of fossil fuels by buildings. While conventional heat pump water heater designs are limited to using toxic ammonia water ...

198

PROGRAM SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BRANCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'6782 Program Support for Solar Heating and Marlo Martin andPROGRAN SUPPORT FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Heating and Cooling Equipment D.J. Wood, H. Ruderman,on home heating appliance choice are referred to Wood,FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT David J. Wood, Henry

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Instrumentation and performance analysis of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture solar heated and cooled building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instrumentation system was designed and installed on the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) building to evaluate the performance of the solar system. The NMDA building is the first specifically designed solar heated and cooled building constructed in the United States. The solar system utilizes the flat plate collectors with liquid as the thermal transfer fluid, hot and cold storage tanks, and an absorption chiller. Over two years of operating experience now exists in regard to the NMDA building. Operation of the NMDA building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system involves three modes. The full heating mode utilizes the collected solar thermal energy for space heating. The full cooling mode utilizes the energy input from the solar collectors in driving the absorption chiller to provide space cooling. The intermediate mode requires heating during the morning hours and cooling during the afternoon. Cooling for the intermediate mode utilizes the cooling tower due to the low ambient relative humidity. The requirement of auxiliary energy is met with a gas fired boiler within the building. The instrumentation system installed on the NMDA building monitored solar insolation, 45 temperatures, 15 flow rates, the rate of electrical energy consumption, local meterology and the relative humidity. The data was recorded on a 15 minute time interval during daylight and every hour during the night.

San Martin, R.L.; Fenton, D.L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Manual for participants in the solar heating/cooling seminars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was intended as a text for participants in the Solar Heating/Cooling seminars presented in conjunction with the ERDA Transportable Solar Laboratory in various regions of the US. The seminar was designed to introduce the practical aspects of solar heating/cooling systems to HVAC contractors, architects, engineers, and other interested individuals. The two-day course enabled the attendees to assess potential solar applications in their geographic area, including tools to do a preliminary design of the system and to analyze its economic benefits. (WDM)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

Sarkisian, Paul H. (Watertown, MA); Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Biermann, Wendell J. (Fayetteville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Economic Analysis of Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last eleven years Houston Lighting & Power has raised utility rates an average of 17% per year. Over the last 3 1/2 years the utility rates have doubled. According to Houston City Magazine, Houstonians can expect future raises of 20-25% annually due to required construction of new utility plants to accommodate Houston's future growth. Utility costs could, and in many cases do, exceed the monthly mortgage payment. This has caused all to become concerned with what can be done to lower the utility bill for homes. In a typical Gulf Coast home approximately 50% of household utility costs are due to the air conditioning system, another 15-20% of utility costs are attributed to hot water heating. The remaining items in the home including lights, toaster, washer, dryer, etc. are relatively minor compared to these two "energy gulpers". Reducing air conditioning and hot water heating costs are therefore the two items on which homeowners should concentrate.

Wagers, H. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Absorptance, Attic, and Duct Insulation on Cooling and Heating Energy Use in Single-Family New Residential Buildings,”

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William; Berdahl, Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on cooling and heating energy use in single- family new residential buildings.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Direct Refrigeration from Heat Recovery Using 2-Stage Absorption Chillers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the cost of some fossil fuels has moderated, the importance of energy conservation by heat recovery has not diminished. The application of waste heat generated steam to produce chilled water is not new. However, there is a newly developed absorption chiller which can produce chilled water 44% more efficiently than the conventional single stage absorption chillers. The new 2-stage parallel flow system makes the chiller package more compact, more efficient, and easier to operate. Many types of waste heat, not just steam, can be used directly in this new chiller without the need for costly recovery and conversion systems.

Hufford, P. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70/sup 0/F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle.

Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mpemba effect, Newton cooling law and heat transfer equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we suggest a simple theoretical solution of the Mpemba effect in full agreement with known experimental data. This solution follows simply as an especial approximation (linearization) of the usual heat (transfer) equation, precisely linearization of the second derivation of the space part of the temperature function (as it is well-known Newton cooling law can be considered as the effective approximation of the heat (transfer) equation for constant space part of the temperature function).

Vladan Pankovic; Darko V. Kapor

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

DRAFT INTERIM REPORT: NATIONAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR PASSIVE AND HYBRID SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

etc. Heat Exchangers Heat Pipes & Thermal Diodes ConceptJ. Heat Exchangers K. Heat Pipes & Thermal Diodes A. Conceptwith two control, one heat pipe, and one cooling study. In

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Approximations for radiative cooling and heating in the solar chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. The radiative energy balance in the solar chromosphere is dominated by strong spectral lines that are formed out of LTE. It is computationally prohibitive to solve the full equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium in 3D time dependent MHD simulations. Aims. To find simple recipes to compute the radiative energy balance in the dominant lines under solar chromospheric conditions. Methods. We use detailed calculations in time-dependent and 2D MHD snapshots to derive empirical formulae for the radiative cooling and heating. Results. The radiative cooling in neutral hydrogen lines and the Lyman continuum, the H and K and intrared triplet lines of singly ionized calcium and the h and k lines of singly ionized magnesium can be written as a product of an optically thin emission (dependent on temperature), an escape probability (dependent on column mass) and an ionization fraction (dependent on temperature). In the cool pockets of the chromosphere the same transitions contribute to the heat...

Carlsson, Mats

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

District cooling and heating development in Stamford, CT. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the development options for introducing district cooling and heating in downtown Stamford, Connecticut. A district energy system as defined for the Stamford project is the production of chilled and hot water at a central energy plant, and its distribution underground to participating building in the vicinity. The objective of the study was to investigate implementation of a district energy system in conjunction with cogeneration as a means to encourage energy conservation and provide the city with an economic development tool. Analysis of the system configuration focused on selecting an arrangement which offered a realistic opportunity for implementation. Three main alternatives were investigated: (1) construction of an 82 MW cogeneration plant and a district heating and cooling system to serve downtown buildings, (2) construction of a small (4 MW) in-fence cogeneration plant combined with cooling and heating, and (3) construction of a district cooling and heating plant to supply selected buildings. Option (1) was determined to be unfeasible at this time due to low electricity prices. The analysis demonstrated that alternatives (2) and (3) were feasible. A number of recommendations are made for detailed cost estimates and ownership, leasing, and financial issues. 12 figs., 10 tabs.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Retrofitting Power Plants to Provide District Heating and Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case studies at five utilities documented consumer and utility benefits of retrofitting fossil steam and combined-cycle plants to provide thermal energy for district heating and cooling (DHC) for nearby loads. This cogeneration strategy helps utilities boost revenues and plant energy utilization efficiencies. It can also revitalize communities by providing inexpensive electricity and thermal energy while reducing emissions.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar heating/cooling and domestic hot-water systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing awareness of global warming forces policy makers and industries to face two challenges: reducing greenhouse gas emissions and securing stable energy supply against ever-increasing world energy consumption, which is projected to increase by ... Keywords: buildings heating, domestic hot-water, energetical analysis, renewable energy sources, solar cooling technologies, solar energy collection, solar thermal systems

Ioan Sârbu; Marius Adam

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Method and apparatus for heat extraction by controlled spray cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two solutions to the problem of cooling a high temperature, high heat flux surface using controlled spray cooling are presented for use on a mandrel. In the first embodiment, spray cooling is used to provide a varying isothermal boundary layer on the side portions of a mandrel by providing that the spray can be moved axially along the mandrel. In the second embodiment, a spray of coolant is directed to the lower temperature surface of the mandrel. By taking advantage of super-Leidenfrost cooling, the temperature of the high temperature surface of the mandrel can be controlled by varying the mass flux rate of coolant droplets. The invention has particular applicability to the field of diamond synthesis using chemical vapor deposition techniques.

Edwards, Christopher Francis (5492 Lenore Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Meeks, Ellen (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Kee, Robert (864 Lucille St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); McCarty, Kevin (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effect of adding flash tank on the evaporator's thermal load of the combined ejector-absorption cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified combined absorption-ejector cooling system using aqua-ammonia (NH3-H2O) refrigerant has been investigated. Removable flash tank was added between the condenser and the evaporator. The modified cycle brings the advantage of improving in the ... Keywords: absorption system, combined absorption cooling system, ejectors, evaporators

Ranj Sirwan; Yusoff Ali; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Monitoring of the performance of a solar-heated-and-cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 12-unit student apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The retrofit of the all-electric building resulted in a system consisting of an array of 1280 square feet of concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vesel, a 25-ton absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for temperature, flow rate, electrical power, and meteorological measurements. The data indicate that 11.2% of the cooling load was met by solar and 8.2% of the total load (cooling plus hot water) was met by solar. The performance of the collector array was determined to be approximately 60% of that suggested by the manufacturer. Steady-state chiller operation exhibited a C.O.P. very close to the manufacturer's specified performance values, but the time-averaged chiller C.O.P. is degraded due to cycling. The composite solar fraction (8.2%) is less than solar cooling only (11.2%) because there was no solar domestic hot water delivery during this monitoring period. The evaluation of system performance for the cooling season indicates a lower performance than expected. However, system performance in the cooling mode can be improved by better adjustment of the thermostats and controls. Continued data collection and analysis should be performed, to improve system operations, assess performance limits, and compare results with design projections.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Overview of active solar absorption/Rankine cooling program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The individual absorption and Rankine projects are identified, along with the main features and accomplishments/status of each and future plans. Included are four projects funded by SOLERAS, a joint US/Saudi Arabian effort. In the absorption program, there are three active component development projects, four systems field test projects, one advanced fluid study project and one advanced cycle study project currently funded by DOE. In the Rankine program, there are five active component development projects, two system field test projects, and one advanced study project. (LEW)

Wahlig, M.; Heitz, A.; Angerman, H.; Glas, R.; Warren, M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller?s capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

Keyhani, M.; Miller, W.A.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Simulation and analysis of district-heating and -cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model, GEOCITY, was developed to study the design and economics of district heating and cooling systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, energy source, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree-days, population size and density, energy supply temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. For district cooling, maximum temperature and cooling degree-hours are required. From this input data the model designs the fluid transport and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY was originally developed to simulate geothermal district heating systems and thus, in addition to the fluid transport and distribution models, it includes a reservoir model to simulate the production of geothermal energy from geothermal reservoirs. The reservoir model can be adapted to simulate the supply of hot water from any other energy source. GEOCITY has been used extensively and has been validated against other design and cost studies. GEOCITY designs the fluid transport and distribution facilities and then calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY can simulate nearly any financial and tax structure through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. Both private and municipal utility systems can be simulated.

Bloomster, C.H.; Fassbender, L.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Steamtown District Heating and Cooling Project, Scranton, Pennsylvania. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of a study intended to examine the feasibility of a district heating and cooling alternative for the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, PA. The objective of the study was to investigate the import of steam from the existing district heating system in Scranton which is operated by the Community Central Energy Corporation and through the use of modern technology provide hot and chilled water to Steamtown for its internal heating and cooling requirements. Such a project would benefit Steamtown by introducing a clean technology, eliminating on-site fuel use, avoiding first costs for central heating and cooling plants and reducing operation and maintenance expenditures. For operators of the existing district heating system, this project represents an opportunity to expand their customer base and demonstrate new technologies. The study was conducted by Joseph Technology Corporation, Inc. and performed for the Community Central Energy Corporation through a grant by the US Department of Energy. Steamtown was represented by the National Park Service, the developers of the site.

NONE

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

Josh A. Salmond

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Heating and cooling the Raft River geothermal transite pipe line  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary transient heat transfer analysis to aid in defining operating limits for the 4000-foot-long transite pipe line at the Raft River geothermal test site was completed. The heat transfer problem was to determine the time required to cool down the line from a 285/sup 0/F operating temperature to 50/sup 0/F and the time to heat up the line from 50/sup 0/F to 285/sup 0/F such that the temperature differential across the pipe wall will not exceed 25/sup 0/F. The pipe and the surrounding soil was modeled with a two-dimensional heat transfer computer code assuming constant convective heat transfer at the soil-atmosphere interface. The results are sensitive to the soil thermal conductivity used in the calculation and imply that measurement of soil thermal conductivity used in the calculation and imply that measurement of soil thermal properties should be made in order to refine the calculations. Also, the effect of variable convective heat transfer at the soil surface should be investigated. However, the results reported here indicate the order of magnitude to be expected for cool-down and heat-up times when operating the transite pipe at the stated condition.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Skin and core temperature response to partial- and whole-body heating and cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate after cooling The whole-body thermal state affects theof Thermal Biology 29 (2004) 549–558 Forehead Head CoolingThermal Biology 29 (2004) 549–558 local spot heating or cooling

Huizenga, Charlie; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Arens, Edward A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Climatic indicators for estimating residential heating and cooling loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive data base of residential energy use generated with the DOE-2.1A simulation code provides an opportunity for correlating building loads predicted by an hourly simulation model to commonly used climatic parameters such as heating and cooling degree-days, and to newer parameters such as insolation-days and latent enthalpy-days. The identification of reliable climatic parameters for estimating cooling loads and the incremental loads for individual building components, such as changing ceiling and wall R-values, infiltration rates or window areas is emphasized.

Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Chang, L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect

We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons, can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to the magnetic field when the magnetic field B > or approx. 10{sup 13} G. At a density of {rho}{approx_equal}10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3}, the conductivity due to superfluid phonons is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when the temperature {approx_equal}10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

Aguilera, Deborah N. [Tandar Laboratory, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Pons, Jose A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Alicante, Apartado de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

231

Superfluid heat conduction and the cooling of magnetized neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superftuid neutron matter, called superfiuid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 13} C. At density p {approx_equal} 10{sup 12}--10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity at when temperature {approx_equal} 10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction show observationally discernible differences.

Cirigliano, Vincenzo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reddy, Sanjay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, Rishi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilera, Deborah N [BUENOS AIRES

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field $B \\gsim 10^{13}$ G. At density $\\rho \\simeq 10^{12}-10^{14} $ g/cm$^3$ the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when temperature $\\simeq 10^8$ K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

Aguilera, Deborah N; Pons, José A; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field $B \\gsim 10^{13}$ G. At density $\\rho \\simeq 10^{12}-10^{14} $ g/cm$^3$ the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when temperature $\\simeq 10^8$ K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

Deborah N. Aguilera; Vincenzo Cirigliano; José A. Pons; Sanjay Reddy; Rishi Sharma

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cooling flows, central galaxy--cluster alignments, X-ray absorption and dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of five of the most luminous, intermediate redshift ($0.1 cooling flows. The alignment between CCGs and their host clusters has been investigated. For those clusters with cooling flows, the position angles of the X-ray emission from the clusters and the optical emission from the CCGs agrees within 5 degrees. For the one probable non-cooling flow cluster in the sample, Abell 2208, the alignment is significantly poorer. We examine the evidence for intrinsic X-ray absorption in the clusters. The X-ray spectra for Abell 1068 and Abell 1664 show that the cooling flows in these clusters are intrinsically absorbed by equivalent hydrogen column densities $\\geq 10^{21} atom cm$^{-2}$. The optical spectra of the CCGs in these clusters exhibit substantial intrinsic reddening, at levels consistent with the X-ray absorption results if standard dust to gas ratios are assumed.

S. W. Allen; A. C. Fabian; A. C. Edge; H. Bohringer; D. A. White

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Keeping cool on the job. [Heat-resistant protective clothing  

SciTech Connect

Maintenance workers at nuclear power plants need special protective clothing that slows overheating from the 55/sup 0/C temperature caused by waste heat from pipes and pressure vehicles. Cooling garments increase efficiency by extending the time workers can function, as well as safeguarding their health and morale. The Electric Power Research Institute evaluated two cooling concepts: circulating liquid suits already available on the market and a prototype frozen-water garment. Performance tests of the frozen-water suit found that it can more than double the 65-minute stay-time of liquid-cooled systems. The frozen-water garment permits mobility, is compatible with radiation protection and other garments and equipment, is easty to clean or decontaminate, has no moving parts, and is attractively priced. 4 figures. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; O'Brien, J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heat Budget Analysis of Nocturnal Cooling and Daytime Heating in a Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal cooling and daytime heating in a basin were studied on clear and calm days by means of heat budget observations. In the nighttime, drainage flow occurs along the basin sideslope and advects cold air to the boundary layer over the basin ...

Junsei Kondo; Tsuneo Kuwagata; Shigenori Haginoya

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a combination of monthly progress reports submitted by AiResearch Manufacturing Company. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. AiResearch Manufacturing Company is developing prototype solar heating/cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.  

SciTech Connect

This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

ANDREWS,J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Incremental cooling load determination for passive direct gain heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the applicability of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) full load compressor hour method for predicting the cooling load increase in a residence, attributable to direct gain passive heating systems. The NAHB method predictions are compared with the results of 200 hour-by-hour simulations using BLAST and the two methods show reasonable agreement. The degree of agreement and the limitations of the NAHB method are discussed.

Sullivan, P.W.; Mahone, D.; Fuller, W.; Gruber, J.; Kammerud, R.; Place, W.; Andersson, B.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Signatures of Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption for Typical AHUs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis is performed to investigate the signatures of different parameters on the heating and cooling energy consumption of typical air handling units (AHUs). The results are presented in graphic format. HVAC simulation engineers can use these graphs to make quick and rational decisions during the model calibration, identify faulty parameters, and develop optimized operation and control schedules. An application example is given as well in the paper.

Wei, G.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

Burdick, A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

(Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1990-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Solar heating and cooling commercialization research program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercialization Research Program has addressed a recognized need to accelerate the commercialization of solar products. The development of communication techniques and materials for a target group of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) wholesalers and distributors has been the primary effort. A summary of the program, the approach to the development of the techniques and materials, the conclusions derived from seminar feedback, the development of additional research activities and reports and the recommendations for follow-on activities are presented. The appendices offer detailed information on specific elements of the research effort.

Christensen, D.L.; Tragert, W.; Weir, S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-CHANNEL, HELIUM-COOLED, TUNGSTEN HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-CHANNEL, HELIUM-COOLED, TUNGSTEN HEAT EXCHANGER Dennis L. Youchison-cooled, refractory heat exchangers are now under consideration for first wall and divertor applications-channel, helium-cooled heat exchanger made almost entirely of tungsten was designed and fabricated by Thermacore

California at Los Angeles, University of

245

InterTechnology Corporation technology summary, solar heating and cooling. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of systems technology for solar-thermal heating and cooling of buildings is given. Solar collectors, control systems for solar heating and cooling, selective surfaces, thermal energy storage, solar-assisted heat pumps, and solar-powered cooling systems are discussed in detail. Also, an ITC specification for a solar control system is included. (WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Investigation of the heat pipe arrays for convective electronic cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to evaluate a heat pipe convective cooling device consisting of sixteen small copper/water heat pipes mounted vertically in a 4x4 array 25.4 mm square. The analytical portion of the investigation focused on determination of the maximum heat transport capacity and the resistance of the individual heat pipes. The resistance of each beat pipe was found to be 2.51 K/Watt, or more than 3 times smaller than the resistance produced by a solid copper rod with the same dimensions. The maximum predicted heat rejection for the module was over 50 Watts, or a power density in excess of 7.75 Watts/CM2. In the experimental portion of the investigation, two different modules were tested. The first module utilized ten circular aluminum fins mounted on the condenser end of each heat pipe to enhance heat rejection, while the second contained only the sixteen copper/water heat pipes. The effects of flow velocity, input power, and base plate temperature on the overall thermal resistance and the heat rejection capacity were determined, as well as the pressure drop resulting from each module. The finned heat pipe array was found to have a lower overall thermal resistance and thus, a higher heat rejection capacity, but also resulted in a significantly larger pressure drop than the array without fins. The results of the heat pipe array experiments were also compared with experimental and empirical results obtained from flow over a flat plate 25.4 mm square.

Howard, Alicia Ann Harris

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual, Case studies/examples, Templates, Technical report User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/geothermal/publications.html Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Energy savings in petroleum refining using absorption heat pumping  

SciTech Connect

There is now a new and highly economic technology available for saving energy in petroleum refineries. This technology--absorption heat pumping--is gaining rapid acceptance overseas, but to date is relatively unknown and untried in the U.S. Packaged units now can be supplied in virtually any capacity rating desired. These units are economical, with paybacks typically in less than two years, and are highly reliable compared to heat pumps incorporating large rotating members. This paper provides an overview of how an absorption heat pump (AHP) works, the different configurations possible, and how they can be applied to fractional distillation in a petroleum refinery. A detailed example flowsheet and economic estimate are presented for a specific petroleum refinery application--modernization of the energy intensive alkylation unit--which is of interest currently. A stand-alone isobutane splitter is compared to a mechanically heat pumped alternative and an absorption heat pumped alternative. In general, the AHP requires less than half the capital investment of the next best alternative and provides numerous important intangible benefits as well. The AHP will show even larger margins of advantage on columns involving higher temperature differentials between top and bottom (temperature ''lifts'').

Davidson, W.F.; Campagne, W.V.L.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Preliminary Analysis of a Solar Heat Pump System with Seasonal Storage for Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For higher solar fraction and suitability for both heating and cooling, a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage was studied in this paper. The system scheme and control strategy of a solar heat pump system with seasonal storage for heating and cooling were set up, which is responsible for the space heating and cooling and domestic hot water for a residential block. Through hourly simulation, the performance and the economics of such systems were analyzed, for the different tank volumes, operating modes and weather conditions. The results show that 1) for most areas of China, the solar systems with seasonal storage can save energy; 2) for areas with cold winter and hot summer, it is suitable to store heat from summer to winter and store cold energy from winter to summer, but for chilly areas, it is suitable to only store heat from summer to winter; 3) when the ratio of volume of seasonal storage tank to collector areas is 2~3, the system performance is optimal and the payback period is shortest for most areas of north China; and 4) if cooling storage is needed, the seasonal storage coupled with short-term storage may raise the solar fraction largely.

Yu, G.; Chen, P.; Dalenback, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modeling of a Membrane-Based Absorption Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a membrane heat pump is proposed and analyzed. Fundamentally, the proposed heat pump consists of an aqueous CaCl{sub 2} solution flow separated from a water flow by a vapor-permeable membrane. The low activity of the solution results in a net flux of water vapor across the membrane, which heats the solution stream and cools the water stream. This mechanism upgrades water-side low-temperature heat to solution-side high-temperature heat, creating a 'temperature lift.' The modeling results show that using two membranes and an air gap instead of a single membrane increases the temperature lift by 185%. The model predicts temperature lifts for the air-gap design of 24, 16, and 6 C for inlet temperatures of 55, 35, and 15 C, respectively. Membranes with lower thermal conductivities and higher porosities improve the performance of single-membrane designs while thinner membranes improve the performance of air-gap designs. This device can be used with a solar heating system which already uses concentrated salt solutions for liquid-desiccant cooling.

Woods, J.; Pellegrino, J.; Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.; Burch, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solar heating and cooling system design and development. Status summary, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling equipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is notoriously true for the great majority of renewable energy systems. (author)

Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A. [DETEC - University of Naples Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

District heating and cooling: a 28-city assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Findings of a project that assessed the potential for construction of district heating and cooling (DHC) systems in 28 US cities are presented. The project sought to determine whether DHC could promote local community and economic development. In the preliminary assessment, 17 of the cities identified up to 23 projects that could be built within three to five years. Most of these projects would rely on nonscarce heat sources such as refuse or geothermal energy, and to improve financial feasibility, the majority would cogenerate electricity along with heat. Many would use existing power plants or industrial boilers to hold down capital costs. Overall, the projects could generate as amany as 24,000 jobs and retain $165 million that otherwise could leave the communities, thereby helping to stabilize local economies.

Meshenberg, M.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads  

SciTech Connect

Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; /Fermilab; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling loads using absorption chillers. Utility rates andvia heat exchangers. Absorption chillers are considered inof single- effect absorption chillers is only one seventh (

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Study of Operating Control Strategies for Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System with Supplemental Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source heat pump for cooling-dominated commercial buildings may utilize supplemental cooling towers to reduce system first cost and to improve system performance. The use of hybrid ground source heat pump (HGSP) can reduce the size of the ground-loop ... Keywords: hybrid ground source heat pump, supplement heat rejection, control strategies, operating performance

Wang Jinggang; Gao Xiaoxia; Yin Zhenjiang; Li Fang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

Qu, Ming [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Yin, Hongxi [School of Engineering Education, Purdue University, 701 W. Stadium Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061 (United States); Archer, David H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ROSAT Evidence for Intrinsic Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flow Galaxies and Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using spatially resolved, deprojected ROSAT PSPC spectra of 10 of the brightest cooling flow galaxies and groups with low Galactic column densities we have detected intrinsic absorption over energies ~0.4-0.8 keV in half of the sample. Since no intrinsic absorption is indicated for energies below ~0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is collisionally ionized gas at temperatures T=10^{5-6} K with most of the absorption arising from ionized states of oxygen but with a significant contribution from carbon and nitrogen. The soft X-ray emission of this warm gas can explain the sub-Galactic column densities of cold gas inferred within the central regions of most of the systems. Attributing the absorption to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from EINSTEIN and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT. Within the central ~10-20 kpc, where the constraints are most secure, the estimated mass of the ionized absorber is consistent with most (perhaps all) of the matter deposited by a cooling flow over the lifetime of the flow. Since the warm absorber produces no significant H or He absorption the large absorber masses are consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from HI and CO observations of cooling flows. It is also found that if T > ~2x10^5 K then the optical and UV emission implied by the warm gas does not violate published constraints. Finally, we discuss how the prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass drop-out in these and other cooling flows can be verified with new CHANDRA and XMM observations. (Abridged)

David A. Buote

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

Performance of residential solar heating and cooling system with flat-plate and evacuated tubular collectors: CSU Solar House I  

SciTech Connect

Measurements in Solar House I at Colorado State University have provided comparison data on space heating, water heating, and cooling by systems in which flat-plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors were used. Data were procured on 47 days during operation of the flat-plate collector and on 112 days when the house was heated or cooled by the evacuated tube collector system. It was concluded that the system comprising an evacuated tubular collector, lithium bromide absorption water chiller, and associated equipment is highly effective in providing solar heating and cooling to a small building, that it can supply up to twice the space heating and several times the cooling obtainable from an equal occupied area of good quality flat-plate collectors, and that a greater fraction of the domestic hot water can be obtained by supplying its heat from main storage. The cost-effectiveness of the system, in comparison with one employing a good flat-plate collector, can be determined when commercial pricing data are made available.

Duff, W.S.; Conway, T.M.; Loef, G.O.G.; Meredith, D.B.; Pratt, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling Free Convection Flow of Liquid Hydrogen within a Cylindrical Heat Exchanger Cooled to 14 K  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lau, W, and Yang, S. , “A Heat Exchanger between Forced FlowWITHIN A CYLINDRICAL HEAT EXCHANGER COOLED TO 14 K S. Qof the container is a heat exchanger between the hydrogen

Yang, S.W.; Oxford U.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Heat-transfer dynamics during cryogen spray cooling of substrate at different initial temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aguilar G 2004 Radial heat transfer dynamics during cryogenof droplet dynamics and heat transfer in spray cooling Exp.S0031-9155(04)84030-2 Heat-transfer dynamics during cryogen

Jia, W; Aguilar, G; Wang, G X; Nelson, J S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM AND METHOD OF USING THE SAME - Energy ...  

An absorption heat pump system that can include a first assembly, ... Building Energy Efficiency; ... Solar Thermal; Startup America;

267

Solar heating and cooling system design and development (status summay through December 1977)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program scope is to develop, fabricate, install, and monitor the operation of prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Application studies have been completed for three application categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, and commercial. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling euipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season was based on the use of systems comprising an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a non-freezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built-up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off-peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. Automatic system control and automatic data acquisition and computation are provided. This system is compared with others evaluated in CSU Solar Houses I, II and III, and with computer predictions based on mathematical models. Of the 69,513 MJ total energy requirement for space heating and hot water during a record cold winter, solar provided 33,281 MJ equivalent to 48 percent. Thirty percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 29 percent was delivered and used for heating and hot water. Of 33,320 MJ required for cooling and hot water during the summer, 79 percent or 26,202 MJ were supplied by solar. Thirty-five percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 26 percent was used for hot water and cooling in the summer. Although not as efficient as the Corning evacuated tube collector previously used, the Philips experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well-insulated heat storage tank. Day time (on-peak) electric auxiliary heating was completely avoided by use of off-peak electric heat storage. A well-designed and operated solar heating and cooling system provided 56 percent of the total energy requirements for heating, cooling, and hot water.

Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

270

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts  

SciTech Connect

Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850şC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Performance of an air-cooled ammonia-water absorption air conditioner at low generator temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ammonia--water absorption air conditioning system has been tested to investigate the stability of operation near the cut-off conditions. Circulation ratios were from 8 to 30. Relations for the estimation of the coefficient of performance and for the prediction of operating temperatures were derived and verified experimentally. Possible operating conditions for an air-cooled ammonia--water air conditioning system were concluded.

Dao, K.; Simmons, M.; Wolgast, R.; Wahlig, M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

On the Use of Cool Materials as a Heat Island Mitigation Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mitigation of the heat island effect can be achieved by the use of cool materials that are characterized by high solar reflectance and infrared emittance values. Several types of cool materials have been tested and their optical and thermal ...

A. Synnefa; A. Dandou; M. Santamouris; M. Tombrou; N. Soulakellis

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Simulation and performance analysis of an ammonia-water absorption heat pump based on the generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer simulation has been conducted to investigate the performance of an absorption heat pump, based on the Generator-Absorber Heat Exchange (GAX) cycle employing ammonia-water as the working fluid pair. The particular feature of this cycle is the ability to recover heat from the absorber and employ it to partially heat the generator, thus improving the COP. In the present study, a detailed simulation has been conducted of one of the preferred configurations for the cycle. A modular computer code for flexible simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was employed. Performance parameters, including COP and capacity, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters over a wide range of conditions in both the cooling and heating mode. The effect of the ambient temperature, the rectifier performance, the flowrate in the GAX heat transfer loop and the refrigerant flow control were investigated. COP`s on the order of 1.0 for cooling and 2.0 for heating have been calculated.

Grossman, G. [Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); DeVault, R.C.; Creswick, F.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tex. , 3rd Ann. Solar Heating & Cooling R&D Contractors'Proceedings, Passive Solar Heating & Cooling~'-~&-l~orkshop,Solar Jubilee, Phoenix, AZ, June 2-6, 1980 A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING

Tavana, Medhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Proprties of the Carrol system and a machine design for solar-powered, air-cooled, absorption space cooling. Phase I and Phase II. Final report, September 1977-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The name Carrol has been selected as a convenient short-hand designation for a prime candidate chemical system comprising ethylene glycol-lithium bromide as an absorbent mixture with water as a refrigerant. The instrumentation, methods of handling data and numerical results from a systematic determination of Carrol property data required to design an air cooled absorption machine based on this chemical system are described. These data include saturation temperature, relative enthalpy, density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and absorber film heat transfer coefficient as functions of solution temperature and Carrol concentration over applicable ranges. For each of the major components of the absorption chiller, i.e., generator, chiller, absorber, condenser, heat exchanger, purge and controls, the report contains an assembly drawing and the principal operating characteristics of that component.

Biermann, W.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management. 6 figs., 2 tabs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thermal analysis of a piston cooling system with reciprocating heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

The reciprocating heat pipe is a very promising technology in engine piston cooling, especially for heavy-duty diesel engines. The concept of the reciprocating heat pipe is verified through the experimental observation of a transparent heat pipe and by thermal testing of a copper/water reciprocating heat pipe. A comparative thermal analysis on the reciprocating heat pipe and gallery cooling systems is performed. The approximate analytical results show that the piston ring groove temperature can be significantly reduced using heat pipe cooling technology, which could contribute to an increase in engine thermal efficiency and a reduction in environmental pollution.

Cao, Y.; Wang, Q. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on cooling and heating energy use in single-family new residential buildings.solar- reflective roof on the heating- and cooling-energy uses of a residential-building

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

Shivvers, Steve D. (Prole, IA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling,Heating,and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For decades, space heating and cooling (space conditioning) accounted for more than half of all residential energy consumption. Estimates from the ...

283

Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on a comprehensive evaluation of the market for active solar heating and cooling products focusing on the attributes and behavior of HVAC decision makers. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Standards applicable to performance measurement of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantage of the utilization of existing standards in the performance monitoring of solar heating and cooling systems is discussed. Existing applicable measurement standards and practices are listed.

Lior, N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

THE STIRLING ENGINE: THERMODYNAMICS AND APPLICATIONS IN COMBINED COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The goal of this study is to assess the potential of the Stirling engine in alternative energy applications including combined cooling, heating, and power… (more)

Harrod, James C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design and evaluation of heat transfer fluids for direct immersion cooling of electronic systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Comprehensive molecular design was used to identify new heat transfer fluids for direct immersion phase change cooling of electronic systems. Four group contribution methods for… (more)

Harikumar Warrier, Pramod Kumar Warrier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Impingement cooling and heat transfer measurement using transient liquid crystal technique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A heat transfer study on jet impingement cooling is presented. The study focuses on the effect of impingement jet flow rate, jet angle, and flow… (more)

Huang, Yizhe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Modeling of Heat Transfer during Cooling of a Hot Steel Plate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, it is crucial to develop accurate heat transfer models in order to predict the temperature history during cooling of steel plates. The present study describes a  ...

289

Vibration Induced Droplet Generation from a Liquid Layer for Evaporative Cooling in a Heat Transfer Cell .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During this investigation, vibration induced droplet generation from a liquid layer was examined as a means for achieving high heat flux evaporative cooling. Experiments were… (more)

Pyrtle, Frank, III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A micro-COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER (m-CHP) INSTRUCTIONAL MODULE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling, Heating, and Power (CHP) is an emerging category of energy systems consisting of power generation equipment coupled with thermally activated components. The application of… (more)

Oliver, Jason Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

292

Active solar heating and cooling information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2012 1 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers The cooling circuits at CERN use evaporative open cooling towers to discharge into the atmosphere the heat towers per complex depend on the amount of cooling power required. LHC one cooling tower per even LHC

Wu, Sau Lan

294

Timonium Elementary School solar energy heating and cooling augmentation experiment. Final engineering report: executive summary (ER-8877)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50% of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type chillers for cooling. The area to be heated or cooled totaled approximately 8500 square feet of the center wing of the school. To accomplish this a system containing 5000 square feet of collectors, 5300 square feet of reflectors, a 15,000 gallon insulated hot water storage tank, 40,000 gallons of chilled water storage, an absorption chiller, miscellaneous plumbing, and instrumentation and controls, were installed. The system utilized untreated water (except for one time deionization of initial water supply) as a working fluid. The collection system efficiency (without reflectors) reached a maximum of 56% on a clear day in April 1975. This was with an average water temperature of 161/sup 0/F. The collection system efficiency (with collector and reflector area totaling 9550 square feet) on a clear day in August amounted to 40.5%. This was with an average water temperature of 170/sup 0/F. Data on the work accomplished and on the system performance are presented.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cooling of X-ray Emitting Gas by Heat Conduction in the Center of Cooling Flow Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the possibility that a large fraction of the gas at temperatures of ? 10 7 K in cooling flow clusters cools by heat conduction to lower temperatures, rather than by radiative cooling. We argue that this process, when incorporated into the so-called “moderate cooling flow model”, where the effective age of the intracluster medium is much lower than the age of the cluster, reduces substantially the expected X-ray luminosity from gas residing at temperatures of ? 10 7 K. In this model, the radiative mass cooling rate of gas at ? 10 7 K inferred from X-ray observations, which is heat conduction is regulated by reconnection between the magnetic field lines in cold ( ? 10 4 K) clouds and the field lines in the intracluster medium. A narrow conduction front is formed, which, despite the relatively low temperature, allows efficient heat conduction from the hot ICM to the cold clouds. The reconnection between the field lines in cold clouds and those in the intracluster medium occurs only when the magnetic field in the ICM is strong enough. This occurs only in the very inner regions of cooling flow clusters, at r ? 10 ? 30 kpc. The large ratio of the number of H? photons to the number of cooling hydrogen atoms is explained by this scenario. 1.

Noam Soker; L. Blanton; Craig L. Sarazin; Chandra Fellow

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Compact intermediate heat transport system for sodium cooled reactor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combination with a sodium cooled reactor having an intermediate heat exchanger for extracting heat in a nonradioactive secondary sodium loop from the sodium rector. It comprises: first and second upstanding closed cylindrical vessels, one of the cylindrical vessels being exterior of the other of the cylindrical vessels; the other of the cylindrical vessels being interior, smaller, and concentric of the larger cylindrical vessel so as to define between the inside of the larger vessel and the outside of the smaller vessel an interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater inlet plenums at the bottom of the larger vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater outlet plenums at the top of the larger and outer vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; tubes communicated to the feedwater inlet plenum at the bottom of the vessels and to the steam outlet plenum at the top of the vessel; a first conduit; a large submersible electromagnetic pump; and a jet pump having an inlet, a venturi, and a diffusing outlet.

Boardman, C.E.; Maurer, J.P.

1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fuzzy incremental control algorithm of loop heat pipe cooling system for spacecraft applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and high precision thermal control technologies are essential for the safe flight of advanced spacecraft. A fuzzy incremental control strategy is proposed for control of an LHP space cooling system comprising a loop heat pipe and a variable ... Keywords: Fuzzy incremental control, Loop heat pipe, Modeling and simulation, Space cooling system

Su-Jun Dong; Yun-Ze Li; Jin Wang; Jun Wang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Carrier Corporation. Fabrication, testing and installation report: 53 kW solar absorption cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 53 kW water cooled packaged solar absorption chiller was fabricated and tested. The generator shell and absorber shell had sight glasses added as a diagnostic device. The unit was modified so that a base suitable for mounting pumps, valves and associated piping was cantilevered from one end of the unit. The installation and start-up of the cooling system is outlined.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

AN AMMONIA-WATER ABSORPTION-HIAT-PUMP CYCLE Donald Kuhlenschmidt, Member ASHRAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Merrick, Member ASHRAE ABSTRACT The scate-of-art in ammonia-water absorption cooling has been applied. Reversible absorption cycles for heating and cooling are possible but with additional cost and complexity concentration change making possible the use of a solution-cooled absorber wherin some heat of absorption can

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

Jukkola, Walfred W. (Westport, CT); Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY); Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C. (Bethel, CT); McCoy, Daniel E. (Williamsport, PA); Fisher, Barry L. (Montgomery, PA); Saiers, Timothy L. (Williamsport, PA); Karstetter, Marlin E. (Loganton, PA)

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ingredients for energy conservation: water cooled luminaires and the heat pump  

SciTech Connect

The energy crisis has focused attention on all aspects of building energy usage--particularly heating and cooling energy. The possibility of utilizing water-cooled luminaires in an area of high relative humidity is explored. Heating is done by a water source heat pump utilizing the water from the luminaires as source for the heat pump. The energy usage of the heat pump system is then compared with the energy usage of other heat reclaim systems thereby demonstrating the energy conservation capabilities of the system.

Dowless, E.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A comparison of eight solar-driven absorption cooling systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large solar driven cooling systems of the absorption chiller type offer opportunities to apply solar energy to the air conditioning of buildings with the attendant savings in conventional energy resources. Many complex design problems are encountered in the attempt to implement this technology. For instance, the range of readily available solar installation operating temperatures is at the low end of the required range for effective operation of the chillers. A study has been made of eight such systems which were operated in a variety of climates during the 1980 cooling season and instrumented within the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Presented here are summary results of this study. Considerably more detail on the performance of these systems is contained in the reference along with a brief discussion of absorption chillers and their application in solar designs. The performance of the monitored installations was not very good. Only two systems showed energy savings and they were insignificant considering the size of the buildings. Nevertheless valuable lessons were learned from the study. Each system had some desirable design features. Taking these features together, a projected composite system was posited which would have performed fairly well. Suggestions are presented which should lead to more effective designs for this type of renewable energy application.

Kelly, C.J.; Logee, T.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Hybrid space heating/cooling system with Trombe wall, underground venting, and assisted heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our goal was to design and monitor a hybrid solar system/ground loop which automatically assists the standard, thermostatically controlled home heating/cooling system. The input from the homeowner was limited to normal thermostat operations. During the course of the project it was determined that to effectively gather data and control the various component interactions, a micro-computer based control system would also allow the HVAC system to be optimized by simple changes to software. This flexibility in an untested concept helped us to achieve optimum system performance. Control ranged from direct solar heating and direct ground loop cooling modes, to assistance of the heat pump by both solar space and ground loop. Sensors were strategically placed to provide data on response of the Trombe wall (surface, 4 in. deep, 8 in. deep), and the ground loop (inlet, 3/4 length, outlet). Micro-computer hardware and computer programs were developed to make cost effective decisions between the various modes of operation. Although recent advances in micro-computer hardware make similar control systems more readily achievable utilizing standard components, attention to the decision making criteria will always be required.

Shirley, J.W.; James, L.C.; Stevens, S.; Autry, A.N.; Nussbaum, M.; MacQueen, S.V.

1983-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following tasks; solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; solar cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling system development; solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; generic solar domestic water heating systems; advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and field monitoring workshop.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

System design package for solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This package contains information used to evaluate the design of Solaron's solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling and back-up heating (when solar energy is not available). Included in the package are such items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A Solaron solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. 1984 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following areas: coordination of research and development on solar heating and cooling; performance testing of solar collectors; performance of solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems using evacuated collectors; central solar heating plants with seasonal storage; passive and hybrid solar low energy buildings; and solar radiation and pyranometry studies. Planning was also initiated for a proposed materials research and testing task. (LEW)

Blum, S.B. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban Heat IslandMitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Absorptance, Attic, and Duct Insulation on Cooling and Heating Energy Use in Single-Family New Residential Buildings,”

Akbari, Hashem

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Absorptance, Attic, and Duct Insulation on Cooling and Heating Energy Use in Single-Family New Residential Buildings,”

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system is scheduled to be on.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system Coal Storage Building 39 NA Cooke Hall 56 Donhowe Building 044 East Gateway District Steam Distr. 199

Webb, Peter

313

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

314

Research on optimization design of the heating/cooling channels for rapid heat cycle molding based on response surface methodology and constrained particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to optimize the layout of the heating/cooling channels for rapid heat cycle molding with hot medium heating and coolant cooling by using response surface methodology and optimization technique. By means of a Box-Behnken experiment ... Keywords: Injection molding, Particle swarm optimization (PSO), Rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM), Response surface methodology (RSM), Steam heating

Guilong Wang; Guoqun Zhao; Huiping Li; Yanjin Guan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of HSLA ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of .... of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar ...

316

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

317

Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40 percent of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, EIA has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. In AEO2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40 percent of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, EIA has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. In AEO2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

Information Center

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Problems in suppressing cooling flows in clusters of galaxies by global heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I use a simple analytical model to show that simple heat conduction models cannot significantly suppress cluster cooling flows. I build a static medium where heat conduction globally balances radiative cooling, and then perturb it. I show that a perturbation extending over a large fraction of the cooling flow region will grow to the non-linear regime within a Hubble time. Such perturbations are reasonable in clusters which frequently experience mergers and/or AGN activity. This result strengthens previous findings which show that a steady solution does not exist for a constant heat conduction coefficient.

Noam Soker

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cool Roofs Are Ready to Save Energy, Cool Urban Heat Islands, and Help Slow Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofing is the fastest growing sector roofing is the fastest growing sector of the building industry, as building owners and facility managers realize the immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun. Studies exploring the energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of cool roofs show that in warm or hot climates, substituting a cool roof for a conventional roof can: * Reduce by up to 15% the annual air-

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired Combustion Efficiency 77 80 98 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 80 84 98 Electric Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Furnace AFUE 77 80 82 Water Heater Gas-Fired Thermal Efficiency 78 80 96 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 79 80 85 Electric Resistance Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 77 84 89 Source(s): Parameter Efficiency

323

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling, and Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center (750,000 DOE investment): This project will help demonstrate a rotating heat exchanger technology for residential HVAC systems. The heat pump will improve HVAC...

324

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center (750,000 DOE investment): This project will help demonstrate a rotating heat exchanger technology for residential HVAC systems. The heat pump will improve HVAC...

325

Industrial heat pumps in Germany -potentials, technological development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet nozzle Closed Cycles: Absorption/Adsorption heat pump thermal compressor driven by waste heat to 80 COP heating 2.5 to 5.8 Cooling function 50% of manufacturers offer cooling functions Cooling capacity [kW] 20 to 2500 COP cooling 1 to 6 #12;ACHEMA 2012 - Industrial heat pumps 21st June 2012

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

326

Heating Up While Staying Cool? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heating Up While Staying Cool? Heating Up While Staying Cool? Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 04.30.13 Heating Up While Staying Cool? Exotic effects at the nanoscale could help shape the future of electronics. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo An image of a remote Joule heating. Image courtesy of John Cumings Artist's rendering of remote Joule heating. Silver blocks are palladium plates. Carbon nanotube is shown in dark blue. If you had to summarize the biggest challenge confronting the field of electronics in a single word today, you might well say, "heat." With the

327

Cool-down and frozen start-up behavior of a grooved water heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A grooved water heat pipe was tested to study its characteristics during the cool-down and start-up periods. The water heat pipe was cooled down from the ambient temperature to below the freezing temperature of water. During the cool-down, isothermal conditions were maintained at the evaporator and adiabatic sections until the working fluid was frozen. When water was frozen along the entire heat pipe, the heat pipe was rendered inactive. The start-up of the heat pipe from this state was investigated under several different operating conditions. The results show the existence of large temperature gradients between the evaporator and the condenser, and the moving of the melting front of the working fluid along the heat pipe. Successful start-up was achieved for some test cases using partial gravity assist. The start-up behavior depended largely on the operating conditions.

Jang, J.H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quad. The estimates for total energy usage are within 12% ofthe total heating and cooling energy usages represented bythe total heating and cooling energy usages represented by

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The estimation of base temperature for heating and cooling degree days for Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Korea, heating degree days (HDD) and cooling degree days (CDD) have been widely used as climatic indicators for the assessment of the impact of climate change, but arbitrary or customary base temperatures have been used for calculation of HDD ...

Kyoungmi Lee; Hee-Jeong Baek; ChunHo Cho

331

Lyman ? Absorption as a Sensitive Probe of the H I Column in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. X-ray spectra of a significant fraction of cooling flow (CF) clusters of galaxies indicate the presence of large columns of “cold ” absorbing gas. The physical nature of the absorbing medium remains a mystery. Searches for H I absorption using the 21 cm hyperfine structure line yielded null results in most cases. The purpose of this contribution is to point out that the Lyman ? absorption cross section is ? 10 7 times larger than for the 21 cm line, it can therefore be used as a very sensitive probe of the H I column in clusters, and can thus place stringent constraints on the nature of the X-ray absorber. This method is applied to the Perseus CF cluster where a medium resolution ( ? 250 km s ?1) UV spectrum is available. The upper limit on the H I column obtained using Lyman ? is at least ? 50 times smaller than the 21 cm detection, and ? 5,000 smaller than implied by X-ray spectra, indicating that the X-ray absorber is exceedingly devoid of H I. Higher resolution UV spectra with HST may improve the H I column limits by an additional factor of ? 4,000. This method can be applied to strongly constrain the nature of the X-ray absorbing medium in a significant fraction of CF clusters.

A. Laor

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Lyman $?$ Absorption as a Sensitive Probe of the H I Column in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray spectra of a significant fraction of cooling flow (CF) clusters of galaxies indicate the presence of a large column of ``cold'' absorbing gas. The physical nature of the absorbing medium remains a mystery. Searches for H I absorption using the 21 cm hyperfine structure line yielded null results in most cases. The purpose of this contribution is to point out that the Lyman $\\alpha$ absorption cross section is ~10^7 times larger than for the 21 cm line, it can therefore be used as a very sensitive probe of the H I column in clusters, and can thus place stringent constraints on the nature of the X-ray absorber. This method is applied to the Perseus CF cluster where a medium resolution (~250 km/s) UV spectrum is available. The upper limit on the H I column obtained using Lyman $\\alpha$ is at least ~50 times smaller than the 21 cm detection, and ~5,000 smaller than implied by X-ray spectra, indicating that the X-ray absorber is exceedingly devoid of H I. Higher resolution UV spectra with HST may improve the H I column limits by an additional factor of ~4,000. This method can be applied to strongly constrain the nature of the X-ray absorbing medium in a significant fraction of CF clusters .

Ari Laor

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Heat transfer and film-cooling for the endwall of a first stage turbine vane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the turbine. Turbine inlet conditions in a gas turbine engine gen- erally consist of temperature and velocityHeat transfer and film-cooling for the endwall of a first stage turbine vane Karen A. Thole of the airfoils. One means of preventing degradation in the turbine is to film-cool components whereby coolant

Thole, Karen A.

334

Title and author(s) REMI/HEAT COOL A COMPUTER PROGRAMME FOR CALCULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2. The Temperature Distribution in the Fuel 8 2.3. The Two-Phase Flow in the Primary System ·· lo 2.1 *. The Steam core coolant, i.e. spray cooling. REMI/HEAT COOL is based on separate description of the steam plays an essential role in the overall heat transfer. Steam flow through a fuel element is calculated

335

Geothermal district heating and cooling system for the city of Calistoga, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calistoga has long been known for having moderate (270/sup 0/F maximum) hydrothermal deposits. The economic feasibility of a geothermal heating and cooling district for a portion of the downtown commercial area and city-owned building was studied. Descriptions of existing and proposed systems for each building in the block are presented. Heating and cooling loads for each building, retrofit costs, detailed cost estimates, system schematics, and energy consumption data for each building are included. (MHR)

Frederick, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system--Rankine air conditioner redesign  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single-family heating and cooling system. The objectives discussed are the interim design and schedule status of the Residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Arizona State University. Prototype carrier 10 ton air-cooled solar absorption chiller. Final evaluation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype air-cooled 10 ton solar absorption chiller was disassembled and inspected after having been field-tested for three consecutive cooling seasons. Included in the inspection were some flow visualization experiments which revealed some problems in the absorber header design. The objectives of this evaluation project were to determine possible causes for the frequent crystallization and generally below-design performance of the chiller during the testing period. The major conclusions reached were that a combination of leaks and of poor (50%) flow distribution in the absorber could account for most of the chiller's poor performance.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Modeling of absorption heat pumps: solar applications employing chemical storage and steady-state modeling with a comparison to experiments  

SciTech Connect

This work develops simulation models for absorption heat pumps (AHPs) with the goal of enabling a more analytical approach to their study and design. A continuous, liquid absorbent AHP with chemical storage is modeled using mass and energy balances and assuming mass transfer equilibrium. This model is used with the TRNSYS program to simulate the performance of an AHP in a residential solar-driven heating and cooling system. The steady-state and cyclic testing of a prototype gas-fired ammonia-water AHP in an environmental chamber is described; measurements include temperatures, pressures, absorbent concentrations, flow rates and heat flows. The coefficient of performance and heating capacity depend most strongly on ambient temperature; varying the load water temperature and flow rate has lesser effects. The performance of the unit is sensitive to refrigerant charge, with the optimum charge varying with ambient temperature. This AHP shows a significant performance degradation in cyclic operation. A modular, steady-state simulation program for absorption heat pumps in developed and validated with experimental data. The model utilizes an analysis of the refrigerant and absorbent inventory to set the system pressures.

McLinden, M.O.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Refrigeration Technologies in Combined Cooling, Heating and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With development of absorption refrigeration technology, the cooling requirement can be met using various optional refrigeration technologies in a CCHP system, including compression refrigeration, steam double-effect absorption refrigeration, steam single-effect absorption refrigeration, flue gas absorption refrigeration and hot water absorption refrigeration, etc. As a universal criterion, the COP coefficient cannot reflect the difference in availability of driving energy for different chillers. Exergy efficiency of optional chillers in CCHP system was analyzed and compared, which can be regarded as an important reference criterion in comparison of energy efficiency. Furthermore, a new index, relative electricity saving ratio, was put forward for evaluating end energy efficiency of all kinds of chillers in a CCHP system, which indicates actual energy or electricity saving ratio for different absorption chillers with various parameters in contrast to the reference electricity-driven refrigeration scheme.

Zuo, Z.; Hu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Transient heat and mass transfer in a drop experiencing absorption with internal circulation  

SciTech Connect

Absorption of gas and vapor into moving liquid droplet is frequently encountered in numerous applications in chemical industries and refrigeration technology. Here, transient heat and mass transfer associated with a moving liquid drop during absorption was numerically studied in this work. The roles played by the internal circulation inside the droplet and the exothermic heat effect were demonstrated. The numerical results reveal that the significant absorption enhancement by internal circulation becomes negligible with the increase of exothermic absorption heat. The highly exothermic system of LiBr/H{sub 2}O, which is used as a typical refrigerant/absorbent combination in commercial absorption heat pump (AHP), was selected as an example to illustrate this point.

Lu, H.H.; Wu, T.C.; Yang, Y.M.; Maa, J.R. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Most homes have central thermostats on heating and cooling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... solar, wind , geothermal ... Quarterly Coal Report › Monthly Energy Review › Residential Energy ... main heating equipment is a portable heater, ...

344

Cooling Strings of Superconducting Devices below 2 K the Helium II Bayonet Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy particle accelerators and colliders contain long strings of superconducting devices - acceleration RF cavities and magnets - operating at high field, which may require cooling in helium II below 2 K. In order to maintain adequate operating conditions, the applied or generated heat loads must be extracted and transported with minimum temperature difference. Conventional cooling schemes based on conductive or convective heat transport in pressurized helium II very soon reach their intrinsic limits of thermal impedance over extended lengths. We present the concept of helium II bayonet heat exchanger, which has been developed at CERN for the magnet cooling scheme of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and describe its specific advantages as a slim, quasi-isothermal heat sink. Experimental results obtained on several test set-ups, and a prototype magnet string have permitted to validate its performance and sizing rules, for transporting linear heat loads in the W.m-1 range over distances of several tens o...

Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Van Weelderen, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

STABLE HEATING OF CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS BY COSMIC-RAY STREAMING  

SciTech Connect

We study heating of cool cores in galaxy clusters by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming using numerical simulations. In this model, CRs are injected by the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) and move outward with Alfven waves. The waves are excited by the streaming itself and become nonlinear. If magnetic fields are large enough, CRs can prevail in and heat the entire core because of a large Alfven velocity. We find that the CR streaming can stably heat both high- and low-temperature clusters for a long time without the assistance of thermal conduction, and it can prevent the development of massive cooling flows. If there is even a minor contribution from thermal conduction, the heating can be stabilized further. We discuss the reason for the stability and indicate that the CR pressure is insensitive to changes in the intracluster medium (ICM) and that the density dependence of the heating term is similar to that of radiative cooling.

Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Theory Centre, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Candidate chemical systems for air cooled solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part I. Organic absorbent systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the available experimental evidence suggests that the optimum ''organic'' absorbent/refrigerant combination would be a methane derivative with a single hydrogen atom with chlorine and fluorine atoms in the other sites, as refrigerant. This would be hydrogen bonded to an absorbent molecule containing the group =NC/sup -/O, with the substituent groups being such that no steric hindrance took place. Cycle analyses showed that the ratio of internal heat transfer to cooling would be large, probably impractically so in view of the high coefficient of performance needed for solar driven cooling and the additional handicap of heat rejection to the atmosphere. A more promising approach would be to reduce the internal heat transfer per unit of space cooling by selecting a refrigerant with a high latent heat of vaporization and selecting an absorbent with suitable properties.

Biermann, W.J.

347

Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, A. Vahab (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

349

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

350

Contact-cooled U-monochromators for high heat load x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design, expected performance, and preliminary test results of a contact-cooled monochromator for use on high heat load x-ray beamlines. The monochromator has a cross section in the shape of the letter U. This monochromator should be suitable for handing heat fluxes up to 5 W/square millimeter. As such, for the present application, it is compatible with the best internally cooled crystal monochromators. There are three key features in the design of this monochromator. First, it is contact cooled, thereby eliminating fabrication of cooling channels, bonding, and undesirable strains in the monochromator due to coolant-manifold-to-crystal-interface. Second, by illuminating the entire length of the crystal and extracting the central part of the reflected beam, sharp slope changes in the beam profile and thus slope errors are avoided. Last, by appropriate cooling of the crystal, tangential slope error can be substantially reduced.

Khounsary, A.; Yun, W.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Xu, S.; Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heat Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer from Rotating Blade Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling J.C. Han and M.T. Schobeiri SCIES Project 03-01-SR113 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Texas A&M University Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded 07/01/2003 (36 Month Duration) $461,024 Total Contract Value ($361,024 DOE) Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory Texas A&M University SR 113 - 10-2005 - JCHan Gas Turbine Needs Need Detailed Heat Transfer Data on Rotating Blade Platforms Improve Current Rotor Blade Cooling Schemes Provide Options for New Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Need Accurate and Efficient CFD Codes to Improve Flow and Heat Transfer Predictions and Guide Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Improved Turbine Power Efficiency by Increasing Turbine

352

Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang [Solar Thermal and Geothermal Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Lim, Hyug [Research and Development Center, LHE Co., Ltd., Gimhae 621-874 (Korea)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tubesheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tubesheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tubesheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch therebetween. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Johnson, F. Thomas (Baldwin Boro, PA); Orr, Richard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building Technologies Office: Space Heating and Cooling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(HVAC) and refrigeration. DOE is conducting research into integration of optimized heat exchanger designs into new products and space conditioning systems. DOE projects...

357

Influence of Heat Source Cooling Limitation on ORC System Layout ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... compensates for the temperature loss induced by a second heat exchanger. ... Abart CDS - a New Compact Multi-pollutant Pot Gas and Alumina Handling ...

358

Crosslinked crystalline polymer and methods for cooling and heating  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to crystalline polyethylene pieces having optimum crosslinking for use in storage and recovery of heat, and it further relates to methods for storage and recovery of heat using crystalline polymer pieces having optimum crosslinking for these uses. Crystalline polymer pieces are described which retain at least 70% of the heat of fusion of the uncrosslinked crystalline polymer and yet are sufficiently crosslinked for the pieces not to stick together upon being cycled above and below the melting point of said polymer, preferably at least 80% of the heat of fusion with no substantial sticking together.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Botham, Ruth A. (Dayton, OH); Ball, III, George L. (West Carrollton, OH)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar heating and cooling in the Los Alamos National Security and Resources Study Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the solar energy system for the National Security and Resources Study Center, a conference center and library at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The solar heating and cooling system makes use of selectively coated collectors, hot storage, cold storage, night evaporative cold storage, heat recovery, a lithium bromide chiller, and a Rankine-cycle chiller. Data are given for the performance of the system for the years 1978 and 1979. The solar energy system has provided 76% of the energy required to heat the building and 97% of the thermal energy required to cool the building.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Murray, H.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Performance Assessment of 239 Series Sub-cooling Heat Exchangers for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helium sub-cooling heat exchangers of the counter-flow type are used to minimize the vapor fraction produced in the final expansion of the 1.9 K distributed cooling loops used for cooling the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These components are of compact design, featuring low-pressure drop and handling very low pressure vapor at low temperature. Following a qualification phase of prototypes, a contract has been placed in European industry for the supply of 239 heat exchanger units. Different levels of extracted heat load require three different variants of heat exchangers. This paper will describe the manufacturing phase with emphasis on the main difficulties encountered to keep the production quality after a brief recall of the prototype phase. Finally, the acceptance tests performed at room temperature and at the nominal cryogenic condition at the factory and at CEA-Grenoble will be presented.

Riddone, G; Roussel, P; Moracchioli, R; Tavian, L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida Solar Energy Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. Information is provided on the system's test, operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings. The Center's office building, approximately 5000 square feet of space, with solar air conditioning and heating as a demonstration of the technical feasibility is located just north of Port Canaveral, Florida. The system was designed to supply approximately 70% of the annual cooling and 100% of the heating load. The project provides unique high-temperature, non-imaging, non-tracking, evacuated-tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection.

Hankins, J.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Application Research of Evaporative Cooling in the Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporative condenser is one kind of high-efficient and energy-water saving heat exchange equipment, which has been widely applied in many engineering fields. The theory and product characteristic of evaporative condenser is introduced in this paper. ... Keywords: Evaporative condenser, Waste heat recovery, Energy saving, Water saving

Zhijiang Wu; Nan Wang; Gongsheng Zhu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modification Research of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modification Research of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar Thermal Power Plant. Author(s), Meng Liu, ...

365

Quasilinear theory of ion-cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas and associated longitudinal cooling  

SciTech Connect

It is shown from quasilinear theory that an initially isotropic magnetized plasma will be forced into an anisotropic state in ion-cyclotron resonance heating. Strong heating of perpendicular ion temperature and strong cooling of longitudinal temperature should occur simultaneously. The maximum temperature ratio predicted by quasilinear theory is in exact agreement with that predicted from basic thermodynamic arguments by Busnardo--Neto, Dawson, Kamimura and Lin. Heating by fast hydromagnetic wave is also examined. (auth)

Arunasalam, V.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Catastrophic cooling and cessation of heating in the solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensations in the more than 10^6 K hot corona of the Sun are commonly observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). While their contribution to the total solar EUV radiation is still a matter of debate, these condensations certainly provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamic response of the corona to the heating processes. We investigate different distributions of energy input in time and space to investigate which process is most relevant for understanding these coronal condensations. For a comparison to observations we synthesize EUV emission from a time-dependent, one-dimensional model for coronal loops, where we employ two heating scenarios: simply shutting down the heating and a model where the heating is very concentrated at the loop footpoints, while keeping the total heat input constant. The heating off/on model does not lead to significant EUV count rates that one observes with SDO/AIA. In contrast, the concentration of the heating near the footpoints leads to thermal non-equilibrium near the l...

Peter, H; Kamio, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results ...

Alfred J. Garrett; Robert J. Kurzeja; Eliel Villa-Aleman; James S. Bollinger; Malcolm M. Pendergast

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Photoreversible Micellar Solution as a Smart Drag-Reducing Fluid for Use in District Heating/Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photoreversible Micellar Solution as a Smart Drag-Reducing Fluid for Use in District Heating solution is developed as a promising working fluid for district heating/cooling systems (DHCs). It can systems. A promising application of DR fluids is in district heating/ cooling systems (DHCs)9

Raghavan, Srinivasa

370

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. Quarterly report, 9 October 1976-9 January 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is to develop twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems. Six of these are to be heating and six are to be heating/cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications. Schedules and technical discussions are given, along with illustrations on the progress made from October 9, 1976 through January 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Silverstein, C.C. (CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Design and technology of heat pipes for cooling and heat exchange  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a comprehensive account of heat pipe design, technology, and operation. It is based on insights and techniques developed by the author during more than twenty years of investigating high-performance heat pipe systems. The book provides information on a unique device with the capability to transport heat isothermally at high rates with no external power input. Emphasis is on high-performance liquid metal heat pipes, although nonliquid metal heat pipes are treated, as well. The first three chapters deal with the nonmathematical background for understanding heat pipe operation and heat transport capability. Remaining chapters detail heat pipe characteristics and design methods. Of special interest are simplified equations for obtaining heat pipe heat transport limits, heat pipe heat exchangers, heat pipe transient behavior, and inverted (nonwetting) heat pipes. Operational boundaries on heat pipe temperature and heat transport rate are described, and step-by-step procedures are given for involved calculations.

Silverstein, C.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

How and why side cooling of high-heat-load optics works.  

SciTech Connect

The temperature gradients in a side-cooled mirror would create a thermal bending moment along the mirror length. For a slender side-cooled mirror with longitudinally uniform incident beam, the tangential slope error is primarily due to the bowing deformation caused by this thermal bending moment. The thermal bending moment depends on the temperature distribution, which is a function of the mirror geometry, heat load, and cooling design. Optimal design of a side-cooled mirror can achieve a 'favorable' temperature profile to make the thermal bending moment, with respect to the substrate neutral plane, approach zero, so that the bowing deformation of the mirror is minimized. To understand the deformation of a side-cooled mirror and achieve an optimal design, a theoretical formulation is developed.

Li, Y.; Khounsary, A.; Nair, S.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); IIT

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

GEOCITY: a computer model for systems analysis of geothermal district heating and cooling costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer-simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating/cooling using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating/cooling based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The basis for our geothermal-energy cost analysis is the unit cost of energy which will recover all the costs of production. The calculation of the unit cost of energy is based on life-cycle costing and discounted-cash-flow analysis. A wide variation can be expected in the range of potential geothermal district heating and cooling costs. The range of costs is determined by the characteristics of the resource, the characteristics of the demand, and the distance separating the resource and the demand. GEOCITY is a useful tool for estimating costs for each of the main parts of the production process and for determining the sensitivity of these costs to several significant parameters under a consistent set of assumptions.

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (PHASE I) Geothermal Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (PHASE I) Geothermal Project BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (PHASE I) Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (PHASE I) Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description The Project will result in the construction of the largest ground source geothermal-based closed loop GHP heating and cooling system in America. Phase I of the Project began with the design, competitive bidding, and contract award for the drilling and "looping" of 1,800 boreholes in sports fields and parking lots on the north side of campus. The components of the entire Project include: (1) 4,100 four hundred feet deep boreholes spread over about 25 acres of sport fields and parking lots (Phase I will involve 1,800 boreholes spread over about 8 acres); (2) Each Phase will require a district energy station (about 9,000 sq. feet) that will each contain (A) two 2,500 ton heat pump chillers (which can produce 150 degree (F) water for heating purposes and 42 degree (F) water for cooling purposes); and (B) a variety of water pumps, electrical and other control systems; (3) a closed loop piping system that continuously circulates about 20,000 gallons of water (no anti-freeze) per minute through the boreholes, energy stations, a (two pipe) hot water loop and a (two pipe) chilled water loop (no water is drawn from the aquifer at any point in the operation); and (4) hot/chilled water-to-air heat exchangers in each of the buildings.

378

Solar cooling R and D overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the principal solar energy conversion processes for cooling is reviewed; applications ready for demonstrations are identified; and directions for near term R and D efforts needed to bring other potentially successful cooling systems to the point of demonstration are recommended. The principal solar cooling methods are classified as: absorption, heat engine/vapor compression, desiccant, solar assisted heat pump, photovoltaic heat pump, and passive and others.

Auh, P.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc" ,,"Total Floorspacea","Heated Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Cooled Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Lit Floorspaceb" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,53812,58474,42420,64085,54696 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,5055,4879,3958,5859,4877 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,5744,6212,4333,7421,5583 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,8196,9530,6195,10358,8251

380

Design and Development of an Intelligent Energy Controller for Home Energy Saving in Heating/Cooling System .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy is consumed every day at home as we perform simple tasks, such as watching television, washing dishes and heating/cooling home spaces during season of… (more)

Abaalkhail, Rana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Experimental Study of Gas Turbine Blade Film Cooling and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern gas turbine engines require higher turbine-entry gas temperature to improve their thermal efficiency and thereby their performance. A major accompanying concern is the heat-up of the turbine components which are already subject to high thermal and mechanical stresses. This heat-up can be reduced by: (i) applying thermal barrier coating (TBC) on the surface, and (ii) providing coolant to the surface by injecting secondary air discharged from the compressor. However, as the bleeding off of compressor discharge air exacts a penalty on engine performance, the cooling functions must be accomplished with the smallest possible secondary air injection. This necessitates a detailed and systematic study of the various flow and geometrical parameters that may have a bearing on the cooling pattern. In the present study, experiments were performed in three regions of a non-rotating gas turbine blade cascade: blade platform, blade span, and blade tip. The blade platform and blade span studies were carried out on a high pressure turbine rotor blade cascade in medium flow conditions. Film-cooling effectiveness or degree of cooling was assessed in terms of cooling hole geometry, blowing ratio, freestream turbulence, coolant-to-mainstream density ratio, purge flow rate, upstream vortex for blade platform cooling and blowing ratio, and upstream vortex for blade span cooling. The blade tip study was performed in a blow-down flow loop in a transonic flow environment. The degree of cooling was assessed in terms of blowing ratio and tip clearance. Limited heat transfer coefficient measurements were also carried out. Mainstream pressure loss was also measured for blade platform and blade tip film-cooling with the help of pitot-static probes. The pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and temperature sensitive paint (TSP) techniques were used for measuring film-cooling effectiveness whereas for heat transfer coefficient measurement, temperature sensitive paint (TSP) technique was employed. Results indicated that the blade platform cooling requires a combination of upstream purge flow and downstream discrete film-cooling holes to cool the entire platform. The shaped cooling holes provided wider film coverage and higher film-cooling effectiveness than the cylindrical holes while also creating lesser mainstream pressure losses. Higher coolant-to-mainstream density ratio resulted in higher effectiveness levels from the cooling holes. On the blade span, at any given blowing ratio, the suction side showed better coolant coverage than the pressure side even though the former had two fewer rows of holes. Film-cooling effectiveness increased with blowing ratio on both sides of the blade. Whereas the pressure side effectiveness continued to increase with blowing ratio, the increase in suction side effectiveness slowed down at higher blowing ratios (M=0.9 and 1.2). Upstream wake had a detrimental effect on film coverage. 0% and 25% wake phase positions significantly decreased film-cooling effectiveness magnitude. Comparison between the compound shaped hole and the compound cylindrical hole design showed higher effectiveness values for shaped holes on the suction side. The cylindrical holes performed marginally better in the curved portion of the pressure side. Finally, the concept tip proved to be better than the baseline tip in terms of reducing mainstream flow leakage and mainstream pressure loss. The film-cooling effectiveness on the concept blade increased with increasing blowing ratio and tip gap. However, the film-coverage on the leading tip portion was almost negligible.

Narzary, Diganta P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Thermal Test of Cast Iron Cooling Stave Produced by Lost Foam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The producing of cooling stave using lost foam casting process has the advantages of .... Numerical simulation of microwave absorption of regenerative heat ...

383

Modeling Free Convection Flow of Liquid Hydrogen within a Cylindrical Heat Exchanger Cooled to 14 K  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A liquid hydrogen in a absorber for muon cooling requires that up to 300 W be removed from 20 liters of liquid hydrogen. The wall of the container is a heat exchanger between the hydrogen and 14 K helium gas in channels within the wall. The warm liquid hydrogen is circulated down the cylindrical walls of the absorber by free convection. The flow of the hydrogen is studied using FEA methods for two cases and the heat transfer coefficient to the wall is calculated. The first case is when the wall is bare. The second case is when there is a duct some distance inside the cooled wall.

Green, Michael A.; Oxford U.; Yang, S.W.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Are X-ray Clusters Cooled by Heat Conduction to the Surrounding Intergalactic Medium?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that X-ray clusters would have cooled substantially over a Hubble time by transport of heat from their hot interior to the their envelope, if the heat conductivity had not been heavily suppressed relative to the Spitzer value due to magnetic fields. The suppression is required in order for the observed abundance of hot X-ray clusters to be consistent with predictions from popular cosmological models. If a similar or stronger suppression factor applies to cluster cores, then thermal conduction can not be the mechanism that prevents cooling flows there.

Abraham Loeb

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preliminary feasibility study of heating and cooling alternatives for Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

The existence of a recently-recognized, low-temperature, geothermal resource under central and western Nebraska represents a potential alternate energy source. The feasibility of using that resource for space heating and cooling at Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska, as an alternative to that facility's current, natural-gas fired, heating and cooling system is explored. This study addresses: (1) the geological (hydrological) aspects of such a project; (2) the retrofitting requirements for modifying the existing heating plants to accommodate the geothermal resource; (3) the possible use of shallow, unconfined groundwater with heat pumps as another energy alternative; and (4) the economic costs and benefits of both deep and shallow-water hydrothermal application.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Preliminary feasibility study of heating and cooling alternatives for Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existence of a recently-recognized, low-temperature, geothermal resource under central and western Nebraska represents a potential alternate energy source. The feasibility of using that resource for space heating and cooling at Nebraska Western College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska, as an alternative to that facility's current, natural-gas fired, heating and cooling system is explored. This study addresses: (1) the geological (hydrological) aspects of such a project; (2) the retrofitting requirements for modifying the existing heating plants to accommodate the geothermal resource; (3) the possible use of shallow, unconfined groundwater with heat pumps as another energy alternative; and (4) the economic costs and benefits of both deep and shallow-water hydrothermal application.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Extracting interstellar diffuse absorption bands from cool star spectra: Application to bulge clump giants in Baade's window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interstellar diffuse bands are usually extracted from hot star spectra because they are characterized by smooth continua. It introduces a strong limitation on the number of available targets, and reduces potential studies of the IS matter and the use of absorptions for cloud mapping. We have developed a new automatic fitting method appropriate to interstellar absorptions in spectra of cool stars that possess stellar atmospheric parameters. We applied this method to the extraction of three DIBs in high resolution VLT FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra of red clump stars from the bulge. By combining all stellar synthetic spectra, HITRAN-LBLRTM atmospheric transmission spectra and diffuse band empirical absorption profiles, we determine the 6196, 6204, and 6284 A DIB strength toward the 219 target stars and discuss the sources of uncertainties. In order to test the sensitivity of the DIB extraction, we intercompare the three results and compare the DIB equivalent widths with the reddening derived from an independent extinct...

Chen, Hui-Chen; Babusiaux, Carine; Puspitarini, Lucky; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Hill, Vanessa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies  

SciTech Connect

Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) to radiator heat pipes.

Ranken, W.A.; Houts, M.G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Quarterly reports for RS-600 programmable controller: solar heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three identical microprocessor control subsystems were developed which can be used in heating, heating and cooling, and/or hot water systems for single-family, or commercial applications. The controller incorporates a low cost, highly reliable (all solid state) microprocessor which can be easily reprogrammed. These reports cover the progress made in the development of the controller. Included in these reports are the technical status, program schedules, and other progress made from October 30, 1976 through July 1, 1977.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

Ingley, H A

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Gravo-thermodynamics of the Intracluster Medium: negative heat capacity and dilation of cooling time scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time scale for cooling of the gravitationally bound gaseous intracluster medium (ICM) is not determined by radiative processes alone. If the ICM is in quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium in the fixed gravitational field of the dark matter halo then energy losses incurred by the gravitational potential energy of the gas should also be taken into account. This "gravitational heating" has been known for a while using explicit solutions to the equations of motion. Here, we re-visit this effect by applying the virial theorem to gas in quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium in an external gravitational field, neglecting the gravity of the gas. For a standard NFW form of halo profiles and for a finite gas density, the response of the gas temperature to changes in the total energy is significantly delayed. The effective cooling time could be prolonged by more than an order of magnitude inside the scale radius ($\\rs$) of the halo. Gas lying at a distance twice the scale radius, has negative heat capacity so that the temperature increases as a result of energy losses. Although external heating (e.g. by AGN activity) is still required to explain the lack of cool ICM near the center, the analysis here may circumvent the need for heating in farther out regions where the effective cooling time could be prolonged to become larger than the cluster age and also explains the increase of temperature with radius in these regions.

Adi Nusser

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

Guidelines for selecting a solar heating, cooling or hot water design  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines are presented for the professional who may have to choose between competing solar heating and cooling designs for buildings. The experience of the National Solar Data Network in monitoring over 100 solar installations are drawn upon. Three basic principles and a design selection checklist are developed which will aid in choosing the most cost effective design.

Kelly, C.J. Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type: Revision  

SciTech Connect

We present a comparative study in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. We use these equations to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type  

SciTech Connect

A comparative study is presented in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. These equations are used to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The calculation method of heating and cooling energy saving potential in urban district  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used to be focus in concerns by taking particulate matters, NOx, VOCs and CO2 emission by combustion of fossil fuels, i.e. coal, crude oil and natural gas. The combustion of these fuels has been a major source of environmental pollution ... Keywords: cooling, electricity, energy, gas, heating, potential, saving

Shin Do Kim; Im Hack Lee; Sung Moon Cheon

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports, April 1, 1978--June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling sytems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

405

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

406

The Relative Effects of U.S. Population Shifts (1930-80) on Potential Heating, Cooling and Water Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on potential heating, cooling and water demand induced by the shift and growth of population from cooler and wetter regions of the country to warmer and drier areas were examined. Heating and cooling degree day totals for each of the ...

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Heating of solar chromosphere by electromagnetic wave absorption in a plasma slab model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating of chromospheric inter-network regions by means of the absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves that originate from the photospheric blackbody radiation is studied in the framework of a plasma slab model. The absorption is provided by the electron-neutral collisions. Given the uncertain nature of the collision cross-section due to the plasma micro-turbulence, it is shown that for plausible physical parameters, the heating flux produced by the absorption of EM waves in the chromosphere is between $20 - 45$ % of the chromospheric radiative loss flux requirement. It is also established that there is an optimal value for the collision cross-section, $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ m$^{2}$, that produces the maximal heating flux of 1990 W m$^{-2}$.

Tsiklauri, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluation of the Corning and Philips evacuated tubular collectors in a residential solar heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 May 1976--1 December 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Applications Laboratory of Colorado State University has completed the design, construction, and installation of a complete set of evacuated tubular collectors on a test bed behind Solar House I. The collectors, the Corning evacuated tube collector (December 16, 1976 to December 31, 1977) and the Philips evacuated tube collector (January 16, 1978 to January 31, 1979) are being used sequentially to operate the heating and cooling system of Solar House I. Data are being collected over an entire heating and cooling season and analyses are being performed on these data to provide an evaluation of the two new collectors and comparison with the present conventional collector as part of a residential heating and cooling system that is otherwise identical in every way. This project is significant for several reasons. First, the two high performance collectors operate in conjunction with an advanced ARKLA lithium bromide water chiller. This cooling unit is designed specifically for operation with solar energy systems. For comparative purposes the advanced ARKLA unit will be available for use with the existing conventional flat-plate collector. In addition, comparisons of operating data are being made with Solar Houses II and III, adjacent to Solar House I. Solar Houses II and III have the same thermal load characteristics as Solar House I, but have different solar heating and cooling systems. House II has an air heating collector and pebble-bed storage. House III has an evacuated tube solar collector, and is also coupled with an advanced absorption water chiller unit. The comparative analysis under the same load conditions, provides an exceptional opportunity in evaluating the relative merits of the new collector systems.

Duff, W.S.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

Louay Chamra

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling (Revised) (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. STEP 1 Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential STEP 2 Identify Challenges to Local Development STEP 3 Evaluate Current Policy STEP 4 Consider Policy Options STEP 5 Implement Policies Increased Development Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling This document identifies and describes five steps for implementing geothermal policies that may reduce barriers and result in deployment and implementation of geothermal heating and cooling technologies, such as ground source heat pumps (GSHP) and direct-use applications. Step 1: Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential Increasing the use of geothermal energy requires a baseline level of knowledge about the industry and market trends in your locality. As you

412

Transient cooling and heating via a bismuth-telluride thermoelectric device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric cooling or heating can be used to drive materials to specified temperatures. By way of the Peltier effect, heat is liberated or absorbed when a current flows across a 'unction of two dissimilar conductors. A time history of the temperature cycle can be used to correlate a thermal response as a function of electrical current and initial temperature. In this thesis, the thermoelectric cooling and heating of copper and mercury, in conjunction with bismuth-telluride (Bl2Te3) semiconductors, are measured and compared against a I-D approximation developed by Bhattacharyya, Lagoudas, Waiig, and Kinra.' Based on results published in the aforementioned article and unpublished work of the author, refinements in the experimental setup are meant to further insure that the I-D assumptions are followed as accurately as possible. The improvements however are dwarfed by possible misconceptions assumed in the physics of the setup.

Clancy, Terry L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

414

Use of cooling-temperature heat for sustainable food production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food production and energy are undoubtedly interlinked. However, at present food production depends almost exclusively on direct use of stored energy sources, may they be nuclear-, petroleum- or bio-based. Furthermore, non-storage based “renewable” energy systems, like wind and solar, need development before bering able to contribute at a significant level. This presentation will point towards surplus heat as a way to bridge the gap between today’s food systems and truly sustainable ones, suitable to be performed in urban and peri-urban areas. Considering that arable land and fresh water resources are the base for our present food systems, but are limited, in combination with continued urbanisation, such solutions are urgently needed. By combining the use of surplus energy with harvest of society’s organic side flows, like e.g. food waste and aquatic based cash crops, truly sustainable and urban close food systems are possible at a level of significance also for global food security.

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

None

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

SciTech Connect

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Roof shading and wall glazing techniques for reducing peak building heating and cooling loads. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The roof shading device proved to be effective in reducing peak building cooling loads under both actual testing conditions and in selected computer simulations. The magnitude of cooling load reductions varied from case to case depending on individual circumstances. Key variables that had significant impacts on its thermal performance were the number of months of use annually, the thermal characteristics of the roof construction, hours of building use, and internal gains. Key variables that had significant impacts upon economic performance were the costs of fuel energy for heating and cooling, and heating and cooling equipment efficiency. In general, the more sensitive the building is to climate, the more effective the shading device will be. In the example case, the annual fuel savings ($.05 psf) were 6 to 10% of the estimated installation costs ($.50 to .75 psf). The Trombe wall installation at Roxborough High School proved to be effective in collecting and delivering significant amounts of solar heat energy. It was also effective in conserving heat energy by replacing obsolete windows which leaked large amounts of heat from the building. Cost values were computed for both solar energy contributions and for heat loss reductions by window replacement. Together they amount to an estimated three hundred and ninety dollars ($390.00) per year in equivalent electric fuel costs. When these savings are compared with installation cost figures it is apparent that the Trombe wall installation as designed and installed presents a potentially cost-effective method of saving fuel costs. The study results indicate that improved Trombe wall efficiency can be achieved by making design and construction changes to reduce or eliminate outside air leakage into the system and provide automatic fan control.

Ueland, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

SciTech Connect

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar collector related research and development in the United States for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the research funded by the Research and Development Branch of the Heating and Cooling Division of Solar Energy of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration is described. Specifically, collector and collector materials research is reported on during FY-1977. The R and D Branch has funded research in open and closed cycle liquid heating flat plate collectors, air heating flat plate collectors, heat pipe collectors, concentrating collectors, collector heat transfer studies, honeycomb glazings, evacuated tube collectors, ponds both salt gradient and viscosity stabilized, materials exposure testing, collector testing standards, absorber surface coatings, and corrosion studies. A short description of the nature of the research is provided as well as a presentation of the significant results.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absorption cooling heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium conditions. However, the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation path due to non-equilibrium partitioning of alloying elements cannot be predicted by equilibrium phase diagrams. Also, it is unclear if there is retention of delta ferrite to room temperature due to compositional or thermal effects. This would dramatically affect the austenite to ferrite transformation due to carbon and nitrogen enrichment in the austenite.

Narayana, B [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Mills, Michael J. [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Ohio State University, The, Columbus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

IMPACTS OF REFRIGERANTLINE LENGTH ON SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IN RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS USING REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on system efficiency of excess refrigerant line length are calculated for an idealized residential heating and cooling system. By excess line length is meant refrigerant tubing in excess of the 25 R provided for in standard equipment efficiency test methods. The purpose of the calculation is to provide input for a proposed method for evaluating refrigerant distribution system efficiency. A refrigerant distribution system uses refrigerant (instead of ducts or pipes) to carry heat and/or cooling effect from the equipment to the spaces in the building in which it is used. Such systems would include so-called mini-splits as well as more conventional split systems that for one reason or another have the indoor and outdoor coils separated by more than 25 ft. This report performs first-order calculations of the effects on system efficiency, in both the heating and cooling modes, of pressure drops within the refrigerant lines and of heat transfer between the refrigerant lines and the space surrounding them.

ANDREWS, J.W.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Optimal Scheduling for Biocide and Heat Exchangers Maintenance Towards Environmentally Friendly Seawater Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using seawater in cooling systems is a common practice in many parts of the world where there is a shortage of freshwater. However, biofouling is one of the major operational problems associated with the usage of seawater in cooling systems. Microfouling is caused by the activities of microorganisms, such as bacteria and algae, producing a very thin layer that sticks to the inside surface of the tubes in heat exchangers. This thin layer has a tremendously negative impact on heat transferred across the heat exchanger tubes in the system. In some instances, even a 250 micrometer thickness of fouling film can reduce the heat exchanger's heat transfer coefficient by 50 percent. On the other hand, macrofouling is the blockage caused by relatively large marine organisms, such as oysters, mussels, clams, and barnacles. A biocide is typically added to eliminate, or at least reduce, biofouling. Typically, microfouling can be controlled by intermittent dosages, and macrofouling can be controlled by continuous dosages of biocide. The aim of this research work is to develop a systematic approach to the optimal operating and design alternatives for integrated seawater cooling systems in industrial facilities. A process integration framework is used to provide a holistic approach to optimizing the design and operation of the seawater cooling system, along with the dosage and discharge systems. Optimization formulations are employed to systematize the decision-making and to reconcile the various economic, technical, and environmental aspects of the problem. Building blocks of the approach include the biocide water chemistry and kinetics, process cooling requirements, dosage scenarios and dynamic profiles, biofilm growth, seawater discharge, and environmental regulations. Seawater chemistry is studied with emphasis on the usage of biocide for seawater cooling. A multi-period optimization formulation is developed and solved to determine: * The optimal levels of dosing and dechlorination chemicals * The timing of maintenance to clean the heat-exchange * The dynamic dependence of the biofilm growth on the applied doses, the seawater-biocide chemistry, the process conditions, and seawater characteristics for each time period. The technical, economic, and environmental considerations of the system are accounted for and discussed through case studies.

Binmahfouz, Abdullah

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

PERFORMANCE OF AN EXPERIMENTAL SOLAR-DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONER--ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1975-SEPT. 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooled, ammonia-water absorption chiller as a starting pointabsorption cycle under such conJitions. A nominal three-ton,continuous operation, heat-actuated water chiller

Dao, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Latent Heating and Cooling Rates in Developing and Nondeveloping Tropical Disturbances during TCS-08: Radar-Equivalent Retrievals from Mesoscale Numerical Models and ELDORA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latent heating and cooling rates have a critical role in predicting tropical cyclone formation and intensification. In a prior study, Park and Elsberry estimated the latent heating and cooling rates from aircraft Doppler radar [Electra Doppler ...

Myung-Sook Park; Andrew B. Penny; Russell L. Elsberry; Brian J. Billings; James D. Doyle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I-' O'l Annual Heating Requirements NBSLD BLAST DOE-2 (SWF)Cooling Requirements (10 6 Btu) Btu) I'" I NBSLD III DOE-2 (DOE-2.1 predictions of annual heating and cooling requirements

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Design, fabrication and testing of a model heating and cooling system for a vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

A full-size model of a typical cooling and heating system for a vacuum vessel was manufactured and examined in order to clarify and enhance the efficiency and reliability of the designed system. The model consisted of two parts; one of which had the same structure as the other and was located facing each other to simulate the adiabatic condition of the vacuum-side of a vacuum vessel. Its components were rectangular plates, eletric heater units, cooling pipes inside of which water and air flew as cooling fluid. A lot of kinds of tests and measurements were performed to evaluate efficiency and reliability on the model. The numerical and theoretical analyses on the system were also carried out using the dimensional finite difference technique. The analytical results agreed pretty well with the experimental.

Shimizu, M.; Miyauchi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kajiura, S.; Koizumi, M.; Hata, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Passive heating and cooling strategies for single family housing in Fresno, California: a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the integration of passive heating, cooling, and ventilating techniques for detached single family housing in Fresno, California. The energy use and patterns of energy use were simulated for a typical tract house in Fresno, and serves as a case study, to which energy saving strategies were applied and evaluated using Ener-Win software. The effectiveness of each strategy was assessed based on the annual savings, the initial cost, and a life-cycle cost analysis. Specific areas of evaluation include: shading, improving the R-value and infiltration rate of the building envelope, thermal mass, natural ventilation, and evaporative cooling. The optimum strategies selected utilize only traditional building techniques. Evaporative cooling used in conjunction with an air conditioner was the most effective energy reducing strategy, but a combination of purely passive strategies yield competitive results. Although the typical Fresno home is already energy efficient, small alterations provide energy savings up to 75% for space conditioning.

Winchester, Nathan James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Stirling cycle heat pump for heating and/or cooling systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a duplex Stirling cycle machine acting as a heat pump. It comprises: a Stirling engine having pistons axially displaceable within parallel cylinders, the engine further having a swashplate rotatable about an axis of, rotation parallel to the cylinders and defining a plane inclined from the axis of rotation. The pistons connected to the swashplate via crossheads whereby axial displacement of the pistons is converted to rotation of the swashplate, and a Stirling cycle heat pump having a compression heat exchanger, an expansion heat exchanger and a regenerator with pistons equal in number to the engine pistons and axially displaceable within cylinders which are oriented co-axially with the engine cylinders. The crossheads further connected to the heat pump pistons whereby the heat pump pistons move simultaneously with the engine pistons over an equal stroke distance.

Meijer, R.J.; Khalili, K.; Meijer, E.; Godett, T.M.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied… (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Spray cooling heat-transfer with subcooled trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon-113) for vertical constant heat flux surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were done using subcooled Freon-113 sprayed vertically downward. Local and average heat transfers were investigated fro Freon-113 sprays with 40 C subcooling, droplet sizes 200-1250{mu}m, and droplet breakup velocities 5-29 m/s. Full-cone type nozzles were used to generate the spray. Test assemblies consisted of 1 to 6 7.62 cm vertical constant heat flux surfaces parallel with each other and aligned horizontally. Distance between heated surfaces was varied from 6.35 to 76.2 mm. Steady state heat fluxes as high as 13 W/cm{sup 2} were achieved. Dependence on the surface distance from axial centerline of the spray was found. For surfaces sufficiently removed from centerline, local and average heat transfers were identical and correlated by a power relation of the form seen for normal-impact sprays which involves the Weber number, a nondimensionalized temperature difference, and a mass flux parameter. For surfaces closer to centerline, the local heat transfer depended on vertical location on the surface while the average heat transfer was described by a semi-log correlation involving the same parameters. The heat transfer was independent of the distance (gap) between the heated surfaces for the gaps investigated.

Kendall, C.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Holman, J.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways to Provide Comfort Indoors Speaker(s): Hui Zhang Date: October 9, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rongxin Yin This presentation describes energy efficient approaches to provide comfort in offices by creating non-uniform and transient thermal environments. The presentation will describe 1) distributions and characteristics of thermoreceptors of human body, 2) comfort responses of people exposed to complex thermal environments, 3) concept of "alliesthesia", 4) personal comfort systems developed by CBE, 5) their energy efficiency and demand response potential, and 6) the CBE advanced thermal comfort model. A recording of this seminar is available at: https://vimeo.com/51536661

434

Standard assumptions and methods for solar heating and cooling systems analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of inputs, assumptions, analytical methods, and a reporting format is presented to help compare the results of residential and commercial solar system analyses being performed by different investigators. By the common use of load data, meteorological data, economic parameters, and reporting format, researchers examining, for example, two types of collectors may more easily compare their results. For residential heating and cooling systems, three locations were selected. The weather data chosen to characterize these cities are the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY). A house for each location was defined that is typical of new construction in that locale. Hourly loads for each location were calculated using a computerized load model that interacts with the system specified inputs characterizing each house. Four locations for commercial cooling analyses were selected from among the existing sites for which TMYs were available. A light commercial (nominal 25-ton cooling load) office building was defined and is used in all four locations. Hourly cooling and heating loads were computed for each city and are available on magnetic tape from the Solar Energy Research Insititute (SERI).

Leboeuf, C.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of the typical meteorological years for solar heating and cooling system studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an evaluation of the weather data set, generated at Sandia Laboratories, known as the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) Data. The purpose of the evaluation is to determine how well the TMY data represent actual long-term weather data in affecting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems. The two data sets are compared through detailed SHAC simulation.

Freeman, T. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Temperature measurement and sensor selection for solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The different methods for temperature and temperature difference measurement are critically described as to their applicability to solar heating and cooling systems. The major commercial temperature sensors are surveyed, and their technical and economic aspects are discussed. Installation and calibration techniques are recommended. The temperature measuring system implemented in the University of Pennsylvania Solar Row House as a consequence of the above considerations is described.

Lior, N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Complex Absorption and Reflection of a Multi-temperature Cyclotron-Bremsstrahlung X-ray Cooling Shock in BY Cam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-analyse the ASCA and GINGA X-ray data from BY Cam, a slightly asynchronous magnetic accreting white dwarf. The spectra are strongly affected by complex absorption, which we model as a continuous (power law) distribution of covering fraction and column of neutral material. This absorption causes a smooth hardening of the spectrum below 3 keV, and is probably produced by material in the preshock column which overlies the X-ray emission region. The ASCA data show that the intrinsic emission from the shock is not consistent with a single temperature plasma. Significant iron L emission co-existing with iron K shell lines from H and He-like iron clearly shows that there is a wide range of temperatures present, as expected from a cooling shock structure. The GINGA data give the best constraints on the maximum temperature emission in the shocked plasma, with kT(max)=21(+18,-4) keV. Cyclotron cooling should also be important, which supresses the highest temperature bremsstrahlung components, so the X-ray data on...

Done, C

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Complex Absorption and Reflection of a Multi-temperature Cyclotron-Bremsstrahlung X-ray Cooling Shock in BY Cam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-analyse the ASCA and GINGA X-ray data from BY Cam, a slightly asynchronous magnetic accreting white dwarf. The spectra are strongly affected by complex absorption, which we model as a continuous (power law) distribution of covering fraction and column of neutral material. This absorption causes a smooth hardening of the spectrum below 3 keV, and is probably produced by material in the preshock column which overlies the X-ray emission region. The ASCA data show that the intrinsic emission from the shock is not consistent with a single temperature plasma. Significant iron L emission co-existing with iron K shell lines from H and He-like iron clearly shows that there is a wide range of temperatures present, as expected from a cooling shock structure. The GINGA data give the best constraints on the maximum temperature emission in the shocked plasma, with kT(max)=21(+18,-4) keV. Cyclotron cooling should also be important, which supresses the highest temperature bremsstrahlung components, so the X-ray data only give a lower limit on the mass of the white dwarf of M> 0.5 solar masses. Reflection of the multi-temperature bremsstrahlung emission from the white dwarf surface is also significantly detected. We stress the importance of modelling ALL these effects in order to gain a physically self-consistent picture of the X-ray spectra from polars in general and BY Cam in particular.

C. Done; P. Magdziarz

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

Performance of active solar space-cooling systems: 1980 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the solar absorption cooling process as represented by the NSDN system is presented. There is comprehensive data on eight solar cooling systems in the NSDN. Among these eight systems solar cooling by an absorption chiller is not a cost effective method to use solar heat. This statement is substantiated by careful analysis of each subsystem and equipment component. Good designs and operating procedures are identified. The problems which reduce cost effectiveness are pointed out. There are specific suggestions for improvements. Finally, there is a comparison of solar cooling by absorption chilling and using photovoltaic cells.

Blum, D.; Frock, S.; Logee, T.; Missal, D.; Wetzel, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System installed at Columbus Technical Institute, Columbus, Ohio was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system, hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building. Extracts from the site files specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

Coy, R.G.; Braden, R.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Spatial Diffusion of X-ray Emission Lines in the M87 Cooling Flow; Evidence for Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent XMM-Newton observations of the cooling flow gas in M87 indicate sharply decreasing oxygen, iron and silicon abundances within $\\sim 5$ kpc of the galactic center. This result is unexpected since stellar mass loss and Type Ia supernovae are expected to produce pronounced central abundance maxima for all three elements. However, it has been suggested that many of the strong X-ray lines are optically thick and diffuse to larger radii in the cooling flow before escaping, falsifying the central abundances. We verify with radiation transfer calculations that this effect does indeed occur in the M87 cooling flow, but that it is insufficient to account for the M87 observations. We suggest that some source of continuous opacity is required to reduce the central X-ray line emission, perhaps by warm gas at $T \\sim 10^5 - 10^6$ K. The radial surface brightness profiles of X-ray resonance lines are also sensitive to turbulence in cooling flows which reduces the line center optical depths considerably. Turbulence may provide sufficient energy to continuously heat the warm absorbing gas.

William G. Mathews; David A. Buote; Fabrizio Brighenti

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

Fiskum, R.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effects of a Carbon Tax on Combined Heat and Power Adoption by a Chris Marnay, Jennifer L. Edwards, Ryan M. Firestone, Srijay Ghosh, Afzal S. Siddidqui, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the µ engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild of generation based closer to heating and/or cooling loads 4. customers' requirements for service quality

445

Dual Heating and Cooling Sorption Heat Pump for a Food Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex compound sorption reactions are ideally suited for use in high temperature lift industrial heat pump cycles. Complex compound heat pumping and refrigeration provides a number of energy-saving advantages over present vapor compression systems beyond the elimination of CFCs. The elimination of moving parts in complex compound equipment lowers maintenance cost. Since ammonia is used as the refrigerant, the replacement of the mechanical compressor by the complex compound allows for direct modular integration into existing refrigeration plants. The availability of waste heat at a user's site allows for the further potential of substantially reduced energy costs.

Rockenfeller, U.; Dooley, B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingdisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle appliesof storage and absorption cooling in case of the cooling

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Film Cooling, Heat Transfer and Aerodynamic Measurements in a Three Stage Research Gas Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A and M University, is re-designed and newly installed to enable coolant gas injection on the first stage rotor platform to study the effects of rotation on film cooling and heat transfer. Pressure and temperature sensitive paint techniques are used to measure film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer on the rotor platform respectively. Experiments are conducted at three turbine rotational speeds namely, 2400rpm, 2550rpm and 3000rpm. Interstage aerodynamic measurements with miniature five hole probes are also acquired at these speeds. The aerodynamic data characterizes the flow along the first stage rotor exit, second stage stator exit and second stage rotor exit. For each rotor speed, film cooling effectiveness is determined on the first stage rotor platform for upstream stator-rotor gap ejection, downstream discrete hole ejection and a combination of upstream gap and downstream hole ejection. Upstream coolant ejection experiments are conducted for coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios of MFR=0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0% and downstream discrete hole injection tests corresponding to average hole blowing ratios of M = 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 and 2.0 for each turbine speed. To provide a complete picture of hub cooling under rotating conditions, experiments with simultaneous injection of coolant gas through upstream and downstream injection are conducted for an of MFR=1% and Mholes=0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 for the three turbine speeds. Heat transfer coefficients are determined on the rotor platform for similar upstream and downstream coolant injection. Rotation is found to significantly affect the distribution of coolant on the platform. The measured effectiveness magnitudes are lower than that obtained with numerical simulations. Coolant streams from both upstream and downstream injection orient themselves towards the blade suction side. Passage vortex cuts-off the coolant film for the lower MFR for upstream injection. As the MFR increases, the passage vortex effects are diminished. Effectiveness was maximum when Mholes was closer to one as the coolant ejection velocity is approximately equal to the mainstream relative velocity for this blowing ratio. Heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness increase with increasing rotational speed for upstream rotor stator gap injection while for downstream hole injection the maximum effectiveness and heat transfer coefficients occur at the reference speed of 2550rpm.

Suryanarayanan, Arun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solar-assisted heat pump system for cost-effective space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of heat pumps for the utilization of solar energy is studied. Two requirements for a cost-effective system are identified: (1) a special heat pump whose coefficient of performance continues to rise with source temperature over the entire range appropriate for solar assist, and (2) a low-cost collection and storage subsystem able to supply solar energy to the heat pump efficiently at low temperatures. Programs leading to the development of these components are discussed. A solar assisted heat pump system using these components is simulated via a computer, and the results of the simulation are used as the basis for a cost comparison of the proposed system with other solar and conventional systems.

Andrews, J W; Kush, E A; Metz, P D

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Simulation and analysis of high efficiency absorption systems for solar cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flexible modular computer code was developed for simulation of absorption systems. The code is capable to investigate, on a comparable basis, various cycles configurations with a variety of working fluids. In Phase 1 of the program, two open cycle absorption systems for solar energy were successfully simulated. Modifications which were applied to the code in Phase 2, allowed the analysis of systems with volatile absorbents, as used in advanced, high COP, absorption systems such as the GAX cycle. Ammonia-water database was developed into equation form and introduced to the code. That eliminated discontinuities in evaluating differentials used in the solver. Properties calculated with these equations fit well the tabulated data. This and other modifications allowed to model absorption cycles using ammonia-water. Single effect cycles converged in most ranges. Direct analysis of the code to advanced cycles, such as GAX, still encountered some convergence problems. It was, however, possible to analyze the GAX cycle in groups. The results show that high COP's are obtainable and are compatible with those reached by LBL. The properties of two additional pairs, that were developed in BG Univ., are reported. 27 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

Shavit, A.; Haim, I. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering); Borde, I.; Jelinek, M. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Applied Research Inst.)

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Performance of solar heating and cooling systems: Solid desiccant cooling/fresh air heating with evacuated-tube collectors in CSU Solar House I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In keeping with the national energy policy goal of fostering an adequate supply of energy at a reasonable cost, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) supports a variety of programs to promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system. The mission of the DOE Solar Buildings Research and Development Program is to support this goal, by providing for the development of solar technology alternatives for the buildings sector. It is the goal of the Program to establish a proven technology base to allow industry to develop solar products and designs for buildings that are economically competitive and can contribute significantly to building energy supplies nationally. Toward this end, the program sponsors research activities related to increasing the efficiency, reducing the cost, and improving the long-term durability of passive and active solar systems for building water and space heating, cooling, and daylighting applications. These activities are conducted in four major areas: Advanced Passive Solar Materials Research, Collector Technology Research, Cooling Systems Research, and Systems Analysis and Applications Research.

Loef, G.O.G.; Beba, S.; Cler, G.; Birdsong, M.; McLay, B.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z