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1

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

2

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO82 to AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

3

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

4

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

5

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

6

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 74.0 ...

9

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)

10

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

11

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

12

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

13

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

14

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

17

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

18

Errors of Nonobservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors of Nonobservation Errors of Nonobservation Finally, several potential sources of nonsampling error and bias result from errors of nonobservation. The 1994 MECS represents, in terms of sampling coverage, the mail frame of the 1994 ASM or 98 percent of the manufacturing universe, which is consistent with the 1991 MECS. Unit Nonresponse Even though the MECS is a legislatively mandated survey and sampled establishments are given sufficient opportunity and time to respond, nonresponse occurs in the MECS and is accounted for in a nonresponse adjustment of sampling weights. Clearly, had these adjustments not been performed, the estimates produced from only the responding establishments would not have been representative of the target universe for the MECS. Such estimates would have been biased. Adjusting the sampling weights to

19

ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

The information as Absolute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents and grounds (i.e. presents proof of the existence, the truth, the self-consistence and the completeness of)the informational conception ("the Information as Absolute" conception)in physics and philosophy. the conception defines the information as an ultimately common, real and fundamental concept/phenomenon - "Absolute", which exists as anabsolutely infinite set ("Information" Set) of elements (members) and informational (e.g., logical) linksbetween the elements; where any element itself is some informational structure also. Correspondingly, for example, Matter as the substence, radiation, etc., is some development or realization of informational patterns, constituting a specific - and practically infinitesimal comparing to the Set - subset of the "Information" Set. The conception allows for the resolution, or at least for a consideration on a higher level of comprehension, of the basic ontological and epistemological problems in philosophy and natural sciences; in physics it allows to suggest reasonable model, which makes more clear basic phisical notions,such as space, time, matter, etc.

Sergey V. Shevchenko; Vladimir V. Tokarevsky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

22

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas...

23

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas...

24

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

25

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

26

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

27

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

39

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

40

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

99

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

100

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

102

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

103

EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cold Fusion Error Unexpected Error Sorry An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has been routed to the appropriate...

104

EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Cold Fusion Error: Unexpected Error Sorry! An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has ...

105

EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Home > Cold Fusion Error Unexpected Error Sorry An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has been routed to the...

106

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

107

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal...

108

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

109

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

110

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

111

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

112

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

113

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

114

Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

115

Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

116

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

117

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

118

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

119

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

120

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

122

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

123

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

124

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

125

California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

126

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

127

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

128

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

129

Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

130

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

131

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

132

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

133

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

134

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

135

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

136

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

137

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

138

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

139

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

140

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

142

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

143

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

144

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

145

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

146

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

147

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

148

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

149

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

150

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

151

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

152

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

153

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

154

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

155

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

156

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

157

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

158

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

159

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

160

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

162

ARM - Field Campaign - Absolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAbsolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer (ASTI) Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Absolute...

163

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

164

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

165

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

166

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

167

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

168

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

169

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

170

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

171

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

172

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

173

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

174

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

175

Wt% = Weight percent of undissolved solids in the slurry = Density ...  

high-level radioactive waste stored in underground, tanks at the Hanford site. The ability to continuously monitor the solids weight percent of mixed slurries in these

176

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

177

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

178

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

179

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

180

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

182

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

183

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

184

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

185

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

186

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

187

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

188

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

189

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries...

190

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

191

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

192

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

193

North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

194

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

195

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

196

"RSE Table N11.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.1;...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and...

197

Impacts of a 10-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20 percent RPS by 2020 rather than the 10 percent RPS called for in S. 1766.

Alan Beamon

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy and Economic Impacts of Implementing Both a 25-Percent RPS and a 25-Percent RFS by 2025  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request by Senator James Inhofe for analysis of a "25-by-25" proposal that combines a requirement that a 25-percent share of electricity sales be produced from renewable sources by 2025 with a requirement that a 25-percent share of liquid transportation fuel sales also be derived from renewable sources by 2025.

John J. Conti

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

200

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

202

Impacts of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15 percent of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

Alan Beamon

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

Distortion Representation of Forecast Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecast error is decomposed into three components, termed displacement error, amplitude error, mid residual error, respectively. Displacement error measures how much of the forecast error can be accounted for by moving the forecast to best fit ...

Ross N. Hoffman; Zheng Liu; Jean-Francois Louis; Christopher Grassoti

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

205

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 4.3: 4.3: 4.3: ...

206

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 4.4: 4.6: 4.5: 4.3: 4.1: 4.2: 4.4: 4.3: ...

207

Is the Midlatitude Zonal Flow Absolutely Unstable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is performed of the growth and propagation of unstable baroclinic wave packets in relatively realistic midlatitude zonal currents. The absolute growth rates are calculated, incorporating the effects of both Ekman friction and ...

S. J. Lin; R. T. Pierrehumbert

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; D. F. Young; M. G. Mlynczak; K. J. Thome; S. Leroy; J. Corliss; J. G. Anderson; C.O. Ao; R. Bantges; F. Best; K. Bowman; H. Brindley; J. J. Butler; W. Collins; J. A. Dykema; D. R. Doelling; D. R. Feldman; N. Fox; X. Huang; R. Holz; Y. Huang; Z. Jin; D. Jennings; D. G. Johnson; K. Jucks; S. Kato; D. B. Kirk-Davidoff; R. Knuteson; G. Kopp; D. P. Kratz; X. Liu; C. Lukashin; A. J. Mannucci; N. Phojanamongkolkij; P. Pilewskie; V. Ramaswamy; H. Revercomb; J. Rice; Y. Roberts; C. M. Roithmayr; F. Rose; S. Sandford; E. L. Shirley; W.L. Smith; Sr.; B. Soden; P. W. Speth; W. Sun; P.C. Taylor; D. Tobin; X. Xiong

209

Absolute Energy USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ansgar, Iowa Zip 50472 Product Absolute Energy has built a 100 million gallon per year ethanol plant on the Iowa-Minnesota border near Lyle, Minnesota. Plant was commissioned in...

210

New-generation absolute angle sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes new schemes for absolute angle sensors designed on the modern element base (megapixel CCD- and CMOS-matrices). In these schemes communication between a measured object and a receiving module is organized through an optical channel ...

Yu. A. Grodetskii; Yu. E. Dukarevich; Yu. M. Ivanov

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

212

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

9:07 9:50 10:33 11:16 12:00 PercentError  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and refrigerated. A second subcore was left unsplit, capped, sealed and frozen for future chemical tests. A third requirements of the chemical procedure for pesticide testing. After slow thaw- ing, two aliquots were wet key processes operate. This paper describes a study to determine the in situ physical and chemical

214

Full field imaging based instantaneous hyperspectral absolute refractive index measurement  

SciTech Connect

Multispectral refractometers typically measure refractive index (RI) at discrete monochromatic wavelengths via a serial process. We report on the demonstration of a white light full field imaging based refractometer capable of instantaneous multispectral measurement of absolute RI of clear liquid/gel samples across the entire visible light spectrum. The broad optical bandwidth refractometer is capable of hyperspectral measurement of RI in the range 1.30 1.70 between 400nm 700nm with a maximum error of 0.0036 units (0.24% of actual) at 414nm for a = 1.50 sample. We present system design and calibration method details as well as results from a system validation sample.

Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar with RXTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have monitored the phase of the main X-ray pulse of the Crab pulsar with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) for almost eight years, since the start of the mission in January 1996. The absolute time of RXTE's clock is sufficiently accurate to allow this phase to be compared directly with the radio profile. Our monitoring observations of the pulsar took place bi-weekly (during the periods when it was at least 30 degrees from the Sun) and we correlated the data with radio timing ephemerides derived from observations made at Jodrell Bank. We have determined the phase of the X-ray main pulse for each observation with a typical error in the individual data points of 50 us. The total ensemble is consistent with a phase that is constant over the monitoring period, with the X-ray pulse leading the radio pulse by 0.0102+/-0.0012 period in phase, or 344+/-40 us in time. The error estimate is dominated by a systematic error of 40 us in the radio data, arising from uncertainties in the variable amount of pulse delay due to interstellar scattering and instrumental calibration. The statistical error is 0.00015 period, or 5 us. The separation of the main pulse and interpulse appears to be unchanging at time scales of a year or less, with an average value of 0.4001+/-0.0002 period. There is no apparent variation in these values with energy over the 2-30 keV range. The lag between the radio and X-ray pulses may be constant in phase (rotational) or constant in time (linear pathlength). We are not (yet) able to distinguish between these two interpretations.

Arnold H. Rots; Keith Jahoda; Andrew G. Lyne

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of...

217

Error detection method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

Olson, Eric J.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Absolut Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolut Energy Capital Absolut Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Absolut Energy Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip W1H - 6HN Sector Renewable Energy Product London-based private equity firm. The firm offers financing for renewable energy ventures. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Human Error Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing human error is recognized in the power-generation industry as a key factor in reducing safety-related events as well as improving asset availability. Achieving a sustainable culture change that leads to human error reduction in plant operations and maintenance remains a significant challenge to the industry. This report presents a behavior-based approach to human performance improvement and error reduction. The report explains fundamental elements of culture change and describes proven practices...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Video Signal Error Concealment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the video quality in packet loss transmission environments: error ... along the direction of each detected straight line. The lines are used to divide the ...

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer to Measure the Absolute Outdoor Longwave Irradiance with Traceability to International System of Units, SI  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180{sup o} view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U{sub 95}) of {+-}3.96 W m{sup 02} with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m{sup 2} lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG, with a standard deviation of {+-}0.7 W m{sup -2}. These results suggest that the ACP design might be used for addressing the need to improve the international reference for broadband outdoor longwave irradiance measurements.

Reda, I.; Zeng, J.; Scheuch, J.; Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An Estimate of Global Absolute Dynamic Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimate the absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography ...

Chang-Kou Tai; Carl Wunsch

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Statistical comparison of the effect of relative and absolute humidity on fixed-bed carbon adsorption capacity. Report for January 1987-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes statistical methods used to evaluate data for toluene (at several typical operating temperatures and humidity levels) and to determine which measure of humidity (relative or absolute) is more important in determining carbon adsorption efficiency. The water content of a solvent-laden stream is critical for its control via carbon adsorption, especially at relative humidities about 50-70%. (Relative humidity is the percent of saturation: absolute humidity is the total water content.)

Dunn, J.E.; Nunez, C.; Kosusko, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Absolute Ages of Globular Clusters and the Age of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main sequence turnoff luminosity is the best stellar `clock' which can be used to determine the absolute ages of globular clusters. This is due to the fact that it is generally assumed that the luminosity and lifetimes of main sequence globular cluster stars are independent of the properties of stellar convection and atmospheres, two areas of stellar evolution which are poorly understood. Several possible sources of error in this stellar clock are discussed, and isochrones are constructed using a variety of different physical assumptions. The mean age of the oldest globular clusters are determined from these isochrones and it is found that the uncertainties in the input physics can lead to changes in the derived age of $\\pm 15\\%$. Surprisingly the largest source of error is the mixing length theory of convection. It is well known that uncertainties in the distance scale and chemical composition of globular cluster stars lead to changes of order $\\sim 22\\%$ in the determination of absolute ages. Combining the various sources of error, the absolute age of the oldest globular clusters are found to lie in the range 11 --- 21 Gyr. This is meant to be a total theoretical range. For the standard inflationary model ($\\Omega = 1, \\Lambda = 0$), a minimum age of the universe of 11 Gyr requires $H_o \\la 60~\\kmsmpc$.

Brian Chaboyer

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sources of Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Sources of error in damage tolerance analysis can be classified as: Uncertainty and assumptions in data input Uncertainty due to assumptions about flaws Interpretations of, and assumptions in, stress history Inaccuracies in stress intensity Computer...

226

Absolute Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolute Energy Capital Absolute Energy Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 5NQ Product London-based private equity firm. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called ??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,? and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named ??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.? This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: ? Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. ? Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. ? Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. ? Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. ? Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: ? Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. ? Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. ? Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. ? Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: ? Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. ? The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

229

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity  

SciTech Connect

EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

232

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

233

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

234

Analysis of a 10-Percent RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10-Percent RenewablePortfolio Standard'

Alan Beamon

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Absolute response of Fuji imaging plate detectors to picosecond-electron bunches  

SciTech Connect

The characterization of the absolute number of electrons generated by laser wakefield acceleration often relies on absolutely calibrated FUJI imaging plates (IP), although their validity in the regime of extreme peak currents is untested. Here, we present an extensive study on the dependence of the sensitivity of BAS-SR and BAS-MS IP to picosecond electron bunches of varying charge of up to 60 pC, performed at the electron accelerator ELBE, making use of about three orders of magnitude of higher peak intensity than in prior studies. We demonstrate that the response of the IPs shows no saturation effect and that the BAS-SR IP sensitivity of 0.0081 photostimulated luminescence per electron number confirms surprisingly well data from previous works. However, the use of the identical readout system and handling procedures turned out to be crucial and, if unnoticed, may be an important error source.

Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Jochmann, A.; Kroll, F.; Jahr, W.; Schramm, U. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden 01314 (Germany); Karsch, L.; Pawelke, J. [TU Dresden, OncoRay-Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Hidding, B.; Pretzler, G. [Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code  

SciTech Connect

Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modular error embedding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Ettinger, J. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure, and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core, and the pore pressure of the flowing fluid. The effects of flow rate and throughput are also discussed. In contrast to some previous investigations, no effect of temperature on permeability was found beyond experimental errors and effects caused by volumetric throughput. The probable causes of differing results in previous studies are also presented.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tone Dependent Color Error Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional grayscale error di#usion halftoning produces worms and other objectionable artifacts. Tone dependent error di#usion #Li and Allebach# reduces these artifacts by controlling the di#usion of quantization errors based on the input graylevel. Li and Allebach design error #lter weights and thresholds for each #input# graylevel optimized based on a human visual system #HVS# model. This paper extends tone dependent error di#usion to color. In color error di#usion, what color to render becomes a major concern in addition to #nding optimal dot patterns. We present a visually optimum design approach for input level #tone# dependent error #lters #for each color plane#. The resulting halftones reduce traditional error di#usion artifacts and achieve greater accuracy in color rendition. 1.

Vishal Monga; Brian L. Evans

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sampling Errors in Seasonal Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limited numbers of start dates and ensemble sizes in seasonal forecasts lead to sampling errors in predictions. Defining the magnitude of these sampling errors would be useful for end users as well as informing decisions on resource ...

Stephen Cusack; Alberto Arribas

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Absolute Spectrophotometry of Northern Compact Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to noise emission line fluxes of H-alpha, H-beta, [OIII], [NII], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an H-beta flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3x10E-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

S. A. Wright; R. L. M. Corradi; M. Perinotto

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Two-Sensor System for Absolute Age and Temperature History  

absolute age and/or temperature history of a device or system starting from the time it is assembled or commissioned. Ideally this information could ...

244

Pocket Guide: Preventing Switching Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many conditions that are frequently identified as factors contributing to, if not directly causing, accidents and other unwanted events. These have come to be called "error-likely conditions." In 2010, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published report 1020018, Error-Likely Situations in Power Switching. That report was the first large-scale effort to fill the knowledge gap in the area of error-likely situations in power switching, and it identified over 100 potentially error-likely ...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quantum Zero-error Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define here a new kind of quantum channel capacity by extending the concept of zero-error capacity for a noisy quantum channel. The necessary requirement for which a quantum channel has zero-error capacity greater than zero is given. Finally, we point out some directions on how to calculate the zero-error capacity of such channels.

Rex A. C. Medeiros; Francisco M. De Assis

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

247

How Do Actuaries Use Data Containing Errors?: Models of Error Detection and Error Correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information systems provide data for business processes and decision making. There is strong evidence that data items stored in organizational databases have a significant rate of errors. If undetected in use, errors in data may significantly affect ...

Barbara D. Klein

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

249

Firewall Configuration Errors Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first quantitative evaluation of the quality of corporate firewall configurations appeared in 2004, based on Check Point FireWall-1 rule-sets. In general that survey indicated that corporate firewalls were often enforcing poorly written rule-sets, containing many mistakes. The goal of this work is to revisit the first survey. The current study is much larger. Moreover, for the first time, the study includes configurations from two major vendors. The study also introduce a novel "Firewall Complexity" (FC) measure, that applies to both types of firewalls. The findings of the current study indeed validate the 2004 study's main observations: firewalls are (still) poorly configured, and a rule-set's complexity is (still) positively correlated with the number of detected risk items. Thus we can conclude that, for well-configured firewalls, ``small is (still) beautiful''. However, unlike the 2004 study, we see no significant indication that later software versions have fewer errors (for both vendors).

Wool, Avishai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

Sun, Z. J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wells, D. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph St. Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave. Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERG/200801 Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to The Nova Scotia. Sandy Cook. #12;Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 1 Introduction In April 2007 matters. Central to the act is the government's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Hughes, Larry

252

Human Error in Airway Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report examines human errors in Airway Facilities (AF) with the intent of preventing these errors from being passed on to the new Operations Control Centers. To effectively manage errors, they first have to be identified. Human factors engineers researched human error literature, analyzed human errors recorded in AF databases, and conducted structured interviews with AF representatives. This study enabled them to categorize the types of human errors, identify potential causal factors, and recommend strategies for their mitigation. The results provide preventative measures that designers, developers, and users can take to reduce human error. 17. Key Words Human Error Error Mitigation Operations Control Centers Error Mitigation Strategies 18. Distribution Statement This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia, 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of this report) 20. Security Classif. (of this page) 21. No. of Pages 23 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was accomplished under the sponsorship of the Office of Chief Scientist for Human Factors, AAR-100. The research team greatly appreciates the support supplied by Beverly Clark of AOP-30 and our subject matter expert, Kermit Grayson of Grayson Consulting. We also wish to extend our thanks to the people interviewed at the facilities who gave their valuable time in helping us to achieve the goals of our project. iv v Table of Contents Page Acknowledgments..........................................................................................................................iii Executive Summary......................................................................................

Vicki Ahlstrom; Vicki Ahlstrom Act; Donald G. Hartman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quantum error control codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is conjectured that quantum computers are able to solve certain problems more quickly than any deterministic or probabilistic computer. For instance, Shor's algorithm is able to factor large integers in polynomial time on a quantum computer. A quantum computer exploits the rules of quantum mechanics to speed up computations. However, it is a formidable task to build a quantum computer, since the quantum mechanical systems storing the information unavoidably interact with their environment. Therefore, one has to mitigate the resulting noise and decoherence effects to avoid computational errors. In this dissertation, I study various aspects of quantum error control codes - the key component of fault-tolerant quantum information processing. I present the fundamental theory and necessary background of quantum codes and construct many families of quantum block and convolutional codes over finite fields, in addition to families of subsystem codes. This dissertation is organized into three parts: Quantum Block Codes. After introducing the theory of quantum block codes, I establish conditions when BCH codes are self-orthogonal (or dual-containing) with respect to Euclidean and Hermitian inner products. In particular, I derive two families of nonbinary quantum BCH codes using the stabilizer formalism. I study duadic codes and establish the existence of families of degenerate quantum codes, as well as families of quantum codes derived from projective geometries. Subsystem Codes. Subsystem codes form a new class of quantum codes in which the underlying classical codes do not need to be self-orthogonal. I give an introduction to subsystem codes and present several methods for subsystem code constructions. I derive families of subsystem codes from classical BCH and RS codes and establish a family of optimal MDS subsystem codes. I establish propagation rules of subsystem codes and construct tables of upper and lower bounds on subsystem code parameters. Quantum Convolutional Codes. Quantum convolutional codes are particularly well-suited for communication applications. I develop the theory of quantum convolutional codes and give families of quantum convolutional codes based on RS codes. Furthermore, I establish a bound on the code parameters of quantum convolutional codes - the generalized Singleton bound. I develop a general framework for deriving convolutional codes from block codes and use it to derive families of non-catastrophic quantum convolutional codes from BCH codes. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of some open problems.

Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Analysis of drilling fluid rheology and tool joint effect to reduce errors in hydraulics calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a simplified and accurate procedure for selecting the rheological model which best fits the rheological properties of a given non- Newtonian fluid and introduces five new approaches to correct for tool joint losses from expansion and contraction when hydraulics is calculated. The new approaches are enlargement and contraction (E&C), equivalent diameter (ED), two different (2IDs), enlargement and contraction plus equivalent diameter (E&C+ED), and enlargement and contraction plus two different IDs (E&C+2IDs). In addition to the Newtonian model, seven major non-Newtonian rheological models (Bingham plastic, Power law, API, Herschel-Bulkley, Unified, Robertson and Stiff, and Casson) provide alternatives for selecting the model that most accurately represents the shear-stress/shear-rate relationship for a given non- Newtonian fluid. The project assumes that the model which gives the lowest absolute average percent error (EAAP) between the measured and calculated shear stresses is the best one for a given non-Newtonian fluid. The results are of great importance in achieving correct results for pressure drop and hydraulics calculations and the results are that the API rheological model (RP 13D) provides, in general, the best prediction of rheological behavior for the mud samples considered (EAAP=1.51), followed by the Herschel-Bulkley, Robertson and Stiff, and Unified models. Results also show that corrections with E&C+2IDs and API hydraulics calculation give a good approximation to measured pump pressure with 9% of difference between measured and calculated data.

Viloria Ochoa, Marilyn

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

256

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

257

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

258

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

259

Nebular Abundance Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The errors inherent to the use of the standard "ionization correction factor" ("i_CF") method of calculating nebular conditions and relative abundances of H, He, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in emission line nebulae have been investigated under conditions typical for planetary nebulae. The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to construct a series of model nebulae with properties spanning the range typical of PNe. Its radial "profiles" of bright, frequently observed optical emission lines were then summed over a variety of "apertures" to generate sets of emission line measurements. These resulting line ratios were processed using the i_CF method to "derive" nebular conditions and abundances. We find that for lines which are summed over the entire nebula the i_CF-derived abundances differ from the input abundances by less than 5% for He and O up to 25% or more for Ne, S, and Ar. For resolved observations, however, the discrepancies are often much larger and are systematically variable with radius. This effect is especially pronounced in low-ionization zones where nitrogen and oxygen are neutral or once-ionized such as in FLIERs, ansae and ionization fronts. We argue that the reports of stellar-enriched N in the FLIERs of several PNe are probably specious.

J. Alexander; B. Balick

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Browse Error - Energy Innovation Portal  

Share Browse Error - Energy Innovation Portal on Facebook; ... Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARY STAR FT ORIONIS  

SciTech Connect

Accurate absolute properties are determined for the first time for the 3.15 day period eccentric eclipsing binary star FT Ori based on new absolute photometry, five differential light curves, and a radial velocity curve. The stars appear to be normal for their spectral types, A0 + A2. The orbit is highly eccentric (e = 0.409) and shows apsidal motion with a period of 536 years. The absolute properties and the degree of central mass concentration of the stars are consistent with current theoretical models at an age of 190 Myr.

Sabby, Jeffrey A. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62025 (United States); Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Ibanoglu, Cafer [Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Boronova, Izmir (Turkey); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: cafer.ibanoglu@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sampling Errors in Rawinsonde-Array Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data used for sounding-array budget computations have random errors, both instrumental errors and errors of representativeness (here called sampling errors). The latter are associated with the fact that radiosondes do not measure large-...

Brian E. Mapes; Paul E. Ciesielski; Richard H. Johnson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9

264

RSE Table 7.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" 9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,4,24,21,5,23,7,0,20

265

RSE Table 3.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,10

266

RSE Table 5.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

267

RSE Table 7.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" " "," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

268

RSE Table 1.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

269

RSE Table 7.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam" " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

270

Architecture Design for Soft Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides a comprehensive description of the architetural techniques to tackle the soft error problem. It covers the new methodologies for quantitative analysis of soft errors as well as novel, cost-effective architectural techniques to mitigate ... Keywords: Computer Architecture, Computer Engineering, Microprocessors

Shubu Mukherjee

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Moist Absolute Instability: The Sixth Static Stability State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is argued that a sixth static stability state, moist absolute instability, can be created and maintained over mesoscale areas of the atmosphere. Examination of over 130 000 soundings and a numerical simulation of an observed event are employed ...

George H. Bryan; Michael J. Fritsch

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

First Observations of Microbaroms with Single Absolute Barometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of microbaroms with single absolute barometers are presented and discussed. Microbaroms are pulses of atmospheric infrasound emitted by ocean surface waves. They can propagate over thousands of kilometers through the ...

Ganesh K. Subramanian; Andreas Muschinski

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (load in conjunction with the use of a cold front end keeps systematic instrumental corrections small. Atmospheric and window emission are minimized by flying the instrument at 24 km altitude. A large outer ground screen and smaller inner screen shield the instrument from stray radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ?...

275

Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3-year moving average) Year 3-year moving average Trendline 1950.00

276

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

277

Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Geometry of Model Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the nature of model error in complex deterministic nonlinear systems such as weather forecasting models. Forecasting systems incorporate two components, a forecast model and a data assimilation method. The latter projects ...

Kevin Judd; Carolyn A. Reynolds; Thomas E. Rosmond; Leonard A. Smith

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

280

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

282

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

283

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

284

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

285

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

286

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Global Percent Tree Cover at a Spatial Resolution of 500 Meters: First Results of the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first results of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field algorithm's global percent tree cover are presented. Percent tree cover per 500-m MODIS pixel is estimated using a supervised regression ...

M. C. Hansen; R. S. DeFries; J. R. G. Townshend; M. Carroll; C. Dimiceli; R. A. Sohlberg

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ninety-nine percent of women will be financially responsible for themselves or their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or their families at some point in their lives, but less than half (47 percent) of working women have a retirement.S. and has reached more than 19,000 people to date. Wi$eUp is available as both an on-line course Calendar for the exact date and time of your annual update training. Agent Planning Work with other

289

Human Errors in Information Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to target audience and stakeholder individuals whom are in charge of securing the assets of their organisations and institutions. This paper starts by providing a brief overview of information security, outlining the main goals and techniques of the discipline. The paper also discusses the role of human factors and how the information security research community has recognised the increasingly crucial role of human behaviour in many security failures. This is followed by a literature review of human errors in information security. Finally, this paper discusses Reason's Generic Error Modelling System (GEMS) as a potential model for explaining human errors in information security [18]. The terms computer security, network security and information security are used interchangeably in this paper.

Munir Ahmed; Lukman Sharif; Muhammad Kabir; Maha Al-maimani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Human Errors: Disadvantages and Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional paradigm for learning and training of operators in complex systems is discussed and criticised to react on the strong influence (the doctrine of 'mental logic') coming from research carried out in artificial intelligence (AI). The most well known arguments against the AI-approach are presented and discussed in relation to expertise, intuition and implicit knowledge. The importance of faults and errors are discussed in the context of a new metaphor for cognitive structures to describe expertise, and how knowledge about unsuccessful behavior influences the actual decision making process of experts. Keywords: human error, meta learning, mental model, experience, expertise 1. INTRODUCTION Why is this type of statements "I learned more from my defeats than from my victories" (Napoleon, ca. 1819) sometimes (or always) true? To answer this question we need a new understanding of human errors, inefficient behavior, and expertise. In this paper we will discuss the importance of...

Matthias Rauterberg; Daniel Felix

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Definition: Time Error | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Frequency Error over a given period.1 Related Terms Interconnection, sustainability, frequency error, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability...

292

Error-correcting codes and cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2006 ... topics where error-correcting codes overlap with cryptography. In some of these ..... human errors, e.g., misconfigurations or bugs. If biological...

293

Absolute Calibration of Analog Detectors by using Parametric Down Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report our systematic study of a promising absolute calibration technique of analog photo-detectors, based on the properties of parametric down conversion. Our formal results and a preliminary uncertainty analysis show that the proposed method can be effectively developed with interesting applications to metrology.

Giorgio Brida; Maria Chekhova; Marco Genovese; Alexander Penin; Maria Luisa Rastello; Ivano Ruo-Berchera

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis

Filippetto, D; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; Stupakov, G V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Machine Translation Errors: English and Iraqi Arabic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in machine translations of English-Iraqi Arabic dialogues were analyzed using the methods developed for the Human Translation Error Rate measure (HTER). Human annotations were used to refine the Translation Error Rate (TER) annotations. The analyses ... Keywords: Arabic, English, error analysis, evaluation, statistical machine translation

S. Condon; D. Parvaz; J. Aberdeen; C. Doran; A. Freeman; M. Awad

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

299

Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

Danko, George (Reno, NV)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

Danko, George (Reno, NV)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

"RSE Table C11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" 1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","Sources","Local Utility",,"Natural Gas","Sources","Local Utility",,"Steam","Sources","Local Utility"

302

"RSE Table C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",4,0,3,0,1,0,2,6

303

"RSE Table N11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

304

"RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

305

"RSE Table N8.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

306

"RSE Table C10.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat",," " " "," ",,"Cogeneration","Conventional","or Fluidized","Bed Boilers","with","Heat","Recovery","Combined-Cycle","Combustion","Turbines","with","Heat","Recovery","Recovered from","High-Temperature","Processes"

307

"RSE Table N11.4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" 4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

308

"RSE Table E1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

309

"RSE Table C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" ,

310

"RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

311

Absolute calibration of Analog Detectors using Stimulated Parametric Down Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous parametric down conversion has been largely exploited as a tool for absolute calibration of photon counting detectors, photomultiplier tubes or avalanche photodiodes working in Geiger regime. In this work we investigate the extension of this technique from very low photon flux of photon counting regime to the absolute calibration of analog photodetectors at higher photon flux. Moving toward higher photon rate, i.e. at high gain regime, with the spontaneous parametric down conversion shows intrinsic limitations of the method, while the stimulated parametric down conversion process, where a seed beam properly injected into the crystal in order to increase the photon generation rate in the conjugate arm, allows us to work around this problem. A preliminary uncertainty budget is discussed.

G. Brida; M. Chekhova; M. Genovese; M. L. Rastello; I. Ruo-Berchera

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements by Incoherent Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and successfully tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the rms bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Zolotorev, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /INFN, Rome; Jagerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 This front cover represents the morphology and resulting device dynamics in organic solar cell blend films of PTB7 and PC71BM, as revealed by combined resonant x-ray scattering and microscopy done at the Advanced Light Source. Harald Ade and co-workers find that the fullerene molecules (red) are miscible in the polymer (blue) up to 30 wt.%, above which they begin to agglomerate (bottom). This agglomeration is important for the optoelectronic processes within the device, but the agglomerates must be kept to small sizes by the solvent processing additive diiodooctane (DIO). Correlation of this morphology with the spectrally resolved quantum efficiency shows that the yellow excitons created upon photoabsorption must arrive at the agglomerate interface for charge separation to occur. The blue electrons and green holes can then percolate through appropriate molecules in the mixed matrix to the electrodes for harvesting of electrical energy. Article Link (PDF)

314

Absolute photoionization cross-section of the propargyl radical  

SciTech Connect

Using synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and multiplexed time-resolved photoionization mass spectrometry we have measured the absolute photoionization cross-section for the propargyl (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) radical, {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(E), relative to the known absolute cross-section of the methyl (CH{sub 3}) radical. We generated a stoichiometric 1:1 ratio of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} : CH{sub 3} from 193 nm photolysis of two different C{sub 4}H{sub 6} isomers (1-butyne and 1,3-butadiene). Photolysis of 1-butyne yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(26.1{+-}4.2) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(23.4{+-}3.2) Mb, whereas photolysis of 1,3-butadiene yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(23.6{+-}3.6) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(25.1{+-}3.5) Mb. These measurements place our relative photoionization cross-section spectrum for propargyl on an absolute scale between 8.6 and 10.5 eV. The cross-section derived from our results is approximately a factor of three larger than previous determinations.

Savee, John D.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Combustion Research Facility, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Soorkia, Satchin [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Orsay (France); Selby, Talitha M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Washington County Campus, West Bend, Wisconsin 53095 (United States)

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Error Exponent Region for Gaussian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction We introduce the notion of error exponent region (EER) for a multi-user channel. This region specifies the set of errorexponent vectors, which are simultaneously achievable by all users in the multi-user channel [1]. In this work, we derive an inner bound (achievable region) and an outer bound for the error exponent region of a Gaussian multiple access channel (GMAC). II. Formulation and Main Result An error exponent region for a multi-user channel depends on the channel operating (rate) point. For a two-user channel, we use the notation EER(R1 , R2 ) to denote the EER when the channel is operated at rate pair (R1 , R2 ). Consider a GMAC Y = X1 +X2 + Z, (1) where X1 and X2 are the channel inputs for user 1 and user 2 with E(X 1 ) = SNR1 , E(X 2 ) = SNR2 , and Z is white Gaussian noise with unit variance. Denote E(R,SNR) the maximum of random coding exponent and expurgated exponent of a single-user Gaussian channel. Our main result follow. Theorem 1: For a two-user GM

Multiple Access Channels; Lihua Weng; Achilleas Anastasopoulos; Eep Pradhan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

RSE Table 4.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,17 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,46,45,8,57,0,0,3

317

RSE Table 5.8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" 8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,14,2,9,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,18

318

RSE Table 5.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,2,3,6,2,3,9,2 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",0,11,4,14,2,9,13,0

319

RSE Table 7.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,20 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,42,45,8,57,0,0,4

320

RSE Table 10.11 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",20,32,21,0,16,68,65,73,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

RSE Table 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",31,0,91,35,0,0,0,47 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",1,0,0,0,0,0,0,8

322

RSE Table 10.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" 0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",6,18,5,0,20,85,29,20,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

323

RSE Table 10.13 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,17,8,20,21,43,34,35,37,29 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

324

RSE Table 5.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Distillate" " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,10,2,10,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,19

325

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation-Table 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation > Table 1 Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for AEO Forecast Evaluation, 1996 to...

326

Meeting the Challenge: The Prospect of Achieving 30 Percent Savings Through the Weatherization Assistance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program has been installing energy-efficiency measures in low-income houses for over 25 years, achieving savings exceeding 30 percent of natural gas used for space heating. Recently, as part of its Weatherization Plus initiative, the Weatherization Assistance Program adopted the goal of achieving 30 percent energy savings for all household energy usage. The expansion of the Weatherization Assistance Program to include electric baseload components such as lighting and refrigerators provides additional opportunities for saving energy and meeting this ambitious goal. This report documents an Oak Ridge National Laboratory study that examined the potential savings that could be achieved by installing various weatherization measures in different types of dwellings throughout the country. Three different definitions of savings are used: (1) reductions in pre-weatherization expenditures; (2) savings in the amount of energy consumed at the house site, regardless of fuel type (''site Btus''); and (3) savings in the total amount of energy consumed at the source (''source Btus''), which reflects the fact that each Btu* of electricity consumed at the household level requires approximately three Btus to produce at the generation source. In addition, the effects of weatherization efforts on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions are examined.

Schweitzer, M.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Combining Inverted Echo Sounder and Horizontal Electric Field Recorder Measurements to Obtain Absolute Velocity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of absolute velocity are difficult to obtain in the ocean, especially over long periods of time at the same location. This paper presents a method of estimating full water column absolute horizontal velocity profiles as a function of ...

Christopher S. Meinen; Douglas S. Luther; D. Randolph Watts; Karen L. Tracey; Alan D. Chave; James Richman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Incorporating Misclassification Error in Skill Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable to account for misclassification error of meteorological observations so that the true skill of the forecast can be assessed. Errors in observations can occur, among other places, in pilot reports of icing and in tornado spotting. ...

William Briggs; Matt Pocernich; David Ruppert

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Systematic Tendency Error in Budget Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric budget calculations suffer from various observational and numerical errors. This paper demonstrates that all budget calculations applied to a large number of samples suffer from additional errors originating from systematic tendency ...

Masao Kanamitsu; Suranjana Saha

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Review of Radiosonde Humidity and Temperature Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to provide a brief but comprehensive summary of sources of error in National Weather Service upper air data, and a guide to the relevant literature. Error analysis must be tailored for particular applications. Temperature ...

Robert W. Pratt

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sources of Error in Objective Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The errors in objective analysis methods that are based on corrections to first-guess fields are considered. An expression that gives a decomposition of an error into three independent components is derived. To test the magnitudes of the ...

Richard Franke

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field evolution; (iii) twist as a topological property of solenoidal fields versus the linkage properties of open and closed discrete curves treated by Gauss, Caligarneau, Berger, and Prior; and (iv) the change of absolute helicity by resistive diffusion. These are important hydromagnetic properties of twisted magnetic fields in the million-degree hot, highly conducting corona of the Sun.

Low, B. C. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect

Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

SYSTEMATIC CONTINUUM ERRORS IN THE Ly{alpha} FOREST AND THE MEASURED TEMPERATURE-DENSITY RELATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuum fitting uncertainties are a major source of error in estimates of the temperature-density relation (usually parameterized as a power-law, T {proportional_to} {Delta}{sup {gamma}-1}) of the intergalactic medium through the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Ly{alpha} forest. Using a simple order-of-magnitude calculation, we show that few percent-level systematic errors in the placement of the quasar continuum due to, e.g., a uniform low-absorption Gunn-Peterson component could lead to errors in {gamma} of the order of unity. This is quantified further using a simple semi-analytic model of the Ly{alpha} forest flux PDF. We find that under(over)estimates in the continuum level can lead to a lower (higher) measured value of {gamma}. By fitting models to mock data realizations generated with current observational errors, we find that continuum errors can cause a systematic bias in the estimated temperature-density relation of ({delta}({gamma})) Almost-Equal-To -0.1, while the error is increased to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 compared to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 in the absence of continuum errors.

Lee, Khee-Gan, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Absolute energy calibration for relativistic electron beams with pointing instability from a laser-plasma accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pointing instability of energetic electron beams generated from a laser-driven accelerator can cause a serious error in measuring the electron spectrum with a magnetic spectrometer. In order to determine a correct electron spectrum, the pointing angle of an electron beam incident on the spectrometer should be exactly defined. Here, we present a method for absolutely calibrating the electron spectrum by monitoring the pointing angle using a scintillating screen installed in front of a permanent dipole magnet. The ambiguous electron energy due to the pointing instability is corrected by the numerical and analytical calculations based on the relativistic equation of electron motion. It is also possible to estimate the energy spread of the electron beam and determine the energy resolution of the spectrometer using the beam divergence angle that is simultaneously measured on the screen. The calibration method with direct measurement of the spatial profile of an incident electron beam has a simple experimental layout and presents the full range of spatial and spectral information of the electron beams with energies of multi-hundred MeV level, despite the limited energy resolution of the simple electron spectrometer.

Cha, H. J.; Choi, I. W.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, I J.; Nam, K. H.; Jeong, T. M.; Lee, J. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Absolute motion Galilean relativity (hence Einsteins) not correct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of relativity of motion was first introduced by Galileo. In his principle of invariance he stated that the laws of motion are the same in all inertial frames. He used the Galileos ship thought experiment in his argument, among other arguments. This principle of invariance was then modified by Einstein (special relativity), which included the speed of light to be invariant in all inertial frames. Therefore, the relativity theory we know today is based on Galileos principle of invariance. There is no sound argument yet in support of relativity of motion. Simply because an observer hasnt been able to identify between illusion of motion and real motion cannot be taken as a sound argument to support relativity of motion. However, in the usual arguments of relativity of motion, to detect absolute motion is difficult. In this paper, a sound argument against Galileos principle of invariance will be presented, which will prove the notion of absolute motion to be correct and disprove relativity of motion, both Galileos and Einsteins. Discussion Imagine two hypothetical identical solar systems in space, initially at rest relative to each other, separated by some distance, with an observer in each solar system. For simplicity, assume that each solar system has one sun and one planet only, the two solar systems do not affect each other, and that the planetary orbits are both circular.

Henok Tadesse; Electrical Engineer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of temperature on the absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on absolute permeability has been a point of disagreement in the petroleum literature for many years. Recent work at Stanford University has shown no dependence on temperature of the absolute permeability to water of unconsolidated sand cores. The objective of this report is to extend the investigation to consolidated sandstone by following similar experimental procedures and observing whether any temperature effects exist. Fontainebleau sandstone was chosen as the core sample because of its low porosity and relatively clay-free composition. These characteristics allow the nature of consolidated sandstone permeability to be studied, while minimizing the effects of extraneous factors. Such factors, often present in Berea and Boise sandstones, include interstitital clay swelling in the presence of distilled water. Properties of sandstone differ from those of unconsolidated sand. Consequently, the effects of throughput water volume and flow rate, in addition to temperature, are studied. Mechanical difficulties with parts of the experimental apparatus have prevented the development of a satisfactory conclusion based on results obtained thus far. Recommendations are provided for necessary modifications before further experiments are performed. When these changes are implemented, a final run can be made to complete the analysis. 19 references, 10 figures.

McKay, W.I.; Brigham, W.E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Absolute Magnitude of RRc Variables From Statistical Parallax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 247 RRc selected from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) for which high-quality light curves, photometry and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey (CARRS). We find that M_(V,RRc) = 0.52 +/- 0.11 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M_(V,RRab) = 0.75 +/- 0.13 and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M_(V, RRc) = 0.27 +/- 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo to be (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (10.9,34.9,7.2) km/s in the radial, rotational and vertical directions with dispersions (sigma_(W_pi), sigma_(W_theta), sigma_(W_z)) = (154.7, 103.6, 93.8) km/s. For the disk, we find (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (8.5, 213...

Kollmeier, Juna A; Burns, Christopher R; Gould, Andrew; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Sneden, Christopher; Crane, Jeffrey D; Dong, Subo; Madore, Barry F; Morrell, Nidia; Prieto, Jose L; Shectman, Stephen; Simon, Joshua D; Villanueva, Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Examination of temperature-induced shape memory of uranium--5. 3-to 6. 9 weight percent niobium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The uranium-niobium alloy system was examined in the range of 5.3-to-6.9 weight percent niobium with respect to shape memory, mechanical properties, metallography, Coefficients of linear thermal expansion, and differential thermal analysis. Shape memory increased with increasing niobium levels in the study range. There were no useful correlations found between shape memory and the other tests. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion tests of as-quenched 5.8 and 6.2 weight percent niobium specimens, but not 5.3 and 6.9 weight percent niobium specimens, had a contraction component on heating, but the phenomenon was not a contributor to shape memory.

Hemperly, V.C.

1976-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through a screen at least partially opaque at the wavelength. The screen has an aperture sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector spaced some distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam as well as a set of intensities displaced from a center of the aperture. The distance from the source to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, and beam intensity.

Earl, Dennis D [Knoxville, TN; Allison, Stephen W [Knoxville, TN; Cates, Michael R [Oak Ridge, TN; Sanders, Alvin J [Knoxville, TN

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE TRIPLE STAR CF TAURI  

SciTech Connect

CF Tau is now known to be an eclipsing triple star with relatively deep total and annular eclipses. New light and radial velocity curves as well as new times of minima were obtained and used for further modeling of the system. Very accurate (better than 0.9%) masses and radii of the eclipsing pair are determined from analysis of the two new light curves, the radial velocity curve, and the times of minimum light. The mass and luminosity of the distant third component is accurately determined as well. Theoretical models of the detached, evolved eclipsing pair match the observed absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 4.3 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.14.

Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS  

SciTech Connect

V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Fekel, Francis C. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

349

Does One Know the Properties of a MICE Solid or Liquid Absorber toBetter than 0.3 Percent?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the report discusses whether the MICE absorbers can be characterized to {+-}0.3 percent, so that one predict absorber ionization cooling within the absorber. This report shows that most solid absorbers can be characterized to much better than {+-}0.3 percent. The two issues that dominate the characterization of the liquid cryogen absorbers are the dimensions of the liquid in the vessel and the density of the cryogenic liquid. The thickness of the window also plays a role. This report will show that a liquid hydrogen absorber can be characterized to better than {+-}0.3 percent, but a liquid helium absorber cannot be characterized to better and {+-}1 percent.

Green, Michael A.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

Spatial and Temporal Variations in Long-Term Normal Percent Possible Solar Radiation Levels in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the time and space variations in long-term monthly-averaged daily percent possible solar radiation levels in the United States. Both principal components analysis and harmonic analysis were used to ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.; Randall S. Cerveny

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

[an error occurred while processing this directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] ... Thus, many systems administrators do not regularly update non ... works well but it does not protect ...

352

[an error occurred while processing this directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] These are ... of commercial products within NIST web pages is for information only; it does not imply ...

353

Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation I: techniques and challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is known to possess some intrinsic robustness, though it is likely that some form of error correction will be necessary for large scale computations. Error handling routines developed for circuit-model quantum computation do not transfer easily to the AQC model since these routines typically require high-quality quantum gates, a resource not generally allowed in AQC. There are two main techniques known to suppress errors during an AQC implementation: energy gap protection and dynamical decoupling. Here we show that both these methods are intimately related and can be analyzed within the same formalism. We analyze the effectiveness of such error suppression techniques and identify critical constraints on the performance of error suppression in AQC, suggesting that error suppression by itself is insufficient for large-scale, fault-tolerant AQC and that a form of error correction is needed. We discuss progress towards implementing error correction in AQC and enumerate several key outstanding problems. This work is a companion paper to "Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation II: non-equilibrium dynamics"', which provides a dynamical model perspective on the techniques and limitations of error suppression and error correction in AQC. In this paper we discuss the same results within a quantum information framework, permitting an intuitive discussion of error suppression and correction in encoded AQC.

Kevin C. Young; Mohan Sarovar; Robin Blume-Kohout

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation presents some statistical analysis of wind power forecast errors and error distributions, with examples using ERCOT data.

Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

RSE Table N8.1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" 1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,," "

356

Density estimation for data with rounding errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rounding of data is common in practice. The problem of estimating the underlying density function based on data with rounding errors is addressed. A parametric maximum likelihood estimator and a nonparametric bootstrap kernel density estimator are proposed. ... Keywords: Bootstrapping, Deconvolution density estimation, Fast Fourier transformation, Kernel density estimation, Measurement error

B. Wang, W. Wertelecki

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Automatic detection of dimension errors in spreadsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a reasoning system for inferring dimension information in spreadsheets. This system can be used to check the consistency of spreadsheet formulas and thus is able to detect errors in spreadsheets. Our approach is based on three static analysis ... Keywords: Dimension, Error detection, Inference rule, Spreadsheet, Static analysis, Unit of measurement

Chris Chambers; Martin Erwig

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

QuarkNet Workshop: Beyond Human Error  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Error Human Error QuarkNet Workshop for High School Science Teachers 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, August 1 -3, 2012 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory This was a three-day workshop for high school science teachers. Measurement and error are key ingredients for all science applications. Both align with the Next Generation Science Standards, but many high school students struggle to understand the importance of error analysis and prevention. Over the three days we examined multiple experiments going on at Fermilab and discussed the ways that scientists take measurements and reduce error on these projects. Participants met and worked with scientists from Fermilab and University of Chicago to look at how error analysis takes place at Fermilab and bridged those ideas into high school classes. Teachers discussed lesson plans available at Fermilab and their own methods of teaching error analysis. Additionally, participants heard from high school students who participated in summer research as they presented their findings and linked students' learning back to the teachers' understanding of error recognition and analysis.

359

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a "beamsplitter"), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beamsplitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Key, William S. (Knoxville, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Word error rates: Decomposition over POS classes and applications for error analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation and error analysis of machine translation output are important but difficult tasks. In this work, we propose a novel method for obtaining more details about actual translation errors in the generated output by introducing the decomposition of Word Error Rate (WER) and Position independent word Error Rate (PER) over different Partof-Speech (POS) classes. Furthermore, we investigate two possible aspects of the use of these decompositions for automatic error analysis: estimation of inflectional errors and distribution of missing words over POS classes. The obtained results are shown to correspond to the results of a human error analysis. The results obtained on the European Parliament Plenary Session corpus in Spanish and English give a better overview of the nature of translation errors as well as ideas of where to put efforts for possible improvements of the translation system. 1

Maja Popovi?; Hermann Ney

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Resilience of Hybrid Ensemble/3DVAR Analysis Schemes to Model Error and Ensemble Covariance Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous idealized numerical experiments have shown that a straightforward augmentation of an isotropic error correlation matrix with an ensemble-based error correlation matrix yields an improved data assimilation scheme under certain conditions. ...

Brian J. Etherton; Craig H. Bishop

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Dynamics of Prediction Errors under the Combined Effect of Initial Condition and Model Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient evolution of prediction errors in the short to intermediate time regime is considered under the combined effect of initial condition and model errors. Some generic features are brought out and connected with intrinsic properties. ...

C. Nicolis; Rui A. P. Perdigao; S. Vannitsem

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Absolute Magnitude and Kinematics of RR Lyrae Stars via Statistical Parallax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new statistical parallax solutions for the absolute magnitude and kinematics of RR Lyrae stars. New proper motion, radial velocity, and abundance data are used; the new data set is 50% larger, and of higher quality, than previously available data sets. Based on an a priori kinematic study, we separate the stars into halo and thick disk sub-populations. Statistical parallax solutions on these sub-samples yield M_V(RR) = +0.71 +/- 0.12 at = -1.61 for the halo (162 stars), and M_V(RR) = +0.79 +/- 0.30 at = -0.76 for the thick disk (51 stars). The solutions yield kinematic parameters (solar motion and velocity ellipsoid) in good agreement with estimates of the halo and thick disk kinematics derived from both RR Lyrae stars and other stellar tracers. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the solutions are accurate, and that the errors may be smaller than the estimates above. The simulations reveal a small bias in the disk solutions, and appropriate corrections are derived. The large uncertainty in the disk M_V(RR) prevents ascertaining the slope of the M_V(RR)-[Fe/H] relation. We find that (1) the distance to the Galactic Center is 7.6 +/- 0.4 kpc; (2) the mean age of the 17 oldest Galactic globular clusters is 16.5 _{-1.9}^{+2.1} Gyr; and (3) the distance modulus of the LMC is 18.28 +/- 0.13 mag. Estimates of H_0 which are based on an LMC distance modulus of 18.50 (e.g., Cepheid studies) increase by 10% if they are recalibrated to match our LMC distance modulus.

A. C. Layden; R. B. Hanson; S. L. Hawley; A. R. Klemola; C. J. Hanley

1996-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hopper Trouble Shooting and Error Messages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Error Messages Message or Symptom Fault Recommendation job hit wallclock time limit user or system Submit job for longer time or start job from last checkpoint and resubmit. If your job hung and produced no output contact consultants. received node failed or halted event for nid xxxx system One of the compute nodes assigned to the job failed. Resubmit the job PtlNIInit failed : PTL_NOT_REGISTERED user The executable is from an XT system (Franklin or Jaguar?) using portals. Recompile on Hopper and resubmit. error while loading shared libraries: libxxxx.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory mostly user, sometimes system Make sure environment variable CRAY_ROOTFS is set to DSL, also the modules loaded when building the dynamic executable is also loaded at run time. Report to consultants if still not resolved.

365

transportation Total Percent delivered cost transportation Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$12.75 - - - - - 36.0% - 2005 $13.64 - $13.64 - - - - - 36.8% - 2006; $14.50 - $14.04 - - - - - 34.3% - 2007 $15 ...

366

Error analysis in wind turbine field testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In wind turbine field testing, one of the most important issues is understanding and accounting for data errors. Extended dynamic testing of wind turbines requires a thorough uncertainty analysis and a regimen of quality assurance steps in order to preserve accuracy. Test objectives need to be identified to determine the accuracy requirements of any data measurement, collection, and analysis process. Frequently, the uncertainty analysis reveals that the major sources of error can be allowed for with careful calibration and signal drift tracking procedures. This paper offers a basis for the discussion and development of a repeatable and accurate process to track errors and account for them in data processing.

McNiff, B [McNiff Light Industries, Carlisle, MA (United States); Simms, D [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

"RSE Table N1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" .3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",3 "Natural Gas",1 "Net Electricity",1 " Purchases",1 " Transfers In",9 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",15 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",3 "Coke and Breeze",2 "Residual Fuel Oil",4 "Distillate Fuel Oil",5 "Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids",1 "Other",2 " Asphalt and Road Oil (a)",0 " Lubricants (a)",0 " Naphtha < 401 Degrees (a)",0

368

"RSE Table N13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",8,9,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",0,0,0 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",0,0,0 314,"Textile Product Mills",90,90,0 315,"Apparel",0,0,0 316,"Leather and Allied Products",0,0,0

369

"RSE Table E13.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",15,15,58,37 " 20-49",17,19,27,7 " 50-99",6,6,5,9 " 100-249",7,7,25,4 " 250-499",2,2,0,0 " 500 and Over",1,1,0,1 "Total",2,2,15,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",16,16,90,35

370

"RSE Table C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost" "NAICS"," "," " "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1,2,0,0,0,0 ," Energy Audits",1,3,5,6,5,7 ," Electricity Load Control",1,3,4,7,6,7

371

"RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1,8,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,0,1,0,4 313,"Textile Mills",2,8,7,0,2 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,0,22,0,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",11,73,8,90,11

372

"RSE Table E7.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS",,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",2,2,2 ," 20-49",2,3,2 ," 50-99",3,3,2 ," 100-249",2,3,2 ," 250-499",3,3,3

373

"RSE Table E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",9,87,48,26,1,85,16,25 " 20-49",11,32,28,5,63,20,3,21 " 50-99",8,23,38,2,22,49,42,4

374

"RSE Table C10.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors" "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

375

"RSE Table E13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,52,15,4,4 " 20-49",2,14,17,33,2 " 50-99",2,31,6,10,2 " 100-249",1,13,7,9,1 " 250-499",2,2,2,1,2 " 500 and Over",1,2,1,1,1

376

"RSE Table N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS"," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",8,4,5 313,"Textile Mills",3,2,3 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,4,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",7,5,5

377

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

378

The Effect of Temperature on the Absolute Permeability to Distilled Water of Unconsolidated Sand Cores  

SciTech Connect

The work presented herein is a study of the effect of temperature on the absolute permeability to distilled water of unconsolidated sandstones at one confining pressure. The absolute permeability to distilled water of Ottawa silica sand was not dependent on the temperature level.

Sageev, A.; Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids for calculating the absolute entropy, S, and free energy, F, by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte. In this paper we remove the excluded volume EV restriction, replacing it by a "free volume" FV approach

Meirovitch, Hagai

380

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Quadrupole, and Sextupole Magnets using POISSON Ro be rt J. La ri<::::R~ i. September 10, 1985 Introduction LS-32 The computer program POISSON was used to calculate the dipole, quadru- pole, and sextupole magnets of the 6 GeV electron storage ring. A trinagular mesh must first be generated by LATTICE. The triangle size is varied over the "universe" at the discretion of the user. This note describes a series of test calculations that were made to help the user decide on the size of the mesh to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular mesh used to calculate a "perfect" dipole magnet is shown in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effectiveness of various error metrics in SCEPTRE.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate accuracy of error metrics in SCEPTRE and produce useful benchmarks, identify metrics that do not work well, identify metrics that do work well, and produce easy to reference results.

Olson, Aaron

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Spatial Error Metrics for Oceanographic Model Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common problem with modern numerical oceanographic models is spatial displacement, including misplacement and misshapenness of ocean circulation features. Traditional error metrics, such as least squares methods, are ineffective in many such ...

Sean B. Ziegeler; James D. Dykes; Jay F. Shriver

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Data Assimilation via Error Subspace Statistical Estimation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identical twin experiments are utilized to assess and exemplify the capabilities of error subspace statistical estimation (ESSE). The experiments consists of nonlinear, primitive equationbased, idealized Middle Atlantic Bight shelfbreak front ...

P. F. J. Lermusiaux

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Regression Error Characteristic CurVes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves provide a powerful tool for visualizing and comparing classification results. Regression Error Characteristic (REC) curves generalize ROC curves to regression. REC curves plot the error tolerance on the xaxis versus the percentage of points predicted within the tolerance on the y-axis. The resulting curve estimates the cumulative distribution function of the error. The REC curve visually presents commonly-used statistics. The area-over-the-curve (AOC) is a biased estimate of the expected error. The R 2 value can be estimated using the ratio of the AOC for a given model to the AOC for the null model. Users can quickly assess the relative merits of many regression functions by examining the relative position of their REC curves. The shape of the curve reveals additional information that can be used to guide modeling. 1.

Jinbo Bi; Kristin P. Bennett

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Error bounds: necessary and sufficient conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the primal as well as from the dual space are used to characterize the error bound property .... known as conditioning rate [45]): Er f(x) := lim inf x??x.

387

Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics, entry in the Compendium of Quantum Physics: Concepts, Experiments, History and Philosophy, ed. F. Weinert, K. Hentschel, D. Greenberger and B. Falkenburg (Springer), to appear

D. Rohrlich

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

Panels with Nonstationary Multifactor Error Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

panel regressions with multifactor error structure. This paper extends this work and examines the important case where the unobserved common factors follow unit root processes and could be cointegrated. It is found that the presence of unit roots does...

Kapetanios, George; Pesaran, M Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

389

Estimation of Errors in Seasonal Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formula is first given for the error in a 2-harmonic seasonal curve of best fit through a set of N oceanographic data points, assuming the departures from the true mean are independent random numbers.

J. S. Godfrey; K. R. Ridgway

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Minimizing Errors Associated with Multiplate Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplate radiation shield errors are examined using the following techniques: 1) ray tracing analysis, 2) wind tunnel experiments, 3) numerical flow simulations, and 4) field testing. The authors objectives are to develop guidelines for ...

Scott J. Richardson; Fred V. Brock; Steven R. Semmer; Cathy Jirak

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Short-Term Dynamics of Model Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural instability of the atmosphere is at the origin of the rapid amplification of errors coming from the uncertainty on the initial conditions and from the imperfect representation (the model) of the atmospheric dynamics. In this paper, ...

S. Vannitsem; Z. Toth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Diagnosing Forecast Errors in Tropical Cyclone Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a diagnostic approach that can be used to examine the sources of numerical model forecast error that contribute to degraded tropical cyclone (TC) motion forecasts. Tropical cyclone motion forecasts depend ...

Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Christopher A. Davis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Error driven paraphrase annotation using Mechanical Turk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The source text provided to a machine translation system is typically only one of many ways the input sentence could have been expressed, and alternative forms of expression can often produce a better translation. We introduce here error driven paraphrasing ...

Olivia Buzek; Philip Resnik; Benjamin B. Bederson

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Quantum error-correcting codes and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

Minimizing Binding Errors Using Learned Conjunctive Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied some of the design trade-offs governing visual representations based on spatially invariant conjunctive feature detectors, with an emphasis on the susceptibility of such systems to false-positive recognition errorsMalsburg's classical ...

Bartlett W. Mel; Jzsef W. Fiser

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Minimizing Binding Errors Using Learned Conjunctive Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied some of the design trade-offs governing visual representations based on spatially invariant conjunctive feature detectors, with an emphasis on the susceptibility of such systems to false-positive recognition errorsMalsburgs ...

Bartlett W. Mel; Jsef W. Fiser

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessing the Ensemble Spread-Error Relationship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential ability of an ensemble prediction system (EPS) to represent its own varying forecast error provides strong motivation to produce an EPS over a less expensive deterministic forecast. Traditionally this ability has been assessed by ...

T. M. Hopson

398

Organizational Errors: Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this chapter is to promote research about organizational errorsi.e., the actions of multiple organizational participants that deviate from organizationally specified rules and can potentially result in adverse ...

Carroll, John Stephen

399

Error matrix in quantum process tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss characterization of experimental quantum gates by the error matrix, which is similar to the standard process matrix $\\chi$ in the Pauli basis, except the desired unitary operation is factored out, by formally placing it either before or after the error process. The error matrix has only one large element, which is equal to the process fidelity, while other elements are small and indicate imperfections. The imaginary parts of the elements along the left column and/or top row directly indicate the unitary imperfection and can be used to find the needed correction. We discuss a relatively simple way to calculate the error matrix for a composition of quantum gates. Similarly, it is rather straightforward to find the first-order contribution to the error matrix due to the Lindblad-form decoherence. We also discuss a way to identify and subtract the tomography procedure errors due to imperfect state preparation and measurement. In appendices we consider several simple examples of the process tomography and also discuss an intuitive physical interpretation of the Lindblad-form decoherence.

Alexander N. Korotkov

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

How to keep your head above water while detecting errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's distributed systems need runtime error detection to catch errors arising from software bugs, hardware errors, or unexpected operating conditions. A prominent class of error detection techniques operates in a stateful manner, i.e., it keeps track ... Keywords: J2EE multi-tier systems, hidden markov model, high throughput distributed applications, intelligent sampling, stateful error detection

Ignacio Laguna; Fahad A. Arshad; David M. Grothe; Saurabh Bagchi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

RSE Table 7.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",8,21,14,7,9,13 " 20-49",4,6,15,4,13,4 " 50-99",3,6,4,3,6,8 " 100-249",3,8,17,2,5,7 " 250-499",4,1,9,7,1,37 " 500 and Over",1,7,4,1,1,1 "Total",2,3,7,2,1,11

402

A systems approach to reducing utility billing errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many methods for analyzing the possibility of errors are practiced by organizations who are concerned about safety and error prevention. However, in situations where the error occurrence is random and difficult to track, ...

Ogura, Nori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Nonlinear Generalized Additive Error Model of Production and Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additive Error Model of Production and Cost by Quirino ParisError Model of Production and Cost Quirino Paris* UniversityAdditive Error Model of Production and Cost I. Introduction

Paris, Quirino; Caputo, Michael R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evolutionary Algorithm-Based Error Parameterization Methods for Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methods of parameterizing model errors have a substantial effect on the accuracy of ensemble data assimilation. After a review of the current error-handling methods, a new blending error parameterization method was designed to combine the ...

Yulong Bai; Xin Li

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Explicitly Accounting for Observation Error in Categorical Verification of Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an accurate representation of errors in observations it is possible to remove the effect of those errors from categorical verification scores. The errors in the observations are treated as additive white noise that is statistically ...

Neill E. Bowler

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ERROR COMPENSATOR FOR A POSITION TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is designed for eliminating the effect of leadscrew errors in positioning machines in which linear motion of a slide is effected from rotary motion of a leadscrew. This is accomplished by providing a corrector cam mounted on the slide, a cam follower, and a transducer housing rotatable by the follower to compensate for all the reproducible errors in the transducer signal which can be related to the slide position. The transducer has an inner part which is movable with respect to the transducer housing. The transducer inner part is coupled to the means for rotating the leadscrew such that relative movement between this part and its housing will provide an output signal proportional to the position of the slide. The corrector cam and its follower perform the compensation by changing the angular position of the transducer housing by an amount that is a function of the slide position and the error at that position. (AEC)

Fowler, A.H.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery  

SciTech Connect

Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

Hess-Flores, M

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability December 12, 2011 - 9:00am...

409

Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 34 recommendations addressing the problems resulting from ... is understood that some human error is inevitable ... that openness about errors leads to ...

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Underestimating Costs in Public Works Projects: Error or Lie?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1964). Errors in project cost estimates. Indian Eco- nomicSystematic errors in cost estimates for public investmentprojects compare in cost estimate experience? (Reprint No.

Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette Skamris; Buhl, Sren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Minimum error discrimination of Pauli channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the problem of discriminating with minimum error probability two given Pauli channels. We show that, differently from the case of discrimination between unitary transformations, the use of entanglement with an ancillary system can strictly improve the discrimination, and any maximally entangled state allows to achieve the optimal discrimination. We also provide a simple necessary and sufficient condition in terms of the structure of the channels for which the ultimate minimum error probability can be achieved without entanglement assistance. When such a condition is satisfied, the optimal input state is simply an eigenstate of one of the Pauli matrices.

Massimiliano F. Sacchi

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

Absolute Spectral Irradiance Measurements of Lightning from 375 to 880 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer-detector optical multichannel analyzer system capable of absolute spectral irradiance measurements has been used to record the time-integrated emissions (150 or 300 ms) from cloud-to-ground lightning. Two detectors, one operating ...

Richard E. Orville; Ronald W. Henderson

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Improved Gaussian Jet Model for Deriving Absolute Geostrophic Velocity from Satellite Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key aspects of a Gaussian jet model for deriving absolute geostrophic velocity from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are improved. Velocities are obtained by synthesizing Gaussian fits to cross-stream velocity anomaly profiles of the Kuroshio and ...

Seung-Bum Kim; M. A. Saunders

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

White-light scanning interferometer for absolute nano-scale gap thickness measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special configuration of white-light scanning interferometer is described for measuring the absolute air gap thickness between two planar plates brought into close proximity. The measured gap is not located in any ...

Xu, Zhiguang

416

GenERRate: generating errors for use in grammatical error detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the issue of automatically generated ungrammatical data and its use in error detection, with a focus on the task of classifying a sentence as grammatical or ungrammatical. We present an error generation tool called GenERRate and show ...

Jennifer Foster; istein E. Andersen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling Human Error For Experimentation, Training, And Error-Tolerant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human error in computer systems has been blamed for many military and civilian catastrophes resulting in mission failure and loss of money and lives. However, the root cause of such failures often lies in the systems design. A central theme in designing for human-error tolerance is to build a multi-layered defense. Creating such a robust system requires that designers effectively manage several aspects of erroneous system usage: prevention, reduction, detection, identification, recovery, and mitigation. These also correspond to discrete stages before and after error occurrence where different defensive measures can be taken. Human error models can be used to better understand these stages, the underlying cognitive mechanisms responsible for errors, and ultimately how to design systems and training to reduce the effects of inherent human limitations. This paper presents a general framework for human error recovery based on five key stages of erroneous performance: the commission of an error, its detection, identification, and correction, and resumption of the original task. These stages constitute the main components of a state model that characterizes human performance, and allows designers and trainers comprehensively address the most important aspects of error-tolerant design. Furthermore, these performance stages can be modeled computationally, to varying degrees, using standard information processing architectures. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of a technique using GOMS models to design systems to

Scott D. Wood; David E. Kieras

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF D. T. Casey, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, F. H. Séguin, C. K. Li et al. Citation: Rev. Sci for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF D. T. Casey,1,a) J. A. Frenje,1 M. Gatu used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute

419

Error resilient video streaming for heterogeneous networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of video streaming for a critical private web cast, for a medium sized audience with heterogeneous nodes having different bandwidths and reliabilities. The nodes can distribute video in a peer-to-peer manner by forming a multicast ... Keywords: error resilience, multiple description coding (MDC), path diversity, video streaming

Divyashikha Sethia; Huzur Saran

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Error bounds of certain Gaussian quadrature formulae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the kernel of the remainder term of Gauss quadrature rules for analytic functions with respect to one class of Bernstein-Szego weight functions. The location on the elliptic contours where the modulus of the kernel attains its maximum value ... Keywords: Analytic function, Elliptic contour, Error bound, Gauss quadrature, Kernel, Remainder term, primary, secondary

Miodrag M. Spalevi?; Miroslav S. Prani?

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluating operating system vulnerability to memory errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliability is of great concern to the scalability of extreme-scale systems. Of particular concern are soft errors in main memory, which are a leading cause of failures on current systems and are predicted to be the leading cause on future systems. While ... Keywords: DRAM failures, fault-tolerance, operating systems

Kurt B. Ferreira; Kevin Pedretti; Ron Brightwell; Patrick G. Bridges; David Fiala; Frank Mueller

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Collective error detection for MPI collective operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An MPI profiling library is a standard mechanism for intercepting MPI calls by applications. Profiling libraries are so named because they are commonly used to gather performance data on MPI programs. Here we present a profiling library whose purpose ... Keywords: MPI, collective, datatype, errors, hashing

Chris Falzone; Anthony Chan; Ewing Lusk; William Gropp

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Explaining ML type errors by data flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel approach to explaining ML type errors: Since the type system inhibits data flows that would abort the program at run-time, our type checker identifies as explanations those data flows that violate the typing rules. It also detects ...

Holger Gast

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Regularities and their relations to error bounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we mainly study various notions of regularity for a finite collection {C1,?,Cm} of closed convex subsets of a Banach space X and their relations with other fundamental concepts. ... Keywords: error bound, graph, linearly regular, multifunction, normal cone, positive linear functional, property (G), regular, strong CHIP, tangent cone

Kung Fu Ng; Wei Hong Yang

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Analysis of Solar Two Heliostat Tracking Error Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the geometrical errors that reduce heliostat tracking accuracy at Solar Two. The basic heliostat control architecture is described. Then, the three dominant error sources are described and their effect on heliostat tracking is visually illustrated. The strategy currently used to minimize, but not truly correct, these error sources is also shown. Finally, a novel approach to minimizing error is presented.

Jones, S.A.; Stone, K.W.

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

10 Percent Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and you can try to explain it. The natural law it illustrates is the second law of thermodynamics; entropy is created in any natural trnasfer of energy. Richard E. Barrans Jr. This...

428

Error Notification, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Searched For Frequently Searched For Helpdesk Home Web Services BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Need Help Helpdesk Homepage Call the Helpdesk for 24x7 support Bus: 631.344.5522 Fax: 631-344-2140 Email: itdhelp@bnl.gov HTTP Error Forbidden: Page Access Rejected You are not authorized to view this page - This error is caused when the server has a list of IP addresses that are not allowed to access the site, and the IP address you are using is in this list. If the problem persists or if you believe you should be able to view this directory or page, please contact the Web server's administrator or call the Helpdesk by using the email address or phone number listed below. Some reasons for getting this notice: All people outside of the BNL Domain (130.199.0.0) will get this notice.

429

Improved Error Bounds for the Adiabatic Approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the discovery of adiabatic quantum computing, a need has arisen for rigorously proven bounds for the error in the adiabatic approximation. We present in this paper, a rigorous and elementary derivation of upper and lower bounds on the error incurred from using the adiabatic approximation for quantum systems. Our bounds are often asymptotically tight in the limit of slow evolution for fixed Hamiltonians, and are used to provide sufficient conditions for the application of the adiabatic approximation. We show that our sufficiency criteria exclude the Marzlin--Sanders counterexample from the class of Hamiltonians that obey the adiabatic approximation. Finally, we demonstrate the existence of classes of Hamiltonians that resemble the Marzlin--Sanders counterexample Hamiltonian, but also obey the adiabatic approximation.

Cheung, Donny; Wiebe, Nathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Error Notification, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Searched For Frequently Searched For Helpdesk Home Application Services BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Need Help Helpdesk Homepage Call the Helpdesk for 24x7 support Bus: 631.344.5522 Fax: 631-344-2140 Email: itdhelp@bnl.gov HTTP Error Forbidden: Page Access Rejected You are not authorized to view this page - This error is caused when the server has a list of IP addresses that are not allowed to access the site, and the IP address you are using is in this list. If the problem persists or if you believe you should be able to view this directory or page, please contact the Web server's administrator or call the Helpdesk by using the email address or phone number listed below. Some reasons for getting this notice: All people outside of the BNL Domain (130.199.0.0) will get this notice.

431

MEASUREMENTS, ERRORS, AND NEGATIVE KINETIC ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of errors in measurement yields new insight into the penetration of quantum particles into classically forbidden regions. In addition to physical values, realistic measurements yield unphysical values which, we show, can form a consistent pattern. An experiment to isolate a particle in a classically forbidden region obtains negative values for its kinetic energy. These values realize the concept of a weak value, discussed in previous works. 0

Yakir Aharonov; Sandu Popescu; Daniel Rohrlich; Lev Vaidman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Systematic errors in long baseline oscillation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives a brief overview of long baseline neutrino experiments and their goals, and then describes the different kinds of systematic errors that are encountered in these experiments. Particular attention is paid to the uncertainties that come about because of imperfect knowledge of neutrino cross sections and more generally how neutrinos interact in nuclei. Near detectors are planned for most of these experiments, and the extent to which certain uncertainties can be reduced by the presence of near detectors is also discussed.

Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Minimal Achievable Error in the LED problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical model to predict the minimal achievable error, given a noise ratio #, in the LED data set problem. The motivation for developing this theoretical model is to understand and explain some of the results that di#erent systems achieve when they solve the LED problem. Moreover, given a new learning algorithm that solves the LED problem, we can now bound its optimal generalization accuracy.

Xavier Llora; Xavier Llora; David E. Goldberg; David E. Goldberg

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Continuous-time quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous-time quantum error correction (CTQEC) is an approach to protecting quantum information from noise in which both the noise and the error correcting operations are treated as processes that are continuous in time. This chapter investigates CTQEC based on continuous weak measurements and feedback from the point of view of the subsystem principle, which states that protected quantum information is contained in a subsystem of the Hilbert space. We study how to approach the problem of constructing CTQEC protocols by looking at the evolution of the state of the system in an encoded basis in which the subsystem containing the protected information is explicit. This point of view allows us to reduce the problem to that of protecting a known state, and to design CTQEC procedures from protocols for the protection of a single qubit. We show how previously studied CTQEC schemes with both direct and indirect feedback can be obtained from strategies for the protection of a single qubit via weak measurements and weak unitary operations. We also review results on the performance of CTQEC with direct feedback in cases of Markovian and non-Markovian decoherence, where we have shown that due to the existence of a Zeno regime in non-Markovian dynamics, the performance of CTQEC can exhibit a quadratic improvement if the time resolution of the weak error-correcting operations is high enough to reveal the non-Markovian character of the noise process.

Ognyan Oreshkov

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Table 1. Forecast Evaluations:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: 1996 to 2000 Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Variable 1996 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO93 1997 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO97 1998 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO98 1999 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO99 2000 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO2000 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 Total Petroleum Consumption 3.2 2.8 2.9 2.8 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 6.0 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.6 Total Coal Consumption 2.9 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.3 Total Electricity Sales 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 Production Crude Oil Production 5.1 4.2 4.3 4.5 4.5

436

A VaR Black-Litterman Model for the Construction of Absolute ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rithmic technique is very efficient, outperforming, in terms of both speed and ..... It can be seen that the error term vector ? does not directly enter the Black-

437

Absolute rate measurements of two-photon process of gases, liquids, and solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to rapid improvements in high-power laser performance, two-photon absorption processes have become a very useful tool for studying the molecular structures of various gases, liquids and solids. However, measurements of absolute two-photon absorption cross sections were more or less ignored previously because of their small size. In this work, we obtained not only the two-photon absorption spectra, but also measurements of their absolute cross sections for various gases, liquids, and solids. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Chen, C.H.; McCann, M.P.; Payne, M.G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

RSE Table N6.1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" 1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

439

RSE Table N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

440

RSE Table S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

RSE Table N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

442

RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" 1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

443

Error Reduction for Weigh-In-Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal and State agencies need certifiable vehicle weights for various applications, such as highway inspections, border security, check points, and port entries. ORNL weigh-in-motion (WIM) technology was previously unable to provide certifiable weights, due to natural oscillations, such as vehicle bouncing and rocking. Recent ORNL work demonstrated a novel filter to remove these oscillations. This work shows further filtering improvements to enable certifiable weight measurements (error < 0.1%) for a higher traffic volume with less effort (elimination of redundant weighing).

Hively, Lee M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Scudiere, Matthew B [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Accounting for Model Errors in Ensemble Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the issue of model errors with the ensemble Kalman filter. Observations generated from the NCEPNCAR reanalysis fields are assimilated into a low-resolution AGCM. Without an effort to account for model errors, the performance ...

Hong Li; Eugenia Kalnay; Takemasa Miyoshi; Christopher M. Danforth

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Stability of error bounds for convex constraint systems in Banach ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 7, 2010 ... space X the error bound property is defined by the inequality ... is the error bound modulus [8]) (also known as conditioning rate [23]) of f at x.

446

An Objective Method for Inferring Sources of Model Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A restricted statistical correction (RSC) approach is introduced to assess the sources of error in general circulation models (GCMs). RSC models short-term forecast error by considering linear transformations of the GCM's forcing terms, which ...

Siegfried Schubert; Yehui Chang

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Prediction of Consensus Tropical Cyclone Track Forecast Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which the tropical cyclone (TC) track forecast error of a consensus model (CONU) routinely used by the forecasters at the National Hurricane Center can be predicted is determined. A number of predictors of consensus forecast error, ...

James S. Goerss

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hidden Error Variance Theory. Part I: Exposition and Analytic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conundrum of predictability research is that while the prediction of flow-dependent error distributions is one of its main foci, chaos fundamentally hides flow-dependent forecast error distributions from empirical observation. Empirical ...

Craig H. Bishop; Elizabeth A. Satterfield

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Forecast-Error Statistics for Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Observation Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective analysis procedures such as statistical interpolation require reliable estimates of forecast-error statistics in order to optimize the analysis weights. Reasonably good estimates of the forecast-error statistics can be obtained from ...

Roger Daley

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Zero-error capacity of a quantum channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the quantum zero-error capacity, a new kind of classical capacity of a noisy quantum channel. Moreover, the necessary requirement for which a quantum channel has zero-error capacity greater than zero is also given.

Rex A. C. Medeiros; Francisco M. de Assis

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Distributed Forcing of Forecast and Assimilation Error Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporally distributed deterministic and stochastic excitation of the tangent linear forecast system governing forecast error growth and the tangent linear observer system governing assimilation error growth is examined. The method used is to ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Midlatitude Development of Regional Errors in a Global GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of geographically confined errors is studied in six experiments with a five-level global spectral (rhomboidal 30) general circulation model. Each experiment consists of 36 identical twin integrations with the initial errors localized ...

David M. Straus

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Error Estimation Using Wavelet Analysis for Data Assimilation: EEWADAi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented for estimating numerical errors in simulations as a function of space and time. This knowledge of numerical errors can provide critical information for the effective assimilation of external data. The new method utilizes ...

Leland Jameson; Takuji Waseda

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction CENTER FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal

Salvaggio, Carl

456

Relative and absolute components of leapfrogging in mobile phones by developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper suggests a novel way of measuring the important concept of leapfrogging in mobile phones. It argues that an adequate measure of leapfrogging needs to include absolute as well as relative components. The new measure is used to measure the performance ... Keywords: Diffusion, ICT, New technology, Penetration, Technology

Jeffrey James

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model

Shearer, Peter

458

The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of the pre-industrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS GCMAM using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value, a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and the lower value measured ...

David H. Rind; Judith L. Lean; Jeffrey Jonas

459

On the vanishing of Tor of the absolute integral Hans Schoutens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

submitted to Elsevier Science 03.06.2003 #12;by Kunz's Theorem, that R is regular (here R1/p denotes NYC College of Technology City University of New York NY, NY 11201 (USA) Abstract Let R be an excellent local domain of positive characteristic with residue field k and let R+ be its absolute integral

Schoutens, Hans

460

Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Determination from Historical Hydrographic Data in the Western North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beta-spiral calculations are presented using averaged western North Atlantic hydrographic data from the period 191473. Profiles of long-term mean geostrophic flow relative to ISM db along 70W from 26 to 32N are shown. Absolute reference ...

Eric J. Lindstrom; David W. Behringer; Bruce A. Taft; Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent errors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

Aizenman, Michael [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Warzel, Simone [Zentrum Mathematik, TU Munich, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Session Cookie Error, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session Cookie Error Session Cookie Error We're Sorry, either you don't have Session Cookies enabled in your browser or your session has expired. Some functions in this site will not work properly without it enabled. Please enable session cookies, then go back and try again or close and re-open your browser to view these web pages correctly. What is a Cookie? What are Cookies used for? What are Persistent Cookies? What are Session Cookies? How can I control or enable which Cookies I want to accept? Need help? What is a Cookie? A "cookie" is a small piece of information that is sent by a web server to be stored on a web browser, so that it can later be read back from that browser the next time this unique visitor returns to that web server. This becomes useful for having the browser remember specific information about this visitor like location of their last visit, time spent, or user preferences (like style sheets). The cookie is a text file that is saved in the browser's directory and is stored in RAM while the browser is running. Also, the cookie may be stored on the computer's hard drive once you log off from that web site or web server.

463

MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS.  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model.

CARDONA,J.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,R.; PTITSYN,V.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of uncertainties and errors on Lyapunov control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyapunov control (open-loop) is often confronted with uncertainties and errors in practical applications. In this paper, we analyze the robustness of Lyapunov control against the uncertainties and errors in quantum control systems. The analysis is carried out through examinations of uncertainties and errors, calculations of the control fidelity under influences of the certainties and errors, as well as discussions on the caused effects. Two examples, a closed control system and an open control system, are presented to illustrate the general formulism.

Yi, X X; Wu, Chunfeng; Oh, C H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Semantic errors in SQL queries: a quite complete list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate classes of SQL queries which are syntactically correct, but certainly not intended, no matter for which task the query was written. For instance, queries that are contradictory, i.e. always return the empty set, are obviously not intended. ... Keywords: SQL, SQL exams, bugs, database courses, databases, errors, logical errors, queries, semantic errors, software correctness, static analysis, teaching

Stefan Brass; Christian Goldberg

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Coded DNA Self-Assembly for Error Detection/Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel framework in which DNA self-assembly can be analyzed for error detection/ location. The proposed framework relies on coding and mapping functions that allow to establish the presence of erroneous bonded tiles based on the ... Keywords: Coding, Nano Manufacturing, Error Detection, Error Resilience

Zahra Mashreghian Arani; Masoud Hashempour; Fabrizio Lombardi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Unitary application of the quantum error correction codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the set of operators for errors and its correction code, we introduce the so-called complete unitary transformation. It can be used for encoding while the inverse of it can be applied for correcting the errors of the encoded qubit. We show that this unitary protocol can be applied for any code which satisfies the quantum error correction condition.

Xoaohua Wu; Bo You

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

"RSE Table N5.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Black Liquor","Total(b)","Waste(c)","from Trees(d)","Processing(e)","Refuse(f)"

469

"RSE Table N11.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,3,3,1,1,0,0,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,4,16,41,4,22,3,0,15 313,"Textile Mills",2,2,5,14,3,5,1,0,5

470

"RSE Table C10.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",3,1,2 ," Microwave Drying",5,1,3 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",7,1,3 ," Open-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Produce Steam",7,1,3 ," Gas-Driven Rotary Engines and/or Turbines",20,1,3 ," Membrane Separation",3,1,2 ," Irradiation",23,1,2 ," Freeze Concentration",9,1,3 ," Membrane Hyperfiltration to Separate Water from Food Products",4,1,3

471

"RSE Table E7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "Economic","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Characteristic(a)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2,2,2 " 20-49",2,3,2 " 50-99",3,3,2 " 100-249",2,3,2 " 250-499",3,3,3 " 500 and Over",1,2,2 "Total",1,1,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",2,3,3 " 50-99",3,3,3

472

"RSE Table E13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,"Total of" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,4,10 " 20-49",33,35,70 " 50-99",10,12,10 " 100-249",9,14,1 " 250-499",1,1,3 " 500 and Over",1,1,2 "Total",3,4,5 "Employment Size" " Under 50",42,44,21 " 50-99",20,21,73 " 100-249",16,16,38 " 250-499",1,2,1

473

Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks: Thermal, Electrical and Stress Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a parametric analysis performed to determine the effect of varying the percent on-cell reformation (OCR) of methane on the thermal and electrical performance for a generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design. OCR of methane can be beneficial to an SOFC stack because the reaction (steam-methane reformation) is endothermic and can remove excess heat generated by the electrochemical reactions directly from the cell. The heat removed is proportional to the amount of methane reformed on the cell. Methane can be partially pre-reformed externally, then supplied to the stack, where rapid reaction kinetics on the anode ensures complete conversion. Thus, the thermal load varies with methane concentration entering the stack, as does the coupled scalar distributions, including the temperature and electrical current density. The endotherm due to the reformation reaction can cause a temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet, resulting in large thermal gradients. This effect depends on factors that include methane concentration, local temperature, and stack geometry.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Reasoning about human error by modeling cognition and interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we focus on system resilience from the perspective of understanding human error. In particular, we consider systematic cognitive slips, including postcompletion errors, which are persistent, though infrequent. We outline the findings from empirical studies that have identified various factors that provoke or mitigate against such errors. We then describe approaches we are pursuing to encapsulate these insights in ways that can be re-used within system design. More broadly, we argue that an understanding of the factors that influence the likelihood of such errors can support organizations in designing systems and processes to minimize the likelihood of such errors.

Ann Blandford; Jonathan Back; Paul Curzon; Simon Y. W. Li; Rimvydas Ruksenas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Error minimizing algorithms for nearest eighbor classifiers  

SciTech Connect

Stack Filters define a large class of discrete nonlinear filter first introd uced in image and signal processing for noise removal. In recent years we have suggested their application to classification problems, and investigated their relationship to other types of discrete classifiers such as Decision Trees. In this paper we focus on a continuous domain version of Stack Filter Classifiers which we call Ordered Hypothesis Machines (OHM), and investigate their relationship to Nearest Neighbor classifiers. We show that OHM classifiers provide a novel framework in which to train Nearest Neighbor type classifiers by minimizing empirical error based loss functions. We use the framework to investigate a new cost sensitive loss function that allows us to train a Nearest Neighbor type classifier for low false alarm rate applications. We report results on both synthetic data and real-world image data.

Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmer, G. Beate [TEXAS A& M

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Graphical Quantum Error-Correcting Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a purely graph-theoretical object, namely the coding clique, to construct quantum errorcorrecting codes. Almost all quantum codes constructed so far are stabilizer (additive) codes and the construction of nonadditive codes, which are potentially more efficient, is not as well understood as that of stabilizer codes. Our graphical approach provides a unified and classical way to construct both stabilizer and nonadditive codes. In particular we have explicitly constructed the optimal ((10,24,3)) code and a family of 1-error detecting nonadditive codes with the highest encoding rate so far. In the case of stabilizer codes a thorough search becomes tangible and we have classified all the extremal stabilizer codes up to 8 qubits.

Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; C. H. Oh

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained

Meirovitch, Hagai

480

A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration  

SciTech Connect

We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

482

Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

484

Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Merchant Commodity Storage and Term Structure Model Error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Merchants operations involves valuing and hedging the cash flows of commodity and energy conversion assets as real options based on stochastic models that inevitably embed model error. In this paper we quantify how empirically calibrated model errors about the futures price term structure affect the valuation and hedging of commodity storage assets, specifically the storage of natural gas, an important energy source. We also explore ways to mitigate the impact of these errors. Our analysis demonstrates the differential impact of term structure model error on natural gas storage valuation versus hedging. We also propose an effective approach to deal with the negative effect of such model error on factor hedging, a specific hedging approach. More generally, our work suggests managerial principles for option valuation and hedging in the presence of term structure model error. These principles should have relevance for the merchant management of other commodity conversion assets and for the management of financial options that also depend on term structure dynamics

Nicola Secom; Guoming Lai; Franois Margot; Alan Scheller-wolf

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective, Occupied, and Vacant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b.Relative Standard Errors b.Relative Standard Errors Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Occupied Floorspace (million square feet) Total Vacant Floorspace (million square feet) Occupied Square Footage as a Percent of Total All Buildings 3.7 3.8 3.9 8.2 0.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5.3 5.5 5.4 10.3 0.8 5,001 to 10,000 3.7 3.7 3.9 10.3 0.9 10,001 to 25,000 5.2 5 5.1 14.3 1.2 25,001 to 50,000 6.6 7 7.1 17.2 1.6 50,001 to 100,000 7.1 7.1 7.5 12 1.1 100,001 to 200,000 8.6 8.6 8.6 20 1.3 200,001 to 500,000 10.1 10.5 10.7 20.5 1.5 Over 500,000 25.8 20.3 21.9 34.2 4.6 Principal Building Activity Education 8.4 7.4 6.8 35.1 2.2 Food Sales and Service 7.5 8.7 8.6 29.9 2.6

487

Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

maintenance, users reporting get the error message similar as follows occassionaly: PE456:inetarpaddresslookup:Failed to read output of sbinarp -a -i ipogif0 command. Try...

488

Generic Error Model of Human-Robot Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wrong human-robot interactions are at the origin of severe damages. Safety requirements ask the analysis of these interactions. At first, erroneous interactions have to be identified. In this paper, we propose to use UML (Unified Modeling Language) to specify human robot interaction. Then, generic error models, associated with the message feature provided by UML, are presented. These error models allow interaction errors to be automatically deduced from the modeling of the human-robot interactions. The use of these generic error models is illustrated on a medical robot for teleechography.

J. Guiochet; et al.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Loaded Transmission Error Measurement System for Spur and Helical Gears.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The majority of loaded static transmission error test stands developed in the past had little success generating accurate results versus analytical predictions for parallel-axis gearing. (more)

Wright, Zachary Harrison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NIST Achieves Record-Low Error Rate for Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The horizontal and vertical lines separate gold electrodes, which are tuned to ... errors caused by instability in laser beam pointing and power, as well ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

ERROR BOUNDS FOR VECTOR-VALUED FUNCTIONS ON ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to the survey papers by Az [2], Lewis & Pang [25], Pang [33], as well as the book by Auslender & Teboule [1]. Numerous characterizations of the error...

492

Use of Quantum Error Coding in a 4-Blade Neutron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of Quantum Error Coding in a 4-Blade Neutron Interferometer. Summary: ... Figure 1: A schematic diagram of the 5-blade neutron interferometer. ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

493

Historical Ocean Subsurface Temperature Analysis with Error Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis of monthly ocean subsurface temperatures from 1950 to 1998 is carried out. The analysis scheme and the results with estimated analysis errors are presented.

Masayoshi Ishii; Masahide Kimoto; Misako Kachi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Creative Uses of Software Errors: Glitches and Cheats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Video games constitute a major sector of computing with distinctive social implications. Analysis of video game programming errors, design limitations, and rule ambiguities suggests a range of positive functions that glitches and cheats may perform. ... Keywords: cheat, computer, error, glitch, video game

Wilma Alice Bainbridge; William Sims Bainbridge

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Estimating Sampling Errors in Large-Scale Temperature Averages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed for estimating the uncertainty (standard error) of observed regional, hemispheric, and global-mean surface temperature series due to incomplete spatial sampling. Standard errors estimated at the grid-box level [SE2 = S2(1 ? ...

P. D. Jones; T. J. Osborn; K. R. Briffa

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Tangential residual as error estimator in the boundary element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new error estimator based on tangential derivative Boundary Integral Equation residuals for 2D Laplace and Helmholtz equations is shown. The direct problem for general mixed boundary conditions is solved using standard and hypersingular ... Keywords: Adaptivity, Boundary Integral Equation residual, Boundary element method, Error estimation, Mesh adaptation, Mesh refinement, Nodal sensitivity

Alejandro E. Martnez-Castro; Rafael Gallego

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Error estimates for the numerical approximation of Neumann control problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We continue the discussion of error estimates for the numerical analysis of Neumann boundary control problems we started in Casas et al. (Comput. Optim. Appl. 31:193-219, 2005). In that paper piecewise constant functions were used to approximate the ... Keywords: boundary control, error estimates, numerical approximation, semilinear elliptic equation

Eduardo Casas; Mariano Mateos

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Multistrategy Discovery and Detection of Novice Programmer Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting and diagnosing errors in novice behavior is an important student modeling task. In this paper, we describe MEDD, an unsupervised incremental multistrategy system for the discovery of classes of errors from, and their detection in, novice programs. ... Keywords: conceptual clustering, multistrategy learning, student modeling, unsupervised learning

Raymund C. Sison; Masayuki Numao; Masamichi Shimura

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Soft Error Vulnerability of Iterative Linear Algebra Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devices become increasingly vulnerable to soft errors as their feature sizes shrink. Previously, soft errors primarily caused problems for space and high-atmospheric computing applications. Modern architectures now use features so small at sufficiently low voltages that soft errors are becoming significant even at terrestrial altitudes. The soft error vulnerability of iterative linear algebra methods, which many scientific applications use, is a critical aspect of the overall application vulnerability. These methods are often considered invulnerable to many soft errors because they converge from an imprecise solution to a precise one. However, we show that iterative methods can be vulnerable to soft errors, with a high rate of silent data corruptions. We quantify this vulnerability, with algorithms generating up to 8.5% erroneous results when subjected to a single bit-flip. Further, we show that detecting soft errors in an iterative method depends on its detailed convergence properties and requires more complex mechanisms than simply checking the residual. Finally, we explore inexpensive techniques to tolerate soft errors in these methods.

Bronevetsky, G; de Supinski, B

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Network protocols: correcting transmission errors of up to two bits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the construction of Hamming Codes that can detect and correct 1-bit transmission errors has been illustrated [1], Hamming Codes that will detect and correct transmission errors of more than 1 bit remain yet to be constructed. In this paper, ...

Sei-Jong Chung

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z