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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

2

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

3

Absolute Measurements of the Magnetic Field Generated by Different Coils in the Center of EGYPTOR Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work is devoted to measure the absolute magnetic field produced by different coils in the EGYPTOR tokamak using a calibrated pickup coil. Scaling these...

H. Hegazy; F. Zacek

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

5

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

6

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (1) Develop scanning LiDAR and multispectral imagery methods to estimate PCC and LAI over both hardwood and coniferous forests; (2) investigate whether a LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data fusion through linear regression...

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

8

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

9

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

10

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

11

A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recalculation of 1 fraction from a patient treatment plan on a phantom and subsequent measurements have become the norms for measurement-based verification, which combines the quality assurance recommendations that deal with the treatment planning system and the beam delivery system. This type of evaluation has prompted attention to measurement equipment and techniques. Ionization chambers are considered the gold standard because of their precision, availability, and relative ease of use. This study evaluates and compares 5 different ionization chambers: phantom combinations for verification in routine patient-specific quality assurance of RapidArc treatments. Fifteen different RapidArc plans conforming to the clinical standards were selected for the study. Verification plans were then created for each treatment plan with different chamber-phantom combinations scanned by computed tomography. This includes Medtec intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom with micro-ionization chamber (0.007 cm{sup 3}) and pinpoint chamber (0.015 cm{sup 3}), PTW-Octavius phantom with semiflex chamber (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and 2D array (0.125 cm{sup 3}), and indigenously made Circular wax phantom with 0.6 cm{sup 3} chamber. The measured isocenter absolute dose was compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) plan. The micro-ionization chamber shows more deviations when compared with semiflex and 0.6 cm{sup 3} with a maximum variation of -4.76%, -1.49%, and 2.23% for micro-ionization, semiflex, and farmer chambers, respectively. The positive variations indicate that the chamber with larger volume overestimates. Farmer chamber shows higher deviation when compared with 0.125 cm{sup 3}. In general the deviation was found to be <1% with the semiflex and farmer chambers. A maximum variation of 2% was observed for the 0.007 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber, except in a few cases. Pinpoint chamber underestimates the calculated isocenter dose by a maximum of 4.8%. Absolute dose measurements using the semiflex ionization chamber with intermediate volume (0.125 cm{sup 3}) shows good agreement with the TPS calculated among the detectors used in this study. Positioning is very important when using smaller volume chambers because they are more sensitive to geometrical errors within the treatment fields. It is also suggested to average the dose over the sensitive volume for larger-volume chambers. The ionization chamber-phantom combinations used in this study can be used interchangeably for routine RapidArc patient-specific quality assurance with a satisfactory accuracy for clinical practice.

Syam Kumar, S.A., E-mail: skppm@rediffmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute (WIA), Adyar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Viscosity, Absolute Dynamic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

where A is the area (cm2). (dv/dx) is the velocity gradient (s?1...), and ? is the coefficient of absolute viscosity (poise).

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Viscosity, absolute dynamic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

where A is the area (cm2), (dv/dx) the velocity gradient (s–1), and ? is the coefficient of absolute viscosity (poise).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO82 to AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

16

Absolute pitch and related abilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of musical processing in listeners with absolute pitch andrelative pitch. The National Academy of Sciences, 95, 3172-G. J. (2001). “Absolute pitch in infant auditory learning:

Dooley, Kevin David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

18

27. 5-percent silicon concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in silicon solar cells using the backside point-contact configuration have been extended resulting in 27.5-percent efficiencies at 10 W/sq cm (100 suns, 24 C), making these the most efficient solar cells reported to date. The one-sun efficiencies under an AM1.5 spectrum normalized to 100 mW/sq cm are 22 percent at 24 C based on the design area of the concentrator cell. The improvements reported here are largely due to the incorportation of optical light trapping to enhance the absorption of weakly absorbed near bandgap light. These results approach the projected efficiencies for a mature technology which are 23-24 percent at one sun and 29 percent in the 100-350-sun (10-35 W/sq cm) range. 10 references.

Sinton, R.A.; Kwark, Y.; Gan, J.Y.; Swanson, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

20

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

22

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

23

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

24

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

25

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

26

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

27

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

39

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

40

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

56

The information as Absolute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article presents and grounds (i.e. presents proof of the existence, the truth, the self-consistence and the completeness of)the informational conception ("the Information as Absolute" conception)in physics and philosophy. the conception defines the information as an ultimately common, real and fundamental concept/phenomenon - "Absolute", which exists as anabsolutely infinite set ("Information" Set) of elements (members) and informational (e.g., logical) linksbetween the elements; where any element itself is some informational structure also. Correspondingly, for example, Matter as the substence, radiation, etc., is some development or realization of informational patterns, constituting a specific - and practically infinitesimal comparing to the Set - subset of the "Information" Set. The conception allows for the resolution, or at least for a consideration on a higher level of comprehension, of the basic ontological and epistemological problems in philosophy and natural sciences; in physics it allows to suggest reasonable model, which makes more clear basic phisical notions,such as space, time, matter, etc.

Sergey V. Shevchenko; Vladimir V. Tokarevsky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

99

Phenomenology of Absolute Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of absolute neutrino masses is reviewed, focusing on tritium beta decay, cosmological measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

Carlo Giunti

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

Seely, John F. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob [International Radiation Detectors, Inc., Torrance, CA 90505-5243 (United States); Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

102

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

103

Absolute Energy USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Absolute Energy (USA) Place: St. Ansgar, Iowa Zip: 50472 Product: Absolute Energy has built a 100 million gallon per year ethanol plant on the...

104

Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

Markus Steidl

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stability comparison of two absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the direct comparison between the stabilities of two mobile absolute gravimeters of different technology: the LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter and FG5X\\#216 of the Universit\\'e du Luxembourg. These instruments rely on two different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. The comparison took place in the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in Luxembourg, at the beginning of the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2013. We analyse a 2h10 duration common measurement, and find that the CAG shows better immunity with respect to changes in the level of vibration noise, as well as a slightly better short term stability.

Gillot, Pierre; Landragin, Arnaud; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Merlet, Sébastien

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

107

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

108

Ninety - Two Percent Minimum Heater Efficiency By 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology is now available to increase heater efficiencies to 92 percent and more. By 1980, this technology will be field proven and corrosion and reliability problems identified and resolved. Recent studies have shown that a minimum efficiency...

Mieth, H. C.; Hardie, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

110

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

111

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

112

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

113

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

114

Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.

115

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Absolute vs. Intensity Limits for CO2 Emission Control: Performance Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We elucidate the differences between absolute and intensity-based limits of CO2 emission when there is uncertainty about the future. We demonstrate that the two limits are identical under certainty, and rigorously establish ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

117

Absolut Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolut Energy Capital Absolut Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Absolut Energy Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip W1H - 6HN Sector Renewable Energy Product London-based private equity firm. The firm offers financing for renewable energy ventures. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Absolute pitch: perception, coding, and controversies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute pitch: perception, coding, and controversies Daniel J. Levitin and Susan E. Rogers are converging to shed light on the nature of processing, categorization and memory for pitch in humans and animals. Although most people are unable to name or place pitch values in consistent, well

Levitin, Daniel

119

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on the Geologic Time Scale #12 as an element changes to another element, e.g. uranium to lead. · The parent element is radioactive · Carbon-14, C14 Nitrogen-14, N14 · Uranium-235, U235 Lead-207, Pb207 · Potassium-40, K40 Argon-40, Ar40

Kammer, Thomas

120

Absolute absorption spectroscopy based on molecule interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new method to measure the absolute photon absorption cross section of neutral molecules in a molecular beam. It is independent of our knowledge of the particle beam density, nor does it rely on photo-induced fragmentation or ionization. The method is based on resolving the recoil resulting from photon absorption by means of near-field matter-wave interference, and it thus applies even to very dilute beams with low optical densities. Our discussion includes the possibility of internal state conversion as well as fluorescence. We assess the influence of various experimental uncertainties and show that the measurement of absolute absorption cross sections is conceivable with high precision and using existing technologies.

Stefan Nimmrichter; Klaus Hornberger; Hendrik Ulbricht; Markus Arndt

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Absolute Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolute Energy Capital Absolute Energy Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 5NQ Product London-based private equity firm. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

123

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

124

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal February 12, 2014 - 11:05am Addthis News Media...

125

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

126

Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics Tom´as Tyc, Lenka Herz symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically

Tyc, Tomas

127

Bloom, fruit development, and embryo development of peaches in a mild-winter region, and use of percent dry weight of ovule as a maturity index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

persica (L.) Batsch] were examined, and percent dry weight of ovule (PDO) was studied as an embryo maturity index for stratification-germination in the breeding program. Differences in bloom times of 5 bloom period (BP) reference cultisms resulted...

Bacon, Terry A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

130

Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

Stidham, Paul Emery

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy...

133

Electrically calibrated absolute radiometer suitable for measurement automation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New electrically calibrated absolute radiometers (ESRs) were developed having fast response and high responsivity; these ESRs are specially useful for measurement automation. They are...

Boivin, Louis-Philippe; McNeely, Francis T

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000 differences by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden over the period 1971 to 2000. Methods The age and the AIDs have increased since the 1970s in Norway and Sweden, and since the 1980s in Finland

135

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future, From Near with the UC Davis Policy Institute is the UC Davis Energy Institute. Renewables Beyond 33 Percent October 17 as it transitions to a renewable energy future. Featuring panelists from government, industry and academia

California at Davis, University of

136

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged of modern nuclear power plants. Domenici is chairman of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations

137

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

138

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

139

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

140

Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

Sun, Z. J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wells, D. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph St. Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave. Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: pb = C + Va(pa) Equation 3 where C is a constant. Ash content can therefore be geophysically determined as variations In log-derived bulk density measurements are in direct response to variations in ash content. However, when any of the above... by applying the relationships between geophysi cally-derived gamma-gamma density and laboratory-derived percent dry ash. The linear gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationship is dependent upon a constant fuel ratio (percent fixed carbon...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

143

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of Funds for Administrative Expenses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

144

Skills, education, and the rise of earnings inequality among the “other 99 percent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disaster assistance, food assistance) that buffer...executives and financial professionals...evidence of rents in top 1 percent...macro-micro-minnesota/2012/02...attractive financial proposition on average...research assistance. Supported...

David H. Autor

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

146

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

147

Effects of time constraint and percent defective on visual inspection performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committ e) (Memb r...

Gilmore, Walter Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Traditional investment versus absolute return programmes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hilary Till and Joseph Eagleeye argue that the differences between the hedge-fund and traditional-investment industries arise from competing views of the key sources of investment returns.

Hilary Till; Joseph Eagleeye

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dynamics of Absolute Vorticity in the Boussinesq Fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of absolute vorticity in the Boussinesq fluid is examined. It is shown that the Boussinesq approximation only captures one of the horizontal ... component of the solenoidal term neglected by the Boussinesq

Zuohao Cao

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Open-loop control of absolutely unstable domains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge...Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver...absolute and convective. In Handbook of plasma physics (ed. M. N. Rosenbluth & R...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Precision absolute-value amplifier for a precision voltmeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bipolar inputs are afforded by the plus inputs of first and second differential input amplifiers. A first gain determining resistor is connected between the minus inputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second diodes are connected between the respective minus inputs and the respective outputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second FETs have their gates connected to the outputs of the amplifiers, while their respective source and drain circuits are connected between the respective minus inputs and an output lead extending to a load resistor. The output current through the load resistor is proportional to the absolute value of the input voltage difference between the bipolar input terminals. A third differential amplifier has its plus input terminal connected to the load resistor. A second gain determining resistor is connected between the minus input of the third differential amplifier and a voltage source. A third FET has its gate connected to the output of the third amplifier. The source and drain circuit of the third transistor is connected between the minus input of the third amplifier and a voltage-frequency converter, constituting an output device. A polarity detector is also provided, comprising a pair of transistors having their inputs connected to the outputs of the first and second differential amplifiers. The outputs of the polarity detector are connected to gates which switch the output of the voltage-frequency converter between up and down counting outputs.

Hearn, W.E.; Rondeau, D.J.

1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolutely secure processing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provide absolute security. That is, systems where... not pass the absolute ... Source: Navarro-Arribas, Guillermo - Artificial Intelligence Research Institute, Universitat...

154

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

155

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

156

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

157

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

158

26-percent efficient point-junction concentrator solar cells with a front metal grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on silicon concentrator cells with point diffusions and metal contacts on both the front and back sides. The design minimizes reflection losses by forming an inverted pyramid topography on the front surface and by shaping the metal grid lines in the form of a triangular ridge. A short-circuit current density of 39.6 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved even though the front grid covers 16 percent of the cell's active area of 1.56 cm{sup 2}. This, together with an open-circuit voltage of 700 mV, has led to an efficiency of 22 percent at one sun, AM1.5 global spectrum. Under direct-spectrum, 8.8-W/cm{sup 2}, concentrated light, the efficiency is 26 percent. This is the highest ever reported for a silicon cell having a front metal grid.

Cuevas, A.; Sinton, R.A.; Midkiff, N.E.; Swanson, R.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

160

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's environmental and economic goals are to ensure ... (e) greenhouse gas emissions will be at least ten per cent). The Nova Scotia Department of Energy also assumes this level of emissions by 2020 in its background paper of carbon dioxide. #12;Energy Research Group: Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction 2 shows NRCan

Hughes, Larry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use and a similar percentage with buildings and appliances are projected to grow faster than those from any other sector. In order to ensure that building energy consumption be significantly reduced. One way this can be achieved is through

162

Development of a graphite probe calorimeter for absolute clinical dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to present the numerical design optimization, construction, and experimental proof of concept of a graphite probe calorimeter (GPC) conceived for dose measurement in the clinical environment (U.S. provisional patent 61/652,540). A finite element method (FEM) based numerical heat transfer study was conducted using a commercial software package to explore the feasibility of the GPC and to optimize the shape, dimensions, and materials used in its design. A functioning prototype was constructed inhouse and used to perform dose to water measurements under a 6 MV photon beam at 400 and 1000 MU/min, in a thermally insulated water phantom. Heat loss correction factors were determined using FEM analysis while the radiation field perturbation and the graphite to water absorbed dose conversion factors were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The difference in the average measured dose to water for the 400 and 1000 MU/min runs using the TG-51 protocol and the GPC was 0.2% and 1.2%, respectively. Heat loss correction factors ranged from 1.001 to 1.002, while the product of the perturbation and dose conversion factors was calculated to be 1.130. The combined relative uncertainty was estimated to be 1.4%, with the largest contributors being the specific heat capacity of the graphite (type B, 0.8%) and the reproducibility, defined as the standard deviation of the mean measured dose (type A, 0.6%). By establishing the feasibility of using the GPC as a practical clinical absolute photon dosimeter, this work lays the foundation for further device enhancements, including the development of an isothermal mode of operation and an overall miniaturization, making it potentially suitable for use in small and composite radiation fields. It is anticipated that, through the incorporation of isothermal stabilization provided by temperature controllers, a subpercent overall uncertainty will be achieved.

Renaud, James; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Marchington, David [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

ABSOLUTE PITCH-BOTH A CURSE AND A BLESSING DANIELJ.L EVITIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSOLUTE PITCH-BOTH A CURSE AND A BLESSING DANIELJ.L EVITIN Absolute pitch is not a medi cal erstandin g of this discomfort and its proper perspective, it is useful to define what absolut e pitch is, demarcate what it is not, and explore its possible origin s. Absolute pitch is generally defined

Levitin, Daniel

164

Absolute shape measurements using high-resolution optoelectronic holography methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute shape measurements using high- resolution optoelectronic holography methods Cosme Furlong optoelectronic holography (OEH) methodology is described. This description addresses apparatus and analysis-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. [S0091-3286(00)02601-5] Subject terms: CAD/CAE models; fiber optics; optoelectronic

Furlong, Cosme

165

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments Dan Chen School of Computer Science¨ur Theoretische Informatik Abstract A Monte Carlo approximation algorithm for the Tukey depth problem in high. Keywords: Tukey depth, computational geometry 1. Introduction Tukey depth is also known as location depth

Morin, Pat

166

Double Beta Decay and the Absolute Neutrino Mass Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a short review of the current status of three-neutrino mixing, the implications for the values of neutrino masses are discussed. The bounds on the absolute scale of neutrino masses from Tritium beta-decay and cosmological data are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the implications of three-neutrino mixing for neutrinoless double-beta decay.

Carlo Giunti

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on the Geologic Time Scale Radiometric.g. uranium to lead. · The parent element is radioactive, the daughter element is stable. · The decay rate nucleosynthesis. Common Radioactive Elements, Parents and Daughters · Carbon-14, C14 Nitrogen-14, N14 · Uranium

Kammer, Thomas

168

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

Heft, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A new method for measuring the absolute neutrino mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The probability of the event that a neutrino produced in pion decay is detected in the intermediate $T$ shorter than the life-time $\\tau_{\\pi}$, $T \\leq \\tau_{\\pi}$, is sensitive to the absolute mass of the neutrino. With a newly formulated S-matrix $S[T]$ that satisfies the boundary conditions of the experiments at a finite $T$, the rate of the event is computed as $\\Gamma_0+\\tilde{g}(\\omega_{\

Kenzo Ishikawa; Yutaka Tobita

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measurement of the absolute timing of attosecond XUV bursts with respect to the driving field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a simple two-color ionization measurement can be used to extract the time of birth of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. A high-order-harmonic attosecond pulse train generated in xenon gas is used to excite a laser-dressed helium atom, which we model using the Floquet formalism. The interference between ionization paths from different Fourier components of the Floquet states results in the oscillation of ion yield with time delay. Using two IR pulses to create a reference intensity modulation, we obtain the phase of ion-yield oscillations, which provides the absolute timing of attosecond bursts with respect to the driving IR field.

Niranjan Shivaram; Henry Timmers; Xiao-Min Tong; Arvinder Sandhu

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 This front cover represents the morphology and resulting device dynamics in organic solar cell blend films of PTB7 and PC71BM, as revealed by combined resonant x-ray scattering and microscopy done at the Advanced Light Source. Harald Ade and co-workers find that the fullerene molecules (red) are miscible in the polymer (blue) up to 30 wt.%, above which they begin to agglomerate (bottom). This agglomeration is important for the optoelectronic processes within the device, but the agglomerates must be kept to small sizes by the solvent processing additive diiodooctane (DIO). Correlation of this morphology with the spectrally resolved quantum efficiency shows that the yellow excitons created upon photoabsorption must arrive at the agglomerate interface for charge separation to occur. The blue electrons and green holes can then percolate through appropriate molecules in the mixed matrix to the electrodes for harvesting of electrical energy. Article Link (PDF)

174

New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp pumps whose speed could be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual $11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of $44,966 in the energy efficiency portion of their new system, GM projected a simple payback of 4 years.

175

MagLab News: The Quest for Absolute Zero in a Magnetic Field...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Quest for Absolute Zero in a Magnetic Field Posted: April 21, 2014 Contact: Kathleen Laufenberg May Science Caf Who: MagLab physicist Tim Murphy Topic: The Quest for Absolute...

176

The Liquid State at the Absolute Zero and the Third Law of Thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... liquid down to the absolute zero and can be solidified only under pressure. The third law of ... of thermodynamics requires that absolute zero shall not be attainable by using the solid liquid transition at ...

A. R. MILLER

1949-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Observation of negative absolute resistance in a Josephson junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We experimentally demonstrate the occurrence of negative absolute resistance (NAR) up to about $-1\\Omega$ in response to an externally applied dc current for a shunted Nb-Al/AlO$_x$-Nb Josephson junction, exposed to a microwave current at frequencies in the GHz range. The realization (or not) of NAR depends crucially on the amplitude of the applied microwave current. Theoretically, the system is described by means of the resistively and capacitively shunted junction model in terms of a moderately damped, classical Brownian particle dynamics in a one-dimensional potential. We find excellent agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulations of the model.

J. Nagel; D. Speer; T. Gaber; A. Sterck; R. Eichhorn; P. Reimann; K. Ilin; M. Siegel; D. Koelle; R. Kleiner

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Lens transmission measurement for an absolute radiation thermometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lens transmission for the National Institute of Metrology of China absolute radiation thermometer is measured by a hybrid method. The results of the lens transmission measurements are 99.002% and 86.792% for filter radiometers with center wavelengths 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively. These results, after correcting for diffraction factors and the size-of-source effect when the lens is incorporated within the radiometer, can be used for measurement of thermodynamic temperature. The expanded uncertainty of the lens transmission measurement system has been evaluated. It is 1.3×10{sup ?3} at 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively.

Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Lu, X. [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Enhancement of absolute neutron dosimetry by activation technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, an activation technique was used for absolute neutron dosimetry. Induced gamma within two activation foils (115In and 197Au) was detected by (5 × 5) sodium iodide (NaI) crystal. Thermal neutron irradiation was performed using the thermal neutron irradiation facility at the National Institute for Standards (NIS). Two gamma lines of 416.9 keV and 411.8 keV from 115In and 198Au, respectively, were chosen for the estimation of the neutron fluence. Gamma lines of 416.8 keV and 1293.56 keV from 115In were used to assure the obtained values of neutron fluence. Absolute neutron dose was calculated utilising the measured neutron fluence. Estimated neutron dose was found to be 1.50 mSv/h. The calculated dose by activation technique was verified by neutron rem meter NM2. Enhancement of neutron fluence was performed by adding Perspex sheets behind the activation foils to produce multiple scattering on the foils, and hence resulting in increasing the capability of accurate estimation of low neutron fluence.

A.R. El-Sersy; N.E. Khaled; S.A. Eman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

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181

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

182

A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

Byington, Alonzo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Absolute Properties of the Eclipsing Binary Star AP Andromedae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AP And is a well-detached F5 eclipsing binary star for which only a very limited amount of information was available before this publication. We have obtained very extensive measurements of the light curve (19097 differential V magnitude observations) and a radial velocity curve (83 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.277 +/- 0.004 and 1.251 +/- 0.004 solar masses, radii of 1.233 +/- 0.006 and 1.1953 +/- 0.005 solar radii, and temperatures of 6565 +/- 150 K and 6495 +/- 150 K. The distance to the system is about 400 +/- 30 pc. Comparison with the theoretical properties of the stellar evolutionary models of the Yonsei-Yale series of Yi et al. shows good agreement between the observations and the theory at an age of about 500 Myr and a slightly sub-solar metallicity.

Lacy, Claud H Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C; Muterspaugh, Matthew W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The modified dynamics (MOND) predicts an absolute maximum to the acceleration produced by `dark halos'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have recently discovered that the modified dynamics (MOND) implies some universal upper bound on the acceleration that can be contributed by a `dark halo'--assumed in a Newtonian analysis to account for the effects of MOND. Not surprisingly, the limit is of the order of the acceleration constant of the theory. This can be contrasted directly with the results of structure-formation simulations. The new limit is substantial and different from earlier MOND acceleration limits (discussed in connection with the MOND explanation of the Freeman law for galaxy disks, and the Fish law for ellipticals): It pertains to the `halo', and not to the observed galaxy; it is absolute, and independent of further physical assumptions on the nature of the galactic system; and it applies at all radii, whereas the other limits apply only to the mean acceleration in the system.

Rafael Brada; Mordehai Milgrom

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute parametric instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Physics 4 Multi-mode spatio-temporal instability in non-Boussinesq convection Summary: and absolute instabilities in high temperature convection 5 4...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute temperature monitoring Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is small respect to the absolute temperature. Therefore we can approximate the exponential term... problem for extending the depth temperature monitoring. One solution...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute efficiency calibration Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ray Conference 453 Calibration of the Pierre Auger fluorescence detector Summary: , Argentina Abstract The absolute calibration of an air fluorescence detector (FD) is an...

188

Cryogenic absolute radiometers as laboratory irradiance standards, remote sensing detectors, and pyroheliometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dramatic improvement in heat diffusivity of pure copper at liquid helium temperatures makes possible very important advances in the absolute accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity,...

Foukal, Peter V; Hoyt, C; Kochling, H; Miller, P

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute high-resolution rate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The average absolute ... Source: Barton, Paul I. - Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection: Engineering 2 Introduction Phase...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute activity measurement Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

College Dublin Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 6 ABSOLUTE PITCH-BOTH A CURSE AND A BLESSING DANIELJ.L EVITIN Summary: ) . The identificationhas been...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute single-molecule entropies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Technology (MIT) Collection: Chemistry 7 The Backbone Conformational Entropy of Protein Folding: Experimental Measures from Atomic Summary: corre- sponds to the absolute...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute asymmetric synthesis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A R C H 2 6 , 2 0 0 1 NEW VOICES IN CHEMISTRY Summary: pharmaceutical com- pounds, agrochemicals, flavors, andfragrancesisassociatedwith absolute molecular configura... , many...

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute u-235 thermal-fission Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for absolute time 12;Radiometric Dating ... Source: Kammer, Thomas - Department of Geology and Geography, West Virginia University Collection: Geosciences ; Biology and...

194

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a "beamsplitter"), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beamsplitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Key, William S. (Knoxville, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a beam splitter''), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beam splitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention. 9 figs.

Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Key, W.S.; Sanders, A.J.; Earl, D.D.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical and radiocarbon methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical Egyptology, the establishment of an absolute chronology for Ancient Egypt has been an ambition which has contained lists of the kings who reigned in Egypt. The Palermo Stone, the Abydos reliefs and the Turin Canon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

A nonmusical paradigm for identifying absolute pitch possessors David A. Rossa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonmusical paradigm for identifying absolute pitch possessors David A. Rossa) Department. The etiology and defining characteristics of this skill, absolute pitch AP , have been very controversial. One literature in pitch memory, a paradigm is presented that is intended to distinguish between AP possessors

Olson, Ingrid

198

Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information Sarah C. Creel to assess what types of pitch information adults use in recognition. Fixation and error data suggest recognition rapidly. Further, adults use both absolute and relative pitch information in recognition

Gentner, Timothy

199

The Mauna Kea Observatories Near-Infrared Filter Set. III. Isophotal Wavelengths and Absolute Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The isophotal wavelengths, flux densities, and AB magnitudes for Vega (alpha Lyr) are presented for the Mauna Kea Observatories near-infrared filter set. We show that the near-infrared absolute calibration for Vega determined by Cohen et al. and Megessier are consistent within the uncertainties, so that either absolute calibration may be used.

A. T. Tokunaga; W. D. Vacca

2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive position MAINICHI (Top Play) (Lead para.) December 7, 2004 Japan and the European Experimental Reactor (ITER). Japan yesterday revealed the details of a proposal to host the project. Tokyo has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Strong thermal leptogenesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that successful strong thermal leptogenesis, where the final asymmetry is independent of the initial conditions and in particular a large pre-existing asymmetry is efficiently washed-out, favours values of the lightest neutrino mass $m_1 \\gtrsim 10\\,{\\rm meV}$ for normal ordering (NO) and $m_1 \\gtrsim 3\\,{\\rm meV}$ for inverted ordering (IO) for models with orthogonal matrix entries respecting $|\\Omega_{ij}^2| \\lesssim 2$. . We show analytically why lower values of $m_1$ require a high level of fine tuning in the seesaw formula and/or in the flavoured decay parameters (in the electronic for NO, in the muonic for IO). We also show how this constraint exists thanks to the measured values of the neutrino mixing angles and can be tighten by a future determination of the Dirac phase. Our analysis also allows to place more stringent constraint for a specific model or class of models, such as $SO(10)$-inspired models, and shows that some models cannot realise strong thermal leptogenesis for any value of $m_1$. A scatter plot analysis fully supports the analytical results. We also briefly discuss the interplay with absolute neutrino mass scale experiments concluding that they will be able in the coming years to either corner strong thermal leptogenesis or find positive signals pointing to a non-vanishing $m_1$. Since the constraint is much stronger for NO than for IO, it is very important that new data from planned neutrino oscillation experiments will be able to solve the ambiguity.

Pasquale Di Bari; Sophie E. King; Michele Re Fiorentin

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sixty Percent Conceptual Design Report: Enterprise Accountability System for Classified Removable Electronic Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Classified removable electronic media (CREM) are tracked in several different ways at the Laboratory. To ensure greater security for CREM, we are creating a single, Laboratory-wide system to track CREM. We are researching technology that can be used to electronically tag and detect CREM, designing a database to track the movement of CREM, and planning to test the system at several locations around the Laboratory. We focus on affixing ''smart tags'' to items we want to track and installing gates at pedestrian portals to detect the entry or exit of tagged items. By means of an enterprise database, the system will track the entry and exit of tagged items into and from CREM storage vaults, vault-type rooms, access corridors, or boundaries of secure areas, as well as the identity of the person carrying an item. We are considering several options for tracking items that can give greater security, but at greater expense.

B. Gardiner; L.Graton; J.Longo; T.Marks, Jr.; B.Martinez; R. Strittmatter; C.Woods; J. Joshua

2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder for Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations and Its Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advanced free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulation methods are available to accurately calculate absolute binding free energies of protein–ligand complexes. However, these methods rely on several sophisticated command scripts ...

Sunhwan Jo; Wei Jiang; Hui Sun Lee; Beno??t Roux; Wonpil Im

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute fluorescence yield Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the fluorescence quantum yields, s and r... ) and 3(c) show the absolute TPE spectra for green- and red-fluorescence, respectively. The TPE spectra... Measurement of two-photon...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute gamma ray Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute gamma ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Characterizing the Memory Behavior of CompilerParallelized...

206

Low-threshold absolute parametric decay instabilities in experiments on electron cyclotron resonance heating in tokamaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have analyzed experimental conditions for the excitation of absolute parametric decay instabilities accompanying the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of plasma at the second ... profile of the plasm...

E. Z. Gusakov; A. Yu. Popov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute parallelism 1929-1932 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the tremor amplitude is obtainable by squaring the absolute values of the Fourier transform for every... (0,0) to (1,1) would correspond to a true spectrum of white noise. The...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute solar euv Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute solar euv Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A&A manuscript no. (will be inserted by hand later)...

209

Gravity Measurements in Panama with the IMGC-02 Transportable Absolute Gravimeter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work hereafter described was designed to determine the gravity datum at the Centro Nacional de Metrologìa de Panamà CENAMEP AIP through absolute measurement of the gravity acceleration, and settle a gravity n...

G. D’Agostino; A. Germak; D. Quagliotti; O. Pinzon…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The effect of body temperature on the determination of pitch by an absolute pitch possessor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few people have absolute pitch (AP); that is, they can identify a pitch that they are hearing without any reference...R 2...= 0.7, or higher) with a temperature coefficient of about ?3 Hz/K near 4...

Masaya Iwamoto; Kouki Doi; Tatsuo Togawa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute rovibrational intensities Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Summer Program 2008 Summary: the agreement in terms of the initial rise, absolute intensity level and fall-off rates. This is due to each... of the rovibrational energy...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute fracture risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fracture risk Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute fracture risk Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 J Bone Miner Res . Author...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute johnson noise Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

johnson noise Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute johnson noise Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOHNSON NOISE THERMOMETRY USING A...

214

Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated Reservoir Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 90084 Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated unconsolidated rocks whose micro-tomographic images cannot be obtained. The lattice-Boltzmann method is used

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute penalties family Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: absolute penalties family Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Penalty Functions Alice E. Smith and David W. Coit Summary: Penalty Functions Alice E. Smith and David W. Coit...

216

Absolute pollen influx and paleoenvironmental interpretations from Lake Wabamun, Alberta, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSOLUTE POI. I, EN INFLUX AND PALEOEXVIRONNV-'NTAL XNTERPRETATTONS FROII LAKE WABAPRI:. I, ALBERTA, CANADA A Thesis RICHARD GEORGE HOLLOWAY Submitted to the Graduate Collcpe of Texas A&II University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degr. . ;. . of MASTER OF SCTENCL' August. 1978 I!ajor Suhject: Botany ABSOLUTE POLLFN INFLUX AND PALEOENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATIONS FROM lAKE WABAMUN, ALBERTA, CANADA A Thesis by RICHARD GEORGE HOLLOWAY Appreoved as to style and content by...

Holloway, Richard George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of {approx}50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

Yang, H.-J.; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000+/-400+/-20km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5+/-2hrs, Dec=70+/-10deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26), and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887). The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983), De Witte (1991) and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality.

Reginald T Cahill

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 19, 2013 December 19, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through September 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

220

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 7, 2013 November 7, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through August 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relationship between heat transfer intensity and absolute vorticity flux intensity in flat tube bank fin channels with Vortex Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat transfer enhancement can be achieved through the secondary flow. It is found that absolute vorticity flux along the main flow can describe the secondary flow intensity and correspond to the heat transfer enhancement averaged in span wise direction. Investigations to verify this phenomenon are reported. The results show that there has a similar distribution for absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction compared with that for span averaged Nusselt number. The conformance of Nusselt number and absolute vorticity flux shows that absolute vorticity flux can reflect the intensity of heat transfer produced by the secondary flow.

Ke-Wei Song; Liang-Bi Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT Determining the temperature of an internal surface within cavernous of these internal surfaces. The cavernous target has often been assumed to be a blackbody, but in field experiments

Salvaggio, Carl

223

Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes Kaihui of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-sensitivity absorption spectros- copy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization

Wang, Feng

224

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA 4 Sandia National and the NIF D. T. Casey, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, F. H. Séguin, C. K. Li et al. Citation: Rev. Sci for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF D. T. Casey,1,a) J. A. Frenje,1 M. Gatu

225

Measuring the absolute deuteriumtritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Laser Energetics, UR, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore at OMEGA and the NIF D. T. Casey, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, F. H. Séguin, C. K. Li et al. Citation and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from in- ertial

226

Maize Transformation -The First Papers to Copy and Read *Absolutely Essential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protocol; Essential reading Armstrong, C.L., Green, C.E. and Phillips, R.L. (1991) DevelopmentMaize Transformation - The First Papers to Copy and Read *Absolutely Essential *Armstrong, C. Essential reading; how `HiII' line was derived. Armstrong, C.L. and Green, C.E. (1985) Establishment

Raizada, Manish N.

227

Dynamically balanced absolute sea level of the global ocean derived from near-surface velocity observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamically balanced absolute sea level of the global ocean derived from near-surface velocity distribution of the global ocean is computed for the first time from observations of near-surface velocity distribution. NCEP reanalysis winds are used to compute the force due to Ekman currents. The mean sea level

228

Measurement of the absolute branching fraction for D(0) -> K- pi+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 1.79 fb-1 of data recorded by the CLEO II detector we have measured the absolute branching fraction for D0 --> K-pi+. The angular correlation between the pi+ emitted in the decay D*+ --> D0pi+, and the jet direction in e+e- --> ccBAR events...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Global and absolute instabilities of spatially developing open flows and media with algebraically decaying tails  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ow in the nite domain does not in uence the analysis...right-hand side of (A 24) does so as well. Since the...absolute and convective. In Handbook of plasma physics (ed. M. N. Rosenbluth...traveling waves. In Handbook of dynamical systems...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A dynamical system approach to the absolute instability of spatially developing localized open flows and media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...singularity at 0 in the general case does not seem to be possible. However...stability analysis in the present paper does not depend on the maximum rate...absolute and convective. In Handbook of plasma physics (ed. M. N. Rosenbluth & R...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Context Effects in Musicians with Absolute Pitch Kathleen R. Agres & Dr. Lori L. Holt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context Effects in Musicians with Absolute Pitch Kathleen R. Agres & Dr. Lori L. Holt Psychology tones and one of pure tones. Every perfect Western pitch was presented 5 times. Listeners identified created. Stimuli: Results & Conclusion Conclusions Pitch context test Pitch context test This research

Holt, Lori L.

232

Absolute continuity and convergence of densities for random vectors on Wiener chaos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this paper is to establish some new results on the absolute continuity and the convergence in total variation for a sequence of d-dimensional vectors whose components belong to a finite sum of Wiener chaoses. First we show...

Nourdin, Ivan; Nualart, David; Poly, Guillaume

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

The third law of thermodynamics, the unattainability of absolute zero, and quantum mechanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The third law of thermodynamics, the unattainability of absolute zero, and quantum mechanics ... Usual statements of the third law may cause many students to draw the erroneous conclusion that the third law is a very weak statement of general applicability or a strong positive statement that applies in only a vanishingly small number of cases. ... Thermodynamics ...

Ernest M. Loebl

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cerebral perfusion and oxygenation are impaired by folate deficiency in rat: absolute measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cerebral perfusion and oxygenation are impaired by folate deficiency in rat: absolute measurements University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; 3 Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel

Fantini, Sergio

235

Absolute viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. (1) Tangential force on unit area of either of two parallel planes at unit distance apart, when the space between the planes in filled with fluid (in question) and one of the planes moves with uni...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

Duffy, Thomas S.

237

Absolute measurement of small-amplitude vibrations by time-averaged heterodyne holography with a dual local oscillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute measurement of small-amplitude vibrations by time-averaged heterodyne holography. This technique enables absolute measurements of sub-nanometric out-of-plane vibration amplitudes. Laser Doppler interferometric methods are commonly used for non-contact measurements of mechanical vibrations. These methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

Absolute atomic oxygen density profiles in the discharge core of a microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet is an rf driven (13.56 MHz ? 20 ? W ) capacitively coupled discharge producing a homogeneous plasma at ambient pressure when fed with a gas flow of helium (1.4 slm) containing small admixtures of oxygen ( ? 0.5 % ) . The design provides excellent optical access to the plasma core. Ground state atomic oxygen densities up to 3 × 10 16 ? cm ? 3 are measured spatially resolved in the discharge core by absolutely calibrated two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The atomic oxygen density builds up over the first 8 mm of the discharge channel before saturating at a maximum level. The absolute value increases linearly with applied power.

Nikolas Knake; Kari Niemi; Stephan Reuter; Volker Schulz-von der Gathen; Jörg Winter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Calibration of a Solar Absolute Cavity Radiometer with Traceability to the World Radiometric Reference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the present method of establishing traceability of absolute cavity radiometers to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) through the process employed in the International Pyrheliometer Comparisons (IPC). This method derives the WRR reduction factor for each of the participating cavity radiometers. An alternative method is proposed, described, and evaluated as a way to reduce the uncertainty in the comparison process. The two methods are compared using a sample of data from the recent IPC-VIII conducted from September 25th to October 13th, 1995 at the World Radiation Center in Davos, Switzerland. A description of absolute cavity radiometers is also included, using a PMO-6 as an example of active cavity radiometers, and a HF as an example of passive cavity radiometers.

Reda, I.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Embolization of Hepatic Arteriovenous Shunt with Absolute Ethanol in a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a 76-year-old man who had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with arteriovenous shunting (AVS). Transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) was selected as treatment because of poor pulmonary function. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the flow of embolic materials through the AVS, we performed embolization of the AVS with absolute ethanol under flow control by balloon catheters. Subsequently, we could perform TACE for HCC safely.

Senokuchi, Terutoshi, E-mail: t-seno@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Baba, Yasutaka, E-mail: yasutaka@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Hayashi, Sadao, E-mail: hayashi@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Nakajo, Masayuki, E-mail: nakajo@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comment on "Measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation of free-fall absolute gravimeters"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper (Rothleitner et al. 2014 Metrologia 51, L9) reports on the measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation in absolute gravimeters. The conclusion that the perturbation reaches only 2/3 of the commonly accepted value violates the fundamental limitation on the maximum speed of information transfer. The conclusion was deluded by unaccounted parasitic perturbations, some of which are obvious from the report.

Nagornyi, V D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE, the University's total expense for scholarships and fellowships was $110,067,000. Fraud cost includes reported

Sanders, Seth

243

www.global.unam.mx www.unam.mx UNAM is home to more than 45 research institutes, centers and university programs; 50 percent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and university programs; 50 percent of the research carried out in Mexico is generated by our institution. Our researchers cover the spectrum of disciplines, including energy, engineering, environmental sciences, genomic sciences, medicine, nanotechnologies, sustainable development, and water. Nationwide, one out of every 3

Petriu, Emil M.

244

Isotope pattern deconvolution for peptide mass spectrometry by non-negative least squares/least absolute deviation template matching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identification of overlapping isotope patterns in mass spectrometric data is achieved using non-negative least squares/non-negative least absolute deviation regression, and is able to disentangle complicated overlaps of patterns.

Martin Slawski; Rene Hussong; Andreas Tholey; Thomas Jakoby; Barbara Gregorius; Andreas Hildebrandt; Matthias Hein

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

New Method of Assessing Absolute Permeability of Natural Methane Hydrate Sediments by Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of natural-gas hydrate sediments was studied using a microfocus X-ray computed-tomography (CT) system. The free-gas spaces, sand particles, and hydrates or ices were identified from the obtained three-dimensional (3-D) images. We used CT data to analyze a continuous pore, which allows gas and water flow. The absolute permeability of sediment samples correlated well with horizontal-channel density in terms of direction. The grain-size distribution in sediment samples depended on the spread of flow channels. The average area and length of a channel evidently have little effect on absolute permeability. We determined that absolute permeability increased with the ratio of horizontal- to vertical-channel numbers. It was clear that the number ratio of the horizontal to vertical channels is a predominant factor that determines absolute permeability in similar porosity ranges. These results indicate that the pore network in sediments can be useful for assessing permeability.

Yusuke Jin; Junko Hayashi; Jiro Nagao; Kiyofumi Suzuki; Hideki Minagawa; Takao Ebinuma; Hideo Narita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

19/11/08 9:42 AMGrove Dictionary: Absolute Pitch Page 1 of 5http://ego.psych.mcgill.ca/levitin.html/pubspages/grove.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19/11/08 9:42 AMGrove Dictionary: Absolute Pitch Page 1 of 5http permission and/or a fee. Absolute Pitch R. Parncutt and D. J. Levitin Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability either to identify the chroma (pitch class) of any isolated tone, using labels such as C, 261 Hz, or Do

Levitin, Daniel

247

The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The measurement of absolute thermal neutron flux using liquid scintillation counting techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was computed as the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual errors . The flux at the same location in the core and at the same reactor power level was measured by the conventional technique of gold foil 34 activation. This measurement... back to 1932 when the neutron was discovered by Chadwick. With the advent of the nuclear reactor in 1942 the problem of absolute neutron flux determination became increasingly important. Since the operating power of a thermal reactor is directly...

Walker, Jack Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0$\\pm$0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared to EPIC-MOS1, MOS2 and ACIS-S detectors. We also address the calibration uncertainty in the RXTE/PCA int...

Guver, Tolga; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Light Curves of Dwarf Plutonian Planets and other Large Kuiper Belt Objects: Their Rotations, Phase Functions and Absolute Magnitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) I report new light curves and determine the rotations and phase functions of several large Kuiper Belt objects, including the dwarf planet Eris (2003 UB313). (120348) 2004 TY364 shows a light curve which if double-peaked has a period of 11.70+-0.01 hours and peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.22+-0.02 magnitudes. (84922) 2003 VS2 has a well defined double-peaked light curve of 7.41+-0.02 hours with a 0.21+-0.02 magnitude range. (126154) 2001 YH140 shows variability of 0.21+-0.04 magnitudes with a possible 13.25+-0.2 hour single-peaked period. The seven new KBOs in the sample which show no discernible variations within the uncertainties on short rotational time scales are 2001 UQ18, (55565) 2002 AW197, (119979) 2002 WC19, (120132) 2003 FY128, (136108) Eris 2003 UB313, (90482) Orcus 2004 DW, and (90568) 2004 GV9. The three medium to large sized Kuiper Belt objects 2004 TY364, Orcus and 2004 GV9 show fairly steep linear phase curves (~0.18 to 0.26 mags per degree) between phase angles of 0.1 and 1.5 degrees. The extremely large dwarf planet Eris (2003 UB313) shows a shallower phase curve (0.09+-0.03 mags per degree) which is more similar to the other known dwarf planet Pluto. It appears the surface properties of the largest dwarf planets in the Kuiper Belt maybe different than the smaller Kuiper Belt objects. This may have to do with the larger objects ability to hold more volatile ices as well as sustain atmospheres. The absolute magnitudes obtained using the measured phase slopes are a few tenths of magnitudes different from those given by the MPC.

Scott S. Sheppard

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Evaluation of White Light Sources For an Absolute Fiber Optic Sensor Readout System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work done in pursuit of an absolute readout system for Fabry-Perot optics sensors such as those built both by FISO and LLNL. The use of white light results in a short coherence length reducing the ambiguity of the Fabry-Perot gap measurement which is required to readout the sensor. The light source coherence length is the critical parameter in determining the ability to build a relative or an absolute system. Optical sources such as lasers and LEDs are rather narrow in optical spectral bandwidth and have long coherence length. Thus, when used in interferometric sensor measurements, one fringe looks much like another and it is difficult to make an absolute measurement. In contrast, white light sources are much broader in spectral bandwidth and have very short coherence lengths making interferometry possible only over the coherence length, which can be 1 or 2 microns. The small number of fringes in the interferogram make it easier to calculate the centroid and to unambiguously determine the sensor gap. However, unlike LEDs and Lasers, white light sources have very low optical power when coupled into optical fibers. Although, the overall light output of a white light source can be hundreds of milliwatts to watts, it is difficult to couple more than microwatts into a 50-micron core optical fiber. In addition, white light sources have a large amount of optical power in spectrum that is not necessarily useful in terms of sensor measurements. The reflectivity of a quarter wave of Titanium Oxide is depicted in Figure 2. This coating of Titanium Oxide is used in the fabrication of the sensor. This figure shows that any light emitted at wavelengths shorter than 600 nm is not too useful for the readout system. A white light LED spectrum is depicted in Figure 3 and shows much of the spectrum below 600 nm. In addition Silicon photodiodes are usually used in the readout system limiting the longest wavelength to about 1100 nm. Tungsten filament sources may have much of their optical power at wavelengths longer than 1100 nm, which is outside the wavelength range of interest. An incandescent spectrum from a tungsten filament is depicted in Figure 4. None of this is to say that other types of readout systems couldn't be built with IR detectors and broadband coatings for the sensors. However, without reengineering the sensors, the wavelength restrictions must be tolerated.

McConaghy, C F

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Techniques and Review of Absolute Flux Calibration from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of precise absolute fluxes for stellar sources has been pursued with increased vigor since the discovery of the dark energy and the realization that its detailed understanding requires accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of redshifted Ia supernovae in the rest frame. The flux distributions of spectrophotometric standard stars were initially derived from the comparison of stars to laboratory sources of known flux but are now mostly based on calculated model atmospheres. For example, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) models provide the basis for the HST CALSPEC archive of flux standards. The basic equations for quantitative spectrophotometry and photometry are explained in detail. Several historical lab based flux calibrations are reviewed; and the SEDs of stars in the major on-line astronomical databases are compared to the CALSPEC reference standard spectrophotometry. There is good evidence that relative fluxes from the visible to the near-IR wavelength of ~2.5 micron are currently accu...

Bohlin, Ralph C; Tremblay, P -E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95125 Catania (Italy)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Relative Probabilities and Absolute Cross Sections of the D — D Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements with a gas target have been made of the relative probabilities and absolute cross sections of the two possible D — D reactions, by simultaneously counting the helium and hydrogen nuclei produced by the reactions. The counters were separated from the target by a thin silica window. The ratio of the cross section of the neutron-producing reaction to that of the proton-producing reaction was found to increase from 0.95 at 120 kev to 1.06 at 250 kev. The "neutron" cross section was 0.019 barn at 120 kev and 0.038 barn at 250 kev while the "proton" cross section increased from 0.020 barn at 120 kev to 0.049 barn at 300 kev. The results can be fitted to an expression of the form ?E=?alPl and the values of the coefficients al are given.

K. G. McNeill and G. M. Keyser

1951-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

C. Bouchiat

2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Absolute cross section for positron-impact ionization of hydrogen near threshold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate positron-impact ionization of hydrogen near threshold using the hyperspherical hidden crossing method (HHCM). Previously, Ihra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 4027 (1997) used the HHCM to obtain the extended Wannier threshold law for zero angular momentum. We extend their analysis to higher angular momentum L and show that the extended Wannier threshold law is L independent. We also calculate the absolute partial-wave ionization cross sections for L=0, 1, 2, and 3 and compare our results with other calculations and with experimental measurements. The HHCM calculation provides an explanation for the very small S-wave and large D-wave contributions to the ionization cross section in terms of destructive and constructive interference, respectively.

Jansen, Krista [University of North Texas; Ward, S.J. [University of North Texas; Macek, Joseph H [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A method to measure the absolute branching fractions of $?_c$ decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proposed to exploit the decay of the meson ${B}^+ \\rightarrow p \\pi^+ \\pi^+ \\bar{\\Sigma}_c^{--}$ and of its charge conjugate $B^-$ copiously produced at LHC to obtain a sample of $\\Lambda_c$ baryons through the strong decay $\\Sigma_c \\rightarrow \\Lambda_c \\pi$. The sample thus obtained is not affected by biases typically introduced by selections that depend on specific decay modes. Therefore it allows a measurement of the absolute branching fraction for the decay of the $\\Lambda_c$ baryon into $ p K \\pi$ or into other observable final states to be performed in a model independent manner. The accuracy that can be achieved with this method is discussed and it is shown that it would be either competitive with or an improvement over current measurements.

Andrea Contu; Dorothea Fonnesu; Rudolf Gerhard Christiaan Oldeman; Biagio Saitta; Claudia Vacca

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Measurement of absolute rates for multiphoton ionization of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present measurements of absolute rates for multiphoton ionization of the ground state of atomic hydrogen by a linearly polarized, subpicosecond KrF laser at a wavelength of 248 nm. The irradiance was varied from 3×1012 to 2×1014 W/cm2, and three above-threshold-ionization peaks were observed. The measured rate for total electron production was less than that predicted by Floquet theory [S.-I. Chu and J. Cooper, Phys. Rev. A 32, 2769 (1985)] and perturbation calculations [S. V. Khristenko and S. I. Vetchinkin, Opt. Specktrosk. 40, 417 (1976)], but significantly higher than calculated by the Reiss [Phys. Rev. A 22, 1786 (1980)] and Keldysh [Sov. Phys.—JETP 20, 1307 (1965)] methods using Volkov final states.

George A. Kyrala and T. David Nichols

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled devicecamera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

Alfio Pappalardo; Luigi Cosentino; Paolo Finocchiaro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

CIPANP00 / 5/00 / Quebec, CA \\Lambda c : Not your average Bearyon 1 's: Absolute production and decay rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIPANP00 / 5/00 / Quebec, CA \\Lambda c : Not your average Bearyon 1 \\Lambda c 's: Absolute / 5/00 / Quebec, CA \\Lambda c : Not your average Bearyon 2 \\Lambda c ! \\LambdaX 1. If \\Lambda c decays, this talk) #12; CIPANP00 / 5/00 / Quebec, CA \\Lambda c : Not your average Bearyon 3 Technique: Charm

264

Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

265

A model-based technique for real-time estimation of absolute fluorine concentration in a CF4/Ar plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model-based technique for real-time estimation of absolute fluorine concentration in a CF4/Ar for quantitative interpretation of actinometric data to deduce bulk plasma fluorine concentration in a CF4/Ar, for application of real-time feedback control to plasma etching. Based upon a model of CF4 chemistry reaction

Terry, Fred L.

266

Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail Mihailescu and Hagai Meirovitch*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail dissociation measurements suggest that the free-energy (F) penalty for the loop displacement is F ) Ffree contribution of water to the total free energy. Namely, for water densities close to the experimental value

Meirovitch, Hagai

267

Precision absolute frequency laser spectroscopy of argon II in parallel and antiparallel geometry using a frequency comb for calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A collinear fast ion beam laser apparatus was constructed and tested. It will be used on-line to the SLOW RI radioactive beam facility in RIKEN (Japan) and as in the present experiment for precision absolute frequency measurements of astrophysically...

Lioubimov, Vladimir

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements and thermoelectric modules to heat or cool in the 40 to 40 °C range. A schematic of our controllerA versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute December 2009 We describe a general-purpose thermoelectric temperature controller with 1 mK stability, 10 m

Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

269

Generation of a Chiral Mesophase by Achiral Molecules: Absolute Chiral Induction in the Smectic C Phase of 4-Octyloxyphenyl 4-Octyloxybenzoate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of a Chiral Mesophase by Achiral Molecules: Absolute Chiral Induction in the Smectic C; E-mail: kishikawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp Is absolute chiral induction in mesophase generated only by banana-shaped molecules? After the discovery of the chiral mesophase generated by achiral banana

Walba, David

270

Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb{sup 3+} concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb{sup 3+} (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb{sup 3+} ions.

Duan, Qianqian [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qin, Feng; Zhang, Zhiguo, E-mail: zhangzhiguo@hit.edu.cn [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhao, Hua, E-mail: zhaoh@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Laboratory of Sono- and Photo-theranostic Technologies, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute controlled crystal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Cell Biology, New York University Collection: Biology and Medicine 6 D-D Nuclear Fusion Using Different Size Pyroelectric Crystals Summary: D-D Nuclear Fusion Using...

275

Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Absolute Nörlund Summability of Fourier Series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......established. Thus it has not become possible to obtain Theorem C from Theorem 10(b). To circumvent this difficulty, we pro- ceed, in what follows, in a different way. Since Theorem 11 gives sufficiency of condition (4.8) in reasonable cases, in this......

G. Das; P. C. Mohapatra

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Absolute Temperature Scale between 4.2° and 5.2°K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vapor pressure of helium has been determined between 4.25° and 5.1°K, using a constant volume gas thermometer. An equation is proposed which fits the experimental data closely, and gives temperatures which differ by a maximum of 0.02° from the currently accepted values. The reliability of the value of the boiling point of helium and the thermodynamic consistency of the properties of liquid helium near the boiling point are discussed.

R. Berman and C. A. Swenson

1954-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has inventoried over 30000 major hazardous waste sites in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each of these  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each new and innovative strategies are developed. Much of the problem and initial cost of subsurface remediation concerns site characterization. A three-dimensional picture of the heterogeneous subsurface

Rubin, Yoram

278

k?p results for the absolute absorption coefficients of GaAs and biaxially strained ZnTe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our calculations of the absolute absorption coefficients of GaAs and biaxially strained ZnTe single crystal layers is based on a 14×14 k?p model description of the band structure close to the Brillouin-zone center of the direct-gap zinc-blende semiconductors. The parameters of this model (momentum matrix elements, band separations at the ? point, effective masses) are known from fitting to independent experiments. The interband absorption continuum near the fundamental gap is calculated by multiplying the single-particle absorption coefficients from heavy- and light-hole valence bands with separate Sommerfeld corrections in order to account for the electron-hole interaction. Our theoretical results, which are obtained without any fitting parameters, are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data.

H. Mayer; U. Rössler; M. Ruff

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Measurement of absolute differential excitation cross sections of molecular oxygen by electron impact: Decomposition of the Herzberg pseudocontinuum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a crossed-beam method, we have measured electron energy-loss spectra for excitation of the Herzberg pseudocontinuum of molecular oxygen. The scattering angle and electron-impact energy ranges covered were from 12° to 156° and from 10 to 30 eV, respectively. We decomposed the spectra into contributions from three superposed Gaussian line shapes by means of computerized least-squares analysis. The three line shapes were identified as representing excitation of the A 3?u+, A? 3?u, and c 1?u- states. Absolute differential and integrated cross sections for all three states’ excitations were obtained, along with linear electronic potential-energy curves for the Franck-Condon region.

Tong W. Shyn and Christopher J. Sweeney

2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

System parameters and measurement instrument parameters are not separately observable: Relational mass is observable while absolute mass is not  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief summary of the objections to the relational nature of inertial mass, gravitational mass and electric charge is presented. The objections are refuted by showing that the measurement process of comparing an instrument reference clock and a reference rod both obeying the laws of physics to a system obeying the same laws of physics results in relational quantities: inertial mass, gravitational mass and electric charge appear only as ratios. This means that scaling of the absolute inertial mass of every object in the universe by the same factor is unobservable (likewise for gravitational mass and electric charge). It is shown that the measurement process does not separate the instrument parameters from the system parameters. Instead a measurement produces functions of fundamental, dimensionless parameters such as the fine structure constant, electron-proton mass ratio and the proton gyro-magnetic factor. It is shown that the measurement of Planck's constant also results in such a function of these dimensio...

Holt, Craig R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vibration intensity difference thresholds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The intensity difference threshold is defined as ‘the difference in the intensity of two stimuli which is just sufficient for their difference to be detected’.… (more)

Forta, Nazim Gizem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Measurement of absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen to its n=3 and 4 levels by electron impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a modulated crossed-beam method, we have measured absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen to its n=3 (3 2S+3 2P+3 2D) and 4(4 2S+4 2P+4 2D+4 2F) levels by electron impact. A wide range of scattering angles was covered, while the impact energies employed were 20 and 30 eV. Absolute integrated excitation cross sections were calculated from the differential ones. Our results are compared with those of others.

Christopher J. Sweeney; Alan Grafe; Tong W. Shyn

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral. It has been selected by the National Institute of Standards and Technology to replace the 1000 watt, DXW-pin 1000 watt lamp that is adapted by Gamma Scientific into a bi-post configuration. It is used

284

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 48, NUMBER 13 1 OCTOBER 1993-1 Determination of the absolute sign of nuclear quadrupole interactions by laser radio-frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 48, NUMBER 13 1 OCTOBER 1993-1 Determination of the absolute sign of nuclear quadrupole interactions by laser radio-frequency double-resonance experiments Tilo Blasberg the quadrupole moment of nuclear spins I > + with the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor leads to a splitting

Suter, Dieter

285

The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

Black, Charles Beyer

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Absolute spectral characterization of silicon barrier diode: Application to soft X-ray fusion diagnostics at Tore Supra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental protocol for absolute calibration of photo-detectors. Spectral characterization is achieved by a methodology that unlike the usual line emissions-based method, hinges on the Bremsstrahlung radiation of a Soft X-Ray (SXR) tube only. Although the proposed methodology can be applied virtually to any detector, the application presented in this paper is based on Tore Supra's SXR diagnostics, which uses Silicon Surface Barrier Diodes. The spectral response of these n-p junctions had previously been estimated on a purely empirical basis. This time, a series of second-order effects, like the spatial distribution of the source radiated power or multi-channel analyser non linearity, are taken into account to achieve accurate measurements. Consequently, a parameterised physical model is fitted to experimental results and the existence of an unexpected dead layer (at least 5 {mu}m thick) is evidenced. This contribution also echoes a more general on-going effort in favour of long-term quality of passive radiation measurements on Tokamaks.

Vezinet, D.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN(111) island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ high-temperature (1165–1248 K) scanning-tunneling microscopy was used to measure temporal fluctuations about the anisotropic equilibrium shape of two-dimensional TiN(111) adatom and vacancy islands on atomically smooth TiN(111) terraces. The equilibrium island shape was found to be a truncated hexagon bounded by alternating ?110? steps, which form [100] and [110] nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energies ? as a function of step orientation ? were obtained from the inverse Legendre transformation of the equilibrium island shape to within an orientation-independent scale factor ?, the equilibrium chemical potential of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 ?110? steps, the ratio ?1/?2=0.72±0.02. The parameter ? and, hence, absolute orientation-dependent values of ?(?) and step stiffnesses ??(?) were extracted from quantitative shape fluctuation data using an exact theoretical approach valid for anisotropic islands. For the two ?110? steps, we obtain ?1=0.23±0.05 and ??1=1.9±1.1 eV/Å with ?2=0.33±0.07 and ??2=0.08±0.02 eV/Å over the observed temperature range. Due to the correspondingly high kink energies, TiN(111) step energies exhibit only a very weak temperature dependence between 0 K and the maximum measurement temperature 1248 K.

S. Kodambaka; S. V. Khare; V. Petrova; D. D. Johnson; I. Petrov; J. E. Greene

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of ?1.7% and ?0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

Hornbeck, Amaury, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan, E-mail: amauryhornbeck@gmail.com, E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine [Radiotherapy Department, Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris (France)] [Radiotherapy Department, Medical Physics Unit, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris (France)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Charge transfer of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5-keV protons with atomic oxygen: Absolute differential and integral cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report measurements of the absolute differential cross sections for charge-transfer scattering of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5-keV protons by atomic oxygen at scattering angles between 0.01° and 2.6° in the laboratory frame. Absolute integral cross sections are also reported and compared with previously published total cross sections. The measurements were made using a flowing gas target, which consisted of a mixture of atomic and molecular oxygen produced by passage of O2 through a microwave discharge. The cross sections for atomic oxygen were obtained by appropriate subtraction of the signal due to molecular oxygen from that due to the mixture of O and O2. © 1996 The American Physical Society.

B. G. Lindsay; D. R. Sieglaff; D. A. Schafer; C. L. Hakes; K. A. Smith; R. F. Stebbings

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Different approximations of shallow fluid flow over an obstacle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different sets of shallow water equations, representing different levels of approximation are considered. The numerical solutions of these different equations for flow past bottom topography in several different flow regimes are compared. For several cases the full Euler solutions are computed as a reference, allowing the assessment of the relative accuracies of the different approximations. Further, the differences between the dispersive shallow water (DSW) solutions and those of the highly simplified, hyperbolic shallow water (SW) equations is studied as a guide to determining what level of approximation is required for a particular flow. First, the Green-Naghdi (GN) equations are derived as a vertically-integrated rational approximation of the Euler equations, and then the generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations are obtained under the further assumption of weak nonlinearity. A series of calculations, each assuming different values of a set of parameters{emdash}undisturbed upstream Froude number, and the height and width of the obstacle, are then presented and discussed. In almost all regions of the parameter space, the SW and DSW theories yield different results; it is only when the flows are entirely subcritical or entirely supercritical and when the obstacles are very wide compared to the depth of the fluid that the SW and DSW theories are in qualitative and quantitative agreement. It is also found that while the gB solutions are accurate only for small bottom topographies (less than 20{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth), the GN solutions are accurate for much larger topographies (up to 65{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth). The limitation of the gB approximation to small topographies is primarily due to the generation of large amplitude upstream propagating solitary waves at transcritical Froude numbers, and is consistent with previous analysis. (Abstract Truncated)

Nadiga, B.T.; Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Characterization of Volatile Compounds of Indian Cress Absolute by GC-Olfactometry/VIDEO-Sniff and Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Volatile Compounds of Indian Cress Absolute by GC-Olfactometry/VIDEO-Sniff and Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography ... During the sniffing sessions, the sniffers were instructed (a) to signal each odor perceived by pressing a push button for as long as the odor lasted, (b) to describe the odors orally, and (c) to quantify their intensity on a five-point scale (2). ...

Katharina Breme; Pascal Tournayre; Xavier Fernandez; Uwe J. Meierhenrich; Hugues Brevard; Daniel Joulain; Jean Louis Berdague?

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron Scattering Methodology for Absolute Measurement of Room-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Capacity and Evidence for Spillover Effect in a Pt-Doped Activated Carbon ... A neutron scattering methodology is proposed to simultaneously determine the total hydrogen adsorption, the excess hydrogen adsorption, and hydrogen gas confined in the porous sample. ... It can be combined with an in situ small-angle neutron scattering to study the hydrogen spillover effect in the kinetic adsorption process. ...

Cheng-Si Tsao; Yun Liu; Mingda Li; Yang Zhang; Juscelino B. Leao; Hua-Wen Chang; Ming-Sheng Yu; Sow-Hsin Chen

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Supplementary absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen’s n=3 and 4 levels by electron impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have conducted measurements of absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of hydrogen atoms to their n=3(3S+3P+3D) and 4(4S+4P+4D+4F) levels. A modulated, crossed-beam method was employed, and the impact energies were 40 and 60eV. Comparison of our results with those of others is quite favorable.

Christopher J. Sweeney; Alan Grafe; Tong W. Shyn

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Book Review: Hegel's Absolute: An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit Verene, D.P. State University of New York Press, Albany, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Book Reviews 63 Hegel's Absolute: An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit Verene, D.P. State University of New York Press, Albany, 2007 Review by Fabio Escobar Castelli, Erie Community College Donald Phillip Verene's latest work... on Hegel is a precise and brief contribution to the "Introduction to Hegel" scholarship. As an exercise in brevity, its summation of the Phenomenology is a laud­ able triumph. As a skeletal presentation of the Notion on its road of despair, however...

Castelli, Fabio Escobar

295

ACHIEVING CALIFORNIA'S 33 PERCENT RENEWABLE PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To remedy this limitation, the report presents a new feed-in tariff approach that is modelled on successful as the basis for feed-in tariff rates that do not achieve the renewable goal, or do so at a higher cost than and risks because of their diversification effects. KEYWORDS Feed-in tariffs, portfolio analysis, generation

296

Determination of the absolute K through O conversion coefficients of the 80-keV M4 transition in Irm193  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We produced carrier-free, nearly isotopically pure Irm193 from thermal-neutron irradiation of Os192. From studies of the conversion-electron spectrum, the photon spectrum, and the absolute counting rates, we determined the absolute K, L1, L2, L3, M1, M3, M5, N, and O+P conversion coefficients for the first time. With possibly one exception, these values agree closely with theoretical calculations. The value for the energy of the unconverted gamma ray was found to be 80.22±0.02 keV. The half-life for Irm193 determined by absolute electron counting in a proportional counter of 100% counting efficiency (4??) was found to be 10.53±0.04 d. We have determined the L1 subshell fluorescence yield, ?1, to be 0.120±0.003 for iridium. Based upon our measurements of initial and final L subshell vacancies together with a best-fit literature value for ?2, we have found a plausible value for the Coster-Kronig coefficient f12 to be 0.091±0.011.

M. Lindner; R. Gunnink; R. J. Nagle

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

298

Atomic and Molecular Photoabsorption:? Absolute Total Cross Sections By Joseph Berkowitz (Argonne National Laboratory). Academic Press:? San Diego, London. 2002. viii + 350 pp. $99.95. ISBN 0-12-091841-2.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic and Molecular Photoabsorption:? Absolute Total Cross Sections By Joseph Berkowitz (Argonne National Laboratory). ... Some mention here of coherent and incoherent scattering, electron positron pair-production, and nuclear photo effect might place the absorption process in its broader context. ...

Peter W. Langhoff

2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

299

A review of "“By My Absolute Royal Authority”: Justice and the Castilian Commonwealth at the Beginning of the First Global Age." by J. B. Owens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

family to court, claiming that they had seized the land illegally. The lawsuit thus became a literal test case for what ?absolute royal authority? (a commonly used phrase throughout the period) actually meant. Owens also uses this case to illustrate how... of land was illegal. The Duke?s lawyers tried to obfuscate matters and delay the hearing (for example, by deposing witnesses who happen to be in America at the time), but they could never deny this basic fact. Nonetheless the tribunal did not find...

Levin, Michael J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NREL: News Feature - Small Improvements to Make Big Difference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Improvements to Make Big Difference Small Improvements to Make Big Difference January 26, 2011 Photo rendering of the fully built Research Support Facility. Enlarge image This artist's rendering shows how the Research Support Facility will look once the ARRA funded expansion project is complete at the end of 2011. Courtesy of RNL Old memo from the boss: Your goal for 2010 - build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). New memo from the boss: Your goal for 2011 - repeat 2010 goal and increase energy efficiency by 17 percent. Fortunately for NREL, these goals are being achieved thanks to $39 million in funding for the new RSF wing from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The ARRA funding allowed a planned 138,000 square

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Correlation of recorded injury and illness data with lifestyle/non-occupational risk factors (smoking and exercise) and absolute aerobic capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0. 688 Effective Sample Size 211 Frequency Missing 1 WARNING: 25% of the cells have expected counts lees than 5. Chi-Square may not be a valid test. 50 TABLE OF MEDCASEC BY SMK MEDCASEC FrequencyI Expected Percent Row Pct Col Pct IN IY... hundred and twelve subjects were involved in this study. The average age of the subjects was 21. 5 years with a standard deviation of 2. 86 years. Ex erimental Procedure Prior to the start of each field test, every volunteer was asked to fill out a...

McSweeney, Kevin P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Faust, I. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Feasibility of the correlation curves method in calorimeters of different types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The simulation of the development of cascade processes in calorimeters of different types for the implementation of energy measurement by correlation curves method, is carried out. Heterogeneous calorimeter has a significant transient effects, associated with the difference of the critical energy in the absorber and the detector. The best option is a mixed calorimeter, which has a target block, leading to the rapid development of the cascade, and homogeneous measuring unit. Uncertainties of energy reconstruction by presented mixed calorimeter on the base of the correlation curves methodology, is less than 10 percent.

Grushevskaya, E A; Fedosimova, A I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Designing for Absolute Moisture Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rarely is an industry trade journal published without at least one article included concerning the topic of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) or the related Sick Building Syndrome (SBI). Whether the subject of the article is a school, an office building or a...

Nunnelly, R. M.; Fex, J. P.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 1. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Forecasts 34% 5.5% 18% 4.5% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 68% 52.9% 36% 20.8% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 31% 2.9% 44% 1.8% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 4.9% 53% 5.2% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts 49% 6.4% 51% 3.6% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 61% 63.5% 23% 28.9% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 38% 6.7% 59% 5.6% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 5.5% 70% 5.8%

307

March  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. Table 2. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Projected 41% 1.0% 51% 1.0% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 55% 51.1% 26% 30.6% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 40% 3.3% 56% 3.0% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 58% 5.8% 64% 6.5% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 53% 6.5% 57% 4.7% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 53% 57.6% 18% 32.7% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 47% 7.1% 68% 7.0% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Projected

308

Different bounds on the different Betti numbers of semialgebraic sets #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different bounds on the different Betti numbers of semi­algebraic sets # Saugata Basu School­ plexity (the sum of the Betti numbers) of basic semi­algebraic sets. This bound is tight as one can were known on the individual higher Betti numbers. In this paper we prove separate bounds on the di

Basu, Saugata

309

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

310

Gender Differences in Seeking Help.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gender differences in willingness to seek help were examined in this study. Males often appear to not seek help from others, especially from a professional,… (more)

Jackson, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute) maximum for f on D if for all x 2 D, f ./ f .x/. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute the maximum value. Minimum is defined similarly. Definition 0.2. Let f W D ! R as above. The function f. The function f is said to be bounded if it is bounded both above and below. Now let D be a subset of R (the

Goodman, Fred

312

Differing Professional Opinions (DPO) Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Order establishes the Department of Energy (DOE) Differing Professional Opinion (DPO) process for employees to raise technical concerns related to environment, safety, and health (ES&H) which cannot be resolved using routine processes. DOE O 442.2

313

Individual Differences in Fish Behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

But they do! In ethology individual differences in behaviour have traditionally been ignored, treated as white noise (Ringler 1983) or, as Arak (1984) points out, considered to be maladaptive deviations from o...

Anne E. Magurran

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gamma-ray spectrometric determination of UF/sub 6/ assay with 1 percent precision for international safeguards. Part 1: product and feed in 1S and 2S sample cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method is based on counting the 186-keV gamma rays emitted by /sup 235/U using a Pb-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Measurements of fifty UF/sub 6/ product and feed cylinders reveal the following precisions and counting times: Product - 2S, 0.98% (600 s); Feed - 2S, 0.48% (2500 s); Product - 1S, 0.62% (1000 s); Feed - 1S, 0.73% (3000 s). A 1% precision is desired for variables - attributes verification measurements of /sup 235/U assay in UF/sub 6/ sample cylinders for safeguards inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Statistically, these measurements stand between fine, high-precision (or variables) measurements and gross, low-precision (or attributes) ones. Because of their intermediate precisions, the variables-attributes measurements may not require analysis of all samples, and this could result in significant savings of IAEA inspector time. Although the precision of the above results is satisfactory, the average relative differences between gamma-ray and mass-spectrometric determinations for the last two sets of measurements (1S cylinders) have positive biases.

Ricci, E.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

PERIAMPULLARY CANCERS: Are There Differences?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By definition, periampullary cancers arise within 2 cm of the major papilla in the duodenum. They encompass four different types of cancers: ampullary (ampulla of Vater), biliary (intrapancreatic distal bile duct), pancreatic (head–uncinate process), and duodenal (mainly from the second portion). Although these tumors have different origins, the complex regional anatomy and their proximation within that confined region generally dictate a common operative approach. Radical resections, such as the Whipple procedure 62 or its variant with preservation of the pylorus with or without extended regional lymphadenectomy,58 have been the main treatments for these cancers, especially with the currently low morbidity and mortality rates.67 Although the perioperative outcomes for these different cancers are similar, the long-term survival has traditionally varied. Consequently, because exact tumor origin is often difficult to clinically ascertain, surgeons have favored an aggressive approach toward resection to benefit those patients harboring cancers with a better prognosis. This observation has intrigued physicians managing patients with these cancers. It is unknown why outcome should vary for adenocarcinomas arising from different anatomic sites in such close proximity. Indeed, if survival does vary significantly for these cancers as clinical impression suggests, clearly, factors other than anatomy alone must be involved. This article explores whether there are differences in the clinical behavior of the periampullary cancers and defines which of these factors, if any, affect outcome. Moreover, it is important to determine which factors are valuable clinically so that they can be used to improve overall survival rates.

Juan M. Sarmiento; David M. Nagorney; Michael G. Sarr; Michael B. Farnell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 76.0 76.2 75.3 73.4 81.1 82.2 72.9 80.3 74.6 72.2 72.3 71.0 2003 70.4 71.0 69.3 63.9 64.8 75.9 55.6 69.6 77.6 71.8 73.7 74.8 2004 76.1 74.9 74.1 72.9 71.1 70.5 74.3 74.9 74.5 72.5 77.7 78.4 2005 81.0 79.1 78.9 74.5 76.2 85.2 80.8 74.1 80.3 78.0 81.0 81.0 2006 78.2 77.9 77.1 70.3 69.8 67.8 70.1 76.8 73.8 78.1 78.2 78.7 2007 77.0 80.1 73.9 74.4 62.5 77.4 68.0 77.1 67.8 74.0 75.2 78.5 2008 78.0 78.1 78.2 67.8 69.9 70.3 72.2 71.4 73.2 68.0 79.2 78.9 2009 78.8 78.7 76.5 71.7 70.4 67.9 64.8 77.2 68.5 72.4 72.6 78.2 2010 77.6 78.6 75.3 64.5 61.1 68.0 66.9 66.1 72.7 69.1 77.7 77.3 2011 79.4 75.3 74.8 72.3 54.3 60.9 70.6 78.8 70.9 77.6 78.7 71.5

317

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

318

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 99.3 99.3 99.2 99.3 99.1 99.2 99.0 99.0 86.9 99.5 99.1 99.2 2003 100.0 98.7 98.7 98.4 98.2 98.4 98.2 98.0 97.6 97.9 98.2 98.5 2004 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.5 97.8 98.7 98.0 98.8 98.7 97.8 98.8 98.9 2005 99.0 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.6 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.3 98.3 98.6 2006 98.7 98.6 98.7 98.4 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.5 98.3 97.9 98.2 98.3 2007 98.4 98.6 98.6 98.3 98.3 97.3 98.4 97.6 95.5 97.9 97.5 98.2 2008 98.2 98.0 98.1 97.9 97.3 95.8 97.8 97.4 97.4 96.8 97.2 97.8 2009 97.8 98.0 97.9 97.4 97.3 97.2 97.3 97.4 97.1 96.5 96.9 97.3 2010 97.8 97.7 97.6 97.0 96.9 97.3 97.1 97.1 96.8 95.9 96.7 97.0 2011 97.0 97.4 97.0 96.3 96.6 96.5 96.4 96.6 97.0 95.6 96.3 96.5

319

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Massachusetts Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.7 1991 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.8 99.9 99.9 1992 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.8 1993 98.9 98.7 98.5 97.7 96.5 97.7 96.8 89.2 97.5 96.7 96.9 97.8 1994 75.2 78.4 72.5 69.8 69.8 61.2 67.0 86.0 79.7 90.6 81.2 87.1 1995 87.9 89.4 92.0 88.3 88.0 82.7 74.6 77.3 77.5 81.0 81.6 79.5 1996 84.7 83.5 82.4 80.2 79.2 71.3 68.1 61.3 55.4 69.5 62.5 68.9 1997 68.0 69.0 72.9 74.1 69.9 48.5 46.0 41.3 43.8 48.7 62.9 68.6

320

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2008 89.7 89.7 89.3 86.2 78.4 70.7 68.4 68.3 68.1 77.4 83.6 89.3 2009 90.8 93.1 87.5 86.3 84.5 64.9 72.9 66.1 67.2 78.4 83.0 87.7 2010 91.5 89.7 88.6 82.6 77.8 68.7 65.0 61.5 67.4 75.8 84.1 93.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

322

Mississippi Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

323

Pennsylvania Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

324

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

325

Maryland Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

326

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

327

Louisiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

328

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 94.2 94.5 94.0 92.6 87.7 86.1 84.2 84.2 84.3 91.1 95.0 1990 91.6 91.5 91.9 91.9 90.3 86.5 83.1 82.4 82.6 87.5 90.1 93.3 1991 93.8 92.3 92.9 91.2 88.8 83.8 80.7 84.7 83.6 86.7 91.5 92.1 1992 92.7 92.1 91.6 90.0 85.8 82.3 83.3 84.1 85.2 90.7 93.4 95.1 1993 95.2 96.0 95.3 93.5 92.1 90.8 89.2 88.5 90.0 92.6 95.2 96.0 1994 97.1 97.6 97.4 96.6 91.8 89.9 83.5 87.1 87.8 90.8 94.4 84.4 1995 93.5 94.0 93.2 92.4 90.0 81.8 82.3 84.8 87.3 88.9 93.4 93.6 1996 93.9 94.8 94.0 92.0 89.9 86.1 82.1 83.8 82.4 87.1 90.9 91.8 1997 89.7 88.2 88.5 83.3 77.4 60.6 67.8 55.4 62.9 69.3 85.9 83.2 1998 87.0 81.6 79.8 75.5 55.6 55.5 47.6 48.5 45.5 71.1 74.9 79.2

329

Arkansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

330

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 92.9 92.8 93.1 92.8 91.4 93.2 94.3 94.4 95.3 91.9 93.4 94.2 2003 93.8 94.2 93.1 93.4 96.9 95.2 94.6 94.5 95.7 92.2 93.9 94.0 2004 94.0 93.9 92.9 92.7 96.0 94.9 95.0 95.3 95.6 93.7 93.7 95.1 2005 94.5 94.5 94.6 94.0 95.7 95.3 95.9 95.8 96.1 93.8 95.3 95.7 2006 96.2 95.5 95.8 98.0 95.5 97.7 96.8 97.3 97.2 95.6 96.4 96.2 2007 96.2 95.9 96.2 95.8 96.4 96.6 96.7 96.9 97.0 95.7 95.8 96.3 2008 96.4 95.9 96.1 96.1 96.0 96.8 97.0 96.5 96.4 95.4 95.7 95.8 2009 95.8 95.3 95.2 94.9 95.3 95.6 95.1 95.6 95.5 94.8 94.9 95.6 2010 95.4 95.7 95.9 95.7 96.0 96.7 96.5 96.3 96.1 94.8 95.3 95.8 2011 95.1 95.0 95.2 95.4 94.9 94.5 95.9 96.5 96.1 97.2 96.3 96.1

331

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

332

Indiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.9 98.5 98.7 99.1 92.8 99.4 98.8 98.8 99.1 99.0 98.8 97.8 2003 97.0 97.0 97.0 96.3 96.6 97.7 96.1 100.0 97.2 96.4 97.1 96.9 2004 97.0 96.7 96.7 96.3 97.3 96.3 97.8 96.5 96.0 96.1 96.7 96.7 2005 96.8 96.7 96.2 95.7 96.4 96.0 96.3 96.3 96.2 96.1 96.4 96.5 2006 96.2 96.3 96.2 96.3 95.8 96.4 95.5 96.1 96.5 97.0 96.2 96.3 2007 96.4 97.0 95.9 96.6 96.1 95.2 95.0 95.6 95.0 94.8 95.9 95.9 2008 95.9 95.8 95.8 94.2 94.1 94.1 93.9 93.9 93.4 93.1 94.4 94.3 2009 94.0 94.9 93.2 92.8 91.7 93.2 92.8 92.1 91.7 93.1 93.3 93.7 2010 94.1 94.5 94.2 93.1 94.1 92.8 93.0 92.9 92.6 93.1 94.0 94.8 2011 95.2 94.7 94.6 94.4 94.4 94.5 93.9 94.7 93.8 94.2 94.2 94.6

333

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

334

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

335

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

336

New Hampshire Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

337

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

338

South Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

339

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

340

Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Nebraska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 71.4 90.5 87.4 84.8 95.4 86.8 82.7 90.4 81.3 75.5 79.7 78.6 2003 80.3 93.4 87.6 91.1 95.3 94.9 87.9 80.0 95.4 69.4 78.6 80.7 2004 81.5 91.9 86.8 94.5 88.7 84.8 89.1 89.1 88.2 83.7 83.7 88.7 2005 86.1 87.2 86.3 83.0 84.5 86.5 85.0 84.4 85.5 83.9 84.3 84.1 2006 87.1 85.9 86.7 85.8 85.0 86.2 87.0 86.2 85.9 83.3 84.2 85.1 2007 84.9 87.4 89.4 86.1 87.5 86.9 88.7 85.5 83.3 77.5 76.6 83.9 2008 86.6 89.0 90.3 89.6 90.1 89.0 87.7 87.3 85.6 75.2 77.2 85.0 2009 90.2 89.1 89.1 86.8 85.8 88.1 86.7 88.8 86.4 83.6 84.6 85.4 2010 87.0 88.8 89.5 86.2 82.5 87.3 86.5 87.8 87.6 87.1 84.0 86.8 2011 87.2 88.9 89.2 86.3 86.1 86.1 87.8 89.1 86.7 86.3 83.3 86.1

342

Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 88.0 91.4 90.8 89.2 91.0 91.3 88.4 91.6 88.4 88.0 89.0 89.1 2003 88.6 88.6 87.7 87.7 85.5 91.4 80.6 86.1 83.9 86.4 88.3 89.1 2004 88.5 88.5 88.0 87.2 84.7 86.1 87.7 85.7 87.7 88.3 88.4 89.3 2005 90.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.2 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

343

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

344

Montana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 2008 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2009 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2010 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9

345

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

346

Delaware Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

347

Oklahoma Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.2 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

348

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.8 99.8

349

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.0 97.8 97.7 97.9 92.7 97.0 98.1 97.2 97.2 95.4 96.1 95.6 2003 94.9 95.0 95.5 95.0 95.1 95.2 95.3 95.1 96.7 94.4 94.9 94.7 2004 94.5 95.4 95.0 95.4 95.8 95.2 95.2 94.4 95.0 94.2 94.4 94.7 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

350

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

351

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

352

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

353

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 2005 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.2 99.5 99.5 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.7 99.9 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

354

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.5 98.5 98.6 98.3 98.1 98.2 98.1 97.7 97.7 97.8 98.0 97.3 1990 98.6 98.4 98.3 98.1 92.2 97.6 97.6 97.5 97.9 97.3 98.0 98.6 1991 98.7 98.9 98.7 96.9 97.4 97.5 97.3 97.7 97.7 97.4 98.9 98.9 1992 99.1 99.1 98.9 98.6 98.5 95.8 95.5 95.8 97.0 99.7 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 95.1 94.6 100.0 95.3 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.7 97.8 98.3 97.0 95.7 95.2 95.6 96.2 99.9 1995 97.8 97.5 96.7 95.0 95.6 88.4 95.0 95.1 95.3 95.3 95.9 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.5 96.9 100.0 97.3 97.3 96.4 97.4 100.0 1997 100.0 98.3 97.8 96.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 97.1 98.8 99.9 100.0 98.0

355

New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

356

Washington Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

357

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0

358

Georgia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

359

NNSA hits 21 percent of CFC goal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

represent such diverse fields as medical research, education, environment, recreation and sports, civil rights and science and technology. By working collectively, the...

360

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.8 99.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Number Percent Official Lawrence HC 26,934 100%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lawrence Free State 134 Blue Valley Northwest 117 Blue Valley North 109 Lawrence 94 Saint Thomas Aquinas 90 Olathe East 80 Shawnee Mission Northwest 78 Shawnee Mission South 75 Shawnee Mission West 71 Total 990

362

Sandia National Laboratories: Voltage Increases Up to 25 Percent...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating- Point...

363

Conditions for collection efficiencies greater than one hundred percent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An account is given for the conditions under which the collection efficiency is hydrogenated amorphous silicon pin-diodes increases to values larger than 100%. By specific bias illumination through the p-side bias generated photocarriers are collected under certain probe beam conditions of the collection efficiency measurement, leading to apparent large collection efficiencies. By numerical modeling they investigated the influence of the diode thickness, bias photon flux and probe absorption coefficient as well as applied voltage for possible sensor applications which may utilize this optical amplifying principle. The alternative with bias light through the n-side and probe light through the p-side is also explored. Collection efficiency values determined by the photogating of bias generated holes become only slightly larger than 100% in contrast to the electron case where values in excess of 3,000% are presented.

Brueggemann, R.; Zollondz, J.H.; Main, C.; Gao, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived...

365

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR OIL/GAS FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Federalland as your second layer. Copy the code into a VBA module in ArcMap. Inputs: Data frame in ArcMap named "Task 2" Layer (0) is a reference layer of your choice Layer...

367

RESEARCH ARTICLE Forty percent revenue increase by combining organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uganda. Cabbage was grown on eight replicate farms in close association with a farmer field school-Saharan Africa indicate the need for effective strategies to restore soils, while improving smallholder incomes an eco- nomic perspective and none have explored its potential in intensively managed, market vegetable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 66.4 55.8 55.8 2000's 47.3 54.0 48.9 45.3 44.0 46.4 48.5 50.0 47.3 37.5 2010's 31.1 31.0 32.3...

369

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 96.0 93.0 96.5 98.1 80.9 82.0 87.0 81.9 68.7 62.8 2000's 78.3 77.6 72.4 68.1 69.0 70.3 71.0 71.5...

370

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 98.4 90.0 81.6 76.5 74.5 80.4 74.8 85.5 90.8 99.5 1990 100.0 100.0 98.7 95.9 92.3 89.9 87.5 86.9 87.2 91.3...

371

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 99.0 99.0...

372

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 66.1 48.5 50.9 50.2 58.7 44.3 34.1 58.5 55.7 73.8 58.9 51.8 2002 45.0 47.4 53.0 41.3 52.5 50.1 38.1 49.3 53.9 52.2 49.1...

373

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

374

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important...

375

Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

376

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 97.9 97.7 97.9 97.7 95.5 94.0 95.6 94.1 91.2 91.7 92.6 92.9 2003 93.8 93.4 92.3 96.3 95.8 95.0 95.8 95.5 94.0 93.6 95.9 94.7 2004 95.1 95.6 95.3 95.7 90.9 95.6 95.7 95.6 95.1 95.0 95.3 95.7 2005 95.9 96.1 96.0 95.9 95.9 95.6 95.1 95.1 94.4 93.3 94.2 95.1 2006 94.6 94.4 94.6 95.4 94.6 95.0 94.2 93.8 92.6 92.1 93.4 93.6 2007 94.6 95.1 95.5 95.3 95.5 95.5 94.8 94.5 93.8 92.7 92.1 93.5 2008 93.6 93.5 94.1 95.5 94.2 95.6 95.1 94.3 94.2 91.9 93.1 94.0 2009 93.9 94.6 94.4 94.5 94.3 94.5 93.2 93.8 92.3 91.6 92.7 92.2 2010 93.6 93.5 93.8 80.9 93.6 93.1 93.1 92.7 91.5 90.4 91.6 92.1 2011 92.3 92.7 92.1 93.0 93.1 92.7 91.9 91.5 90.2 89.8 91.0 91.7

377

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

378

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

379

A Night and Day Difference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 11 PNNL-SA-80423 A Night-and-Day Difference "Grand Challenge" demonstrates team-based science approach; provides new systems-level understanding of microbes important for biofuels and carbon sequestration. In late 2004, when Dr. Himadri Pakrasi walked into the crowded EMSL Auditorium, he recognized only one scientist he knew. In the hours that followed, discussions circled around a single challenge: designing a multi- disciplinary, multi-institutional effort to understand the ways unique cyanobacteria harness energy from sunlight by day and generate their own fertilizer at night. The ultimate goal? To make discoveries that support engineering of such microbes for energy and environmental purposes. The day was the original scoping meeting

380

Gasoline Price Differences Caused by:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: While my agency cannot be expert in every local gasoline market in the United States, we are familiar with a number of factors that can account for significant differences in prices between markets: Proximity of supply - distance from the refineries supplying the local market. Additionally, the proximity of those refineries to crude oil supplies can be a factor, as well as shipping logistics, including pipeline or waterborne, from refinery to market. Cost of supply - including crude oil, refinery operating, and transportation costs. Supply/demand balance - some regions are typically in excess or short supply, while others may vary seasonally, or when supply interruptions (such as refinery shutdowns) occur. Competitive environment - including the number of suppliers, and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Relative permeabilities of gas and water for different rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of gas–water two-phase flow through coal seams play crucial roles in water depletion and gas production associated with coalbed methane (CBM) recovery. One of the most important characteristic is the relative permeability of gas and water which is largely dependent on gas/water saturations in coal, varying with coal ranks. For better understanding of the seepage mechanism of the gas–water flow in coal, the relative permeabilities of gas and water in different rank coals selected from south Qinshui Basin have been investigated under various gas/water saturations through water replacement with methane using an unsteady-state method. The results have shown that the ratio of effective methane permeability and absolute permeability is obviously increasing with rank, implying that the gas slippage of high rank coal has more significant effect than the low rank coal. A series of relative permeability curves for selected coals have been obtained. All of these curves show that the selected coals are featured by smaller methane permeabilities and narrow spans of two-phase flow regions and lower relative permeability, and have low methane permeabilities under irreducible water condition as well. The experiments also revealed that the selected coals exhibit high residual water saturation with low relative permeabilities of gas and water. With increasing of the maximal vitrinite reflectance, the irreducible water saturation exhibits a U-shaped tendency whereas the methane permeability under the irreducible water condition generally increases. The irreducible water saturation slightly increases with increasing of vitrinite and weakly decreases as inertinite increases, while the methane permeability under irreducible water condition is negatively related with vitrinite and positively related to inertinite to some extent. The experimental data were further parameterized to correlate the relative permeabilities of methane and water to gas saturation, showing that a correlation of power function can fit the experiments well. As a result, a permeability model incorporated with coal rank and maceral compositions with gas saturation was developed to predict the relative permeabilities of gas (methane) and water in coals.

Jian Shen; Yong Qin; Geoff X. Wang; Xuehai Fu; Chongtao Wei; Bo Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Overview of TEPP presentated by Tom Clawson....

383

Absolute rate constants for the gas-phase reaction is of the NO/sub 3/ radical with CH/sub 3/SCH/sub 3/, NO/sub 2/, CO, and a series of alkanes at 298 +/- 2 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flash photolysis-visible absorption apparatus has been constructed and employed in a study of the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of the NO/sub 3/ radical with CH/sub 3/SCH/sub 3/, NO/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, and n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/. The measured absolute rate constants at 298 +/- 2 K are as follows (in units of 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/): CH/sub 3/SCH/sub 3/, 7.5 +/- 0.5 independent of pressure over the range 50-400 Torr; NO/sub 2/, 5.6 +/- 0.4 and 8.0 +/- 1.1 at 120 and 400 Torr total pressure of helium, respectively; CO, less than or equal to 0.00003; CH/sub 4/, less than or equal to 0.0002; C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, less than or equal to 0.00004; n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/, less than or equal to 0.0002. The error limits represent two standard deviations. (Systematic errors could contribute an additional approx. 10% range.) These results are discussed with respect to the previous literature data and the atmospheric lifetimes of these compounds. The rate constant for the reaction of NO/sub 3/ radicals with CH/sub 3/SCH/sub 3/ measured in the present work is consistent with both another recent absolute determination and previous relative rate measurements, confirming the relative rate technique previously used to determine NO/sub 3/ radical reaction rate constants.

Wallington, T.J.; Atkinson, R.; Winer, A.M.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

1986-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Reciprocal cross differences in Brahman-Hereford F2 cows: reproductive and maternal traits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.09 higher percent calf crop weaned than F2 BH cows (P < 0.01) and a 0.22 �± 0.11 higher percent calf crop weaned than BH x HB cows (P < 0.05). HB x BH cows had a 0.25 �± 0.08 higher percent calf crop weaned than F2 BH (P < 0.01) and a 0.20 �± 0...

Wright, Bradley Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Does the Effect of Pollution on Infant Mortality Differ Between Developing and Developed Countries? Evidence from Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gained access to the birth certificate registry, which0.03 percent of the births certificates have missing month

Arceo, Eva; Hanna, Rema; Oliva, Paulina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2004 2004 * The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has produced annual evaluations of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and replacing the historical year of data with the most recent. The forecast evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute percent errors for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2004. (There is no report titled Annual Energy Outlook 1988 due to a change in the naming convention of the AEOs.) The average absolute percent error is the simple mean of the absolute values of the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and the

387

A Collaborative Study to Evaluate Quantitation Utilizing Different Injection Modes for Capillary GC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in tralab RSD for on-column injection for ppm and percent level components to be less than 3%, and in some cases not to ex ceed 1%. In the present study, the interlab precision for the on-column injector in the percent hydrocarbons analysis was found......

D.H. McMahon

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

When Does a Difference Make a Difference? A Snapshot on Global Icon Comprehensibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global markets require global solutions, especially in user interface design. There are differences between cultures – but do those differences call for different icon designs? This paper provides a snapshot on icon

Sonja Auer; Ester Dick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) The files in this site contain a revised (October 2009) version of the climatological mean values in 4° Latitude X 5° Longitude box areas and the distribution maps. These were originally published in: Takahashi, et al. (2009), DSR II, 56, 554-577. The data file containing annual flux data for each 4° X 5° box is located here. The data file from which this map was created, including all 12 months of data is here. This data file, in ASCII form, also contains the flux data and the intermediate values used to calculate that flux for each month. In December 2010 our colleague, R. Wanninkhof pointed out a problem with the flux data for the month of December. The file of ice coverage for December was corrupted and showed zero ice for the entire month, worldwide. This has been corrected with the estimated percent of ice and the flux recalculated. Version "c" of the data files contain this correction.

390

Mass ejection from neutron star mergers: different components and expected radio signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In addition to producing a strong gravitational signal, a short gamma-ray burst (GRB), and a compact remnant, neutron star mergers eject significant masses at significant kinetic energies. This mass ejection takes place via dynamical mass ejection and a GRB jet but other processes have also been suggested: a shock-breakout material, a cocoon resulting from the interaction of the jet with other ejecta, and viscous and neutrino driven winds from the central remnant or the accretion disk. The different components of the ejected masses include up to a few percent of a solar mass, some of which is ejected at relativistic velocities. The interaction of these ejecta with the surrounding interstellar medium will produce a long lasting radio flare, in a similar way to GRB afterglows or to radio supernovae. The relative strength of the different signals depends strongly on the viewing angle. An observer along the jet axis or close to it will detect a strong signal at a few dozen days from the radio afterglow (or the or...

Hotokezaka, Kenta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Aristotle's Moral Absolutes: A Preliminary Look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's response to this objection. Though I claim Curzer's account fails, I make use of Curzer's work in another context in order to respond to Hursthouse's objection. Ultimately, I will claim that the wrongness of actions like moicheia can be satisfactorily...

Saenz Zavala, Victor

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Absolute Summability Factors for Nörlund Means  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......real or complex and not equal to - 1 , - 2 , . . . . For a ^ -- 1, -- 2,..., we have Aoc Aoc Tf A a--1 A-n-k -n-n-k-l _ KJ n-k Aa Aoc in Aoc ' (1.21) where each side denotes 1 if k = 0, n = 0. Hence Q & = Z%k for 0......

L. S. Bosanquet; G. Das

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of Absolute Hardness: A New Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemistry Department, College of Science, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz, 61357-43169, Iran ... Parr, R. G.; Yang, Y. Density-Functional Theory of Atoms and Molecules; Oxford University Press, New York, 1989. ...

Siamak Noorizadeh; Hadi Parsa

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

ERNSTMORITZARNDTUNIVERSITAT Absolute number density and kinetic analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and C2F4 molecules in pulsed CF4/H2 rf plasmas I n a u g u r a l d i s s e r t a t i o n zur Erlangung and kinetics of the target species in pulsed CF4/H2 rf plasmas 69 5.1 Plasma process parameters selected

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

395

Are There Absolutely Unsolvable Problems? Gödel's Dichotomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......foundations of mathematics and their implications, on the day after Christmas, 1951, at a meeting of the American Mathematical Society...3-22 Feferman, Solomon. 1998In Hajek, P. (Ed.). In the Light of Logic. New York: Oxford University Press Feferman, Solomon......

Solomon Feferman

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Individual Differences in Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While human reliability analysis (HRA) methods include uncertainty in quantification, the nominal model of human error in HRA typically assumes that operator performance does not vary significantly when they are given the same initiating event, indicators, procedures, and training, and that any differences in operator performance are simply aleatory (i.e., random). While this assumption generally holds true when performing routine actions, variability in operator response has been observed in multiple studies, especially in complex situations that go beyond training and procedures. As such, complexity can lead to differences in operator performance (e.g., operator understanding and decision-making). Furthermore, psychological research has shown that there are a number of known antecedents (i.e., attributable causes) that consistently contribute to observable and systematically measurable (i.e., not random) differences in behavior. This paper reviews examples of individual differences taken from operational experience and the psychological literature. The impact of these differences in human behavior and their implications for HRA are then discussed. We propose that individual differences should not be treated as aleatory, but rather as epistemic. Ultimately, by understanding the sources of individual differences, it is possible to remove some epistemic uncertainty from analyses.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Terrorism and Islamism: differences, dynamics and dilemmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper points out the increasing and erroneous conflation of Islamism with terrorism in mass media and policy-oriented conversations. It argues for a nuanced understanding of the differences between the different groups that are broadly categorised as 'Muslim fundamentalists' and suggests instead a finer reading of the context in which the various and vastly different groups operate. Focusing on the Islamists (amongst the various other kinds of Muslim groups) and building upon 13 months of intensive fieldwork in urban Lahore, the paper then attempts to point out the context, potential and limitations of a particular group, the Jama'at-e-Islami Pakistan.

Humeira Iqtidar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

City Hall plazas : they're different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay explores the form, goals, and ideals behind city hall plazas by asking the questions: What is the difference between a city hall plaza and any other urban plaza? What are the uses intended by the city in the ...

Hall, Kristen E. (Kristen Elizabeth)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL Versions and Lattices X. Ding Front End, Nov. 23, 2010 parameters of 11 and 13GeV from interpolation) � Take the muon/pion/kaons at z=0 m from MARS output (Field of Running MARS #12;4 Muon Yield from Different Versions of ICOOL with ST2a-BNL Input Deck #12;5 Muon Yield

McDonald, Kirk

400

Preliminary Differences Between CPOL and CRM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

differences between TWP-ICE data differences between TWP-ICE data from the CPOL radar and the CRM: Should we point fingers at convective intensity, microphysics, or both? Adam Varble 1 , Ed Zipser 1 , and Ann Fridland 2 1 University of Utah 2 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Outline * CRM vs. CPOL - Constant altitude radar reflectivity histograms * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example - Horizontal and vertical radar reflectivity cross sections * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example * Preliminary Conclusions Histograms (Active) Cross-Sections - Active (Baseline) 6 Hours Later... Cross-Sections - Active (Sensitivity) 6 Hours Later... Stratiform Differences Histograms (Suppressed) Cross-Sections - Suppressed Preliminary Conclusions * Active Period - Both CRM runs produce too much convective area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2009) Each year since 1996, EIA's Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the projections included in previous editions of the AEO. Each year, the comparison adds the projections from the most recent AEO and updates the historical data to the most recently available. The comparison summarizes the relationship of the AEO reference case projections since 1982 to realized outcomes by calculating the average absolute percent differences for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2009. Annual Energy Outlook Restrospective Review, 2009 Report pdf images Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Difference between AEO Reference Case Projections

402

Differences in Mexican-American and Anglo-American Women's Response to a Modified Clothing TAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise conclusions in the statistical sense, could be drawn. For the Mexican-American women studied, there was a direct relationship between cloth- ing awareness and social status scores (P. = 75-90 per- ' cent), occupational rating (no statistical....5 percent). Area of ma jnr socialization did not affect Mexican-American ~z-omen'( cognizance of clothing. Anglo-Americans were more likely to have Iliqher clothing awareness scores (P. = 95 percent) than werr the Mexico-born women. Although...

Bathke, Carol Sander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Making a difference... A National Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making a difference... A National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Accredited Trials Unit Contacts Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University of Birmingham Edgbaston. Funding The CRCTU receives core funding from Cancer Research UK and has successfully obtained project

Birmingham, University of

404

Original article Comparative abilities of different herbivorous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as it influences digestive function and ingestive behaviour, is the most im- portant factor influencing animal products, such as meat, milk, cheese or wool, that has determined which spe- cies have grazed in particular resources differing spa- tially in species composition, structure and digestibility. The current state

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 3  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 0.9 40.4 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 33.3 20.5 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 32.8 21.6 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 5.2 63.7 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.2 62.0 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 9.9 63.7

406

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

407

1995 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected 5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently by John Zyren, Charles Dale and Charles Riner Introduction The United States has completed its first summer driving season using reformulated gasoline (RFG). Motorists noticed price increases at the retail level, resulting from the increased cost to produce and deliver the product, as well as from the tight sup- ply/demand balance during the summer. This arti- cle focuses on the costs of producing RFG as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate. RFG Regulatory Requirements The use of RFG is a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The CAAA cover a wide range of programs aimed at improving air qual-

408

Skewness in individual stocks at different investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the (a)symmetry of several individual stock returns at different investment horizons: daily, weekly and monthly. While some asymmetries are observed in daily returns, they disappear almost completely in weekly and monthly returns. The explanation for this fact lies in the convergence to normality that takes place when the investment horizon increases. These features allow one to question several financial models; in particular, they question the preference for positive skewness as a factor for investments in stock markets.

Amado Peiró

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental and morphological differences within Icteridae: Icterus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World bird #0;? 27 species of Icterus #0;? Distribute from N. Alaska to S. Chile GIS Methods 1. Imported breeding areas from NatureServepg 2. Determined Species Richness 3 Imported data from WorldClim Global. from – Climate Data #0;? Temperature #0... Ei tl d Environmen al and morphological differences within IcteridaeIcteridae: : Icterus Jessica L Rodriguez – Haskell Indian Nations University, Haskell Indian BRIDGE Program AdéLi Ni KUiitOithlAndrés Lirara--Noriega – Kansas Un versity rnitho...

Rodriquez, Jessica

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

POSITIVE EVOLUTION FAMILIES SOLVING NONAUTONOMOUS DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Our starting point are systems of nonautonomous difference equations of the form (nDE) (t, ft) = 0 equations of type (nDE) have been developed by various authors, see for example [Coo70], [Hal71], [BW81], [Kat70]) were also applied, e.g., by S. Boulite et al. [BMM06] or N. Lan [Lan99]. In order to solve (nDE

411

Comparison of Different Methods of Harvesting Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 683 OCTOBER, 1946 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF HARVESTING COTTON Division of Agricultural Engineering . and Division of Agronomy... on the rougher methods of harvesting cotton, such as hand-snapping and machine harvesting both with the picker type and the stripper type mechanical harvesters. This n-as largely because the lint from the roughly harvested cottons contained more foreign...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 16-18, 1987 SLIDLIN CH81ICAL CX1'1PANY RARE GAS RECXNERY SYSID1 K.O, ~LM 19) PSIG STEAM F,D, FAN0'1 '" N Z N NAT~L GAS SEAL SEAL FU\\RE OIL PoT STACK TANK FLARE GAS I?T ~y ~LM ~LM ESL...RECOVERING FLARE GAS ENERGY - A DIFFERENT APPROACH \\ WALTER BRENNER Process Engineer SunOlin Chemical Co. Claymont, Delaware AUSTRACT Most petrochemical complexes and oil re fineries have systems to collect and dispose of waste gases...

Brenner, W.

413

Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

Demos, Stavros G

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- - Making A Difference Where we started - and where we are going Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address d f emergency preparedness concerns of shipments to WIPP * EM established in 1989, TEPP became a funded program - Identified need to have a program to focus on p g preparedness for all radiological shipments - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1 Brief TEPP History * Developed MERRTT thru the Training and Medical I T i G Issues Topic Groups - Began using MERRTT in 1998 * MERRTT and WIPP STEP Merged * Stakeholders began asking for a more advanced level of training - In 2005, TEPP looked to the NFPA 472 standard for training competencies - Many of the NFPA competencies were not attainable - TEPP worked with NFPA to re-shape the competencies so

415

Electromagnetic mass difference on the lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate electromagnetic mass difference of mesons using a method proposed by Duncan {\\it et al}. The RG-improved gauge action and the non-compact Abelian gauge action are employed to generate configurations. Quark propagators in the range of $m_{PS}/m_{V}=0.76-0.51$ are obtained with the meanfield-improved clover quark action. Chiral and continuum extrapolations are performed and the results are compared with experiments. Finite size effects are also examined. Quark masses are extracted from the measured spectrum. Our preliminary values for light quark masses are $m_{u}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu =2 {GeV}) = 3.03(19)$ MeV, $m_{d}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 4.44(28)$ MeV, $m_{s}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 99.2(52)$ MeV.

Yusuke Namekawa; Yoshio Kikukawa

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Vector difference calculus for physical lattice models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vector difference calculus is developed for physical models defined on a general triangulating graph G, which may be a regular or an extremely irregular lattice, using discrete field quantities roughly analogous to differential forms. The role of the space ?p of p-forms at a point is taken on by the linear space generated at a graph vertex by the geometrical p-simplices which contain it. The vector operations divergence, gradient, and curl are developed using the boundary ? and coboundary d. Dot, cross, and scalar products are defined in such a way that discrete analogs of the vector integral theorems, including theorems of Gauss-Ostrogradski, Stokes, and Green, as well as most standard vector identities hold exactly, not as approximations to a continuum limit. Physical conservation laws for the models become theorems satisfied by the discrete fields themselves. Three discrete lattice models are constructed as examples, namely a discrete version of the Maxwell equations, the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible flow, and the Navier linearized model for a homogeneous, isotropic elastic medium. Weight factors needed for obtaining quantitative agreement with continuum calculations are derived for the special case of a regular triangular lattice. Green functions are developed using a generalized Helmholtz decomposition of the fields.

W. Schwalm; B. Moritz; M. Giona; M. Schwalm

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Scenario E3 Max Tech Wind Power Nuclear Power NG Fired CCcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GWcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GW

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. Thecommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP from 2006 toEnergy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Project Management - The People Make the Difference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. manages the high level nuclear waste tanks for the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection, at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford tanks contain more than 53 million gallons of waste, 200 million curies (three times that released by Chernobyl), and 67 of the 177 tanks have leaked at some time in the past. The current company has been responsible for the tanks since fall 1996. Previous to 1996, there is a long history of the Hanford tank farms being the bane of DOE Environmental Management. One tank would periodically and spontaneously release large quantities of flammable gas. Another tank, which does not have double containment as now required by law, self-boiled and required the addition of more than 5,000 gallons of water per month to maintain temperatures within the design parameters of the tank. Only a single-wall steel pipe with limited leak detection was available to transfer waste the 7-mile route from the western-most tank farms to a waste evaporator. The regulators, public, and congress had little confidence that DOE or its contractors knew the chemical, physical, or nuclear characteristics of the tanks contents. The nuclear safety controls were so complex and varied for different tanks and different operations, that very few employees understood the hazards and the control requirements. In fact, in 1993, congress found it necessary to pass a law restricting the operations of 54 of the 177 tanks due to safety concerns--these tanks are known as ''watch list'' tanks. This was a bleak picture--DOE's most hazardous nuclear waste storage site--and no one really knew what was in the tanks and control measures were akin to bandaids and bailing wire. This is not the condition today. No tanks spontaneously belch gas above the flammability limit of hydrogen. All tanks have consistent flammable gas controls that are understood by the tank farm workers. A new doubly contained transfer line, with redundant leak detection systems, routinely transports waste across the 7 miles from the west to east tanks. The high-heat tank has been emptied. A new ventilation system services the doubly contained tanks with the highest heat content. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, a presidential appointed group that oversees DOE nuclear safety, has declared that the tank contents are sufficiently characterized. The systems and a plan are in place to remove residual pumpable liquids from the non-compliant single-shell tanks by 2004. More than half of the tanks have been removed from the ''watch list'' and the rest will be removed within the next year. And, a comprehensive plan exists to retrieve the waste, send it to a treatment plant, and close the tank farms.

DELOZIER, M.P.

2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Laterality and age-level differences between young women and elderly women in controlled force exertion (CFE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed to examine laterality and age-level differences in maximal handgrip strength and CFE using women as subjects. The subjects were 50 young women (mean age 20.9 ± 1.9 years) and 50 elderly women (mean age 72.9 ± 6.6 years). The maximal handgrip strength was measured twice with a 1-min interval, and the larger value was used in this study. In the CFE test, the subjects matched their submaximal grip strengths to the demand values changing at a constant frequency (range = 5–25% of the maximal grip strength). The CFE test was performed twice after one practice trial (one trial was 40 s). The sum of the percent of differences between the demand value and the grip exertion value was used as an estimate of CFE. CFE was estimated using a mean from two trials, excluding the first 15 s of each trial. The elderly were significantly inferior in maximal handgrip strength of the dominant and non-dominant hands to young adults (about 70%), and the non-dominant hand was significantly inferior to the dominant hand. The elderly were significantly inferior in CFE of both hands to young adults (about 50%), and the non-dominant hand was significantly inferior. In conclusion, the age-level differences in maximal handgrip strength and CFE are found in the dominant and non-dominant hands, and laterality is also found in both young adults and the elderly. The CFE relating closely to nerve function may have a larger age-level difference than maximal handgrip strength.

Hiroshi Kubota; Shinichi Demura; Haruka Kawabata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it's doing -- that's what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.1 - Richard Feynman HOW LAKEETA CALCULATES THE VELOCITY OF A CAR MOVING something, she reminded me that I was the teacher and that I should be giving her answers, not asking her

Steinberg, Richard N.

424

Determining price differences among different classes of wool from the U.S. and Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. wool industry has long received lower prices for comparable wool types than those of Australia. In order to better understand such price differences, economic evaluations of both the U.S. and Australian wool markets were conducted...

Hager, Shayla Desha

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain, Component Sizes and Control Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain,...

426

Spectral differences in real-space electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real-space grids for electronic structure calculations are efficient because the potential is diagonal while the second derivative in the kinetic energy may be sparsely evaluated with finite differences or finite elements. In applications to vibrational problems in chemical physics a family of methods known as spectral differences has improved finite differences by several orders of magnitude. In this paper the use of spectral differences for electronic structure is studied. Spectral differences are implemented in two electronic structure programs PARSEC and HARES which currently employ finite differences. Applications to silicon clusters and lattices indicate that spectral differences achieve the same accuracy as finite differences with less computational work.

D. K. Jordan; D. A. Mazziotti

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

On the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancelation of error) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems with three different fuel lattices (CANDU, HWR and PWR) were designed with the reference solution provided by the Monte-Carlo code SERPENT in this paper. The analysis of these benchmark problems confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the core-diffusion calculation. When lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core-diffusion calculation, it is appropriate to use the fine-mesh FDM for reactors (such as PWR) with uniformly-distributed fuel pins; however, it is inappropriate to use the fine-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors with the cluster fuel geometry because the lattice-homogenized cross sections assigned to each sub-mesh are not physically meaningful. It is recommended to use the coarse-mesh (2 × 2 meshes per lattice) to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core-diffusion calculation.

W. Shen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The convergence of an explicit finite difference solution for transient heat transfer in solids with radiation at one boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Interior Point 'n ' 17 8 ? 01 Temperature Resp C 2'( C 1, Wi Constant Tempera x = L, and Havin Transfer to a He Degree Absolute Calculated With Modulus as Per S at x/L = 0. 0 onse th a ture g Ra at S Temp a Mr tabi of Hea at dian ink.... The Fourier equation for one? dimensional heat conduction in solids with constant physical properties is BT K 0 T Qe gC Q~x (3 ? 01) The net radiant heat transfer rate between two gray bodies A and B at absolute temperature T and T will be B according...

Patel, Bhagubhai Desaibhai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Face recognition with disparity corrected gabor phase differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the relative relevance of Gabor amplitudes and phases for face recognition. We propose an algorithm to reliably estimate offset point disparities from phase differences and show that disparity-corrected Gabor phase differences are well suited ...

Manuel Günther; Dennis Haufe; Rolf P. Würtz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Differences Between Industries in the Definition of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to identify and assess the differences that exist in the way acceptable risks are defined and proved in different industries. ... main parts: (1) the definition of acceptable risk in the nuclear i...

John C. Chicken; S. A. Harbison

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A difference based approach to the semiparametric partial linear model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A commonly used semiparametric partial linear model is considered. We propose analyzing this model using a difference based approach. The procedure estimates the linear component based on the differences of the observations ...

Wang, Lie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Original article Differences between blood and plasma concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porte / ruminant / sang / plasma 1. INTRODUCTION Many studies in ruminant nutrition focus- ies have already focused on differences between blood and plasma concentrations of various metabolitesOriginal article Differences between blood and plasma concentrations of acetate, &beta

Boyer, Edmond

433

Subcell Structure and Two Different Superstructures of the Rare Earth Metal Silicide Carbides Y  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title compounds crystallize with a very pronounced subcell structure that has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data of all four compounds. Only subcell (and no superstructure) reflections have been observed for Pr{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2}: space group Cmmm, a=396.7(1) pm, b=1645.2(3) pm, c=439.9(1) pm, R=0.019 for 309 structure factors and 20 variable parameters. In this subcell structure there are C{sub 2} pairs with split atomic positions. This structure may be considered the thermodynamically stable forms of these compounds at high temperatures. Two different superstructures with doubled a or c axes, respectively, of the subcell have been observed, where the C{sub 2} pairs have different orientations. In the structure of Tb{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the a axis of the subcell is doubled. The resulting superstructure in the standard setting has the space group Pbcm: a=423.6(1) pm, b=770.7(1) pm, c=1570.2(3) pm, R=0.031 f or 1437 structure factors and 22 variable parameters. Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} has the same superstructure: a=420.3(1) pm, b=767.5(1) pm, c=1561.1(3) pm, R=0.045, 801 F values, 22 variables. In the structure of Y{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the c axis of the subcell is doubled, resulting in a body-centered space group with the standard setting Imma: a=842.6(2) pm, b=1563.4(2) pm, c=384.6(1) pm, R=0.035, 681 F values, 15 variables. In all of these structures the rare earth atoms form two-dimensionally infinite sheets of edge-sharing octahedra that contain the C{sub 2} pairs. In between these sheets there are zig-zag chains of silicon atoms with Si-Si distances varying between 246.2(3) and 253.6(3) pm, somewhat longer than the two-electron bonds of 235 pm in elemental silicon, suggesting a bond order of 0.5 for the Si-Si bonds. The C-C distances in the C{sub 2} pairs vary between 127(1) and 131(1) pm, corresponding to a bond order of approximately 2. 5. Hence, using oxidation numbers, the compounds may to a first approximation be represented by the formula (R{sup +3}){sub 3}(Si{sup {minus}3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}){sup {minus}3}. A more detailed analysis of the interatomic distances showed that the shortest R-R distances are comparable with the R-R distances in the structures of the rare earth elements, thus indicating some R-R bonding. Therefore, the oxidation numbers of the rare earth atoms are slightly lower than +3, in agreement with the metallic conductivity of these compounds. As a consequence, considering the relatively short Si-Si bonds, the absolute value of the oxidation number of the silicon atoms may be lower than 3, resulting in a Si-Si bond order somewhat higher than 0.5.

Jeitschko, Wolfgang; Gerdes, Martin H.; Witte, Anne M.; Rodewald, Ute Ch.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Brief Communications Why Sex Matters: Brain Size Independent Differences in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brief Communications Why Sex Matters: Brain Size Independent Differences in Gray Matter, Germany The different brain anatomy of men and women is both a classic and continuing topic of major interest. Among the most replicated and robust sex differences are larger overall brain dimensions in men

Gaser, Christian

435

Sub-exponential Solutions of Multidimensional DifferenceEquations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We shall prove that practically any recursive solution of a linear multidimensional difference equation increases sub-exponentially. If all the steps of the recursive procedure are ’’of the same direction‘‘, useful growth estimates ... Keywords: Multidimensional difference equations, non-linear difference equations, recursive solutions, sub-exponential solutions

Jan Veit

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1991 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1992 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1993 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1994 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1995 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1996 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1997 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1998 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1999 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

437

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.4 11.4 9.7 7.2 6.7 4.5 9.7 6.3 6.3 7.0 6.6 10.3 2002 10.3 11.3 13.0 5.3 5.8 6.0 4.5 5.8 4.3 6.9 7.1 11.9 2003 10.5 13.2 11.4 9.1 7.8 6.6 6.3 6.2 7.1 12.1 11.9 12.9 2004 11.2 10.7 8.8 9.1 6.4 4.7 5.0 5.6 7.2 7.2 9.4 10.9 2005 11.3 11.5 11.3 9.8 5.5 5.1 4.9 5.3 5.2 6.2 9.4 10.7 2006 8.7 10.4 8.9 6.1 4.5 4.4 3.7 3.9 6.5 5.8 7.7 9.2 2007 13.1 13.7 11.0 9.9 6.1 3.7 4.5 3.8 6.9 3.5 8.4 10.4 2008 9.5 10.4 7.5 6.6 4.7 3.1 3.0 4.2 4.5 4.5 6.7 9.6 2009 12.8 10.9 8.0 4.2 1.7 2.2 2.0 2.0 3.6 2.8 3.4 7.6 2010 7.3 7.1 6.3 4.1 3.3 2.3 2.1 4.3 4.6 5.1 6.1 10.6 2011 11.3 10.0 8.0 7.2 4.2 3.5 2.2 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.9 5.0

438

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 96.2 96.1 96.3 96.1 96.4 96.0 96.7 94.9 1991 96.5 97.0 97.5 98.1 97.8 97.8 97.9 97.8 98.2 97.8 96.8 96.8 1992 96.8 97.2 97.4 98.2 98.3 98.2 98.1 98.1 98.3 98.2 97.4 97.0 1993 97.2 97.2 97.2 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.3 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.3 97.0 1994 97.3 97.6 97.8 98.3 97.6 98.3 98.2 98.4 98.5 97.9 97.8 97.0 1995 96.7 97.3 97.5 97.9 97.9 98.1 98.2 97.8 98.1 97.8 97.4 96.7 1996 96.7 96.9 96.7 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.2 97.6 97.4 97.0 96.1 1997 97.1 97.4 97.7 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.7 97.9 97.8 97.5 96.4 96.1

439

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33.6 44.6 45.1 46.7 45.0 48.3 48.5 41.4 43.8 54.6 54.8 55.3 2002 55.5 54.5 47.0 46.9 41.4 41.7 36.1 34.9 36.7 33.1 32.9 33.0 2003 37.3 38.2 36.6 36.4 36.4 35.7 37.7 38.8 44.8 45.3 45.3 48.8 2004 58.9 65.1 52.4 51.8 51.2 55.8 50.6 52.0 51.7 53.3 55.4 57.8 2005 47.4 48.2 43.8 47.9 46.2 40.8 40.9 38.2 40.1 40.3 42.7 43.5 2006 37.1 41.1 37.8 37.6 36.4 37.6 38.3 35.9 37.9 39.7 37.1 37.6 2007 36.3 35.8 34.0 35.0 32.8 32.4 26.5 26.4 24.4 28.9 29.7 30.4 2008 32.5 30.5 30.2 27.5 28.3 30.7 25.9 25.0 28.6 30.6 31.5 31.3 2009 32.5 34.6 31.8 30.4 29.8 28.5 25.9 23.5 24.4 27.1 28.8 28.4 2010 28.6 28.5 25.4 26.7 21.9 22.5 21.3 21.4 22.8 24.5 29.0 27.8

440

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 90.4 90.1 89.3 85.0 85.4 81.3 78.6 78.2 73.6 74.8 82.4 89.7 1990 90.5 92.3 85.6 85.3 78.9 77.8 80.2 80.1 76.5 75.8 80.7 81.5 1991 86.2 85.4 84.4 81.0 75.8 72.8 76.8 75.1 73.1 75.0 79.5 81.1 1992 81.0 78.9 79.5 77.3 72.4 70.9 72.9 69.3 69.3 76.0 82.6 81.5 1993 81.4 81.5 82.3 77.8 71.3 66.2 69.1 72.1 72.8 74.1 77.9 77.2 1994 83.7 83.4 83.3 77.7 73.4 73.2 74.7 73.4 75.1 76.4 78.0 81.9 1995 80.8 82.8 79.3 76.3 71.7 66.5 66.5 64.1 68.1 72.3 77.2 79.9 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997 74.3 72.1 69.3 67.7 59.1 53.5 53.3 54.6 56.2 59.3 65.6 68.3 1998 55.3 60.7 59.0 53.6 48.2 49.8 43.2 43.2 43.3 50.2 53.3 56.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 96.9 95.0 94.2 94.3 92.7 91.7 91.2 96.2 97.2 98.8 1990 99.1 99.4 97.7 97.0 96.4 96.7 95.7 95.0 95.1 96.8 98.4 99.1 1991 99.4 99.4 94.3 92.2 90.6 87.2 84.0 85.2 79.5 84.3 82.2 89.0 1992 90.6 89.5 88.3 87.2 83.7 84.0 84.8 81.4 82.7 88.9 88.5 95.4 1993 97.0 96.0 94.3 91.0 92.5 90.6 89.7 86.7 89.6 89.7 90.9 93.5 1994 93.8 89.3 86.1 81.3 80.1 79.6 76.4 74.5 76.4 73.9 76.7 81.4 1995 81.5 83.2 77.4 78.9 77.1 76.5 72.8 70.0 71.3 67.8 70.8 75.2 1996 79.1 80.5 78.2 76.4 74.2 73.0 69.2 66.7 67.6 64.0 70.8 74.9 1997 77.2 79.7 78.0 69.2 64.7 60.9 73.2 63.1 62.9 65.9 67.9 73.3 1998 76.5 79.1 75.1 72.9 71.0 70.0 65.2 55.2 55.5 62.6 63.6 69.9

442

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1983 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1984 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1985 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1986 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1987 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1988 93.8 93.3 92.5 91.7 89.4 87.5 86.3 87.2 87.6 87.4 88.7 89.7 1989 91.0 91.2 90.8 89.2 88.2 86.1 85.1 85.1 84.6 85.2 87.7 90.7 1990 90.8 88.8 88.3 86.9 85.5 83.8 81.8 81.7 80.3 81.2 84.7 87.9 1991 89.4 88.5 87.8 84.0 83.2 80.0 79.3 81.6 78.1 78.7 85.1 86.1 1992 87.1 85.2 84.7 84.0 79.3 79.4 76.0 76.1 78.0 80.9 83.1 85.6 1993 86.6 86.3 86.4 84.9 82.2 79.0 79.2 78.0 78.3 79.9 83.0 85.1

443

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 98.3 97.8 97.3 97.3 95.0 91.8 95.8 95.6 96.9 97.2 1990 98.1 98.0 97.9 97.6 97.3 97.4 94.7 94.5 95.5 94.6 97.0 97.0 1991 96.8 97.1 96.1 96.2 96.9 97.2 93.7 93.9 93.6 92.3 94.7 96.3 1992 96.7 96.7 95.9 95.7 95.1 96.0 94.2 93.3 93.6 91.2 93.7 96.2 1993 96.6 96.4 96.5 95.8 95.2 95.5 93.0 93.1 95.2 90.6 94.1 95.9 1994 95.9 96.1 95.7 94.9 95.3 94.3 91.2 91.7 93.1 91.5 93.2 95.5 1995 95.9 96.0 95.1 94.3 95.1 95.5 92.3 89.7 89.3 89.8 93.5 93.8 1996 94.5 95.5 93.8 93.1 92.4 92.5 88.0 87.1 90.6 89.1 92.8 94.3 1997 94.6 95.4 94.4 93.9 93.7 92.9 86.2 83.1 90.2 86.9 89.8 93.0 1998 95.4 95.1 96.1 95.8 95.0 91.6 92.0 91.1 93.2 87.5 94.0 95.2

444

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.3 98.9 98.8 98.6 97.4 96.8 96.4 96.3 96.3 97.5 97.9 98.1 1990 97.9 97.8 97.6 98.6 96.9 98.4 96.3 95.8 93.3 96.9 97.6 99.6 1991 98.5 98.1 98.0 97.7 97.8 96.9 95.8 95.8 95.8 96.3 96.5 97.2 1992 97.1 98.0 96.7 96.5 96.6 94.9 95.4 96.8 90.6 92.0 92.8 94.6 1993 95.4 94.0 94.9 93.9 94.9 91.1 91.2 91.2 87.5 88.8 91.5 93.5 1994 92.7 93.0 92.7 91.8 91.9 89.6 88.7 87.8 87.5 89.0 91.2 93.1 1995 93.0 92.5 92.5 91.9 92.0 90.1 89.6 88.9 88.2 88.8 91.8 91.9 1996 92.2 93.7 91.9 92.6 90.8 90.8 87.8 87.2 86.1 87.5 91.6 92.7 1997 93.5 93.1 92.0 91.3 90.4 88.9 90.6 87.6 85.8 88.2 90.6 92.3 1998 86.4 80.5 80.5 76.4 72.1 66.7 67.7 68.6 64.2 70.5 74.9 77.0

445

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.1 96.3 94.1 93.5 92.8 91.7 89.1 89.1 91.6 91.6 94.8 95.3 1990 97.6 97.4 96.3 94.9 95.6 92.8 92.0 90.9 94.6 96.4 96.7 97.0 1991 98.0 94.9 93.5 92.6 91.7 89.6 87.0 88.1 88.5 92.8 92.8 97.7 1992 97.2 97.0 96.3 92.7 89.9 88.9 86.3 86.0 90.5 91.2 89.1 92.9 1993 93.3 93.4 92.5 90.1 91.2 90.6 88.3 89.5 90.2 92.1 90.7 92.5 1994 94.2 92.5 91.9 89.9 90.5 88.3 87.2 86.4 89.3 90.4 89.9 91.5 1995 91.7 92.8 88.7 86.9 87.8 87.9 84.5 84.8 86.5 88.4 87.9 87.2 1996 89.6 90.2 86.9 83.7 84.8 83.6 82.1 78.5 83.5 83.2 84.1 84.1 1997 87.3 87.8 86.5 83.8 86.1 82.6 79.7 78.6 83.8 81.0 83.1 85.8 1998 87.1 87.4 86.9 85.2 83.6 86.4 84.4 83.0 83.7 79.9 82.9 84.0

446

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.6 1.2 2.9 2.8 1.7 0.4 0.4 0.1 2002 0.1 0.1 1.4 1.1 1.9 1.7 2.1 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 2003 0.1 0.0 0.3 1.2 0.8 0.9 1.9 3.0 2.7 0.9 0.4 0.1 2004 0.1 0.1 0.3 1.1 0.8 1.5 1.5 2.3 2.0 0.3 0.2 0.0 2005 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 2006 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 1.6 2.0 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 2007 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.5 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.1 2008 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 2009 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.5 2010 8.3 5.3 6.0 5.7 5.3 3.9 2.6 2.9 2.9 5.0 5.5 6.3 2011 8.9 9.0 8.3 8.6 6.5 4.3 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.9 8.5 8.6

447

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 41.4 29.5 26.1 37.6 29.0 29.3 26.0 26.2 22.4 26.8 29.3 13.6 2002 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 2003 15.7 18.9 21.5 19.6 26.7 11.7 16.8 18.8 18.6 22.1 18.5 22.3 2004 13.9 16.7 14.5 16.8 21.1 11.7 16.7 15.3 16.0 19.4 10.5 23.0 2005 17.8 14.7 15.9 11.0 16.3 16.5 12.9 13.8 16.3 13.2 16.5 19.7 2006 18.6 18.7 16.4 15.0 12.5 13.3 8.8 10.5 11.4 12.8 10.5 15.7 2007 13.0 19.0 15.1 12.7 10.1 14.3 8.0 6.3 17.1 8.3 9.0 10.9 2008 19.9 14.2 16.6 7.2 8.2 9.5 10.7 7.0 13.2 8.2 15.2 23.1 2009 12.2 14.7 8.0 12.3 9.5 7.8 6.7 9.5 10.8 3.5 8.6 7.0 2010 7.3 6.2 5.2 3.8 3.8 6.3 5.5 4.2 5.7 9.3 7.7 10.4

448

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Delaware Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

449

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.3 14.8 13.4 11.3 10.4 10.0 9.2 10.2 4.2 4.8 15.5 9.7 2002 12.2 12.1 11.1 11.1 11.9 10.9 9.4 10.4 13.5 7.7 9.4 11.2 2003 11.5 11.6 12.1 10.9 10.9 12.3 10.5 12.0 8.0 5.8 10.5 10.1 2004 12.4 13.5 11.5 13.0 11.1 11.5 9.3 8.7 8.0 7.6 8.7 9.8 2005 17.0 16.9 17.4 14.3 10.2 11.1 15.9 16.5 14.3 11.9 12.4 14.8 2006 14.8 14.0 11.5 9.6 7.6 11.4 11.0 9.9 9.6 10.8 13.6 13.7 2007 13.5 18.5 12.7 13.3 10.1 7.8 10.2 9.0 11.0 9.7 11.2 15.1 2008 16.6 13.4 13.1 10.6 9.0 9.2 9.0 7.7 9.3 9.8 11.3 12.9 2009 14.7 15.7 13.5 12.0 10.0 9.4 7.5 8.5 8.0 8.2 9.6 15.0 2010 14.2 14.8 11.4 10.3 8.8 7.5 8.0 10.3 9.0 8.1 9.6 11.0

450

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 95.2 80.1 79.2 79.2 69.2 67.8 65.6 67.7 70.7 73.3 76.0 79.0 2002 77.7 78.3 78.6 78.2 72.6 66.8 66.7 65.1 66.8 72.6 76.2 85.5 2003 87.3 100.0 100.0 75.7 74.2 72.4 75.0 67.7 70.4 73.2 77.4 80.1 2004 79.9 84.7 80.7 82.2 78.6 73.8 70.0 68.3 69.2 76.4 82.1 83.7 2005 83.6 86.4 82.6 78.0 74.4 71.5 72.1 83.9 94.3 82.4 75.7 96.4 2006 93.0 87.6 82.4 77.2 73.3 72.9 71.7 69.7 71.5 76.3 75.1 79.5 2007 83.0 84.1 81.8 76.2 72.2 71.7 71.4 71.2 73.9 76.6 78.7 82.2 2008 81.0 84.1 83.3 78.8 76.0 76.0 76.9 76.1 74.1 77.7 80.2 83.2 2009 82.6 85.8 77.5 76.6 74.2 73.8 73.8 72.4 72.8 77.4 76.0 81.5 2010 81.6 78.8 78.4 75.2 73.0 74.0 74.2 73.8 73.0 76.3 77.3 82.7

451

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.8 96.5 97.1 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.7 98.8 98.1 98.5 1990 95.6 95.3 94.1 93.2 92.3 89.6 96.9 94.2 93.0 90.2 89.9 93.5 1991 93.6 93.3 91.8 87.9 85.4 88.2 96.4 95.2 85.8 86.1 90.5 91.4 1992 91.7 91.6 89.9 90.9 88.7 81.7 85.6 83.6 80.5 84.5 87.1 90.9 1993 94.1 94.7 94.5 93.4 89.5 88.4 88.1 87.8 82.9 85.2 84.8 92.0 1994 88.2 88.9 85.8 82.3 79.2 72.9 75.9 77.8 65.1 62.2 73.5 80.7 1995 81.4 80.6 79.2 79.8 76.0 71.8 70.4 68.4 NA NA NA NA 1996 83.8 79.1 77.7 77.3 69.8 66.0 51.8 54.1 66.2 40.3 68.6 76.6 1997 82.4 91.9 74.2 77.5 67.0 68.6 67.6 69.2 63.2 50.0 72.4 77.2 1998 80.4 78.6 77.9 72.1 74.6 67.1 66.3 82.0 74.5 80.4 66.5 51.5

452

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.7 29.6 30.3 21.0 19.7 16.7 8.3 12.9 13.3 18.6 12.0 18.7 2002 22.6 19.5 29.3 17.6 15.0 24.0 7.4 8.4 8.8 16.4 18.9 19.6 2003 20.3 22.7 24.9 19.3 17.1 24.1 8.7 9.7 10.9 15.7 17.7 19.4 2004 19.7 21.4 24.7 19.0 18.3 14.2 9.2 10.6 16.5 18.8 16.0 16.6 2005 24.4 20.0 24.6 18.5 19.0 18.2 10.0 8.6 12.9 15.1 14.2 18.3 2006 13.8 15.1 17.1 13.3 13.0 9.8 8.3 7.7 10.5 11.5 10.2 12.4 2007 12.1 13.0 14.5 11.6 9.7 8.9 7.1 6.4 6.9 9.8 8.5 10.5 2008 12.0 13.8 13.2 13.6 12.4 8.5 8.0 7.1 8.6 7.4 8.0 11.4 2009 11.8 12.1 10.5 10.2 8.8 7.6 6.6 6.1 7.3 7.8 9.0 8.7 2010 11.1 11.7 10.5 9.1 7.0 7.8 6.8 6.5 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.5

453

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.3 1.9 0.9 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.9 3.0 2002 3.0 2.9 3.6 2.3 2.0 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.8 1.1 2.1 3.4 2003 2.9 2.8 3.3 2.1 1.8 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.6 2004 1.8 2.4 1.9 1.0 1.5 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.8 2.4 2005 3.1 2.9 2.2 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.9 0.6 0.7 1.0 1.3 2.3 2006 1.3 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.0 2007 1.0 1.2 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 2008 1.3 1.4 1.8 1.1 0.9 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 2009 2.5 1.7 1.5 1.2 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.6 1.0 1.8 2010 2.3 2.4 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.6 1.5 1.0 2.0 2011 1.9 3.3 2.1 1.3 0.9 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.3

454

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.1 9.8 10.4 6.2 3.9 3.4 1.5 4.8 1.2 2.9 5.6 6.4 2002 5.4 6.2 5.4 4.8 1.9 1.7 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.3 4.9 6.7 2003 6.3 7.0 5.4 4.0 1.8 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.7 2.4 3.3 4.6 2004 5.1 5.7 4.0 3.8 2.1 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.2 2.7 3.4 4.5 2005 5.7 6.6 4.5 2.6 2.0 1.6 2.1 2.0 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.8 2006 4.6 4.7 4.0 2.7 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.2 3.0 3.5 2007 3.9 4.8 3.5 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.4 1.5 1.2 2.2 3.7 2008 3.9 4.2 3.5 2.5 1.1 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.4 1.6 2.7 4.1 2009 4.8 4.7 3.8 2.2 2.1 2.6 1.7 1.4 1.1 1.6 2.0 3.2 2010 4.7 4.4 3.2 1.4 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1.5 1.7 2.9 2011 4.0 3.5 3.0 1.5 1.0 0.7 0.5 0.7 1.0 0.8 1.9 2.8

455

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 87.1 83.9 47.7 48.9 40.4 44.6 82.7 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 75.5 80.2 97.3 91.1 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 99.3 98.4 98.2 97.8 92.0 84.1 86.8 49.9 66.5 87.3 89.1 1997 89.6 91.7 82.2 88.5 80.8 72.4 71.1 67.9 68.7 71.1 80.7 64.1

456

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2002 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2003 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2004 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2005 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2006 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2007 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2008 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2009 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2010 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2011 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

457

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

458

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.8 10.0 9.1 4.6 6.6 4.9 5.5 3.8 4.0 5.6 5.3 5.4 2002 6.1 6.1 6.5 5.0 4.1 3.9 5.1 3.8 3.8 5.0 4.8 4.9 2003 5.4 5.9 5.8 4.6 4.0 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.5 6.2 6.1 2004 6.5 6.8 6.3 5.7 5.1 6.0 5.8 4.4 4.9 7.2 7.0 5.0 2005 5.5 6.2 5.6 5.3 4.7 4.6 4.3 3.8 4.6 6.8 5.5 5.1 2006 5.3 5.7 5.2 4.6 4.0 4.1 3.7 3.3 4.1 5.4 5.5 5.8 2007 4.5 5.6 4.4 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.7 4.5 4.5 3.7 2008 4.1 4.6 3.9 4.0 3.1 2.8 3.0 2.9 3.2 4.8 5.4 4.4 2009 4.5 4.6 3.9 3.9 2.7 2.9 2.9 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 3.9 2010 4.0 3.9 3.6 3.1 2.4 2.5 2.2 2.1 2.4 2.7 2.2 2.0 2011 2.7 3.0 2.1 1.9 1.4 1.3 2.1 1.4 1.7 1.8 2.3 2.5

459

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 32.2 25.0 16.8 19.7 13.2 12.9 38.9 31.5 31.7 41.7 48.4 68.2 2002 58.3 44.3 59.1 37.8 44.2 40.0 17.5 18.2 19.5 21.2 23.0 28.8 2003 25.6 28.9 20.3 22.8 14.8 13.2 13.6 11.9 12.5 15.8 23.9 21.7 2004 21.4 23.6 14.9 15.1 12.4 11.3 10.7 11.5 13.4 15.9 20.9 22.6 2005 24.3 25.3 17.8 18.4 14.8 14.1 9.6 12.3 13.6 15.9 18.3 19.5 2006 20.9 21.8 22.3 14.7 14.8 11.9 11.7 10.6 11.5 16.9 16.6 23.7 2007 22.1 26.8 17.9 16.6 14.8 11.6 11.3 10.2 10.6 13.6 20.4 25.3 2008 27.5 26.4 21.5 17.5 17.4 9.7 10.4 9.2 8.1 11.3 23.4 26.0 2009 21.4 23.7 19.2 19.9 13.9 11.5 8.7 9.4 11.2 16.2 20.4 26.7 2010 23.5 26.8 23.1 19.6 18.0 13.4 12.7 11.0 10.9 13.6 22.0 22.3

460

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 27.3 21.8 18.9 13.8 17.8 15.8 17.4 17.4 17.3 19.6 16.5 16.9 2002 16.8 18.2 18.9 17.2 15.5 16.5 18.0 19.1 16.3 18.0 18.8 18.4 2003 20.6 20.1 18.7 19.5 19.2 20.3 16.6 16.0 18.1 18.2 18.1 18.4 2004 18.8 18.3 16.3 16.0 14.6 16.6 16.2 15.2 15.5 15.6 17.5 20.3 2005 16.5 17.5 17.3 16.0 15.8 15.2 16.1 14.9 17.4 17.9 17.2 19.7 2006 15.6 16.9 17.6 14.8 14.9 14.2 16.0 15.7 14.6 15.7 15.5 17.6 2007 16.6 18.1 17.0 17.7 16.1 17.5 16.6 14.7 15.3 16.1 16.6 16.5 2008 19.1 20.3 18.1 17.7 17.7 16.4 16.4 15.9 16.1 17.0 15.8 18.1 2009 17.3 19.7 16.0 17.8 19.4 21.5 18.1 18.8 18.2 16.1 17.4 17.8 2010 18.0 18.5 19.6 19.1 18.5 16.8 15.8 16.9 16.1 18.0 17.6 18.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "absolute percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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461

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 75.8 74.5 76.0 71.7 64.9 47.6 51.7 50.8 57.5 64.4 69.5 73.5 1990 73.1 74.0 74.5 72.3 67.4 58.1 49.6 51.5 52.2 62.1 70.1 74.6 1991 73.0 72.2 72.4 67.3 62.1 51.2 44.3 41.2 47.5 60.1 87.2 70.0 1992 73.7 74.5 71.4 70.5 66.6 55.5 48.5 51.6 49.9 61.1 68.6 73.1 1993 74.5 72.3 72.6 68.0 63.7 51.6 50.5 54.4 50.9 63.1 68.1 73.1 1994 73.7 71.6 70.8 66.3 60.1 45.7 41.7 42.3 45.4 55.4 63.4 69.8 1995 72.5 72.2 71.2 68.0 61.5 45.8 41.6 39.0 46.9 57.1 68.0 72.5 1996 73.7 72.1 73.1 68.5 64.4 46.1 44.2 41.3 44.6 55.8 67.2 70.2 1997 70.0 70.2 67.3 66.2 58.6 45.7 55.7 40.7 39.7 54.2 64.8 65.7 1998 70.8 66.5 65.7 60.1 44.3 42.3 39.6 37.5 42.5 47.8 57.9 64.7

462

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.1 9.5 8.2 5.5 7.6 14.7 17.1 12.4 4.5 8.9 4.5 3.6 2002 13.5 1.7 6.8 1.5 1.6 1.2 100.0 0.8 100.0 0.7 0.8 1.0 2003 10.9 12.0 11.3 10.5 11.9 9.1 7.6 10.1 9.0 7.3 9.2 16.5 2004 2.0 1.7 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.3 1.3 2.0 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 2005 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.5 3.2 2.0 1.4 3.4 3.2 3.8 2006 1.3 1.3 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 1.0 0.9 0.8 2007 0.9 1.0 4.3 0.9 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 1.3 2008 1.1 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.9 0.9 2009 1.8 2.2 1.5 0.8 0.5 1.3 1.0 0.5 2.1 0.8 0.8 1.2 2010 1.2 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.7 2011 0.7 0.9 0.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6

463

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 87.4 88.1 87.1 86.0 81.2 74.4 75.5 75.0 78.9 85.1 87.8 90.3 1990 89.9 89.2 89.9 86.4 82.4 78.5 77.0 75.6 77.7 83.0 87.9 91.4 1991 91.6 90.0 87.2 83.6 78.6 74.7 75.5 73.7 75.6 82.6 87.8 89.8 1992 89.1 88.0 88.4 85.7 78.9 73.9 72.0 73.5 73.1 84.2 85.7 88.5 1993 89.4 87.0 86.9 83.8 76.1 73.9 74.6 69.4 72.6 82.8 84.5 86.3 1994 87.4 86.5 84.9 78.4 75.9 70.5 66.7 67.5 66.5 75.1 78.7 81.5 1995 81.0 80.0 78.6 76.8 67.8 61.4 62.9 59.0 58.3 69.9 77.9 79.2 1996 77.3 76.1 76.1 72.3 63.1 42.1 56.4 53.9 65.1 68.5 72.4 74.0 1997 73.2 69.3 70.0 65.6 58.9 50.2 47.4 49.3 50.4 55.0 67.3 67.4 1998 61.5 61.2 61.1 54.9 42.3 45.6 48.0 36.3 44.9 56.3 50.7 50.3

464

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 2.9 3.2 2.9 7.8 9.4 18.1 21.2 16.4 7.7 7.9 4.4 2002 5.0 5.1 6.6 13.0 12.4 16.1 22.4 18.5 11.6 5.7 4.3 4.3 2003 2.4 3.4 3.2 8.2 11.0 6.9 14.8 21.1 9.1 5.3 5.0 3.1 2004 2.7 2.8 4.6 10.3 9.4 14.0 13.4 11.0 9.2 2.6 2.4 2.3 2005 1.7 1.4 1.4 3.2 6.6 8.2 16.3 19.2 9.0 3.8 2.5 1.7 2006 1.7 2.0 3.2 5.7 9.4 12.9 16.2 16.9 9.4 3.6 2.1 2.1 2007 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.4 4.9 9.8 16.2 17.3 9.6 4.0 2.8 1.7 2008 1.6 1.5 2.7 7.5 10.4 13.4 18.9 17.9 10.9 4.1 1.7 1.6 2009 1.5 2.0 4.4 4.6 6.3 9.2 16.6 17.0 11.0 3.3 1.5 1.1 2010 1.2 1.2 1.2 2.5 6.5 10.6 17.3 18.2 12.5 5.8 3.7 1.9 2011 1.5 1.7 5.6 10.4 11.0 17.0 20.8 19.9 12.8 4.9 3.6 1.6

465

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 95.3 95.6 95.9 94.3 91.3 91.5 87.2 86.2 88.2 87.5 90.7 93.4 1990 95.8 94.8 93.7 93.2 90.7 88.8 88.4 86.9 87.4 86.8 90.6 91.5 1991 93.8 94.7 96.1 91.0 87.7 85.1 84.8 85.5 85.9 86.5 90.5 92.3 1992 93.0 94.7 91.3 92.7 88.4 87.0 85.9 85.4 86.4 87.6 88.7 90.8 1993 92.5 93.0 92.8 91.8 87.6 84.2 85.9 84.7 85.7 87.8 92.7 98.7 1994 93.9 95.9 95.4 94.8 91.2 91.7 94.2 94.3 96.6 95.3 96.4 97.4 1995 97.2 98.0 96.3 95.1 93.3 93.1 91.5 93.4 92.3 91.8 92.6 100.0 1996 96.4 97.0 95.6 96.3 92.4 94.2 88.5 91.6 92.7 90.2 94.1 95.7 1997 96.3 96.8 95.2 93.8 91.8 91.1 90.3 91.8 91.3 92.6 90.4 95.9 1998 95.5 95.4 94.0 93.0 88.8 86.8 86.1 84.9 82.4 81.5 86.1 89.0

466

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.3 96.2 94.7 94.2 93.4 93.5 94.7 99.0 99.7 1990 99.6 99.3 96.6 94.4 94.3 93.2 89.3 86.4 87.1 86.2 91.7 96.5 1991 98.1 96.5 95.8 91.8 92.3 89.1 89.5 80.6 89.2 90.0 93.2 97.0 1992 96.9 95.7 92.1 87.7 94.1 91.3 88.6 80.7 80.7 86.4 94.8 96.9 1993 93.6 94.0 93.7 91.2 88.5 86.4 87.1 79.8 84.6 90.0 92.4 93.8 1994 94.9 96.2 96.3 89.8 87.4 85.1 81.4 82.2 83.6 88.0 89.6 92.1 1995 93.7 92.4 91.3 87.4 84.5 80.0 78.7 75.1 83.8 72.6 81.9 82.9 1996 81.3 80.5 78.9 73.5 68.8 66.3 62.0 60.0 61.8 67.2 69.4 70.2 1997 60.9 89.2 58.4 55.9 45.7 50.1 44.8 47.8 47.2 47.0 48.2 52.0 1998 63.8 64.1 66.9 60.1 51.7 59.2 55.7 57.9 54.8 53.3 60.2 59.7

467

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29.3 31.1 27.6 21.9 21.2 19.6 18.6 15.6 18.5 16.8 15.6 21.1 2002 23.5 22.2 23.5 21.5 18.7 18.3 17.4 16.9 18.0 18.5 22.1 26.0 2003 21.1 23.1 26.0 26.8 23.9 18.0 15.3 17.3 13.3 14.9 13.0 18.4 2004 19.5 22.5 18.1 16.6 15.0 13.7 11.6 15.1 13.6 13.6 15.4 18.5 2005 22.4 22.7 21.9 17.6 15.7 15.4 17.7 20.4 16.9 19.4 20.1 25.4 2006 23.6 22.4 21.6 19.0 17.0 16.3 18.5 19.1 15.6 16.6 19.9 21.8 2007 21.5 23.6 20.8 23.0 17.1 17.5 17.7 19.8 19.9 20.0 21.2 23.1 2008 16.5 15.9 16.1 9.9 11.1 8.6 4.0 5.6 4.6 7.7 9.7 13.7 2009 18.4 13.1 12.9 6.5 4.2 4.2 3.1 3.9 4.9 6.2 8.8 11.6 2010 14.6 17.7 9.8 7.1 4.9 3.6 3.0 3.5 3.0 4.2 6.8 12.3

468

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.5 10.3 7.4 5.5 6.3 3.3 6.0 4.5 5.4 7.8 10.9 9.9 2002 8.5 5.3 8.3 6.1 4.9 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.6 10.4 12.8 10.2 2003 10.3 8.9 9.3 6.7 5.2 6.0 5.5 5.6 6.3 8.8 10.6 9.1 2004 10.4 8.9 8.8 5.7 4.9 5.3 4.0 4.8 5.1 8.4 16.2 12.9 2005 11.8 9.6 9.8 7.7 7.8 8.0 8.8 8.3 9.1 11.5 12.5 10.7 2006 10.3 9.5 9.6 6.1 7.4 6.4 5.7 6.7 7.1 9.4 11.9 10.2 2007 8.9 8.1 6.4 6.1 5.8 5.2 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.6 7.0 7.5 2008 7.9 6.5 5.8 5.0 6.0 5.0 4.6 5.0 5.1 7.2 9.1 10.2 2009 6.9 7.2 6.4 4.7 4.3 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 7.3 9.4 10.2 2010 9.3 7.6 5.7 4.9 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.5 5.6 5.0 5.5 6.5 2011 6.5 6.5 5.5 5.3 4.6 5.1 4.2 4.4 5.9 5.6 6.2 5.8

469

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 96.4 94.9 91.0 89.2 89.5 88.2 89.8 90.7 94.4 97.0 1990 97.2 96.9 96.3 94.8 91.6 91.6 89.5 89.5 89.1 93.3 95.0 96.2 1991 97.1 95.7 94.7 89.8 86.4 85.5 87.5 88.0 91.1 91.5 95.7 95.5 1992 95.4 94.2 93.6 91.9 87.9 86.9 86.7 87.4 87.9 93.0 94.6 94.9 1993 91.6 91.6 95.3 93.5 92.4 93.5 89.9 81.6 88.1 88.5 94.5 95.4 1994 93.6 95.9 94.6 92.1 88.2 85.4 83.0 83.5 83.4 87.6 87.9 89.9 1995 90.8 91.2 89.9 86.3 87.4 80.6 76.5 81.5 81.7 85.7 91.0 92.7 1996 93.8 92.0 92.1 90.3 84.0 91.1 85.9 85.4 84.3 88.9 88.9 91.9 1997 92.5 91.5 90.3 89.0 86.3 88.6 84.0 80.3 84.9 89.9 89.9 91.3 1998 90.4 90.1 90.4 86.2 84.8 82.2 76.5 79.1 81.9 82.3 87.1 88.6

470

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity Factor at 80 Meters  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived from 90 m national elevation dataset. 6) 100% exclude 3 km surrounding criteria 2-5 (except water) Merged datasets and buffer 3 km 5) 100% exclusion of airfields, urban, wetland and water areas. USGS North America Land Use Land Cover (LULC), version 2.0, 1993; ESRI airports and airfields (2006); U.S. Census Urbanized Areas (2000 and 2003) 10) 50% exclusion of non-ridgecrest forest Ridge-crest areas defined using a terrain definition script, overlaid with USGS LULC data screened for the forest categories. Other Criteria 8) 50% exclusion of remaining Dept. of Defense lands except

471

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 97.1 96.7 95.9 95.1 94.3 94.7 94.1 94.2 94.6 96.8 1990 97.6 97.1 96.0 95.7 94.3 94.5 93.6 93.1 92.6 93.3 94.7 95.6 1991 97.3 97.5 97.1 96.6 95.9 94.8 94.5 94.7 94.1 95.8 96.5 97.4 1992 97.2 97.2 96.3 95.6 94.1 92.8 93.1 92.7 94.1 95.0 97.0 97.4 1993 97.3 97.4 96.5 96.3 94.6 96.2 95.0 93.4 93.4 95.4 97.1 98.1 1994 98.1 98.3 98.2 95.8 95.8 95.4 95.2 94.1 95.2 96.2 96.5 97.8 1995 97.9 98.5 97.8 96.7 95.9 96.2 94.4 94.9 95.6 94.7 95.6 97.0 1996 94.9 96.5 93.7 92.4 86.2 86.8 81.4 85.0 87.0 87.3 92.2 93.2 1997 83.9 81.9 77.6 71.5 61.9 56.1 51.6 50.3 48.6 51.7 64.7 53.1 1998 47.0 49.3 45.6 32.1 26.8 24.3 22.2 22.7 23.0 25.2 38.3 37.7

472

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.1 4.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 3.6 1.9 2.9 2.5 2.5 3.3 4.0 2002 4.1 4.5 4.1 3.6 3.5 4.2 3.2 3.5 3.9 3.4 3.8 4.4 2003 4.2 5.9 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.3 2.6 3.7 3.2 4.4 3.3 2004 4.6 3.8 4.2 3.3 3.3 3.7 2.9 3.2 4.4 3.3 4.1 3.6 2005 2.7 4.1 3.8 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.7 3.5 3.6 2006 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.4 5.3 2.9 3.0 2.4 4.2 3.1 2007 2.6 3.1 3.5 2.3 2.9 4.0 2.8 2.6 3.6 2.5 3.7 3.6 2008 2.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 2.9 2.4 2.8 2.5 3.2 3.0 3.3 3.3 2009 3.5 3.4 4.8 3.3 3.1 2.8 2.8 2.9 2.8 3.4 3.1 2.8 2010 2.6 3.4 2.9 2.7 3.6 2.3 2.5 5.1 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2011 3.1 4.3 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.9 2.9 2.8 3.1 3.8 2.4

473

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 93.9 94.3 92.6 92.6 97.2 96.7 96.8 89.1 91.9 97.7 98.9 1990 99.2 98.5 93.4 90.1 92.1 90.6 92.2 89.7 88.4 91.8 98.4 98.6 1991 94.2 93.3 93.2 93.2 92.6 89.2 89.9 89.6 92.6 98.5 97.9 95.4 1992 93.6 92.4 98.6 99.1 99.7 99.9 92.8 99.6 91.9 99.8 99.9 98.0 1993 94.5 94.1 99.6 99.5 100.0 91.9 90.4 91.1 92.9 90.7 92.2 96.1 1994 94.1 97.5 93.7 91.5 88.4 85.6 84.6 85.9 84.3 86.7 91.3 91.4 1995 89.7 89.9 89.5 87.0 83.4 76.1 73.5 72.7 77.9 80.9 90.7 93.4 1996 98.1 98.6 97.9 97.4 93.7 88.9 91.6 86.8 86.8 91.5 96.1 97.4 1997 97.1 96.7 93.4 91.1 58.0 59.4 85.4 86.8 87.2 93.9 96.0 94.0 1998 85.1 83.9 88.3 78.9 75.8 69.8 59.1 70.2 57.3 69.0 74.5 82.6

474

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 83.9 83.2 83.8 81.9 76.4 72.0 71.3 72.1 69.2 72.9 77.9 1996 73.4 78.9 76.0 62.5 59.1 55.0 51.2 53.1 50.7 54.2 58.2 61.8 1997 60.3 59.0 57.7 57.1 54.8 50.5 49.9 45.0 49.9 52.2 51.9 54.3

475

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 83.8 85.2 82.9 82.4 77.7 77.9 76.4 79.0 79.8 83.7 83.8 85.9 1995 85.5 85.5 82.5 83.1 80.0 79.3 73.9 71.3 75.2 79.4 80.2 82.8 1996 84.0 85.6 82.8 82.3 77.7 72.9 73.3 71.9 78.4 79.5 81.2 84.4 1997 86.2 87.1 82.9 83.7 78.8 76.9 72.7 71.6 74.7 80.1 83.0 86.4

476

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.6 93.6 89.7 88.2 85.3 81.7 80.7 80.2 83.0 86.4 89.4 96.8 1990 96.5 90.3 88.7 86.9 82.0 80.9 80.1 82.5 78.9 84.3 87.9 94.1 1991 92.1 90.7 88.8 84.7 81.6 79.7 79.6 80.3 78.8 82.8 90.7 92.5 1992 90.8 90.6 89.3 88.2 85.0 82.7 79.7 83.3 83.4 84.6 87.9 92.9 1993 91.5 92.9 94.6 90.9 86.5 83.0 85.4 84.9 85.6 86.0 91.2 93.0 1994 97.0 94.9 92.4 90.3 89.3 86.8 87.9 89.0 86.1 88.6 91.6 92.6 1995 96.1 97.1 93.3 90.7 89.7 88.4 87.4 88.4 87.9 91.1 94.8 97.2 1996 97.7 98.1 96.9 94.9 92.2 89.0 88.7 88.1 86.6 90.6 92.2 93.2 1997 94.3 93.5 90.0 88.5 85.4 84.3 81.0 81.9 82.9 85.6 88.6 91.6 1998 90.7 91.3 88.8 86.3 83.7 80.9 71.5 71.5 73.6 74.6 77.4 79.2

477

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 97.1 92.7 90.5 89.6 94.4 94.9 99.3 99.3 2002 99.3 99.2 99.2 99.3 80.9 79.0 78.8 78.4 86.9 99.4 96.3 99.6 2003 97.3 98.3 81.5 78.0 62.0 62.8 61.5 54.7 55.2 70.5 100.0 95.4 2004 94.3 77.2 72.2 65.1 68.5 66.1 60.9 54.9 55.5 58.7 76.9 73.3 2005 76.0 75.0 71.9 66.3 71.4 64.0 61.8 63.1 67.6 76.6 70.9 69.0 2006 66.8 63.2 71.2 60.6 60.5 63.6 55.1 60.2 64.8 61.6 78.2 70.2 2007 77.8 76.7 78.2 73.6 78.3 72.5 59.1 59.3 73.8 63.5 71.8 68.8 2008 100.0 100.0 83.8 82.2 57.2 60.9 54.5 72.1 75.9 93.1 83.1 100.0 2009 77.2 77.4 82.7 70.6 44.2 54.8 55.5 78.9 84.3 79.0 82.4 83.1

478

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.1 99.2 98.7 98.3 97.6 97.6 97.0 97.2 97.4 96.7 97.3 98.0 1990 98.2 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.4 97.5 96.6 96.6 96.9 95.6 96.5 98.1 1991 98.7 98.3 97.8 97.7 97.5 98.0 97.3 97.2 97.2 95.9 97.6 98.0 1992 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.7 97.7 97.8 97.9 96.7 97.8 94.6 97.4 98.4 1993 98.6 99.0 98.5 98.0 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.3 93.6 96.5 98.2 1994 98.5 98.6 98.3 97.4 97.6 97.7 98.1 97.7 97.9 97.0 97.8 98.6 1995 98.5 98.5 98.2 98.2 97.9 97.8 98.1 97.9 98.1 96.7 97.9 98.4 1996 98.4 98.8 98.6 98.1 98.2 98.3 98.1 98.0 97.6 97.0 98.3 98.6 1997 98.8 98.9 98.8 98.5 98.5 98.1 98.3 98.3 98.0 97.5 98.4 98.4 1998 99.3 99.2 99.1 98.9 98.8 99.0 98.9 98.6 98.7 98.4 99.0 99.1

479

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 88.9 90.2 90.6 89.0 82.8 85.9 86.8 83.0 84.1 79.3 84.6 87.4 1990 91.5 90.4 89.7 87.7 85.8 88.1 86.1 85.2 85.0 79.3 86.3 86.4 1991 91.0 91.7 88.5 87.4 87.4 86.8 84.7 84.0 82.9 73.6 85.1 87.5 1992 89.4 89.0 87.1 85.2 83.1 80.2 81.0 82.4 80.2 77.9 82.2 88.3 1993 89.4 89.9 91.0 87.9 87.4 82.3 82.8 81.3 79.2 77.7 81.5 87.8 1994 87.8 88.6 88.1 85.9 83.2 82.7 84.2 80.1 80.6 79.4 84.1 87.6 1995 89.7 89.1 86.5 85.5 86.0 85.3 83.7 82.5 80.4 77.1 85.9 85.5 1996 88.8 90.1 88.2 87.2 85.7 86.0 82.4 81.9 80.0 77.3 84.9 87.6 1997 87.8 89.7 87.7 86.1 86.4 83.3 83.1 82.8 82.5 76.4 83.1 86.9 1998 90.2 88.9 88.3 86.7 85.7 85.6 84.2 83.3 80.6 75.3 83.9 86.1

480

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.1 14.0 7.1 7.1 4.2 3.7 5.2 1.0 5.5 8.3 6.6 10.2 2002 8.4 8.1 10.1 6.4 5.3 6.2 5.3 5.9 6.6 12.5 12.6 12.4 2003 14.2 12.9 8.9 7.2 7.0 5.9 6.2 5.7 9.3 6.2 11.3 9.3 2004 9.2 8.9 8.9 6.9 6.4 6.2 6.9 6.5 7.3 7.9 10.4 11.6 2005 9.8 7.7 9.6 5.8 6.3 5.5 5.5 6.7 8.2 8.2 10.6 8.9 2006 8.2 9.3 7.4 4.3 7.0 5.0 6.4 5.9 6.3 8.2 8.3 8.4 2007 9.3 9.4 5.8 7.6 6.1 5.5 6.0 5.0 6.9 6.8 9.5 9.1 2008 8.4 7.5 7.0 6.7 5.5 4.5 4.7 4.7 5.3 9.1 8.4 7.6 2009 8.6 8.5 5.3 6.3 7.1 6.2 6.8 5.0 6.2 7.8 6.8 8.1 2010 7.5 6.4 5.7 5.4 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.3 5.0 4.7 5.5 6.3 2011 4.5 4.8 4.8 3.5 3.4 3.2 3.5 2.2 2.5 2.4 3.1 4.0

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481

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1991 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1992 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1993 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1994 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1995 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1996 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1997 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1998 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1999 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

482

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Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the past 7 y, the price of crystalline silicon...by 86%, and the price of PV modules has...In the meantime, average commercial c-Si...furnish a solar-to-fuels device with an efficiency...avoid the deleterious effect of concentrated base...2008 ) The hydrogen fuel alternative . MRS Bull...

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483

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

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2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solar-to-fuels conversion. Distributed and grid-scale adoption of nondispatchable, intermittent...Energy (2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program. Hydrogen production. Available...2003 ) Design considerations for a hybrid amorphous silicon/photoelectrochemical...

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485

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Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program. Hydrogen production. Available at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/mypp/. Accessed April 30, 2014 . 10 Walter MG ( 2010 ) Solar water splitting cells...

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486

Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires Are Recycled  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There were 263 million tires scrapped in 2009 (latest available data) which amounts to more than 4.7 million tons of waste. Fortunately, 84% of that waste was recycled. Most of the recycled tires...

487

Graduates 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database As of 4/2/2013 #12;29 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

488

Graduates 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 6 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database As of 7/15/2014 #12;30 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

489

Graduates 6 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database #12;33 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates First Placement is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

490

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electronics. This approach allows for facile optimization en route to addressing lower-cost...Gasteiger HA , eds ( 2003 ) Handbook of Fuel Cells: Fundamentals, Technology and Applications...Department of Energy (2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program...

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491

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Cambridge, MA 02139 Direct solar-to-fuels conversion...Information for 10% solar-to-fuel conversion...University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. bMassachusetts...

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492

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power system modeling, wind energy I. I NTRODUCTION Generating electricity from wind technology has several advantages

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Using image processing to measure tree crown diameters and estimate percent crown closure  

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. 92 15739. 78 12458. 89 14827. 1D 34621. 61 29827. 54 31822. 85 2'l709. 21 17220. 59 16172. 18 16078. 61 15824. 26 28936. 74 26003. 63 26839. 35 24482. 40 16616. 60 15824. 26 26422. 72 zszee. es 14828. 65 14340. 70 23922. 95 22465. 35...

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494

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...nickel-borate thin film electrocatalyst . J Am Chem Soc 135 ( 9 ): 3662 – 3674...Accelerating materials development for photoelectrochemical hydrogen...Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program ECCS-1150878 (to...a NiBi anode and NiMoZn cathode operating in 1 M KOH (pH...

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495

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...can effectively be harnessed to electricity by fuel cell devices (3, 4) or converted...solar cell describes both wired and wireless water splitting and constrains the currents and...technology pathways to reach baseload electricity costs . Energy Environ Sci 5...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-based supply curves for wind resources, along with projected costs and performance for other generation technologies such as pulverized coal

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Graduates 0 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D Completions and Placement, Ten Year Trend 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 French and Italian Placement Category As of 4/2/2013 #12;12 Number of Grads with Placement Info French and Italian, PhD Graduates First First Placement Category by Broad Field Category 77% 14% 18% 60% 11% 68% 36% 18% 3% 13% 42% 11% 3% 4% 7

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

498

Record Alewife Harvest Hikes U.S. Great Lakes Commercial Fish Catch 16 Percent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School Set for Persian Gulf Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Iran signed a draft agreement on 17 June 1975 in Kuwait to establish a Persian Gulf Regional Center to train captains, and mechanics. Training courses will be in English and Arabic. The Persian Gulf Regional

499

Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

500

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEO 2007 referencecoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z