Sample records for absolute percent errors

  1. Absolute Percent Error Based Fitness Functions for Evolving Forecast Models AndyNovobilski,Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Absolute Percent Error Based Fitness Functions for Evolving Forecast Models Andy computfi~gas a methodof data mining,is its intrinsic ability to drive modelselection accordingto a mixedset of criteria. Basedon natural selection, evolutionary computing utilizes evaluationof candidatesolutions

  2. Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas FieldsLiquids

  3. 9:07 9:50 10:33 11:16 12:00 PercentError

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Uncertainty Analysis RMS Error (10:00 AM -- 11:30 AM):12.1% Figure 7.30. Heat pump model validation in heating-cycle. Presumably this is due to the heat accumulation or dissipation inside the heat pump and fluid transient delay the parameter estimation heat pump model works effectively for the simulation of ground source heat pump bridge

  4. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  5. "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8 Water00Annual

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Decoherence at absolute zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha

    2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytical study of the loss of quantum coherence at absolute zero. Our model consists of a harmonic oscillator coupled to an environment of harmonic oscillators at absolute zero. We find that for an Ohmic bath, the offdiagonal elements of the density matrix in the position representation decay as a power law in time at late times. This slow loss of coherence in the quantum domain is qualitatively different from the exponential decay observed in studies of high temperature environments.

  9. Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume,234 0% 0% #12;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters

  10. "EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application...

  11. HERA TRANSVERSE POLARIMETER ABSOLUTE SCALE AND ERROR BY RISETIME CALIBRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg, Germany Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan, Armenia AND K. P. SCH the spin rotators at the HER­ #12; 2 V.GHARIBYAN AND K. P. SCH Ë? ULER MES experiment by detecting evolves then naturally through the spin flip driven by synchrotron radiation (the Sokolov­Ternov e#ect [8

  12. Measurement of the absolute \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10{sup 20} protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10{sup 20} POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  13. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  14. Absolute Source Activity Measurement with a Single Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikit, I.; Nemes, T.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper the activity of {sup 60}Co source was measured using the full absorption, sum and random coincidences (pile up) peaks and the total spectrum area in the gamma spectra. By the exact treatment of the chance coincidence and pile-up events, surprisingly good results were obtained. With the source on the detector end-cap (when the angular correlation effects are negligible), this simple method yields absolute activity values deviating from the reference activity for about 1 percent.

  15. Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal...

  16. Absolute Motion and Gravitational Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Process Physics provides a new explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. An analysis of various experiments demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed experimentally by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The in-flow also manifests turbulence and the experimental data confirms this as well, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. The Einstein assumptions leading to the Special and General Theory of Relativity are shown to be falsified by the extensive experimental data. Contrary to the Einstein assumptions absolute motion is consistent with relativistic effects, which are caused by actual dynamical effects of absolute motion through the quantum foam, so that it is Lorentzian relativity that is seen to be essentially co...

  17. Absolute Motion and Gravitational Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2003-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Process Physics provides a new explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. An analysis of various experiments demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed experimentally by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The in-flow also manifests turbulence and the experimental data confirms this as well, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. The Einstein assumptions leading to the Special and General Theory of Relativity are shown to be falsified by the extensive experimental data. Contrary to the Einstein assumptions absolute motion is consistent with relativistic effects, which are caused by actual dynamical effects of absolute motion through the quantum foam, so that it is Lorentzian relativity that is seen to be essentially correct.

  18. Compressor performance, absolutely! M. R. Titchener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titchener, Mark R.

    Compressor performance, absolutely! M. R. Titchener Dept of CS, U. of Auck., N.Z. (Email: mark the absolute performance of existing string compressors may be measured. Kolmogorov (1958) recognised://tcode.auckland.ac.nz/~corpus has been used to evaluate the `absolute' performance of a series of popular compressors. The results

  19. An absolute Johnson noise thermometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Callegaro; Vincenzo D'Elia; Marco Pisani; Alessio Pollarolo

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed an absolute Johnson noise thermometer (JNT), an instrument to measure the thermodynamic temperature of a sensing resistor, with traceability to voltage, resistance and frequency quantities. The temperature is measured in energy units, and can be converted to SI units (kelvin) with the accepted value of the Boltzmann constant kb; or, conversely, it can be employed to perform measurements at the triple point of water, and obtain a determination of kb. The thermometer is composed of a correlation spectrum analyzer an a calibrated noise source, both constructed around commercial mixed-signal boards. The calibrator generates a pseudorandom noise, by digital synthesis and amplitude scaling with inductive voltage dividers; the signal spectrum is a frequency comb covering the measurement bandwidth. JNT measurements at room temperature are compatible with those of a standard platinum resistance thermometer within the combined uncertainty of 60 ppm. A path towards future improvements of JNT accuracy is also sketched.

  20. PROPAGATION OF ERRORS IN SPATIAL ANALYSIS Peter P. Siska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    , the conversion of data from analog to digital form used to be an extremely time-consuming process. At present process then the resulting error is inflated up to 20 percent for each grid cell of the final map. The magnitude of errors naturally increases with an addition of every new layer entering the overlay process

  1. Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides et d and absolute instabilities in Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow Benoît PIER Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides flow type often disrupt oil-well drilling By implementing a detailed instability analysis, the dynamics

  2. Absolute geopotential height system for Ethiopia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedada, Tullu Besha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used airborne gravity data, the 2008 Earth Gravity Model (EGM08) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) digital elevation data in a ‘Remove-Compute-Restore’ process to determine absolute vertical reference ...

  3. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  4. Emission trading with absolute and intensity caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jaemin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kyoto Protocol introduced emission trading to help reduce the cost of compliances for the Annex B countries that have absolute caps. However, we need to expand the emission trading to cover developing countries in order ...

  5. Ways to Increase Percent Calf Crop in Beef Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly, John R.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in young heifers shows a marked increase in breeding efficiency. Work at the University of Arizona on rebreeding first calf heifers supports this data. Arizona work showed 79 percent pregnancy rates in heifers with calves early weaned and 46 percent... mo. mo. mo. mo. mo. mo. mo. mo. Low level Angus 0 0 0 33 82 90100100 Hereford 0 11 22 33 38 50 100 100 Crossbreed 0 0 12 68 85 100 100 100 Setting some arbitrary age at which t heifers is not the solution. The outcome would largely on how...

  6. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Washington Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPrice (Percent)the

  7. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in West Virginia Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPrice (Percent)theby

  8. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen...

  9. Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of...

  10. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Simulation study on error propagation effects when determining second virial coefficients from the speed-of-sound or the Joule-Thomson experiment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Peursem, David J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . C. Experimental Errors IV. SPEED-OF-SOUND . . A. Research Method. B. Data Reduction and Analysis. . . 1. Perfect Data. a. First-Order Model Consistency Test. . . . . b. Second-Order Model Consistency Test . . . 2. Random Error Induced Data. 3.... . 2. Random Error Induced Data. 3. Systematic Error Induced Data. a. Fixed Absolute Errors. . . b. Fixed Fractional Errors, VI. CONCLUSIONS, LIST OF SYMBOLS . REFERENCES. APPENDIX A: SIMULATION LABORATORY DATA. A. Perfect Speed-of-Sound. B...

  12. A Model of Absolute Autonomy and Power: Toward Group Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hexmoor, Henry

    575 2420 fax:479 575 5339 Abstract. We present a model of absolute autonomy and power in agent systems present a model that approximates absolute autonomy and power in agent systems. This absolute sense1 A Model of Absolute Autonomy and Power: Toward Group Effects HENRY HEXMOOR Computer Science

  13. Multiverse Set Theory and Absolutely Undecidable Propositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Väänänen, Jouko

    Multiverse Set Theory and Absolutely Undecidable Propositions Jouko V¨a¨an¨anen University of Helsinki and University of Amsterdam Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Background 4 3 The multiverse of sets 6 3.1 The one universe case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 The multiverse

  14. Error detection method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  15. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Louisiana Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Aprthe Price

  16. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Massachusetts Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar

  17. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Minnesota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb MarPricethe

  18. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Mississippi Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb MarPricethethe

  19. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan FebPricePricePriceby

  20. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe PricePriceby the

  1. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethe Price

  2. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethe

  3. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Tennessee Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethethe

  4. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPrice

  5. PERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR OIL/GAS FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBGOperablePERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR

  6. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Louisiana Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar AprPricePrice (Percent)the

  7. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Marby the Price (Percent)

  8. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPrice (Percent)the Price

  9. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPrice (Percent)the

  10. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Louisiana Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePrice (Percent)the Price

  11. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Louisiana Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePrice (Percent)the

  12. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Marby

  13. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb

  14. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year JanthePriceby

  15. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year

  16. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethe Price

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethe Pricethe

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricetheby the Price

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricetheby the

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Tennessee Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricetheby

  1. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Tennessee Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethebythe Price

  2. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Washington Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) YearPricethe

  3. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Washington Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)

  4. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in West Virginia Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by the Price

  5. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in West Virginia Represented

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by the Priceby

  6. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by the

  7. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by thethe Price

  8. Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade21752 2,616 January 1996 January1996Percent

  9. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet) U.S.Developmental WellsYear JanDeliveries (Percent)

  10. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John [Department of Physics, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA 70125 (United States); Jenkins III, Robert L. [Applied Physics Department, Richard Stockton College, Galloway, NJ 08205 (United States); Maddox, Larry, E-mail: drichar7@xula.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  11. Absolute absorption spectroscopy based on molecule interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Nimmrichter; Klaus Hornberger; Hendrik Ulbricht; Markus Arndt

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method to measure the absolute photon absorption cross section of neutral molecules in a molecular beam. It is independent of our knowledge of the particle beam density, nor does it rely on photo-induced fragmentation or ionization. The method is based on resolving the recoil resulting from photon absorption by means of near-field matter-wave interference, and it thus applies even to very dilute beams with low optical densities. Our discussion includes the possibility of internal state conversion as well as fluorescence. We assess the influence of various experimental uncertainties and show that the measurement of absolute absorption cross sections is conceivable with high precision and using existing technologies.

  12. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartori, Pablo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Max...

  13. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  14. Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyc, Tomas

    Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics Tom´as Tyc, Lenka Herz symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically

  15. Absolute Calibration of the Auger Fluorescence Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bauleo; J. Brack; L. Garrard; J. Harton; R. Knapik; R. Meyhandan; A. C. Rovero; A. Tamashiro; D. Warner; for the Auger Collaboration

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the ombined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  16. Quantum error control codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  17. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  19. Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

  20. Quantum Error Correction Workshop on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    Error Correction Avoiding Errors: Mathematical Model decomposition of the interaction algebra;Quantum Error Correction Designed Hamiltonians Main idea: "perturb the system to make it more stable" · fast (local) control operations = average Hamiltonian with more symmetry (cf. techniques from NMR

  1. Systematic Errors in measurement of b1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, S A

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of spin observables can be obtained from the relative difference of or asymmetry between cross sections of different spin states of beam or target particles. Such observables have the advantage that the normalization factors needed to calculate absolute cross sections from yields often divide out or cancel to a large degree in constructing asymmetries. However, normalization factors can change with time, giving different normalization factors for different target or beam spin states, leading to systematic errors in asymmetries in addition to those determined from statistics. Rapidly flipping spin orientation, such as what is routinely done with polarized beams, can significantly reduce the impact of these normalization fluctuations and drifts. Target spin orientations typically require minutes to hours to change, versus fractions of a second for beams, making systematic errors for observables based on target spin flips more difficult to control. Such systematic errors from normalization drifts are discussed in the context of the proposed measurement of the deuteron b(1) structure function at Jefferson Lab.

  2. Efficient Small Area Estimation in the Presence of Measurement Error in Covariates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Trijya

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    for the four estimators, yi, eYiS, bYiME, bYiSIMEX when the number of small areas is 100, measure- ment error variance Ci = 3 and 2v = 4. k is the percentage of areas having auxiliary information measured with error. : : : : : : : 52 2 Absolute value... 3 Jackknife estimates of the mean squared error of the Lohr-Ybarra estimator bYiME and the SIMEX estimator bYiSIMEX when the num- ber of small areas is 100, measurement error variance Ci = 2 and 2v = 4. k is the percentage of areas having...

  3. Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowski, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relation 15 Must-Before Race Prediction 16 Implementation 17viii Abstract Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors bySANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC PREDICTION OF CONCURRENCY ERRORS A

  4. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  5. Absolute Maximal Entanglement and Quantum Secret Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helwig, Wolfram; Riera, Arnau; Latorre, José I; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the existence of absolutely maximally entangled (AME) states in quantum mechanics and its applications to quantum information. AME states are characterized by being maximally entangled for all bipartitions of the system and exhibit genuine multipartite entanglement. With such states, we present a novel parallel teleportation protocol which teleports multiple quantum states between groups of senders and receivers. The notable features of this protocol are that (i) the partition into senders and receivers can be chosen after the state has been distributed, and (ii) one group has to perform joint quantum operations while the parties of the other group only have to act locally on their system. We also prove the equivalence between pure state quantum secret sharing schemes and AME states with an even number of parties. This equivalence implies the existence of AME states for an arbitrary number of parties based on known results about the existence of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  6. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â? and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â? This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?¢ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?¢ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?¢ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?¢ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?¢ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?¢ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?¢ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

  9. absolutely calibrated effective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    identical to the Sun, to set the absolute zero point of the effective temperature scale to within few degrees. Our newly calibrated, accurate and precise temperature...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: high-precision absolute yaw encoder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-precision absolute yaw encoder Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events,...

  11. absolute neutrino mass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  12. absolute neutrino masses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  13. Modular error embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Ettinger, J. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

  14. Error Analysis of Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat-Exchanger Text-Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 PLn T T T=? + ? + Then () () 2 2 2'2 2 2 vqb 7235.425 8.2 0.0057 2PPT TT?? ??=++ + ????1gAPt? (13) We substitute the equation (13) into equation (10), and gain the max absolute error of air moisture content: () () 2 22 2'2 22 qb 1 g 0...

  15. Approaches to Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Kempe

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this little survey is to give a simple description of the main approaches to quantum error correction and quantum fault-tolerance. Our goal is to convey the necessary intuitions both for the problems and their solutions in this area. After characterising quantum errors we present several error-correction schemes and outline the elements of a full fledged fault-tolerant computation, which works error-free even though all of its components can be faulty. We also mention alternative approaches to error-correction, so called error-avoiding or decoherence-free schemes. Technical details and generalisations are kept to a minimum.

  16. absolute gamma ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absolute gamma ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Absolute Branching Ratio of...

  17. STATISTICAL MODEL OF SYSTEMATIC ERRORS: LINEAR ERROR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

    to apply. The algorithm to maximize a likelihood function in the case of a non-linear physico - the same variances of errors 3.1. One-way classification 3.2. Linear regression 4. Real case (vaporizationSTATISTICAL MODEL OF SYSTEMATIC ERRORS: LINEAR ERROR MODEL E.B. Rudnyi Department of Chemistry

  18. Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stidham, Paul Emery

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

  19. Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes Diploma Thesis Neele von Deetzen Arbeitsbereich Nachrichtentechnik School of Engineering and Science Bremen, February 28th, 2005 #12;Unequal Error Protection Turbo Convolutional Codes / Turbo Codes 18 3.1 Structure

  20. EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hosted byCold Fusion Error

  1. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partridge, B; Perley, R A; Stevens, J; Butler, B J; Rocha, G; Walter, B; Zacchei, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated VLA and ATCA observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 3.6% +- 1.0% below Planck values; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 6.2% +- 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  2. Uncertainty quantification and error analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higdon, Dave M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Mark C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Habib, Salman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klein, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berliner, Mark [OHIO STATE UNIV.; Covey, Curt [LLNL; Ghattas, Omar [UNIV OF TEXAS; Graziani, Carlo [UNIV OF CHICAGO; Seager, Mark [LLNL; Sefcik, Joseph [LLNL; Stark, Philip [UC/BERKELEY; Stewart, James [SNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UQ studies all sources of error and uncertainty, including: systematic and stochastic measurement error; ignorance; limitations of theoretical models; limitations of numerical representations of those models; limitations on the accuracy and reliability of computations, approximations, and algorithms; and human error. A more precise definition for UQ is suggested below.

  3. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  4. PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged of modern nuclear power plants. Domenici is chairman of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations

  5. Franklin Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Error Messages Message or Symptom Fault Recommendation job hit wallclock time limit user or system Submit...

  6. Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migdall, Alan

    metrologia Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements must be created in pairs, the VIS channel is also stimulated. In this Metrologia, 1998, 35, 295-300 295

  7. absolute efficiency calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  8. absolute radiometric calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging...

  9. absolute calibration site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  10. absolute intensity calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  11. absolute solar transmission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data were collected from Chang, Grace C. 7 January 1996 NREUfP-463-20619 Calibration of a Solar Absolute Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of Scientific and Technical Information...

  12. Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High, Karen

    Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics Xun Jin Different goals and potential audiences determine that two types of environmental performance assessments metrics can be partitioned into two camps. One suite of metrics aim to assess the environmental

  13. Absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension of tree-valued mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naor, Assaf

    We prove that every Lipschitz function from a subset of a locally compact length space to a metric tree has a unique absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension (AMLE). We relate these extensions to a stochastic game called ...

  14. absolute transition probabilities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition...

  15. General Relativity and Spatial Flows: I. Absolute Relativistic Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Martin

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two complementary and equally important approaches to relativistic physics are explained. One is the standard approach, and the other is based on a study of the flows of an underlying physical substratum. Previous results concerning the substratum flow approach are reviewed, expanded, and more closely related to the formalism of General Relativity. An absolute relativistic dynamics is derived in which energy and momentum take on absolute significance with respect to the substratum. Possible new effects on satellites are described.

  16. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  17. Finding beam focus errors automatically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

  18. Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS Performing the experiment and collecting data learned, you might get a better grade.) Data analysis should NOT be delayed until all of the data. This will help one avoid the problem of spending an entire class collecting bad data because of a mistake

  19. The Absolute Magnitude of RR Lyrae Stars Derived from the Hipparcos Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Masanori Miyamoto; Yuzuru Yoshii

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present determination of the absolute magnitude $M_V(RR)$ of RR Lyrae stars is twofold, relying upon Hipparcos proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes separately. First, applying the statistical parallax method to the proper motions, we find $=0.69\\pm0.10$ for 99 halo RR Lyraes with $$ =--1.58. Second, applying the Lutz-Kelker correction to the RR Lyrae HIP95497 with the most accurately measured parallax, we obtain $M_V(RR)$=(0.58--0.68)$^{+0.28}_{-0.31}$ at [Fe/H]=--1.6. Furthermore, allowing full use of low accuracy and negative parallaxes as well for 125 RR Lyraes with -- 2.49$\\leq$[Fe/H]$\\leq$0.07, the maximum likelihood estimation yields the relation, $M_V(RR)$=(0.59$\\pm$0.37)+(0.20$\\pm$0.63)([Fe/H]+1.60), which formally agrees with the recent preferred relation. The same estimation yields again $$ = $0.65\\pm0.33$ for the 99 halo RR Lyraes. Although the formal errors in the latter three parallax estimates are rather large, all of the four results suggest the fainter absolute magnitude, $M_V(RR)$$\\approx$0.6--0.7 at [Fe/H]=--1.6. The present results still provide the lower limit on the age of the universe which is inconsistent with a flat, matter-dominated universe and current estimates of the Hubble constant.

  20. If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

  1. Impacts of Increasing Natural Gas Fueled CHP from 20 to 35 Percent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Increasing Natural Gas Fueled CHP from 20 to 35 Percent of Total Electricity Production in Texas, April 2011 Impacts of Increasing Natural Gas Fueled CHP from 20 to 35...

  2. Effects of time constraint and percent defective on visual inspection performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Walter Edgar

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committ e) (Memb r...

  3. Absolute Lineshifts - A new diagnostic for stellar hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainis Dravins

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For hydrodynamic model atmospheres, absolute lineshifts are becoming an observable diagnostic tool beyond the classical ones of line-strength, -width, -shape, and -asymmetry. This is the wavelength displacement of different types of spectral lines away from the positions naively expected from the Doppler shift caused by stellar radial motion. Caused mainly by correlated velocity and brightness patterns in granular convection, such absolute lineshifts could in the past be studied only for the Sun (since the relative Sun-Earth motion, and the ensuing Doppler shift is known). For other stars, this is now becoming possible thanks to three separate developments: (a) Astrometric determination of stellar radial motion; (b) High-resolution spectrometers with accurate wavelength calibration, and (c) Accurate laboratory wavelengths for several atomic species. Absolute lineshifts offer a tool to segregate various 2- and 3-dimensional models, and to identify non-LTE effects in line formation.

  4. Absolute Lineshifts - A new diagnostic for stellar hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dravins, D

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For hydrodynamic model atmospheres, absolute lineshifts are becoming an observable diagnostic tool beyond the classical ones of line-strength, -width, -shape, and -asymmetry. This is the wavelength displacement of different types of spectral lines away from the positions naively expected from the Doppler shift caused by stellar radial motion. Caused mainly by correlated velocity and brightness patterns in granular convection, such absolute lineshifts could in the past be studied only for the Sun (since the relative Sun-Earth motion, and the ensuing Doppler shift is known). For other stars, this is now becoming possible thanks to three separate developments: (a) Astrometric determination of stellar radial motion; (b) High-resolution spectrometers with accurate wavelength calibration, and (c) Accurate laboratory wavelengths for several atomic species. Absolute lineshifts offer a tool to segregate various 2- and 3-dimensional models, and to identify non-LTE effects in line formation.

  5. Stability comparison of two absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillot, Pierre; Landragin, Arnaud; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Merlet, Sébastien

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the direct comparison between the stabilities of two mobile absolute gravimeters of different technology: the LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter and FG5X\\#216 of the Universit\\'e du Luxembourg. These instruments rely on two different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. The comparison took place in the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in Luxembourg, at the beginning of the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2013. We analyse a 2h10 duration common measurement, and find that the CAG shows better immunity with respect to changes in the level of vibration noise, as well as a slightly better short term stability.

  6. Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

  7. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K.

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Static disassembly is a crucial ?rst step in reverse engineering executable ?les, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  8. Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowski, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    errors in systems code using smt solvers. In Computer Aideddata race witnesses by an SMT-based analysis. In NASA Formalscalability relies on a modern SMT solver and an e?cient

  9. Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

  10. Double Beta Decay and the Absolute Neutrino Mass Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti

    2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After a short review of the current status of three-neutrino mixing, the implications for the values of neutrino masses are discussed. The bounds on the absolute scale of neutrino masses from Tritium beta-decay and cosmological data are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the implications of three-neutrino mixing for neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  11. absolute standard hydrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absolute standard hydrogen First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrogen Storage CODES &...

  12. Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Scott

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

  13. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPrice (Percent) Year

  14. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Virginia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPrice (Percent)

  15. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wyoming Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) YearPricePrice (Percent)

  16. Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantity of2".9. Percent of

  17. Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantity of2".9. Percent of.0.

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Price (Percent)

  19. Unequal error protection of subband coded bits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devalla, Badarinath

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Source coded data can be separated into different classes based on their susceptibility to channel errors. Errors in the Important bits cause greater distortion in the reconstructed signal. This thesis presents an Unequal Error Protection scheme...

  20. Two-Layer Error Control Codes Combining Rectangular and Hamming Product Codes for Cache Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meilin

    We propose a novel two-layer error control code, combining error detection capability of rectangular codes and error correction capability of Hamming product codes in an efficient way, in order to increase cache error ...

  1. have risen by about 15 percent. These increases, which tend to remain in the atmo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States emitted 25 percent of the total global greenhouse gases. The largest contributors are electricity Warming Trend: How Climate Change Could Affect the Northwest W hile the debate over global warming global temperatures, that the earth is warm- ing. Over the last 100 years, the earth's average

  2. Microstructural Evolution During Laser Resolidification of Fe-25 Atom Percent Ge Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    selection is discussed using competitive growth kinetics. I. INTRODUCTION TECHNIQUES of rapidly melting the process of laser resolidification. Third, the inti- mate contact of the surface-melted layerMicrostructural Evolution During Laser Resolidification of Fe-25 Atom Percent Ge Alloy KRISHANU

  3. POLICY STATEMENT ON PERCENT SALARY FOR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS PAID EXCLUSIVELY FROM FEDERAL AWARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    POLICY STATEMENT ON PERCENT SALARY FOR PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS PAID EXCLUSIVELY FROM FEDERAL AWARDS awards, including federal flow through-funding. This Policy applies to all Principal Investigators whose salary is derived entirely from federal awards. This Policy does not apply to Principal Investigators who

  4. Reliability of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimating Whole-Fish Energy Density and Percent Lipids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reliability of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimating Whole-Fish Energy Density impedance analysis (BIA) as a nonlethal means of predicting energy density and percent lipids for three fish. Although models that combined BIA measures with fish wet mass provided strong predictions of total energy

  5. Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular...

  6. Correction due to finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D; Zanimonskiy, Y Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correction due to finite speed of light is among the most inconsistent ones in absolute gravimetry. Formulas reported by different authors yield corrections scattered up to 8 $\\mu$Gal with no obvious reasons. The problem, though noted before, has never been studied, and nowadays the correction is rather postulated than rigorously proven. In this paper we investigate the problem from several prospectives, find the corrections for different types of absolute gravimeters, and establish relationships between different ways of implement them. The obtained results enabled us to analyze and understand the discrepancies in the results of other authors. We found that the correction derived from the Doppler effect is accountable only for $\\tfrac{2}{3}$ of the total correction due to finite speed of light, if no signal delays are considered. Another major source of inconsistency was found in the tacit use of simplified trajectory models.

  7. In Self-contradiction, Machian Geocentrism Entails Absolute Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Herbert I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luka Popov has attempted to advance Machian physics by maintaining that the heliocentric system must be replaced by Tycho Brahe's geocentric system. We show that while geocentrism relies on Mach's contention that accelerations are relative, this contention is untenable because, inter alia, the consequences of an acceleration of an object with respect to the fixed stars cannot be duplicated by acceleration of the stars with respect to this object and, if the universe and a co-rotating observer have the same angular velocity, this motion is detectable because they have different linear velocities. Also, geocentrism precludes the relativity of accelerations and leads to an absolute space while Mach argued against absolute space, Popov's result that the force exerted by the Earth on the Sun depends on the square of the Sun's mass but is independent of the Earth's mass is paradoxical, and the annual asymmetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background falsifies all geocentric or 'Tychonic/Brahean) systems.

  8. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  9. Distributed Error Confinement Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patt-Shamir, Boaz

    . These algorithms can serve as building blocks in more general reactive systems. Previous results in exploring locality in reactive systems were not error confined, and relied on the assump- tion (not used in current, that seems inherent for voting in reactive networks; its analysis leads to an interesting combinatorial

  10. Comparison of analytical methods for percent phosphorus determination in electroless nickel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, W.W.; Sullivan, H.H.

    1982-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of five analytical methods for percent phosphorus determination and makes recommendations for the use of common methods to provide accurate and precise results in the field. The analytical methods are: (1) ASTM-E39 gravimetric method; (2) development colorimetric method; (3) independent colorimetric method; (4) UCC-ND alkalimetric method; (5) UCC-ND inductively coupled plasma method. Analysis of the data indicates the concentration of phosphorus in the electroless nickel plate sample to be approximately 12.1%. All of the methods evaluated demonstrated the capability of determining percent phosphorus accurately through the accumulation of a large number of readings. The primary difference among the methods is the precision capabilites of individual tests. 3 figures, 6 tables.

  11. SYSTEMATIC CONTINUUM ERRORS IN THE Ly{alpha} FOREST AND THE MEASURED TEMPERATURE-DENSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan, E-mail: lee@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum fitting uncertainties are a major source of error in estimates of the temperature-density relation (usually parameterized as a power-law, T {proportional_to} {Delta}{sup {gamma}-1}) of the intergalactic medium through the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Ly{alpha} forest. Using a simple order-of-magnitude calculation, we show that few percent-level systematic errors in the placement of the quasar continuum due to, e.g., a uniform low-absorption Gunn-Peterson component could lead to errors in {gamma} of the order of unity. This is quantified further using a simple semi-analytic model of the Ly{alpha} forest flux PDF. We find that under(over)estimates in the continuum level can lead to a lower (higher) measured value of {gamma}. By fitting models to mock data realizations generated with current observational errors, we find that continuum errors can cause a systematic bias in the estimated temperature-density relation of ({delta}({gamma})) Almost-Equal-To -0.1, while the error is increased to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 compared to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 in the absence of continuum errors.

  12. Precise method of compensating radiation-induced errors in a hot-cathode-ionization gauge with correcting electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeki, Hiroshi, E-mail: saeki@spring8.or.jp; Magome, Tamotsu, E-mail: saeki@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Kohto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate pressure-measurement errors caused by a synchrotron radiation environment, a precise method using a hot-cathode-ionization-gauge head with correcting electrode, was developed and tested in a simulation experiment with excess electrons in the SPring-8 storage ring. This precise method to improve the measurement accuracy, can correctly reduce the pressure-measurement errors caused by electrons originating from the external environment, and originating from the primary gauge filament influenced by spatial conditions of the installed vacuum-gauge head. As the result of the simulation experiment to confirm the performance reducing the errors caused by the external environment, the pressure-measurement error using this method was approximately less than several percent in the pressure range from 10{sup ?5} Pa to 10{sup ?8} Pa. After the experiment, to confirm the performance reducing the error caused by spatial conditions, an additional experiment was carried out using a sleeve and showed that the improved function was available.

  13. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  14. Absolute Efficiency Calibration of a Beta-Gamma Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Lidey, Lance S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract- Identification and quantification of nuclear events such as the Fukushima reactor failure and nuclear explosions rely heavily on the accurate measurement of radioxenon releases. One radioxenon detection method depends on detecting beta-gamma coincident events paired with a stable xenon measurement to determine the concentration of a plume. Like all measurements, the beta-gamma method relies on knowing the detection efficiency for each isotope measured. Several methods are commonly used to characterize the detection efficiency for a beta-gamma detector. The most common method is using a NIST certified sealed source to determine the efficiency. A second method determines the detection efficiencies relative to an already characterized detector. Finally, a potentially more accurate method is to use the expected sample to perform an absolute efficiency calibration; in the case of a beta-gamma detector, this relies on radioxenon gas samples. The complication of the first method is it focuses only on the gamma detectors and does not offer a solution for determining the beta efficiency. The second method listed is not similarly constrained, however it relies on another detector to have a well-known efficiency calibration. The final method using actual radioxenon samples to make an absolute efficiency determination is the most desirable, but until recently it was not possible to produce all four isotopically pure radioxenon. The production, by University of Texas (UT), of isotopically pure radioxenon has allowed the beta-gamma detectors to be calibrated using the absolute efficiency method. The first four radioxenon isotope calibration will be discussed is this paper.

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: unattainability principle challenged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kolá?; David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

    2012-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator (QR), i.e. a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards the absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T->0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g. phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin-waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  19. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  20. Optimized replica gas estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minh, D. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast with most Monte Carlo integration algorithms, which are used to estimate ratios, the replica gas identities recently introduced by Adib enable the estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions using multiple copies of a system and normalized transition functions. Here, an optimized form is presented. After generalizing a replica gas identity with an arbitrary weighting function, we obtain a functional form that has the minimal asymptotic variance for samples from two replicas and is provably good for a larger number. This equation is demonstrated to improve the convergence of partition function estimates in a two-dimensional Ising model.

  1. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  2. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  3. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  4. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  5. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21YearThousandthePrice (Percent)

  6. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  7. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  8. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayPrice

  9. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

  10. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Aprthe

  11. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar AprthePrice

  12. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb MarPrice

  13. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Missouri Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb

  14. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan FebPrice

  15. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan FebPricePrice

  16. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan FebPricePricePrice

  17. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Jan

  18. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe Price

  19. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe PricePrice

  20. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe PricePriceby

  1. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe PricePricebyPrice

  2. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oklahoma Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year Janthe

  3. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePrice

  4. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethe Pricethe

  5. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethethe Price

  6. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Texas Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year JanthePricethethePrice

  7. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice (Percent) Year

  8. Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantity of2".

  9. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar AprPrice (Percent) Decade

  10. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar AprPrice (Percent)

  11. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar AprPrice (Percent)Price

  12. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar AprPricePrice (Percent)

  13. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Marby the Price (Percent)the

  14. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Marby the PricePrice (Percent)

  15. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Marby thethe Price (Percent)

  16. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Marby thethethePrice (Percent)

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPrice (Percent) Decade

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPrice (Percent)

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Delaware Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPrice (Percent)thePrice

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent) Decade Year-0

  1. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Illinois Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent) Decade

  2. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent) DecadePrice

  3. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent)

  4. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent)Price

  5. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent)PricePrice

  6. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPrice (Percent)PricePricePrice

  7. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePrice (Percent) Decade

  8. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePrice (Percent)

  9. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePrice (Percent)thePrice

  10. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePricePrice (Percent)

  11. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan FebPricePricePrice (Percent)Price

  12. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar

  13. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan Febthe

  14. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan Febthethe

  15. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Jan

  16. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Janthe Price

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year Janthe

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Year JanthePrice

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Yearthe Price

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in North Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Yearthe Pricethe

  1. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) Yearthe

  2. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) YearthePrice

  3. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oklahoma Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent) YearthePricePrice

  4. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oklahoma Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)

  5. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Price

  6. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethe Pricethethe

  7. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethe

  8. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricetheby thethe

  9. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricetheby thethethe

  10. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Texas Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)Pricethebythe

  11. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Texas Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPrice (Percent)PricethebythePrice

  12. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) Year Jan Feb

  13. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) Year Jan

  14. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) Year JanPrice

  15. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Virginia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) Year

  16. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Virginia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent) YearPrice

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wyoming Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by thethe

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wyoming Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice (Percent)by thethePrice

  19. U.S. Parking Facilities Cut Energy Use by 90 Percent, Switch 270 Million

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTestFeedEnergy Navy Moanalua TerracePercent | Department

  20. Simulation study on error propagation effects when determining second virial coefficients from the speed-of-sound or the Joule-Thomson experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Peursem, David J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The errors considered in this work are i) random errors, ii) fixed absolute systematic er- rors, and iii) fixed fractional systematic errors. As a result of this work, a model consistency test (MCT) was developed which allows the experimentalist to test...- butane at 320 K 14 5, First-order MCI' for model 1 (EF). 6. First-order MCT for model 2 (EF). 7. First-order MCT for model 3 (EF). 8. First-order MCI' for model 4 (EF). 9. First-order MCT for model 5 (EF). 10. First-order MCT for model 6 (EF). 11...

  1. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through a screen at least partially opaque at the wavelength. The screen has an aperture sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector spaced some distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam as well as a set of intensities displaced from a center of the aperture. The distance from the source to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, and beam intensity.

  2. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, once the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-quark sector, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. The results for the light neutrino masses are $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ $(m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 1.2:1)$ in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the heaviest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale.

  3. THE ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION OF THE EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Landi, Enrico [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the absolute calibration of the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode by comparing EIS full-disk mosaics with irradiance observations from the EUV Variability Experiment on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We also use extended observations of the quiet corona above the limb combined with a simple differential emission measure model to establish new effective area curves that incorporate information from the most recent atomic physics calculations. We find that changes to the EIS instrument sensitivity are a complex function of both time and wavelength. We find that the sensitivity is decaying exponentially with time and that the decay constants vary with wavelength. The EIS short wavelength channel shows significantly longer decay times than the long wavelength channel.

  4. The chromospherically active binary star EI Eridani I. Absolute dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Washuettl; K. G. Strassmeier; T. Granzer; M. Weber; K. Oláh

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed determination of the astrophysical parameters of the chromospherically active binary star EI Eridani. Our new radial velocities allow to improve the set of orbital elements and reveal long-term variations of the barycentric velocity. A possible third-body orbit with a period of approximately 19 years is presented. Absolute parameters are determined in combination with the Hipparcos parallax. EI Eri's inclination angle of the rotational axis is confined to 56.0 plus/minus 4.5 degrees, its luminosity class IV is confirmed by its radius of 2.37 plus/minus 0.12 R_Sun. A comparison to theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks suggests a mass of 1.09 plus/minus 0.05 M_Sun and an age of approximately 6.15 Gyr. The present investigation is the basis of our long-term Doppler imaging study of its stellar surface.

  5. Conductance and absolutely continuous spectrum of 1D samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Bruneau; Vojkan Jakši?; Yoram Last; Claude-Alain Pillet

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators $h=-\\Delta+v$ acting on $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{Z}_+)$ in terms of the limiting behavior of the Landauer-B\\"uttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting $h$ to a finite interval $[1,L]\\cap\\mathbb{Z}_+$ and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval $I$ are non-vanishing in the limit $L\\to\\infty$ iff ${\\rm sp}_{\\rm ac}(h)\\cap I=\\emptyset$. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schr\\"odinger Conjecture.

  6. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F., E-mail: chengfe@hust.edu.cn; Hou, S. Y.; Zhuang, G.; Luo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  7. Absolute Measurement Of Laminar Shear Rate Using Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot Jenner; Brian D'Urso

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An absolute measurement of the components of the shear rate tensor $\\mathcal{S}$ in a fluid can be found by measuring the photon correlation function of light scattered from particles in the fluid. Previous methods of measuring $\\mathcal{S}$ involve reading the velocity at various points and extrapolating the shear, which can be time consuming and is limited in its ability to examine small spatial scale or short time events. Previous work in Photon Correlation Spectroscopy has involved only approximate solutions, requiring free parameters to be scaled by a known case, or different cases, such as 2-D flows, but here we present a treatment that provides quantitative results directly and without calibration for full 3-D flow. We demonstrate this treatment experimentally with a cone and plate rheometer.

  8. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Southworth, John, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: astro.js@keele.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  9. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  10. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II.

  11. An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevance An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has shown that individuals who live in poverty have dietary intakes that are not in agreement

  12. Analysis of farm-to-retail price spreads for whole and two percent milk in seven selected cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Marla Lashea

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of transmission for whole milk was from 0.37 (Hartford) to 2.54 (Dallas) and from 0.39 (Hartford) to 3.66 (Dallas) for two percent milk....

  13. Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.A.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

  14. Further Developments of a Robust Absolute Calibration Method Utilizing Beta/Gamma Coincidence Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a conference proceedings from the MARC conference. It discusses the research conducted into an alternative method of detector calibration and absolute activity measurement.

  15. absolute single-molecule entropies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application to Chemistry Websites Summary: A simulation method for...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute zero temperature Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Gases Group Collection: Physics 47 Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Summary: of...

  17. A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byington, Alonzo

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

  18. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  19. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsujimoto

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, even if the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-type quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-type quark sector and all mass matrices are real, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. Especially for $\\theta_{13}=0$, we found that the neutrino masses are decided as $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ or $1:50:250$ ($m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 3:1$ or $12:1$) in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the greatest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale. Including the decoupling effects caused by three singlet neutrinos, we also perform a renormalization group analysis to fix the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix at low energy.

  20. INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [University of Maryland, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550W 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Lubin, P. M. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mirel, P. [Wyle Informations Systems, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Singal, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A., E-mail: Michael.D.Seiffert@jpl.nasa.gov [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Caixa Postal 515, 12245-970-Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

  1. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Key, W.S.; Sanders, A.J.; Earl, D.D.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a beam splitter''), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beam splitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention. 9 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Key, William S. (Knoxville, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a "beamsplitter"), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beamsplitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention.

  3. Precision absolute-value amplifier for a precision voltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, W.E.; Rondeau, D.J.

    1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipolar inputs are afforded by the plus inputs of first and second differential input amplifiers. A first gain determining resistor is connected between the minus inputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second diodes are connected between the respective minus inputs and the respective outputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second FETs have their gates connected to the outputs of the amplifiers, while their respective source and drain circuits are connected between the respective minus inputs and an output lead extending to a load resistor. The output current through the load resistor is proportional to the absolute value of the input voltage difference between the bipolar input terminals. A third differential amplifier has its plus input terminal connected to the load resistor. A second gain determining resistor is connected between the minus input of the third differential amplifier and a voltage source. A third FET has its gate connected to the output of the third amplifier. The source and drain circuit of the third transistor is connected between the minus input of the third amplifier and a voltage-frequency converter, constituting an output device. A polarity detector is also provided, comprising a pair of transistors having their inputs connected to the outputs of the first and second differential amplifiers. The outputs of the polarity detector are connected to gates which switch the output of the voltage-frequency converter between up and down counting outputs.

  4. Precision absolute value amplifier for a precision voltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, William E. (Berkeley, CA); Rondeau, Donald J. (El Sobrante, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipolar inputs are afforded by the plus inputs of first and second differential input amplifiers. A first gain determining resister is connected between the minus inputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second diodes are connected between the respective minus inputs and the respective outputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second FETs have their gates connected to the outputs of the amplifiers, while their respective source and drain circuits are connected between the respective minus inputs and an output lead extending to a load resister. The output current through the load resister is proportional to the absolute value of the input voltage difference between the bipolar input terminals. A third differential amplifier has its plus input terminal connected to the load resister. A second gain determining resister is connected between the minus input of the third differential amplifier and a voltage source. A third FET has its gate connected to the output of the third amplifier. The source and drain circuit of the third transistor is connected between the minus input of the third amplifier and a voltage-frequency converter, constituting an output device. A polarity detector is also provided, comprising a pair of transistors having their inputs connected to the outputs of the first and second differential amplifiers. The outputs of the polarity detector are connected to gates which switch the output of the voltage-frequency converter between up and down counting outputs.

  5. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  6. Flux recovery and a posteriori error estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    bility and the local efficiency bounds for this estimator are established provided that the ... For simple model problems, the energy norm of the true error is equal.

  7. Original Article Error Bounds and Metric Subregularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    theory of error bounds of extended real-valued functions. Another objective is to ... Another observation is that neighbourhood V in the original definition of metric.

  8. Over 30{percent} efficient InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Kurita, H. [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan)] [Central Research Laboratory, Japan Energy Corporation, 3-17-35 Niizo-Minami, Toda, Saitama 335 (Japan); Ohmori, M. [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)] [Japan Energy Research Center Company, Ltd., 1-11-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106 (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-terminal monolithic InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cell with a new efficiency record of 30.28{percent} is realized with a practical large area of 4 cm{sup 2} under one-sun air-mass 1.5 global illumination. We report improvements of the tandem cell performance by introducing a double-hetero (hereafter DH) structure InGaP tunnel junction, in which the InGaP layers are surrounded by high band gap AlInP barriers. The DH structure by AlInP barriers increase the peak current of InGaP tunnel junction. The AlInP barrier directly below the InGaP top cell, which takes the part of a back surface field (hereafter BSF) layer, is found to be considerably effective in reflecting minority carriers in the top cell. The AlInP BSF layer does not only form a high potential barrier but also prevents the diffusion of zinc from a high doped tunnel junction toward the top cell during epitaxial growth. Furthermore, an InGaP tunnel junction reduces the absorption loss, which exists in a GaAs tunnel junction, and increases the photogenerated current in the GaAs bottom cell. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation presents some statistical analysis of wind power forecast errors and error distributions, with examples using ERCOT data.

  10. A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy by analyzing Boltzmann samples and the TIP3P model of water, and very good results for the free energy are obtained, as compared with results

  11. Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids for calculating the absolute entropy, S, and free energy, F, by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte energy evaluation is a central issue in atomistic modeling.1­5 When the free energy is known, equilibrium

  12. Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical and radiocarbon methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical Egyptology, the establishment of an absolute chronology for Ancient Egypt has been an ambition which has contained lists of the kings who reigned in Egypt. The Palermo Stone, the Abydos reliefs and the Turin Canon

  13. Error propagation equations and tables for estimating the uncertainty in high-speed wind tunnel test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Error propagation equations, based on the Taylor series model, are derived for the nondimensional ratios and coefficients most often encountered in high-speed wind tunnel testing. These include pressure ratio and coefficient, static force and moment coefficients, dynamic stability coefficients, calibration Mach number and Reynolds number. The error equations contain partial derivatives, denoted as sensitivity coefficients, which define the influence of free-stream Mach number, M{infinity}, on various aerodynamic ratios. To facilitate use of the error equations, sensitivity coefficients are derived and evaluated for nine fundamental aerodynamic ratios, most of which relate free-stream test conditions (pressure, temperature, density or velocity) to a reference condition. Tables of the ratios, R, absolute sensitivity coefficients, {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}M{infinity}, and relative sensitivity coefficients, (M{infinity}/R) ({partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}M{infinity}), are provided as functions of M{infinity}.

  14. Error Mining on Dependency Trees Claire Gardent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Error Mining on Dependency Trees Claire Gardent CNRS, LORIA, UMR 7503 Vandoeuvre-l`es-Nancy, F-l`es-Nancy, F-54600, France shashi.narayan@loria.fr Abstract In recent years, error mining approaches were propose an algorithm for mining trees and ap- ply it to detect the most likely sources of gen- eration

  15. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre] [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P. [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France)] [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France); Ecoffet, R. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  16. Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

  17. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the language of the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 3 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvement of the error threshold of fault tolerant quantum computing. We also derive a modified Hamming bound that applies to all stabilizer codes, including degenerate ones.

  18. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Poulin

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code that defines an equivalence class between encoded states. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 4 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure and a wider class of logical operations without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvements of the error threshold of fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  19. Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

  20. Error Detection and Error Classification: Failure Awareness in Data Transfer Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louisiana State University; Balman, Mehmet; Kosar, Tevfik

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Data transfer in distributed environment is prone to frequent failures resulting from back-end system level problems, like connectivity failure which is technically untraceable by users. Error messages are not logged efficiently, and sometimes are not relevant/useful from users point-of-view. Our study explores the possibility of an efficient error detection and reporting system for such environments. Prior knowledge about the environment and awareness of the actual reason behind a failure would enable higher level planners to make better and accurate decisions. It is necessary to have well defined error detection and error reporting methods to increase the usability and serviceability of existing data transfer protocols and data management systems. We investigate the applicability of early error detection and error classification techniques and propose an error reporting framework and a failure-aware data transfer life cycle to improve arrangement of data transfer operations and to enhance decision making of data transfer schedulers.

  1. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured

  2. machining parameters showed 5 percent scatter in dimensional instability, but all were within the required tolerance band.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    the edge radii of cutting tools with mea- surement error on desirability function approach was used. The optimal cutting parameters are derived to control dimensional vector of regression coefficients Cr rake angle correction factor Cl chip thickness correction factor d

  3. Quantum error-correcting codes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

  4. Organizational Errors: Directions for Future Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John Stephen

    The goal of this chapter is to promote research about organizational errors—i.e., the actions of multiple organizational participants that deviate from organizationally specified rules and can potentially result in adverse ...

  5. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  6. Parameters and error of a theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the error of a theoretical model of the type whose parameters are determined from adjustment to experimental data. By applying a standard statistical method, the maximum-likelihoodlmethod, we derive expressions for both the parameters of the theoretical model and its error. We investigate the derived equations by solving them for simulated experimental and theoretical quantities generated by use of random number generators. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Absolute vs. Intensity Limits for CO2 Emission Control: Performance Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    We elucidate the differences between absolute and intensity-based limits of CO2 emission when there is uncertainty about the future. We demonstrate that the two limits are identical under certainty, and rigorously establish ...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute gamma ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute gamma ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Characterizing the Memory Behavior of CompilerParallelized...

  9. Primary crossflow vortices, secondary absolute instabilities and their control in the rotating-disk boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Primary crossflow vortices, secondary absolute instabilities and their control in the rotating patterns of crossflow vortices are derived by employing asymptotic techniques. This approach accounts three-dimensional velocity profiles, are subject to inviscid crossflow in- stabilities and rapidly

  10. Evaluating operating system vulnerability to memory errors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Mueller, Frank (North Carolina State University); Fiala, David (North Carolina State University); Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability is of great concern to the scalability of extreme-scale systems. Of particular concern are soft errors in main memory, which are a leading cause of failures on current systems and are predicted to be the leading cause on future systems. While great effort has gone into designing algorithms and applications that can continue to make progress in the presence of these errors without restarting, the most critical software running on a node, the operating system (OS), is currently left relatively unprotected. OS resiliency is of particular importance because, though this software typically represents a small footprint of a compute node's physical memory, recent studies show more memory errors in this region of memory than the remainder of the system. In this paper, we investigate the soft error vulnerability of two operating systems used in current and future high-performance computing systems: Kitten, the lightweight kernel developed at Sandia National Laboratories, and CLE, a high-performance Linux-based operating system developed by Cray. For each of these platforms, we outline major structures and subsystems that are vulnerable to soft errors and describe methods that could be used to reconstruct damaged state. Our results show the Kitten lightweight operating system may be an easier target to harden against memory errors due to its smaller memory footprint, largely deterministic state, and simpler system structure.

  11. The Error-Pattern-Correcting Turbo Equalizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhussien, Hakim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The error-pattern correcting code (EPCC) is incorporated in the design of a turbo equalizer (TE) with aim to correct dominant error events of the inter-symbol interference (ISI) channel at the output of its matching Viterbi detector. By targeting the low Hamming-weight interleaved errors of the outer convolutional code, which are responsible for low Euclidean-weight errors in the Viterbi trellis, the turbo equalizer with an error-pattern correcting code (TE-EPCC) exhibits a much lower bit-error rate (BER) floor compared to the conventional non-precoded TE, especially for high rate applications. A maximum-likelihood upper bound is developed on the BER floor of the TE-EPCC for a generalized two-tap ISI channel, in order to study TE-EPCC's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain for various channel conditions and design parameters. In addition, the SNR gain of the TE-EPCC relative to an existing precoded TE is compared to demonstrate the present TE's superiority for short interleaver lengths and high coding rates.

  12. Absolute Measure of Local Chirality and the Chiral Polarization Scale of the QCD Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Alexandru; Terrence Draper; Ivan Horváth; Thomas Streuer

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the absolute measure of local chirality is championed since it has a uniform distribution for randomly reshuffled chiral components so that any deviations from uniformity in the associated "X-distribution" are directly attributable to QCD-induced dynamics. We observe a transition in the qualitative behavior of this absolute X-distribution of low-lying eigenmodes which, we propose, defines a chiral polarization scale of the QCD vacuum.

  13. Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess-Flores, M

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

  14. A systems approach to reducing utility billing errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogura, Nori

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods for analyzing the possibility of errors are practiced by organizations who are concerned about safety and error prevention. However, in situations where the error occurrence is random and difficult to track, ...

  15. Error Detection and Recovery for Robot Motion Planning with Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald, Bruce Randall

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robots must plan and execute tasks in the presence of uncertainty. Uncertainty arises from sensing errors, control errors, and uncertainty in the geometry of the environment. The last, which is called model error, has ...

  16. Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" Resolved: Running jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom: After the Hopper August 14...

  17. Global Error bounds for systems of convex polynomials over ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the Lipschitzian/Holderian type global error ...... set is not neccessarily compact, we obtain the Hölder global error bound result.

  18. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more »comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  19. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Waugh, C. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Seguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Glebov, V. Yu. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Sangster, T. C. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  20. Optimal error estimates for corrected trapezoidal rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talvila, Erik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrected trapezoidal rules are proved for $\\int_a^b f(x)\\,dx$ under the assumption that $f"\\in L^p([a,b])$ for some $1\\leq p\\leq\\infty$. Such quadrature rules involve the trapezoidal rule modified by the addition of a term $k[f'(a)-f'(b)]$. The coefficient $k$ in the quadrature formula is found that minimizes the error estimates. It is shown that when $f'$ is merely assumed to be continuous then the optimal rule is the trapezoidal rule itself. In this case error estimates are in terms of the Alexiewicz norm. This includes the case when $f"$ is integrable in the Henstock--Kurzweil sense or as a distribution. All error estimates are shown to be sharp for the given assumptions on $f"$. It is shown how to make these formulas exact for all cubic polynomials $f$. Composite formulas are computed for uniform partitions.

  1. Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore of offshore accidents there is a continuous focus on safety improvements. An improved evaluation method concepts in the model are structured in hierarchical categories, based on well-established knowledge

  2. Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults, 90089-0191. Phone: 213-740-6772. Email: barbersa@usc.edu #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS 2 Abstract (144 words) Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information

  3. Uncertainty and error in computational simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Alvin, K.F.; Rutherford, B.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper addresses the question: ``What are the general classes of uncertainty and error sources in complex, computational simulations?`` This is the first step of a two step process to develop a general methodology for quantitatively estimating the global modeling and simulation uncertainty in computational modeling and simulation. The second step is to develop a general mathematical procedure for representing, combining and propagating all of the individual sources through the simulation. The authors develop a comprehensive view of the general phases of modeling and simulation. The phases proposed are: conceptual modeling of the physical system, mathematical modeling of the system, discretization of the mathematical model, computer programming of the discrete model, numerical solution of the model, and interpretation of the results. This new view is built upon combining phases recognized in the disciplines of operations research and numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The characteristics and activities of each of these phases is discussed in general, but examples are given for the fields of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. They argue that a clear distinction should be made between uncertainty and error that can arise in each of these phases. The present definitions for uncertainty and error are inadequate and. therefore, they propose comprehensive definitions for these terms. Specific classes of uncertainty and error sources are then defined that can occur in each phase of modeling and simulation. The numerical sources of error considered apply regardless of whether the discretization procedure is based on finite elements, finite volumes, or finite differences. To better explain the broad types of sources of uncertainty and error, and the utility of their categorization, they discuss a coupled-physics example simulation.

  4. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  5. On the Error in QR Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ] . . . [R(t2, t1) +E2][R(t1, t0) +E1]R(t0) , k = 1, 2, . . . , where Q(tk) is the exact Q-factor at tk and the triangular transitions R(tj , tj?1) are also the exact ones. Moreover, the factors Ej , j = 1, . . . , k, are bounded in norm by the local error... committed during integration of the relevant differential equations; see Theorems 3.1 and 3.16.” We will henceforth simply write (2.7) ?Ej? ? ?, j = 1, 2, . . . , and stress that ? is computable, in fact controllable, in terms of local error tolerances...

  6. High Performance Dense Linear System Solver with Soft Error Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    High Performance Dense Linear System Solver with Soft Error Resilience Peng Du, Piotr Luszczek systems, and in some scientific applications C/R is not applicable for soft error at all due to error) high performance dense linear system solver with soft error resilience. By adopting a mathematical

  7. Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

  8. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  9. MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF ULTRASONIC ANEMOMETER ERRORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    commonly show systematic errors depending on wind speed due to inaccurate ultrasonic transducer mounting three- dimensional wind speed time series. Results for the variance and power spectra are shown. 1 wind speeds with ultrasonic anemometers: The measu- red flow is distorted by the probe head

  10. Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control Chun-hung Cheng1 , Jian Tang2 , Ada Wai is a function that matches a new object with one of the predefined classes. Document classification is characterized by the large number of attributes involved in the objects (documents). The traditional method

  11. Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Ada Waichee

    Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control Chun­hung Cheng 1 , Jian Tang 2 , Ada. Classification is a function that matches a new object with one of the predefined classes. Document classification is characterized by the large number of attributes involved in the objects (documents

  12. A VaR Black-Litterman Model for the Construction of Absolute ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    rithmic technique is very efficient, outperforming, in terms of both speed and ..... It can be seen that the error term vector ? does not directly enter the Black-

  13. SU-E-T-152: Error Sensitivity and Superiority of a Protocol for 3D IMRT Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gueorguiev, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Cotter, C; Turcotte, J; Sharp, G; Crawford, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mah'D, M [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To test if the parameters included in our 3D QA protocol with current tolerance levels are able to detect certain errors and show the superiority of 3D QA method over single ion chamber measurements and 2D gamma test by detecting most of the introduced errors. The 3D QA protocol parameters are: TPS and measured average dose difference, 3D gamma test with 3mmDTA/3% test parameters, and structure volume for which the TPS predicted and measured absolute dose difference is greater than 6%. Methods: Two prostate and two thoracic step-and-shoot IMRT patients were investigated. The following errors were introduced to each original treatment plan: energy switched from 6MV to 10MV, linac jaws retracted to 15cmx15cm, 1,2,3 central MLC leaf pairs retracted behind the jaws, single central MLC leaf put in or out of the treatment field, Monitor Units (MU) increased and decreased by 1 and 3%, collimator off by 5 and 15 degrees, detector shifted by 5mm to the left and right, gantry treatment angle off by 5 and 15 degrees. QA was performed on each plan using single ion chamber, 2D ion chamber array for 2D gamma analysis and using IBA's COMPASS system for 3D QA. Results: Out of the three tested QA methods single ion chamber performs the worst not detecting subtle errors. 3D QA proves to be the superior out of the three methods detecting all of introduced errors, except 10MV and 1% MU change, and MLC rotated (those errors were not detected by any QA methods tested). Conclusion: As the way radiation is delivered evolves, so must the QA. We believe a diverse set of 3D statistical parameters applied both to OAR and target plan structures provides the highest level of QA.

  14. Quantum Latin squares and unitary error bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Musto; Jamie Vicary

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce quantum Latin squares, combinatorial quantum objects which generalize classical Latin squares, and investigate their applications in quantum computer science. Our main results are on applications to unitary error bases (UEBs), basic structures in quantum information which lie at the heart of procedures such as teleportation, dense coding and error correction. We present a new method for constructing a UEB from a quantum Latin square equipped with extra data. Developing construction techniques for UEBs has been a major activity in quantum computation, with three primary methods proposed: shift-and-multiply, Hadamard, and algebraic. We show that our new approach simultaneously generalizes the shift-and-multiply and Hadamard methods. Furthermore, we explicitly construct a UEB using our technique which we prove cannot be obtained from any of these existing methods.

  15. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com; Chapman, S., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com [Radiant Technologies, Inc., 2835C Pan American Fwy NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  16. HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    that you always start with the same volume and pressure. 3) Compress the gas in the syringe as slowly as possible clicking at 5cm3 intervals and recording the volume. You can continue to slowly compress the gas reasoning. b) What do we call this process? #12;HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name

  17. Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000 differences by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden over the period 1971 to 2000. Methods The age and the AIDs have increased since the 1970s in Norway and Sweden, and since the 1980s in Finland

  18. Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal Abstract Determination of the internal temperature of a mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) from remotelyRadiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction

  19. Absolute cross section for Si2 P... electron-impact excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savin, Daniel Wolf

    the excited ions was detected using an absolutely calibrated optical system. The fractional population such as qua- sars and active galactic nuclei. Modern space observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope 3-ray line intensities with detectors calibrated to a high degree of accuracy 7,8,6 , placing more demand

  20. A rapid multiple-sample approach to the determination of absolute paleointensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    an alternative approach to absolute paleointensity determination, one which involves exactly five heatings involves the simultaneous thermal treatment of several subspecimens sampled from different regions throughout the igneous rock unit under investigation. For inclusion of data in a given determination, self

  1. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating.Sjöströmc a Dept. of NetLab: IPTV, Video and Display Quality, Acreo AB, Sweden b Dept. of Image and Video at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated

  2. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizenman, Michael [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Warzel, Simone [Zentrum Mathematik, TU Munich, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  3. The absolute and relative de Rham-Witt complexes Lars Hesselholt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -schemes to * *Z(p)-schemes. From this comparison, we derive a Gauss-Manin connection on the crystalline. There is a canonical surjective map Wn .X! Wn .X=S from the absolute de Rham of the canonical map f-1Wn* * 1S! Wn 1X. The graded pieces for the I-adic filtration are differential graded

  4. DIGITALVISION ltra-wideband (UWB) radios have relative bandwidths larger than 20% or absolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    .S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allowed the use of unlicensed UWB communications [8]. The first bandwidths of more than 500 MHz. Such wide bandwidths offer a wealth of advan- tages for both communications ranging accuracy. For communications, both large relative and large absolute band- width alleviate small

  5. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  6. A theoretical analysis of the systematic errors in the Red Clump distance to the LMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Salaris; Susan Percival; Leo Girardi

    2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the uncertainty on the theoretical population corrections to the LMC Red Clump (RC) absolute magnitude, by employing a population synthesis algorithm to simulate theoretically the photometric and spectroscopic properties of RC stars, under various assumptions about the LMC Star Formation Rate (SFR) and Age Metallicity Relationship (AMR). A comparison of the outcome of our simulations with observations of evolved low-intermediate mass stars in the LMC allows one to select the combinations of SFR and AMR that bracket the real LMC star formation history, and to estimate the systematic error on the associated RC population corrections. The most accurate estimate of the LMC distance modulus from the RC method (adopting the OGLE-II reddening maps for the LMC) is obtained from the K-band magnitude, and provides (m-M)_{0, LMC}=18.47 +/-0.01(random) +0.05/-0.06(systematic). Distances obtained from the I-band, or from the multicolour RC technique which determines at the same time reddening and distance, both agree (albeit with a slightly larger error bar) with this value.

  7. Message passing in fault tolerant quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. E. Evans; A. M. Stephens

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by Knill's scheme for message passing error detection, here we develop a scheme for message passing error correction for the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor code. We show that for two levels of concatenated error correction, where classical information obtained at the first level is used to help interpret the syndrome at the second level, our scheme will correct all cases with four physical errors. This results in a reduction of the logical failure rate relative to conventional error correction by a factor proportional to the reciprocal of the physical error rate.

  8. Efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Texture-Based Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresolution texture-based volume visualization is an excellent technique to enable interactive rendering of massive data sets. Interactive manipulation of a transfer function is necessary for proper exploration of a data set. However, multiresolution techniques require assessing the accuracy of the resulting images, and re-computing the error after each change in a transfer function is very expensive. They extend their existing multiresolution volume visualization method by introducing a method for accelerating error calculations for multiresolution volume approximations. Computing the error for an approximation requires adding individual error terms. One error value must be computed once for each original voxel and its corresponding approximating voxel. For byte data, i.e., data sets where integer function values between 0 and 255 are given, they observe that the set of error pairs can be quite large, yet the set of unique error pairs is small. instead of evaluating the error function for each original voxel, they construct a table of the unique combinations and the number of their occurrences. To evaluate the error, they add the products of the error function for each unique error pair and the frequency of each error pair. This approach dramatically reduces the amount of computation time involved and allows them to re-compute the error associated with a new transfer function quickly.

  9. Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

  10. Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained

  11. Quantum Error Correcting Subsystem Codes From Two Classical Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Bacon; Andrea Casaccino

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The essential insight of quantum error correction was that quantum information can be protected by suitably encoding this quantum information across multiple independently erred quantum systems. Recently it was realized that, since the most general method for encoding quantum information is to encode it into a subsystem, there exists a novel form of quantum error correction beyond the traditional quantum error correcting subspace codes. These new quantum error correcting subsystem codes differ from subspace codes in that their quantum correcting routines can be considerably simpler than related subspace codes. Here we present a class of quantum error correcting subsystem codes constructed from two classical linear codes. These codes are the subsystem versions of the quantum error correcting subspace codes which are generalizations of Shor's original quantum error correcting subspace codes. For every Shor-type code, the codes we present give a considerable savings in the number of stabilizer measurements needed in their error recovery routines.

  12. Reply To "Comment on 'Quantum Convolutional Error-Correcting Codes' "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. F. Chau

    2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In their comment, de Almedia and Palazzo \\cite{comment} discovered an error in my earlier paper concerning the construction of quantum convolutional codes (quant-ph/9712029). This error can be repaired by modifying the method of code construction.

  13. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  14. Evolved Error Management Biases in the Attribution of Anger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galperin, Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    von Hippel, W. , Poore, J. C. , Buss, D. M. , et al. (under27, 733-763. Haselton, M. G. , & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error27, 733-763. Haselton, M. G. , & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error

  15. Clustered Error Correction of Codeword-Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunfan Li; Ilya Dumer; Leonid P. Pryadko

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Codeword stabilized (CWS) codes are a general class of quantum codes that includes stabilizer codes and many families of non-additive codes with good parameters. For such a non-additive code correcting all t-qubit errors, we propose an algorithm that employs a single measurement to test all errors located on a given set of t qubits. Compared with exhaustive error screening, this reduces the total number of measurements required for error recovery by a factor of about 3^t.

  16. Efficient Semiparametric Estimators for Biological, Genetic, and Measurement Error Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Tanya

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the models considered in Tsiatis and Ma (2004), our model is less stringent because it allows an unspecified model error distribution and unspecified covariate distribution, not just the latter. With an unspecified model error distribution, the RMM... with measurement error is a very different problem compared to the model considered in Tsiatis and Ma (2004), where the model error distribution has a known parametric form. Consequently, the semiparamet- ric treatment here is also drastically different. Our...

  17. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Schunck; Jordan D. McDonnell; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild; Dave Higdon

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  18. Franklin Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) TargetFormsTrouble Shooting and Error

  19. Edison Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarthTrouble Shooting and Error

  20. Susceptibility of Commodity Systems and Software to Memory Soft Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Susceptibility of Commodity Systems and Software to Memory Soft Errors Alan Messer, Member, IEEE Abstract--It is widely understood that most system downtime is acounted for by programming errors transient errors in computer system hardware due to external factors, such as cosmic rays. This work

  1. A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Paul

    A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman UCLIC MPEB, Malet Place London, WC1E 7JE sarah and the subsequent process of creating a taxonomy of errors from the information gathered. A total of 350 errors were. These codes are then organised into a taxonomy similar to that of Zhang et al (2004). We show how

  2. A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman UCLIC MPEB, Malet Place London, WC1E 7JE sarah and the subsequent process of creating a taxonomy of errors from the information gathered. A total of 345 errors were. These codes are then organised into a taxonomy similar to that of Zhang et al (2004). We show how

  3. Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core Nontechnical Skills In normal flight operations, crews are faced with a variety of external threats and commit a range of errors of these threats and errors therefore forms an essential element of enhancing performance and minimizing risk

  4. Error rate and power dissipation in nano-logic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-controlled logic and single electron logic processors have been investigated with respect to thermal-induced bit error. A maximal error rate for both logic processors is regarded as one bit-error/year/chip. A maximal clock frequency...

  5. Bolstered Error Estimation Ulisses Braga-Neto a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga-Neto, Ulisses

    the bolstered error estimators proposed in this paper, as part of a larger library for classification and error of the data. It has a direct geometric interpretation and can be easily applied to any classification rule as smoothed error estimation. In some important cases, such as a linear classification rule with a Gaussian

  6. Absolute dipole gamma-ray strength functions for /sup 176/Lu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1984-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived absolute dipole strength-function information for /sup 176/Lu from an average resonance capture study of /sup 175/Lu with 2-keV neutrons, and from neutron capture cross-section measurements with neutrons from 30 keV to about 1 MeV. We found that we needed to increase our previous estimate of the relative M1/E1 strengths near 5 MeV by a factor of 3, and to revise downward the absolute magnitude of our E1 strength function. We accomplished the latter, while still maintaining continuity with the photonuclear data, by adjusting the one free parameter in our line shape. The present E1 and M1 strengths now seem correct both near the neutron separation energy and also around 1 MeV.

  7. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tavares, Andre C. [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  8. Absolute Magnitude Distribution And Light Curves Of Gamma-Ray Burst Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Richardson

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometry data were collected from the literature and analyzed for supernovae that are thought to have a gamma-ray burst association. There are several gamma-ray burst afterglow light curves that appear to have a supernova component. For these light curves, the supernova component was extracted and analyzed. A supernova light curve model was used to help determine the peak absolute magnitudes as well as estimates for the kinetic energy, ejected mass and nickel mass in the explosion. The peak absolute magnitudes are, on average, brighter than those of similar supernovae (stripped-envelope supernovae) that do not have a gamma-ray burst association, but this can easily be due to a selection effect. However, the kinetic energies and ejected masses were found to be considerably higher, on average, than those of similar supernovae without a gamma-ray burst association.

  9. The Roland De Witte 1991 Detection of Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 Roland De Witte carried out an experiment in Brussels in which variations in the one-way speed of RF waves through a coaxial cable were recorded over 178 days. The data from this experiment shows that De Witte had detected absolute motion of the earth through space, as had six earlier experiments, beginning with the Michelson-Morley experiment of 1887. His results are in excellent agreement with the extensive data from the Miller 1925/26 detection of absolute motion using a gas-mode Michelson interferometer atop Mt.Wilson, California. The De Witte data reveals turbulence in the flow which amounted to the detection of gravitational waves. Similar effects were also seen by Miller, and by Torr and Kolen in their coaxial cable experiment. Here we bring together what is known about the De Witte experiment.

  10. The Roland De Witte 1991 Detection of Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 Roland De Witte carried out an experiment in Brussels in which variations in the one-way speed of RF waves through a coaxial cable were recorded over 178 days. The data from this experiment shows that De Witte had detected absolute motion of the earth through space, as had six earlier experiments, beginning with the Michelson-Morley experiment of 1887. His results are in excellent agreement with the extensive data from the Miller 1925/26 detection of absolute motion using a gas-mode Michelson interferometer atop Mt.Wilson, California. The De Witte data reveals turbulence in the flow which amounted to the detection of gravitational waves. Similar effects were also seen by Miller, and by Torr and Kolen in their coaxial cable experiment. Here we bring together what is known about the De Witte experiment.

  11. Absolute calibration of a charge-coupled device camera with twin beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meda, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I., E-mail: i.ruoberchera@inrim.it; Degiovanni, I. P.; Brida, G.; Rastello, M. L.; Genovese, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the absolute calibration of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera by exploiting quantum correlation. This method exploits a certain number of spatial pairwise quantum correlated modes produced by spontaneous parametric-down-conversion. We develop a measurement model accounting for all the uncertainty contributions, and we reach the relative uncertainty of 0.3% in low photon flux regime. This represents a significant step forward for the characterization of (scientific) CCDs used in mesoscopic light regime.

  12. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  13. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pe?ina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ond?ej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  14. Comment on 'Simultaneous gravity and gradient measurements from a recoil-compensated absolute gravimeter'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article (Niebauer et al. 2011 Metrologia 48 154-163) reports on the important innovations enhancing the ability of absolute gravimeter to measure vertical gravity gradient along with the gravity acceleration. This comment suggests experiments to further assess the improvements and the results obtained with the modified instrument, considers some limitations of non-linear models in metrology and ways to overcome them, and discusses possible applications of the described instrument.

  15. Comment on "Measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation of free-fall absolute gravimeters"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper (Rothleitner et al. 2014 Metrologia 51, L9) reports on the measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation in absolute gravimeters. The conclusion that the perturbation reaches only 2/3 of the commonly accepted value violates the fundamental limitation on the maximum speed of information transfer. The conclusion was deluded by unaccounted parasitic perturbations, some of which are obvious from the report.

  16. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  17. An Improved Technique for Reducing False Alarms Due to Soft Errors A significant fraction of soft errors in modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polian, Ilia

    of soft errors in modern microprocessors has been reported to never lead to a system failure. Any techniques are enhanced by a methodology to handle soft errors on address bits. Furthermore, we demonstrate]. Consequently, many state-of-the art systems provide soft error detection and correction capabilities [Hass 89

  18. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  19. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K. [Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique. There was a lower error rate with IMRT compared with 3D/conventional RT, highlighting the need for sustained vigilance against errors common to more traditional treatment techniques.

  20. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Kerst, D.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the MST reversed field pinch magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and field errors. Several helical modes become phase locked to each other to form a rotating localized disturbance, the disturbance locks to an impulsive field error generated at a sawtooth crash, the error fields grow monotonically after locking (perhaps due to an unstable interaction between the modes and field error), and over the tens of milliseconds of growth confinement degrades and the discharge eventually terminates. Field error control has been partially successful in eliminating locking.

  1. Evaluating and Minimizing Distributed Cavity Phase Errors in Atomic Clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ruoxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform 3D finite element calculations of the fields in microwave cavities and analyze the distributed cavity phase errors of atomic clocks that they produce. The fields of cylindrical cavities are treated as an azimuthal Fourier series. Each of the lowest components produces clock errors with unique characteristics that must be assessed to establish a clock's accuracy. We describe the errors and how to evaluate them. We prove that sharp structures in the cavity do not produce large frequency errors, even at moderately high powers, provided the atomic density varies slowly. We model the amplitude and phase imbalances of the feeds. For larger couplings, these can lead to increased phase errors. We show that phase imbalances produce a novel distributed cavity phase error that depends on the cavity detuning. We also design improved cavities by optimizing the geometry and tuning the mode spectrum so that there are negligible phase variations, allowing this source of systematic error to be dramatically reduced.

  2. Evaluating and Minimizing Distributed Cavity Phase Errors in Atomic Clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruoxin Li; Kurt Gibble

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform 3D finite element calculations of the fields in microwave cavities and analyze the distributed cavity phase errors of atomic clocks that they produce. The fields of cylindrical cavities are treated as an azimuthal Fourier series. Each of the lowest components produces clock errors with unique characteristics that must be assessed to establish a clock's accuracy. We describe the errors and how to evaluate them. We prove that sharp structures in the cavity do not produce large frequency errors, even at moderately high powers, provided the atomic density varies slowly. We model the amplitude and phase imbalances of the feeds. For larger couplings, these can lead to increased phase errors. We show that phase imbalances produce a novel distributed cavity phase error that depends on the cavity detuning. We also design improved cavities by optimizing the geometry and tuning the mode spectrum so that there are negligible phase variations, allowing this source of systematic error to be dramatically reduced.

  3. In Search of a Taxonomy for Classifying Qualitative Spreadsheet Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przasnyski, Zbigniew; Seal, Kala Chand

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most organizations use large and complex spreadsheets that are embedded in their mission-critical processes and are used for decision-making purposes. Identification of the various types of errors that can be present in these spreadsheets is, therefore, an important control that organizations can use to govern their spreadsheets. In this paper, we propose a taxonomy for categorizing qualitative errors in spreadsheet models that offers a framework for evaluating the readiness of a spreadsheet model before it is released for use by others in the organization. The classification was developed based on types of qualitative errors identified in the literature and errors committed by end-users in developing a spreadsheet model for Panko's (1996) "Wall problem". Closer inspection of the errors reveals four logical groupings of the errors creating four categories of qualitative errors. The usability and limitations of the proposed taxonomy and areas for future extension are discussed.

  4. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  5. E791 DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM Error reports received ; no new errors reported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    of events written to tape. 18 #12; Error and Status Displays Mailbox For Histogram Requests Vax­online Event Display VAX 11 / 780 Event Reconstruction Event Display Detector Monitoring 3 VAX Workstations 42 EXABYTE of the entire E791 DA system. The VAX 11/780 was the user interface to the VME part of the system, via the DA

  6. Graphical Quantum Error-Correcting Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; C. H. Oh

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a purely graph-theoretical object, namely the coding clique, to construct quantum errorcorrecting codes. Almost all quantum codes constructed so far are stabilizer (additive) codes and the construction of nonadditive codes, which are potentially more efficient, is not as well understood as that of stabilizer codes. Our graphical approach provides a unified and classical way to construct both stabilizer and nonadditive codes. In particular we have explicitly constructed the optimal ((10,24,3)) code and a family of 1-error detecting nonadditive codes with the highest encoding rate so far. In the case of stabilizer codes a thorough search becomes tangible and we have classified all the extremal stabilizer codes up to 8 qubits.

  7. Output error identification of hydrogenerator conduit dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, M.A.; Wozniak, L. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Whittemore, T.R. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two output error model reference adaptive identifiers are considered for estimating the parameters in a reduced order gate position to pressure model for the hydrogenerator. This information may later be useful in an adaptive controller. Gradient and sensitivity functions identifiers are discussed for the hydroelectric application and connections are made between their structural differences and relative performance. Simulations are presented to support the conclusion that the latter algorithm is more robust, having better disturbance rejection and less plant model mismatch sensitivity. For identification from recorded plant data from step gate inputs, the other algorithm even fails to converge. A method for checking the estimated parameters is developed by relating the coefficients in the reduced order model to head, an externally measurable parameter.

  8. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  9. Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Ariño; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

  10. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  11. Quantum root-mean-square error and measurement uncertainty relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Busch; Pekka Lahti; Reinhard F Werner

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a controversy over Heisenberg's famous error-disturbance relation. Here we resolve the conflict by way of an analysis of the possible conceptualizations of measurement error and disturbance in quantum mechanics. We discuss two approaches to adapting the classic notion of root-mean-square error to quantum measurements. One is based on the concept of noise operator; its natural operational content is that of a mean deviation of the values of two observables measured jointly, and thus its applicability is limited to cases where such joint measurements are available. The second error measure quantifies the differences between two probability distributions obtained in separate runs of measurements and is of unrestricted applicability. We show that there are no nontrivial unconditional joint-measurement bounds for {\\em state-dependent} errors in the conceptual framework discussed here, while Heisenberg-type measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-independent} errors have been proven.

  12. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  13. A two reservoir model of quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Clemens; Julio Gea-Banacloche

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two reservoir model of quantum error correction with a hot bath causing errors in the qubits and a cold bath cooling the ancilla qubits to a fiducial state. We consider error correction protocols both with and without measurement of the ancilla state. The error correction acts as a kind of refrigeration process to maintain the data qubits in a low entropy state by periodically moving the entropy to the ancilla qubits and then to the cold reservoir. We quantify the performance of the error correction as a function of the reservoir temperatures and cooling rate by means of the fidelity and the residual entropy of the data qubits. We also make a comparison with the continuous quantum error correction model of Sarovar and Milburn [Phys. Rev. A 72 012306].

  14. Trial application of a technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., Oakton, VA (United States); Cooper, S.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States); Parry, G.W. [NUS, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new method for HRA, ATHEANA, has been developed based on a study of the operating history of serious accidents and an understanding of the reasons why people make errors. Previous publications associated with the project have dealt with the theoretical framework under which errors occur and the retrospective analysis of operational events. This is the first attempt to use ATHEANA in a prospective way, to select and evaluate human errors within the PSA context.

  15. Temperature-dependent errors in nuclear lattice simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Richard Thomson

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the temperature dependence of discretization errors in nuclear lattice simulations. We find that for systems with strong attractive interactions the predominant error arises from the breaking of Galilean invariance. We propose a local "well-tempered" lattice action which eliminates much of this error. The well-tempered action can be readily implemented in lattice simulations for nuclear systems as well as cold atomic Fermi systems.

  16. Absolute polarization standards at medium and high energies. [200 to 900 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaughton, M.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement of a polarization asymmetry is rather easy, the normalization of the measurement to obtain the analyzing power requires an absolute knowledge of the beam polarization or comparison with a known standard analyzing power. Such calibration standards can be hard to find. This paper concentrates on medium and higher energies, and divides the techniques into four categories: double scattering, polarized target methods, polarized source methods, and theoretical methods. Secondary standards are also discussed, and earlier data are assessed. 52 references, 6 figures. (RWR)

  17. The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

  18. An absolute quantum energy inequality for the Dirac field in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin J. Smith

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Weak Energy Inequalities (QWEIs) are results which limit the extent to which the smeared renormalised energy density of a quantum field can be negative. On globally hyperbolic spacetimes the massive quantum Dirac field is known to obey a QWEI in terms of a reference state chosen arbitrarily from the class of Hadamard states; however, there exist spacetimes of interest on which state-dependent bounds cannot be evaluated. In this paper we prove the first QWEI for the massive quantum Dirac field on four dimensional globally hyperbolic spacetime in which the bound depends only on the local geometry; such a QWEI is known as an absolute QWEI.

  19. Error estimates for the Euler discretization of an optimal control ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Frédéric Bonnans

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 10, 2014 ... Abstract: We study the error introduced in the solution of an optimal control problem with first order state constraints, for which the trajectories ...

  20. Cosmic Ray Spectral Deformation Caused by Energy Determination Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Carlson; Conny Wannemark

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra, falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the Maximum Detectable Rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  1. Optimized Learning with Bounded Error for Feedforward Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggiore, Manfredi

    Optimized Learning with Bounded Error for Feedforward Neural Networks A. Alessandri, M. Sanguineti-based learnings. A. Alessandri is with the Naval Automatio

  2. New Fractional Error Bounds for Polynomial Systems with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Our major result extends the existing error bounds from the system involving only a ... linear complementarity systems with polynomial data as well as high-order ...

  3. Identification of toroidal field errors in a modified betatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschialpo, P. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)); Marsh, S.J. (SFA Inc., Landover, Maryland 20785 (United States)); Len, L.K.; Smith, T. (FM Technologies Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)); Kapetanakos, C.A. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly developed probe, having a 0.05% resolution, has been used to detect errors in the toroidal magnetic field of the NRL modified betatron accelerator. Measurements indicate that the radial field components (errors) are 0.1%--1% of the applied toroidal field. Such errors, in the typically 5 kG toroidal field, can excite resonances which drive the beam to the wall. Two sources of detected field errors are discussed. The first is due to the discrete nature of the 12 single turn coils which generate the toroidal field. Both measurements and computer calculations indicate that its amplitude varies from 0% to 0.2% as a function of radius. Displacement of the outer leg of one of the toroidal field coils by a few millimeters has a significant effect on the amplitude of this field error. Because of uniform toroidal periodicity of these coils this error is a good suspect for causing the excitation of the damaging [ital l]=12 resonance seen in our experiments. The other source of field error is due to the current feed gaps in the vertical magnetic field coils. A magnetic field is induced inside the vertical field coils' conductor in the opposite direction of the applied toroidal field. Fringe fields at the gaps lead to additional field errors which have been measured as large as 1.0%. This source of field error, which exists at five toroidal locations around the modified betatron, can excite several integer resonances, including the [ital l]=12 mode.

  4. Homological Error Correction: Classical and Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove several theorems characterizing the existence of homological error correction codes both classically and quantumly. Not every classical code is homological, but we find a family of classical homological codes saturating the Hamming bound. In the quantum case, we show that for non-orientable surfaces it is impossible to construct homological codes based on qudits of dimension $D>2$, while for orientable surfaces with boundaries it is possible to construct them for arbitrary dimension $D$. We give a method to obtain planar homological codes based on the construction of quantum codes on compact surfaces without boundaries. We show how the original Shor's 9-qubit code can be visualized as a homological quantum code. We study the problem of constructing quantum codes with optimal encoding rate. In the particular case of toric codes we construct an optimal family and give an explicit proof of its optimality. For homological quantum codes on surfaces of arbitrary genus we also construct a family of codes asymptotically attaining the maximum possible encoding rate. We provide the tools of homology group theory for graphs embedded on surfaces in a self-contained manner.

  5. A technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, S.E.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; Wreathall, J.; Parry, G.W. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has become an important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical element of PRA; however, limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. A multidisciplinary HRA framework has been developed with the objective of providing a structured approach for analyzing operating experience and understanding nuclear plant safety, human error, and the underlying factors that affect them. The concepts of the framework have matured into a rudimentary working HRA method. A trial application of the method has demonstrated that it is possible to identify potentially significant human failure events from actual operating experience which are not generally included in current PRAs, as well as to identify associated performance shaping factors and plant conditions that have an observable impact on the frequency of core damage. A general process was developed, albeit in preliminary form, that addresses the iterative steps of defining human failure events and estimating their probabilities using search schemes. Additionally, a knowledge- base was developed which describes the links between performance shaping factors and resulting unsafe actions.

  6. We report measurement of the equilibrium plasma current profiles in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) that exhibit a peak beta in excess of 10 percent. The beta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiment (LDX) that exhibit a peak beta in excess of 10 percent. The beta of an LDX plasma is calculated will be discussed along with the conditions that lead to the creation of high beta plasmas. #12;Outline · Magnetic · Average and peak beta Substantial analyses must be performed on the magnetic data to actually obtain

  7. VSP members have nationwide access to low, cost-controlled pricing on all lens extras, for savings up to 20 percent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    up to 20 percent. Patient Option Single Vision Multifocal Polycarbonate Lenses $25 $30 Polycarbonate Polycarbonate Ten times more impact-resistant than any other plastic lens, polycarbonate is the lens of choice, polycarbonate lenses also provide UV protection and scratch-resistance. Progressive Lenses Unlike traditional

  8. ERROR VISUALIZATION FOR TANDEM ACOUSTIC MODELING ON THE AURORA TASK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    ERROR VISUALIZATION FOR TANDEM ACOUSTIC MODELING ON THE AURORA TASK Manuel J. Reyes. This structure reduces the error rate on the Aurora 2 noisy English digits task by more than 50% compared development of tandem systems showed an improvement in the performance on the Aurora task [2] of these systems

  9. Numerical Construction of Likelihood Distributions and the Propagation of Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Swain; L. Taylor

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard method for the propagation of errors, based on a Taylor series expansion, is approximate and frequently inadequate for realistic problems. A simple and generic technique is described in which the likelihood is constructed numerically, thereby greatly facilitating the propagation of errors.

  10. Calibration and Error in Placental Molecular Clocks: A Conservative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    Calibration and Error in Placental Molecular Clocks: A Conservative Approach Using for calibrating both mitogenomic and nucleogenomic placental timescales. We applied these reestimates to the most calibration error may inflate the power of the molecular clock when testing the time of ordinal

  11. Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    gradient method or Generalized Minimum RESidual (GMRES) method, is how to choose the residual tolerance for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using

  12. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  13. Mutual information, bit error rate and security in Wójcik's scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhanjun Zhang

    2004-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the correct calculations of the mutual information of the whole transmission, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) are presented. Mistakes of the general conclusions relative to the mutual information, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the security in W\\'{o}jcik's paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 90}, 157901(2003)] have been pointed out.

  14. Uniform and optimal error estimates of an exponential wave ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the error propagation, cut-off of the nonlinearity, and the energy method. ...... gives Lemma 3.4 for the local truncation error, which is of spectral order in ... estimates, we adopt a strategy similar to the finite difference method [4] (cf. diagram.

  15. Quasi-sparse eigenvector diagonalization and stochastic error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the diagonalization of quantum Hamiltonians using the quasi-sparse eigenvector (QSE) method. We also introduce the technique of stochastic error correction, which systematically removes the truncation error of the QSE result by stochastically sampling the contribution of the remaining basis states.

  16. Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie Department it difficult to mine error-handling specifications through manual inspection of source code. In this paper, we, without any user in- put. In our framework, we adapt a trace generation technique to distinguish

  17. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits A Dissertation Presented David Reed All rights reserved. #12;Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting is to use superconducting quantum bits in the circuit quantum electro- dynamics (cQED) architecture. There

  18. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    may not even exist. For this reason we investigate error detection and recovery (EDR) strategies. We may not even exist. For this reason we investigate error detection and recovery (EDR ) strategies. We and implementational questions remain. The second contribution is a formal, geometric approach to EDR. While EDR

  19. Upper bounds on the error probabilities and asymptotic error exponents in quantum multiple state discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R., E-mail: koenraad.audenaert@rhul.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, S9, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Mosonyi, Milán, E-mail: milan.mosonyi@gmail.com [Física Teòrica: Informació i Fenomens Quàntics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, ES-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Mathematical Institute, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Egry József u 1., Budapest 1111 (Hungary)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the multiple hypothesis testing problem for symmetric quantum state discrimination between r given states ?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}. By splitting up the overall test into multiple binary tests in various ways we obtain a number of upper bounds on the optimal error probability in terms of the binary error probabilities. These upper bounds allow us to deduce various bounds on the asymptotic error rate, for which it has been hypothesized that it is given by the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound (or Chernoff divergence) C(?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}), as recently introduced by Nussbaum and Szko?a in analogy with Salikhov's classical multi-hypothesis Chernoff bound. This quantity is defined as the minimum of the pairwise binary Chernoff divergences min{sub j

  20. An Efficient Approach towards Mitigating Soft Errors Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadi, Muhammad Sheikh; Uddin, Md Nazim; Jürjens, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smaller feature size, higher clock frequency and lower power consumption are of core concerns of today's nano-technology, which has been resulted by continuous downscaling of CMOS technologies. The resultant 'device shrinking' reduces the soft error tolerance of the VLSI circuits, as very little energy is needed to change their states. Safety critical systems are very sensitive to soft errors. A bit flip due to soft error can change the value of critical variable and consequently the system control flow can completely be changed which leads to system failure. To minimize soft error risks, a novel methodology is proposed to detect and recover from soft errors considering only 'critical code blocks' and 'critical variables' rather than considering all variables and/or blocks in the whole program. The proposed method shortens space and time overhead in comparison to existing dominant approaches.

  1. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bel; C. P. Connaughton; M. Toots; M. M. Bandi

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  2. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bel, G; Toots, M; Bandi, M M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  3. Absolute x-ray dosimetry on a synchrotron medical beam line with a graphite calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, P. D., E-mail: Peter.Harty@arpansa.gov.au; Ramanathan, G.; Butler, D. J.; Johnston, P. N. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lye, J. E. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Hall, C. J. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Stevenson, A. W. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The absolute dose rate of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter. The calorimetry results were compared to measurements from the existing free-air chamber, to provide a robust determination of the absolute dose in the synchrotron beam and provide confidence in the first implementation of a graphite calorimeter on a synchrotron medical beam line. Methods: The graphite calorimeter has a core which rises in temperature when irradiated by the beam. A collimated x-ray beam from the synchrotron with well-defined edges was used to partially irradiate the core. Two filtration sets were used, one corresponding to an average beam energy of about 80 keV, with dose rate about 50?Gy/s, and the second filtration set corresponding to average beam energy of 90 keV, with dose rate about 20 Gy/s. The temperature rise from this beam was measured by a calibrated thermistor embedded in the core which was then converted to absorbed dose to graphite by multiplying the rise in temperature by the specific heat capacity for graphite and the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the core and beam. Conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water was achieved using Monte Carlo calculations with the EGSnrc code. The air kerma measurements from the free-air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. Results: Absolute measurements of the IMBL dose rate were made using the graphite calorimeter and compared to measurements with the free-air chamber. The measurements were at three different depths in graphite and two different filtrations. The calorimetry measurements at depths in graphite show agreement within 1% with free-air chamber measurements, when converted to absorbed dose to water. The calorimetry at the surface and free-air chamber results show agreement of order 3% when converted to absorbed dose to water. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.9%. Conclusions: The good agreement of the graphite calorimeter and free-air chamber results indicates that both devices are performing as expected. Further investigations at higher dose rates than 50?Gy/s are planned. At higher dose rates, recombination effects for the free-air chamber are much higher and expected to lead to much larger uncertainties. Since the graphite calorimeter does not have problems associated with dose rate, it is an appropriate primary standard detector for the synchrotron IMBL x rays and is the more accurate dosimeter for the higher dose rates expected in radiotherapy applications.

  4. Can corner-cube absolute gravimeters sense the effects of Special Relativity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D; Zanimonskiy, Y Y

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic treatment of the finite speed of light correction in absolute gravimeters, as evolved by Rothleitner and Francis in Metrologia 2011, 48 442-445, following the initial publication in Metrologia 2011, 48 187-195, leads to spurious conclusions. The double Doppler shift implemented in the gravimeters obliterates the difference between its relativistic and non-relativistic formulation. Optical heterodyning used in Michelson-type interferometers makes the quadratic Lorenz-like term of the double Doppler shift discernable against the linear term, while in relativistic experiments the quadratic term has to be detected against the unit. The disturbance of the registered trajectory caused by the finite speed of light includes tracking signal delay as intrinsic part not reducible to the Doppler shifts.

  5. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Magoon, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Shoup, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ulreich, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ashabranner, R. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carpenter, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKernan, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeoman, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fletcher, K. [State Univ. of New York at Geneseo, NY (United States); Farrell, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jasion, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  6. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  7. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmore »ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.« less

  8. The effective beta sensitivity to the incident neutron energy dependence of the absolute delayed neutron yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Angelo, A. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)); Filip, A. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of the [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, and [sup 238]U absolute delayed neutron yields v[sub d] is one of the principal sources of uncertainty in predicting the fission reactor reactivity scale [beta][sub eff]. The current uncertainties in the dependence of v[sub d] on incident neutron energy is investigated for significance in the evaluation of [beta][sub eff]. The uncertainty effects on the GODIVA, JEZEBEL, Zero Power Reactor, SNEAK, and Masurca benchmark facility calculations are analyzed using ENDF/B and JEF basic data. Different assumptions about the energy dependence result in variations of up to 5% in the reactor spectrum averaged values of v[sub d], and these would result in variations of up to [approximately] 2% in the value of [beta][sub eff] for a typical liquid-metal fast breeder reactor.

  9. The modified dynamics (MOND) predicts an absolute maximum to the acceleration produced by `dark halos'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Brada; Mordehai Milgrom

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently discovered that the modified dynamics (MOND) implies some universal upper bound on the acceleration that can be contributed by a `dark halo'--assumed in a Newtonian analysis to account for the effects of MOND. Not surprisingly, the limit is of the order of the acceleration constant of the theory. This can be contrasted directly with the results of structure-formation simulations. The new limit is substantial and different from earlier MOND acceleration limits (discussed in connection with the MOND explanation of the Freeman law for galaxy disks, and the Fish law for ellipticals): It pertains to the `halo', and not to the observed galaxy; it is absolute, and independent of further physical assumptions on the nature of the galactic system; and it applies at all radii, whereas the other limits apply only to the mean acceleration in the system.

  10. Logical Error Rate Scaling of the Toric Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern H. E. Watson; Sean D. Barrett

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, a great deal of attention has focused on characterizing the performance of quantum error correcting codes via their thresholds, the maximum correctable physical error rate for a given noise model and decoding strategy. Practical quantum computers will necessarily operate below these thresholds meaning that other performance indicators become important. In this work we consider the scaling of the logical error rate of the toric code and demonstrate how, in turn, this may be used to calculate a key performance indicator. We use a perfect matching decoding algorithm to find the scaling of the logical error rate and find two distinct operating regimes. The first regime admits a universal scaling analysis due to a mapping to a statistical physics model. The second regime characterizes the behavior in the limit of small physical error rate and can be understood by counting the error configurations leading to the failure of the decoder. We present a conjecture for the ranges of validity of these two regimes and use them to quantify the overhead -- the total number of physical qubits required to perform error correction.

  11. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  12. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions: An International Comparison; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Sillanpaa, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Scharff, R.; Soder, L.; Larsen, X. G.; Giebel, G.; Flynn, D.; Dobschinski, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power forecasting is expected to be an important enabler for greater penetration of wind power into electricity systems. Because no wind forecasting system is perfect, a thorough understanding of the errors that do occur can be critical to system operation functions, such as the setting of operating reserve levels. This paper provides an international comparison of the distribution of wind power forecasting errors from operational systems, based on real forecast data. The paper concludes with an assessment of similarities and differences between the errors observed in different locations.

  13. Universal Framework for Quantum Error-Correcting Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li; Li-Juan Xing

    2009-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a universal framework for quantum error-correcting codes, i.e., the one that applies for the most general quantum error-correcting codes. This framework is established on the group algebra, an algebraic notation for the nice error bases of quantum systems. The nicest thing about this framework is that we can characterize the properties of quantum codes by the properties of the group algebra. We show how it characterizes the properties of quantum codes as well as generates some new results about quantum codes.

  14. Table 1. Number and Percent of Women Faculty in Science/Engineering by Department, 2000* Division/Department Women Men % Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    .2% Agricultural & Applied Economics 0.00 22.00 0.0% Life Sciences Communication 3.80 8.33 31.3% Rural Sociology 3 Communication 4.41 11.00 28.6% School of Library & Information Studies 4.00 2.00 66.7% #12;Political Science 8Table 1. Number and Percent of Women Faculty in Science/Engineering by Department, 2000* Division

  15. Table 1. Number and Percent of Women Faculty in Science/Engineering by Department, 2005 Division/Department Women Men % Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    223.20 366.73 37.8% Agricultural & Applied Economics 3.00 22.90 11.6% Life Sciences Communication 5 Communication 5.00 8.50 37.0% School of Library & Information Studies 7.00 0.50 93.3% Political Science 7.00 27Table 1. Number and Percent of Women Faculty in Science/Engineering by Department, 2005 Division

  16. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, William L. (Mountain View, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, .DELTA.S.sub.R, on a continuous real-time basis for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error .gtoreq..DELTA.S.sub.R, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than .DELTA.S.sub.R, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  17. A Posteriori Error Estimation for - Department of Mathematics ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuhao Cao supervised under Professor Zhiqiang Cai

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 19, 2013 ... the “correct” Hilbert space the true flux µ?1?×u lies in, to recover a ...... The error heat map shows that ZZ-patch recovery estimator leads.

  18. Quantum error correcting codes based on privacy amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhicheng Luo

    2008-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) quantum error-correcting codes are based on pairs of classical codes which are mutually dual containing. Explicit constructions of such codes for large blocklengths and with good error correcting properties are not easy to find. In this paper we propose a construction of CSS codes which combines a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig, that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. While the bit-flip errors can be decoded as efficiently as the classical code used, the problem of efficiently decoding the phase-flip errors remains open.

  19. avoid vocal errors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Error Avoiding Quantum Codes Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: The existence is proved of a class of open quantum...

  20. Rateless and rateless unequal error protection codes for Gaussian channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Kevin P. (Kevin Patrick)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we examine two different rateless codes and create a rateless unequal error protection code, all for the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The two rateless codes are examined through both analysis ...

  1. An Approximation Algorithm for Constructing Error Detecting Prefix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 2, 2006 ... 2-bit Hamming prefix code problem. Our algorithm spends O(n log3 n) time to calculate a 2-bit. Hamming prefix code with an additive error of at ...

  2. Secured Pace Web Server with Collaboration and Error Logging Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Lixin

    : Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) using the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) API, error logging............................................................................................ 8 Chapter 3 Secure Pace Web Server with SSL........................................................... 29 3.1 Introduction to SSL

  3. Transition state theory: Variational formulation, dynamical corrections, and error estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Transition state theory: Variational formulation, dynamical corrections, and error estimates Eric, Brazil Received 18 February 2005; accepted 9 September 2005; published online 7 November 2005 Transition which aim at computing dynamical corrections to the TST transition rate constant. The theory

  4. YELLOW SEA ACOUSTIC UNCERTAINTY CAUSED BY HYDROGRAPHIC DATA ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    the littoral and blue waters. After a weapon platform has detected its targets, the sensors on torpedoes, bathymetry, bottom type, and sound speed profiles. Here, the effect of sound speed errors (i.e., hydrographic

  5. Strontium-90 Error Discovered in Subcontract Laboratory Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. D. Brown A. S. Nagel

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    West Valley Demonstration Project health physicists and environment scientists discovered a series of errors in a subcontractor's spreadsheet being used to reduce data as part of their strontium-90 analytical process.

  6. Sample covariance based estimation of Capon algorithm error probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Christ D.

    The method of interval estimation (MIE) provides a strategy for mean squared error (MSE) prediction of algorithm performance at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) below estimation threshold where asymptotic predictions fail. ...

  7. Sensitivity of OFDM Systems to Synchronization Errors and Spatial Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    jitter cause inter-carrier interference. The overall system performance in terms of symbol error rate is limited by the inter-carrier interference. For a reliable information reception, compensatory measures must be taken. The second part...

  8. Diagnosing multiplicative error by lensing magnification of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak lensing causes spatially coherent fluctuations in flux of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This lensing magnification allows for weak lensing measurement independent of cosmic shear. It is free of shape measurement errors associated with cosmic shear and can therefore be used to diagnose and calibrate multiplicative error. Although this lensing magnification is difficult to measure accurately in auto correlation, its cross correlation with cosmic shear and galaxy distribution in overlapping area can be measured to significantly higher accuracy. Therefore these cross correlations can put useful constraint on multiplicative error, and the obtained constraint is free of cosmic variance in weak lensing field. We present two methods implementing this idea and estimate their performances. We find that, with $\\sim 1$ million SNe Ia that can be achieved by the proposed D2k survey with the LSST telescope (Zhan et al. 2008), multiplicative error of $\\sim 0.5\\%$ for source galaxies at $z_s\\sim 1$ can be detected and la...

  9. Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements Hongbin Guo address: hguo1@asu.edu (Hongbin Guo) Preprint submitted to NeuroImage December 11, 2008 #12;reached. A new

  10. Universally Valid Error-Disturbance Relations in Continuous Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Yanbei Chen

    2015-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum physics, measurement error and disturbance were first naively thought to be simply constrained by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Later, more rigorous analysis showed that the error and disturbance satisfy more subtle inequalities. Several versions of universally valid error-disturbance relations (EDR) have already been obtained and experimentally verified in the regimes where naive applications of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation failed. However, these EDRs were formulated for discrete measurements. In this paper, we consider continuous measurement processes and obtain new EDR inequalities in the Fourier space: in terms of the power spectra of the system and probe variables. By applying our EDRs to a linear optomechanical system, we confirm that a tradeoff relation between error and disturbance leads to the existence of an optimal strength of the disturbance in a joint measurement. Interestingly, even with this optimal case, the inequality of the new EDR is not saturated because of doublely existing standard quantum limits in the inequality.

  11. Robust mixtures in the presence of measurement errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianyong Sun; Ata Kaban; Somak Raychaudhury

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a mixture-based approach to robust density modeling and outlier detection for experimental multivariate data that includes measurement error information. Our model is designed to infer atypical measurements that are not due to errors, aiming to retrieve potentially interesting peculiar objects. Since exact inference is not possible in this model, we develop a tree-structured variational EM solution. This compares favorably against a fully factorial approximation scheme, approaching the accuracy of a Markov-Chain-EM, while maintaining computational simplicity. We demonstrate the benefits of including measurement errors in the model, in terms of improved outlier detection rates in varying measurement uncertainty conditions. We then use this approach in detecting peculiar quasars from an astrophysical survey, given photometric measurements with errors.

  12. TESLA-FEL 2009-07 Errors in Reconstruction of Difference Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Standard Least Squares Solution 2 3 Error Emittance and Error Twiss Parameters as the position of the reconstruction point changes, we will introduce error Twiss parameters and invariant error in the point of interest has to be achieved by matching error Twiss parameters in this point to the desired

  13. A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaeli, David R.

    A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan ECE Department years, reliability research has largely used the following taxonomy of errors: Undetected Errors Errors (CE). While this taxonomy is suitable to characterize hardware error detection and correction

  14. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  15. Coding Techniques for Error Correction and Rewriting in Flash Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Shoeb Ahmed

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    CODING TECHNIQUES FOR ERROR CORRECTION AND REWRITING IN FLASH MEMORIES A Thesis by SHOEB AHMED MOHAMMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CODING TECHNIQUES FOR ERROR CORRECTION AND REWRITING IN FLASH MEMORIES A Thesis by SHOEB AHMED MOHAMMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  16. Systematic errors in current quantum state tomography tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Schwemmer; Lukas Knips; Daniel Richart; Tobias Moroder; Matthias Kleinmann; Otfried Gühne; Harald Weinfurter

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Common tools for obtaining physical density matrices in experimental quantum state tomography are shown here to cause systematic errors. For example, using maximum likelihood or least squares optimization for state reconstruction, we observe a systematic underestimation of the fidelity and an overestimation of entanglement. A solution for this problem can be achieved by a linear evaluation of the data yielding reliable and computational simple bounds including error bars.

  17. Fault-Tolerant Thresholds for Encoded Ancillae with Homogeneous Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Eastin

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a procedure for calculating thresholds for quantum computation as a function of error model given the availability of ancillae prepared in logical states with independent, identically distributed errors. The thresholds are determined via a simple counting argument performed on a single qubit of an infinitely large CSS code. I give concrete examples of thresholds thus achievable for both Steane and Knill style fault-tolerant implementations and investigate their relation to threshold estimates in the literature.

  18. Design and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification of Specific Proteins in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    for selective enrichment of tag peptides. Another cysteine peptide enrichment and isotope tagging scheme hasDesign and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification spectrometry is most useful when quantitative data is also obtained. We recently introduced isotope

  19. Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    by alternating 110 steps, which form 100 and 110 nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energiesAbsolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 110 steps, the ratio 1 / 2 0.72 0

  20. A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

    A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute December 2009 We describe a general-purpose thermoelectric temperature controller with 1 mK stability, 10 m elements and thermoelectric modules to heat or cool in the 40 to 40 °C range. A schematic of our controller

  1. Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail Mihailescu and Hagai Meirovitch*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail dissociation measurements suggest that the free-energy (F) penalty for the loop displacement is F ) Ffree contribution of water to the total free energy. Namely, for water densities close to the experimental value

  2. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  3. Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

  4. Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial Charge Models and Optimization of Nonpolar Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, Robert C.

    Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial, and Irwin D. Kuntz Supporting Information Table S1. Experimental Free Energies of Hydration (Ghyd) in kcal,2-dimethylcyclohexane 1.58 36 trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane 2.11 37 ethene 1.28 38 propene 1.32 39 but-1-ene 1.38 40

  5. A new and efficient error resilient entropy code for image and video compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Jungki

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Image and video compression standards such as JPEG, MPEG, H.263 are severely sensitive to errors. Among typical error propagation mechanisms in video compression schemes, loss of block synchronization causes the worst result. Even one bit error...

  6. Error Monitoring: A Learning Strategy for Improving Academic Performance of LD Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.; Nolan, Susan; Clark, Frances L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Warner, Michael M.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Error monitoring, a learning strategy for detecting and correcting errors in written products, was taught to nine learning disabled adolescents. Students could detect and correct more errors after they received training ...

  7. Assessing the Impact of Differential Genotyping Errors on Rare Variant Tests of Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast, Shannon Marie

    Genotyping errors are well-known to impact the power and type I error rate in single marker tests of association. Genotyping errors that happen according to the same process in cases and controls are known as non-differential ...

  8. Population effects on the red giant clump absolute magnitude The K-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaris, M; Salaris, Maurizio

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the behaviour of the Red Clump K-band absolute magnitude (M(K,RC)) in simple and composite stellar populations, in light of its use as standard candle for distance determinations. The advantage of using M(K,RC), following recent empirical calibrations of its value for the solar neighbourhood, arises from its very low sensitivity to the extinction by interstellar dust. We provide data and equations which allow the determination of the K-band population correction Delta(M(K,RC)) (difference between the Red Clump brightness in the solar neighbourhood and in the population under scrutiny) for any generic stellar population. These data complement the results presented in Girardi & Salaris(2001) for the V- and I-band. We show how data from galactic open clusters consistently support our predicted Delta(M(V,RC)), Delta(M(I,RC)) and Delta(M(K,RC)) values. Multiband VIK population corrections for various galaxy systems are provided. They can be used in conjunction with the method ...

  9. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bouvier, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /CSIC, Catalunya /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Unlisted, US /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ecole Polytechnique /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  10. Absolute frequency measurement of the In$^{+}$ clock transition with a mode-locked laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. von Zanthier; Th. Becker; M. Eichenseer; A. Yu. Nevsky; Ch. Schwedes; E. Peik; H. Walther; R. Holzwarth; J. Reichert; Th. Udem; T. W. Hänsch; P. V. Pokasov; M. N. Skvortsov; S. N. Bagayev

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute frequency of the In$^{+}$ $5s^{2 1}S_{0}$ - $5s5p^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition at 237 nm was measured with an accuracy of 1.8 parts in $10^{13}$. Using a phase-coherent frequency chain, we compared the $^{1}S_{0}$ - $^{3}P_{0}$ transition with a methane-stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 $\\mu$m which was calibrated against an atomic cesium fountain clock. A frequency gap of 37 THz at the fourth harmonic of the He-Ne standard was bridged by a frequency comb generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser. The frequency of the In$^{+}$ clock transition was found to be $1 267 402 452 899.92 (0.23)$ kHz, the accuracy being limited by the uncertainty of the He-Ne laser reference. This represents an improvement in accuracy of more than 2 orders of magnitude on previous measurements of the line and now stands as the most accurate measurement of an optical transition in a single ion.

  11. Towards quantitative control on discreteness error in the non-linear regime of cosmological N body simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Joyce; Bruno Marcos; Thierry Baertschiger

    2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of discreteness arising from the use of the N-body method on the accuracy of simulations of cosmological structure formation are not currently well understood. After a discussion of how the relevant discretisation parameters introduced should be extrapolated to recover the Vlasov-Poisson limit, we study numerically, and with analytical methods we have developed recently, the central issue of how finite particle density affects the precision of results. In particular we focus on the power spectrum at wavenumbers around and above the Nyquist wavenumber, in simulations in which the force resolution is taken smaller than the initial interparticle spacing. Using simulations of identical theoretical initial conditions sampled on four different "pre-initial" configurations (three different Bravais lattices, and a glass) we obtain a {\\it lower bound} on the real discreteness error. With the guidance of our analytical results, we establish with confidence that the measured dispersion is not contaminated either by finite box size effects or by subtle numerical effects. Our results show notably that, at wavenumbers {\\it below} the Nyquist wavenumber, the dispersion increases monotonically in time throughout the simulation, while the same is true above the Nyquist wavenumber once non-linearity sets in. For normalizations typical of cosmological simulations, we find lower bounds on errors at the Nyquist wavenumber of order of a percent, and larger above this scale. The only way this error may be reduced below these levels at these scales, and indeed convergence to the physical limit firmly established, is by extrapolation, at fixed values of the other relevant parameters, to the regime in which the mean comoving interparticle distance becomes less than the force smoothing scale.

  12. SHEAN (Simplified Human Error Analysis code) and automated THERP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most widely used human error analysis tools is THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). Unfortunately, this tool has disadvantages. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, realizing these drawbacks, commissioned Dr. Swain, the author of THERP, to create a simpler, more consistent tool for deriving human error rates. That effort produced the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program Human Reliability Analysis Procedure (ASEP), which is more conservative than THERP, but a valuable screening tool. ASEP involves answering simple questions about the scenario in question, and then looking up the appropriate human error rate in the indicated table (THERP also uses look-up tables, but four times as many). The advantages of ASEP are that human factors expertise is not required, and the training to use the method is minimal. Although not originally envisioned by Dr. Swain, the ASEP approach actually begs to be computerized. That WINCO did, calling the code SHEAN, for Simplified Human Error ANalysis. The code was done in TURBO Basic for IBM or IBM-compatible MS-DOS, for fast execution. WINCO is now in the process of comparing this code against THERP for various scenarios. This report provides a discussion of SHEAN.

  13. New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop on the Avidin/Biotin Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop energy and entropy. HSMD is extended here for the first time for calculating the absolute free energy change to the total free energy of binding is calculated here for the first time. Our result, A0 ) -24

  14. Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: Application to liquid argon and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method The hypothetical scanning HS method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration. © 2004 American Institute

  15. Development of an integrated system for estimating human error probabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Morzinski, J.A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project had as its main objective the development of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA), knowledge-based expert system that would provide probabilistic estimates for potential human errors within various risk assessments, safety analysis reports, and hazard assessments. HRA identifies where human errors are most likely, estimates the error rate for individual tasks, and highlights the most beneficial areas for system improvements. This project accomplished three major tasks. First, several prominent HRA techniques and associated databases were collected and translated into an electronic format. Next, the project started a knowledge engineering phase where the expertise, i.e., the procedural rules and data, were extracted from those techniques and compiled into various modules. Finally, these modules, rules, and data were combined into a nearly complete HRA expert system.

  16. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst's understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  17. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst`s understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  18. Non-Gaussian numerical errors versus mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meurice; M. B. Oktay

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We probe the numerical errors made in renormalization group calculations by varying slightly the rescaling factor of the fields and rescaling back in order to get the same (if there were no round-off errors) zero momentum 2-point function (magnetic susceptibility). The actual calculations were performed with Dyson's hierarchical model and a simplified version of it. We compare the distributions of numerical values obtained from a large sample of rescaling factors with the (Gaussian by design) distribution of a random number generator and find significant departures from the Gaussian behavior. In addition, the average value differ (robustly) from the exact answer by a quantity which is of the same order as the standard deviation. We provide a simple model in which the errors made at shorter distance have a larger weight than those made at larger distance. This model explains in part the non-Gaussian features and why the central-limit theorem does not apply.

  19. Reducing Collective Quantum State Rotation Errors with Reversible Dephasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin C. Cox; Matthew A. Norcia; Joshua M. Weiner; Justin G. Bohnet; James K. Thompson

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21 dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of $2.1 \\times 10^5$ laser cooled and trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  20. Meta learning of bounds on the Bayes classifier error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kevin R; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meta learning uses information from base learners (e.g. classifiers or estimators) as well as information about the learning problem to improve upon the performance of a single base learner. For example, the Bayes error rate of a given feature space, if known, can be used to aid in choosing a classifier, as well as in feature selection and model selection for the base classifiers and the meta classifier. Recent work in the field of f-divergence functional estimation has led to the development of simple and rapidly converging estimators that can be used to estimate various bounds on the Bayes error. We estimate multiple bounds on the Bayes error using an estimator that applies meta learning to slowly converging plug-in estimators to obtain the parametric convergence rate. We compare the estimated bounds empirically on simulated data and then estimate the tighter bounds on features extracted from an image patch analysis of sunspot continuum and magnetogram images.

  1. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP-3y and first MINOS results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk; A. Slosar

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2-sigma) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses Sigma ranging from ~2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to ~0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2-sigma, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter sigma_8. We show how the partial degeneracy between Sigma and sigma_8 in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of sigma_8 pushes the upper bound of Sigma in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current Sigma and m_2beta constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  2. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk

    2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m_beta by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m_2beta from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on Sigma from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the 2 degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-alpha forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a non-zero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m_beta,m_2beta,Sigma) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between Sigma and m_2beta constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and non-oscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  3. Absolute kinematics of radio source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Perez-Torres; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; E. Ros

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the thirteen extragalactic radio sources of the complete S5 polar cap sample at 15.4 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array, on 27 July 1999 (1999.57) and 15 June 2000 (2000.46). We present the maps from those two epochs, along with maps obtained from observations of the 2 cm VLBA survey for some of the sources of the sample, making a total of 40 maps. We discuss the apparent morphological changes displayed by the radio sources between the observing epochs. Our VLBA observations correspond to the first two epochs at 15.4 GHz of a program to study the absolute kinematics of the radio source components of the members of the sample, by means of phase delay astrometry at 8.4 GHz, 15.4 GHz, and 43 GHz. Our 15.4 GHz VLBA imaging allowed us to disentangle the inner milliarcsecond structure of some of the sources, thus resolving components that appeared blended at 8.4 GHz. For most of the sources, we identified the brightest feature in each radio source with the core. These identifications are supported by the spectral index estimates for those brightest features, which are in general flat, or even inverted. Most of the sources display core-dominance in the overall emission. We find that three of the sources have their most inverted spectrum component shifted with respect to the origin in the map, which approximately coincides with the peak-of-brightness at both 15.4 GHz and 8.4 GHz.

  4. A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000+/-400+/-20km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5+/-2hrs, Dec=70+/-10deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26), and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887). The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983), De Witte (1991) and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality.

  5. Trade-off between the tolerance of located and unlocated errors in nondegenerate quantum error-correcting codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry L. Haselgrove; Peter P. Rohde

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent study [Rohde et al., quant-ph/0603130 (2006)] of several quantum error correcting protocols designed for tolerance against qubit loss, it was shown that these protocols have the undesirable effect of magnifying the effects of depolarization noise. This raises the question of which general properties of quantum error-correcting codes might explain such an apparent trade-off between tolerance to located and unlocated error types. We extend the counting argument behind the well-known quantum Hamming bound to derive a bound on the weights of combinations of located and unlocated errors which are correctable by nondegenerate quantum codes. Numerical results show that the bound gives an excellent prediction to which combinations of unlocated and located errors can be corrected with high probability by certain large degenerate codes. The numerical results are explained partly by showing that the generalized bound, like the original, is closely connected to the information-theoretic quantity the quantum coherent information. However, we also show that as a measure of the exact performance of quantum codes, our generalized Hamming bound is provably far from tight.

  6. Hard Data on Soft Errors: A Large-Scale Assessment of Real-World Error Rates in GPGPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haque, Imran S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are gaining widespread use in computational chemistry and other scientific simulation contexts because of their huge performance advantages relative to conventional CPUs. However, the reliability of GPUs in error-intolerant applications is largely unproven. In particular, a lack of error checking and correcting (ECC) capability in the memory subsystems of graphics cards has been cited as a hindrance to the acceptance of GPUs as high-performance coprocessors, but the impact of this design has not been previously quantified. In this article we present MemtestG80, our software for assessing memory error rates on NVIDIA G80 and GT200-architecture-based graphics cards. Furthermore, we present the results of a large-scale assessment of GPU error rate, conducted by running MemtestG80 on over 20,000 hosts on the Folding@home distributed computing network. Our control experiments on consumer-grade and dedicated-GPGPU hardware in a controlled environment found no errors. However, our su...

  7. Are you getting an error message in UniFi Plus? (suggestion...check the auto-hint line!) In most cases, Unifi Plus does not prominently display error messages; instead, the error message will be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Are you getting an error message in UniFi Plus? (suggestion...check the auto-hint line!) In most cases, Unifi Plus does not prominently display error messages; instead, the error message and processing messages Keyboard shortcuts Instructions for accessing other blocks, windows or forms from

  8. Error estimates and specification parameters for functional renormalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnoerr, David [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boettcher, Igor, E-mail: I.Boettcher@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Pawlowski, Jan M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wetterich, Christof [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a strategy for estimating the error of truncated functional flow equations. While the basic functional renormalization group equation is exact, approximated solutions by means of truncations do not only depend on the choice of the retained information, but also on the precise definition of the truncation. Therefore, results depend on specification parameters that can be used to quantify the error of a given truncation. We demonstrate this for the BCS–BEC crossover in ultracold atoms. Within a simple truncation the precise definition of the frequency dependence of the truncated propagator affects the results, indicating a shortcoming of the choice of a frequency independent cutoff function.

  9. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  10. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, Larry, E-mail: lguth@math.mit.edu [Department of Mathematics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lubotzky, Alexander, E-mail: alex.lubotzky@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ?}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  11. Full protection of superconducting qubit systems from coupling errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Storcz; J. Vala; K. R. Brown; J. Kempe; F. K. Wilhelm; K. B. Whaley

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state qubits realized in superconducting circuits are potentially extremely scalable. However, strong decoherence may be transferred to the qubits by various elements of the circuits that couple individual qubits, particularly when coupling is implemented over long distances. We propose here an encoding that provides full protection against errors originating from these coupling elements, for a chain of superconducting qubits with a nearest neighbor anisotropic XY-interaction. The encoding is also seen to provide partial protection against errors deriving from general electronic noise.

  12. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  13. Correctable noise of Quantum Error Correcting Codes under adaptive concatenation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesse Fern

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the transformation of noise under a quantum error correcting code (QECC) concatenated repeatedly with itself, by analyzing the effects of a quantum channel after each level of concatenation using recovery operators that are optimally adapted to use error syndrome information from the previous levels of the code. We use the Shannon entropy of these channels to estimate the thresholds of correctable noise for QECCs and find considerable improvements under this adaptive concatenation. Similar methods could be used to increase quantum fault tolerant thresholds.

  14. Absolute calibration of image plates for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Back, Norman L.; Eder, David C.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Ping Yuan; Song, Peter M.; Throop, Alan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bartal, Teresa; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Link, Anthony J.; Van Woerkom, Linn [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV and 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate photon stimulated luminescence per electron at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energy depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of our absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  15. The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

  16. Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Tunable Laser on a Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Albert; William Burgett; Jason Rhodes

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As spectrophotometric calibration may play a significant role in the accuracy of photometric redshift measurement, and photometric redshift accuracy is important for measuring dark energy using SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration and relative spectrophotometric calibration across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication.

  17. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  18. Absolute frequency measurements of 85Rb nF7/2 Rydberg states using purely optical detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. M. Johnson; H. O. Majeed; B. Sanguinetti; Th. Becker; B. T. H. Varcoe

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-step laser excitation scheme is used to make absolute frequency measurements of highly excited nF7/2 Rydberg states in 85Rb for principal quantum numbers n=33-100. This work demonstrates the first absolute frequency measurements of rubidium Rydberg levels using a purely optical detection scheme. The Rydberg states are excited in a heated Rb vapour cell and Doppler free signals are detected via purely optical means. All of the frequency measurements are made using a wavemeter which is calibrated against a GPS disciplined self-referenced optical frequency comb. We find that the measured levels have a very high frequency stability, and are especially robust to electric fields. The apparatus has allowed measurements of the states to an accuracy of 8.0MHz. The new measurements are analysed by extracting the modified Rydberg-Ritz series parameters.

  19. Absolute spin calibration of an electron spin polarimeter by spin-resolved photoemission from the Au(111) surface states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacho, Cephise M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vlaic, Sergio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Malvestuto, Marco; Ressel, Barbara [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Seddon, Elaine A. [Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we report the absolute characterization of a spin polarimeter by measuring the Sherman function with high precision. These results have been obtained from the analysis of the spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Au(111) surface states. The measurements have been performed with a 250 kHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire amplified laser system combined with a high energy-, angle-, and spin-resolving time-of-flight electron spectrometer.

  20. Constraining the absolute neutrino mass scale and Majorana CP violating phases by future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, in a three generation framework, current and future neutrino oscillation experiments can determine six out of the nine parameters which fully describe the structure of the neutrino mass matrix. We try to clarify the interplay among the remaining parameters, the absolute neutrino mass scale and two CP violating Majorana phases, and how they can be accessed by future neutrinoless double beta ($0\

  1. Theoretical full power correction factors as related to changes in ambient temperature, pressure and absolute humidity for aircraft turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Michel Antoun

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN AMBIENT TEMPERATURE, PRESSURF. AND ABSOLUTE HUMIDITY FOR AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINES (August 1969) Michael Antoun Raphael B. S. (Mechanical Engineering) Texas A&M University Directed by: Professor Stanley H, Lowy ABSTRACT Power losses in aircraft gas... rated at standard atmospheric conditions (i. e, ambient temperature 69 F 3'Fend atmospheric pressure 29. 92 in. Hg. dry) . Obviously this same turbine will not be exposed to such standard conditions; therefore we have a change in power directly...

  2. Detection of multimode spatial correlation in PDC and application to the absolute calibration of a CCD camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brida, Giorgio; Genovese, Marco; Rastello, Maria Luisa; Ruo-Berchera, Ivano

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a new method based on the spatial entanglement for the absolute calibration of analog detector. The idea consists on measuring the sub-shot-noise intensity correlation between two branches of parametric down conversion, containing many pairwise correlated spatial modes. We calibrate a scientific CCD camera and a preliminary evaluation of the statistical uncertainty indicates the metrological interest of the method.

  3. Detection of multimode spatial correlation in PDC and application to the absolute calibration of a CCD camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Brida; Ivo Pietro Degiovanni; Marco Genovese; Maria Luisa Rastello; Ivano Ruo-Berchera

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a new method based on the spatial entanglement for the absolute calibration of analog detector. The idea consists on measuring the sub-shot-noise intensity correlation between two branches of parametric down conversion, containing many pairwise correlated spatial modes. We calibrate a scientific CCD camera and a preliminary evaluation of the statistical uncertainty indicates the metrological interest of the method.

  4. Soft Error Modeling and Protection for Sequential Elements Hossein Asadi and Mehdi B. Tahoori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on system-level soft error rate. The number of clock cycles required for an error in a bistable to be propagated to system outputs is used to measure the vulnerability of bistables to soft errors. 1 Introduction, soft errors become the main reliability concern during lifetime operation of digital systems. Soft

  5. Low-Cost Hardening of Image Processing Applications Against Soft Errors Ilia Polian1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polian, Ilia

    , and their hardening against soft errors becomes an issue. We propose a methodology to identify soft errors as uncritical based on their impact on the system's functionality. We call a soft error uncritical if its impact are imperceivable for the human user of the system. We focus on soft errors in the motion esti- mation subsystem

  6. Distinguishing congestion and error losses: an ECN/ELN based scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamakshisundaram, Raguram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    error rates, like wireless links, packets are lost more due to error than due to congestion. But TCP does not differentiate between error and congestion losses and hence reduces the sending rate for losses due to error also, which unnecessarily reduces...

  7. Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Everett Palmer NASA Ames Research Center Introduction Advanced automation has been of mode­related problems [SW95]. After studying accidents and incidents in the new, highly automated

  8. Measurement Errors in Visual Servoing V. Kyrki ,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kragic, Danica

    feedback for closed loop control of a robot motion termed visual servoing has received a significant amount robot trajectory and its uncertainty. The procedures of camera calibration have improved enormously over on the modeling of an error function and thus has a major effect on the robot's trajectory. On the other hand

  9. Energy efficiency of error correction for wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    -control is an important issue for mobile computing systems. This includes energy spent in the physical radio transmission and Networking Conference 1999 [7]. #12;ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF ERROR CORRECTION FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONA ­ 2 on the energy of transmission and the energy of redundancy computation. We will show that the computational cost

  10. Effects of errors in the solar radius on helioseismic inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequencies of intermediate-degree f-modes of the Sun seem to indicate that the solar radius is smaller than what is normally used in constructing solar models. We investigate the possible consequences of an error in radius on results for solar structure obtained using helioseismic inversions. It is shown that solar sound speed will be overestimated if oscillation frequencies are inverted using reference models with a larger radius. Using solar models with radius of 695.78 Mm and new data sets, the base of the solar convection zone is estimated to be at radial distance of $0.7135\\pm 0.0005$ of the solar radius. The helium abundance in the convection zone as determined using models with OPAL equation of state is $0.248\\pm 0.001$, where the errors reflect the estimated systematic errors in the calculation, the statistical errors being much smaller. Assuming that the OPAL opacities used in the construction of the solar models are correct, the surface $Z/X$ is estimated to be $0.0245\\pm 0.0006$.

  11. Error field and magnetic diagnostic modeling for W7-X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Sam A. [PPPL; Gates, David A. [PPPL; NEILSON, GEORGE H. [PPPL; OTTE, M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Pedersen, T. S.; GEIGER, J.; LORE, J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction, detection, and compensation of error fields for the W7-X device will play a key role in achieving a high beta (? = 5%), steady state (30 minute pulse) operating regime utilizing the island divertor system [1]. Additionally, detection and control of the equilibrium magnetic structure in the scrape-off layer will be necessary in the long-pulse campaign as bootstrapcurrent evolution may result in poor edge magnetic structure [2]. An SVD analysis of the magnetic diagnostics set indicates an ability to measure the toroidal current and stored energy, while profile variations go undetected in the magnetic diagnostics. An additional set of magnetic diagnostics is proposed which improves the ability to constrain the equilibrium current and pressure profiles. However, even with the ability to accurately measure equilibrium parameters, the presence of error fields can modify both the plasma response and diverter magnetic field structures in unfavorable ways. Vacuum flux surface mapping experiments allow for direct measurement of these modifications to magnetic structure. The ability to conduct such an experiment is a unique feature of stellarators. The trim coils may then be used to forward model the effect of an applied n = 1 error field. This allows the determination of lower limits for the detection of error field amplitude and phase using flux surface mapping. *Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  12. Two infinite families of nonadditive quantum error-correcting codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; C. H. Oh

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct explicitly two infinite families of genuine nonadditive 1-error correcting quantum codes and prove that their coding subspaces are 50% larger than those of the optimal stabilizer codes of the same parameters via the linear programming bound. All these nonadditive codes can be characterized by a stabilizer-like structure and thus their encoding circuits can be designed in a straightforward manner.

  13. Threshold error rates for the toric and surface codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Wang; A. G. Fowler; A. M. Stephens; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface code scheme for quantum computation features a 2d array of nearest-neighbor coupled qubits yet claims a threshold error rate approaching 1% (NJoP 9:199, 2007). This result was obtained for the toric code, from which the surface code is derived, and surpasses all other known codes restricted to 2d nearest-neighbor architectures by several orders of magnitude. We describe in detail an error correction procedure for the toric and surface codes, which is based on polynomial-time graph matching techniques and is efficiently implementable as the classical feed-forward processing step in a real quantum computer. By direct simulation of this error correction scheme, we determine the threshold error rates for the two codes (differing only in their boundary conditions) for both ideal and non-ideal syndrome extraction scenarios. We verify that the toric code has an asymptotic threshold of p = 15.5% under ideal syndrome extraction, and p = 7.8 10^-3 for the non-ideal case, in agreement with prior work. Simulations of the surface code indicate that the threshold is close to that of the toric code.

  14. RESIDUAL TYPE A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES FOR ELLIPTIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    to double obstacle problems are briefly discussed. Key words. a posteriori error estimates, residual Science Foundation under the grant No.19771080 and China National Key Project ``Large Scale Scientific\\Gamma satisfies / Ÿ 0 on @ and K is the convex set of admissible displacements K := fv 2 H 1 0(\\Omega\\Gamma : v

  15. Multilayer Perceptron Error Surfaces: Visualization, Structure and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Marcus

    . This is commonly formulated as a multivariate non­linear optimization problem over a very high­dimensional space of analysis are not well­suited to this problem. Visualizing and describ­ ing the error surface are also three related methods. Firstly, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is proposed as a method

  16. Multi-layer Perceptron Error Surfaces: Visualization, Structure and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Marcus

    . This is commonly formulated as a multivariate non-linear optimization problem over a very high-dimensional space of analysis are not well-suited to this problem. Visualizing and describ- ing the error surface are also three related methods. Firstly, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is proposed as a method

  17. Analysis of possible systematic errors in the Oslo method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Larsen; M. Guttormsen; M. Krticka; E. Betak; A. Bürger; A. Görgen; H. T. Nyhus; J. Rekstad; A. Schiller; S. Siem; H. K. Toft; G. M. Tveten; A. V. Voinov; K. Wikan

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have reviewed the Oslo method, which enables the simultaneous extraction of level density and gamma-ray transmission coefficient from a set of particle-gamma coincidence data. Possible errors and uncertainties have been investigated. Typical data sets from various mass regions as well as simulated data have been tested against the assumptions behind the data analysis.

  18. Flexible Error Protection for Energy Efficient Reliable Architectures Timothy Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Dong

    Flexible Error Protection for Energy Efficient Reliable Architectures Timothy Miller , Nagarjuna and Computer Engineering The Ohio State University {millerti,teodores}@cse.ohio-state.edu, nagarjun. To deal with these com- peting trends, energy-efficient solutions are needed to deal with reli- ability

  19. Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering Carlos that is difficult to measure directly (e.g., lifetime of a pavement, efficiency of an engine, etc). To estimate y computation time. As an example of this methodology, we give pavement lifetime estimates. This work

  20. A Method for Treating Discretization Error in Nondeterministic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, K.F.

    1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A response surface methodology-based technique is presented for treating discretization error in non-deterministic analysis. The response surface, or metamodel, is estimated from computer experiments which vary both uncertain physical parameters and the fidelity of the computational mesh. The resultant metamodel is then used to propagate the variabilities in the continuous input parameters, while the mesh size is taken to zero, its asymptotic limit. With respect to mesh size, the metamodel is equivalent to Richardson extrapolation, in which solutions on coarser and finer meshes are used to estimate discretization error. The method is demonstrated on a one dimensional prismatic bar, in which uncertainty in the third vibration frequency is estimated by propagating variations in material modulus, density, and bar length. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the method for combining non-deterministic analysis with error estimation to obtain estimates of total simulation uncertainty. The results also show the relative sensitivity of failure estimates to solution bias errors in a reliability analysis, particularly when the physical variability of the system is low.