National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for above-normal temperatures contributing

  1. Effect of temperature on phonon contribution to Green function of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneeva, L. A., E-mail: korneeva_mila@mail.ru; Mazur, E. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15

    The phonon contribution to the nodal electron Green function in cuprates is considered. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the real part of the self-energy component of the Green function for cuprates with a hole doping level close to optimal is described by the electron-phonon interaction in the framework of the extended Eliashberg model.

  2. Volcanic contribution to decadal changes in tropospheric temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santer, Benjamin D.

    Despite continued growth in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, global mean surface and tropospheric temperatures have shown slower warming since 1998 than previously. Possible explanations for the slow-down include ...

  3. Contribution of circulation changes to recent and future temperature extremes in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution of circulation changes to recent and future temperature extremes in Europe J. Cattiaux.cattiaux@meteo.fr The exceptionally mild autumn 2006 T2m anomaly: on average 2.5K (3.2 ), and exceeding 5K over North-Western Europe = 0.7) misses the recent warming (Fig 4). Recent warming and extremes in Europe Figure 2. T2m (left

  4. A Discussion of Testing Protocols and LANL's Contribution to High Temperature Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of LANL?s testing protocol work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003

  5. Factors contributing to the degradation of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fibers under elevated temperature and humidity conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Joseph M

    2006-10-30

    The moisture absorption behavior of Zylon fibers was characterized in various high temperature and high humidity conditions in a controlled environment. The results of these thermal cycling tests show that PBO fibers not ...

  6. Contribution of radicals and ions in catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes from low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marvi, Z.; Xu, S.; Foroutan, G.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-01-15

    The growth kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a low-temperature, low-pressure reactive plasma is investigated using a multiscale numerical simulation, including the plasma sheath and surface diffusion modules. The plasma-related effects on the characteristics of SWCNT growth are studied. It is found that in the presence of reactive radicals in addition to energetic ions inside the plasma sheath area, the effective carbon flux, and the growth rate of SWCNT increase. It is shown that the concentration of atomic hydrogen and hydrocarbon radicals in the plasma plays an important role in the SWCNT growth. The effect of the effective carbon flux on the SWCNT growth rate is quantified. The dependence of the growth parameters on the substrate temperature is also investigated. The effects of the plasma sheath parameters on the growth parameters are different in low- and high-substrate temperature regimes. The optimum substrate temperature and applied DC bias are estimated to maximize the growth rate of the single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  7. Received 5 Mar 2014 | Accepted 11 Jul 2014 | Published 18 Aug 2014 Sea surface temperature contributes to marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    ARTICLE Received 5 Mar 2014 | Accepted 11 Jul 2014 | Published 18 Aug 2014 Sea surface temperature,3 & Michael J. Benton1 During the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, four distinct crocodylomorph lineages colonized most probably ectothermic reptiles, these lineages colonized the marine realm and diversified during

  8. Mervyn Hine's Contribution

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Cérémonie avec plusieurs discours (qui?) et remarques pour honorer la contribution de Marvyn Hine qui prendra sa retraite. La célébration sera suivie d'un "vin d'honneur".

  9. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  10. CONTRIBUTED Adaptive Stochastic Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    sources, many forms of energy storage, and microgrid management (see Fig. 1). Computationally, controlling that are extremely close to optimal. We then address the problem of energy storage (e.g., in a large batteryCONTRIBUTED P A P E R Adaptive Stochastic Control for the Smart Grid The main theme of this paper

  11. Introduction and Motivation Our Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohassel, Payman

    Introduction and Motivation Our Contribution Summary Efficient Polynomial Operations in the Shared PKC 2006 1 / 19 #12;Introduction and Motivation Our Contribution Summary Outline 1 Introduction and Motivation Secure Multiparty Computation Motivation 2 Our Contribution Overview Protocols 2 / 19 #12

  12. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  13. Contributed Paper Effects of Exurban Development and Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    construcciones puede alterar la calidad del mismo. Estudiamos los efectos del desarrollo residencial y los construcciones y a la elevaci´on. Usamos modelos de ocupaci´on para determinar las asociaciones de 36 especies de aves con la densidad de construcciones, cubierta del dosel del bosque, temperatura media promedio

  14. Contribution of GIS to ATIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Mei-Po; Golledge, Reginald G.

    1994-01-01

    Contribution of GIS to ATIS Mei-Po Kwan Reginald G. Golledgeregulation. Contribution of GIS to ATIS Mei-Po Kwan Reginaldintegrating CPMs into GIS MostATIS modelsassumethat a

  15. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 707 JANUARY 2014 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds by J. A. Davis R. E. Looker D.Yee M. Marvin Accumulation in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds. Contribution No. 707. San

  16. High Performance Computing contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Computing contributions to DoD Mission Success 2002 #12;Approved for public/C nanotube in a field emitter configuration #12;HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING contributions tocontributions ­ SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Introduction 3 Overview of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program 3

  17. The contribution of cosmic rays to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A search has been made for a contribution of the changing cosmic ray intensity to the global warming observed in the last century. The cosmic ray intensity shows a strong 11 year cycle due to solar modulation and the overall rate has decreased since 1900. These changes in cosmic ray intensity are compared to those of the mean global surface temperature to attempt to quantify any link between the two. It is shown that, if such a link exists, the changing cosmic ray intensity contributes less than 8% to the increase in the mean global surface temperature observed since 1900.

  18. Schwinger Pair Production at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Thermal corrections to Schwinger pair production are potentially important in particle physics, nuclear physics and cosmology. However, the lowest-order contribution, arising at one loop, has proved difficult to calculate unambiguously. We show that this thermal correction may be calculated for charged scalars using the worldline formalism, where each term in the decay rate is associated with a worldline instanton. We calculate all finite-temperature worldline instantons, their actions and fluctuations prefactors, thus determining the complete one-loop decay rate at finite temperature. The thermal contribution to the decay rate becomes nonzero at a threshold temperature T=eE/2m, above which it dominates the zero temperature result.

  19. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz The GREENS MENS Assistant Secretary for Foreign Affairs #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per Reconstruction (40 year smoothed) Linear trend (AD 1000-1850) 1998 THE TEMPERATURE'S RISING #12;GREENHOUSE GASES

  20. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water and Temperature

  1. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 663 OCTOBER 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA on the Margins of San Francisco Bay Final Report An RMP Technical Report by Craig Jones Sea Engineering, Inc. Donald Yee Jay A. Davis Lester J. McKee Ben K. Greenfield Aroon R. Melwani Michelle A. Lent San Francisco

  2. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 548 JANUARY 2008 7770 Pardee Lane, Second floor, Oakland, CA 94621 p: 510-746-7334 (SFEI), f: 510-746-7300, www.sfei.org San Francisco Estuary National Williams San Francisco Estuary Institute In collaboration with San Francisco Estuary partners including

  3. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 681 AUGUST 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and Organochlorine Pesticides from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San Francisco Bay by Nicole David David C. Gluchowski Jon E. Leatherbarrow Donald Yee Lester J. Mc

  4. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 663 APRIL 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA on the Margins of San Francisco Bay Draft Report by Craig Jones Sea Engineering, Inc. Donald Yee Jay A. Davis Lester J. McKee Ben K. Greenfield Aroon R. Melwani Michelle A. Lent San Francisco Estuary Institute #12

  5. Design Editorial Industrial Research Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Journal of Mechanical Design Editorial Industrial Research Contributions Would authors working in industry be welcome contributors to JMD? The answer is an emphatic "yes, indeed!" but the reality is that authors from industry are a small minority relative to authors from academia. There are some real reasons

  6. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  7. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  8. IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES AT EXTENDED SINKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES, which can contribute to the observed growth strains. 1. Introduction Irradiation growth of zirconium

  9. Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution † CarlThis paper analyzes two major reforms to the patent systemthey are issued. Three additional reforms relating to patent

  10. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  11. Finite Temperature Schrödinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bai-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Qing-Cai Wang; Yan Wang

    2011-06-11

    We know Schr\\"{o}dinger equation describes the dynamics of quantum systems, which don't include temperature. In this paper, we propose finite temperature Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature. When the temperature T=0, it become Shr\\"{o}dinger equation.

  12. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  13. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  14. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-06-15

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  15. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot...

  16. Ab-initio elastic and thermodynamic properties of high-temperature cubic intermetallics at finite temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Michael Eric

    2009-05-15

    and anharmonic contributions to the free energy are accounted for while magnetic effects are neglected. The method involves the construction of a free energy surface in volume/temperature space through the use of quasi-harmonic lattice dynamics. Additional strain...

  17. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  18. Contributions to automated realtime underwater navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanway, Michael Jordan

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents three separate-but related-contributions to the art of underwater navigation. These methods may be used in postprocessing with a human in the loop, but the overarching goal is to enhance vehicle ...

  19. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Implementing Diagnostic Criteria and Estimating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Implementing Diagnostic Criteria and Estimating Frequency of Mild Cognitive criteria. Objectives: To operationalize diagnostic criteria for MCI and examine the frequency of MCI in ethnically and lin- guistically diverse elders (individuals older than 65 years). Design: Prospective

  20. Towards increasing fisheries' contribution to food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    .L.D. Palomares, A. McCrea- Strub, L. van der Meer and D. Zeller. 2012. Towards increasing fisheries' contribution Freire, Krista Greer, Claire Hornby, Vicky Lam, Maria Lourdes Palomares, Ashley McCrea Strub, Liesbeth

  1. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  2. EIA Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of the Midwest. In the four cities monitored for this report (Chicago, Kansas City, New York, and Pittsburgh), the composite daily average temperatures were above normal by...

  3. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  4. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  5. 256 Inorg. Chem. 1984, 23, 256-258 Contribution from the Department of Chemistry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    256 Inorg. Chem. 1984, 23, 256-258 Contribution from the Department of Chemistry, Purdue University v, is the effective nuclear frequency factor, K , ~is the electronic transmission coefficient' expression6 for the acti- vation free energy, AGFC*, and its temperature derivative. Thus7 (1) (a) Isied, S

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  7. Superconductivity at Any Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anber, Mohamed M; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We construct a 2+1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z. The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z, whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A, and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field. This model can be a step towards realizing the long sought room temperature superconductivity.

  8. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  9. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  10. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  11. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  12. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  13. History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selman, Alan

    History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science John E. Savage Department of Computer Science Brown University Providence, RI 02912 savage@cs.brown.edu Alan L. Selman Department of Computer@cse.buffalo.edu Carl Smith Department of Computer Science University of Maryland College Park, MD 20741 smith

  14. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, David

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes by African Ancestry at HLA. Oksenberg, PhD Background: In those with multiple sclerosis (MS), Afri- can American individuals have a more ancestry at HLA correlated with dis- ability as measured by the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P .001

  15. Contributions Carpe Diem and Slow Down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    whole civilisation has been founded on our technological developments to harness cheap energy--coal, oil, clean water, clean air, and a whole range of other "ecosystem services," as they are called. And our as important. Every adult across the planet July 2011 281 #12;Contributions does not just want access to clean

  16. Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    4 Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution Carl Shapiro, University of California the current U.S. patent system allows patent holders to capture private rewards that exceed their social with the patent system and discourage in- novation by others. Economic efficiency is promoted if rewards to patent

  17. SHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi S. Y. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990). To date, there have been several reports on the pro- cess analysis and economic evaluation and methods Process analysis and economic evaluation of P(3HB/V) production and recovery were carried outSHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi á S. Y. Lee Economic considerations in the production of poly(3

  18. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  19. Intellectual Contribution Policy College of Business and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Intellectual Contribution Policy College of Business and Economics Introduction: The creation and dissemination of intellectual contributions to business and economic theory, practice, and pedagogy and Economics (COBE) at Boise State University. Such intellectual contributions should continue throughout

  20. On the Free Energy of Noncommutative Quantum Electrodynamics at High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. T. Brandt; J. Frenkel; C. M. Muramoto

    2006-09-28

    We compute higher order contributions to the free energy of noncommutative quantum electrodynamics at a nonzero temperature $T$. Our calculation includes up to three-loop contributions (fourth order in the coupling constant $e$). In the high temperature limit we sum all the {\\it ring diagrams} and obtain a result which has a peculiar dependence on the coupling constant. For large values of $e\\theta T^2$ ($\\theta$ is the magnitude of the noncommutative parameters) this non-perturbative contribution exhibits a non-analytic behavior proportional to $e^3$. We show that above a certain critical temperature, there occurs a thermodynamic instability which may indicate a phase transition.

  1. Who Contributes to the Knowledge Sharing Economy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Arthi

    2015-01-01

    Information sharing dynamics of social networks rely on a small set of influencers to effectively reach a large audience. Our recent results and observations demonstrate that the shape and identity of this elite, especially those contributing \\emph{original} content, is difficult to predict. Information acquisition is often cited as an example of a public good. However, this emerging and powerful theory has yet to provably offer qualitative insights on how specialization of users into active and passive participants occurs. This paper bridges, for the first time, the theory of public goods and the analysis of diffusion in social media. We introduce a non-linear model of \\emph{perishable} public goods, leveraging new observations about sharing of media sources. The primary contribution of this work is to show that \\emph{shelf time}, which characterizes the rate at which content get renewed, is a critical factor in audience participation. Our model proves a fundamental \\emph{dichotomy} in information diffusion:...

  2. Correlation energy contribution to nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Baroni; M. Armati; F. Barranco; R. A. Broglia; G. Colo'; G. Gori; E. Vigezzi

    2004-04-07

    The ground state correlation energies associated with collective surface and pairing vibrations are calculated for Pb- and Ca-isotopes. It is shown that this contribution, when added to those predicted by one of the most accurate modern nuclear mass formula (HFBCS MSk7 mass formula), reduces the associated rms error by an important factor, making mean field theory, once its time dependence is taken into account, a quantitative predictive tool for nuclear masses.

  3. Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    6 5,946 4,816 1,130 35 14 7 6,937 5,619 1,318 40 16 * 7,928 6,422 1,506 50 20 8, 9, or 10 9,910 8 Tuition Charge to Source School Contribution 60 24 * 7,928 6,422 1,506 65 26 7 6,937 5,619 1,318 70 28 6 5

  4. Foreground contributions to the Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadeusz Wibig; Arnold W. Wolfendale

    2005-06-21

    A detailed search has been made for evidence of foreground contributions to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) WMAP, such foregrounds being related to our Galaxy. We find remarkable results. On the largest angular scales we find significant differences between the power in the fluctuations for positive and negative Galactic latitudes and between the four Galactic Quadrants. There are also differences between the power spectrum at latitudes within 10 deg of the Plane and at higher latitudes. The `slope' of the power spectrum has similar variations. In an effort to find the origin of these Galactic-style effects we have examined the evidence from Galactic gamma rays, specifically from the EGRET instrument. A correlation is found between gamma ray intensities and the CMB and other cosmic ray indicators. Most of the large scale Galactic asymmetries (eg north, south difference and Quadrant variations) have analogues in cosmic ray asymmetries and also in some other Galactic properties, such as the column density of gas. Thus, it is possible to hypothesise on direct cosmic ray-induced contributions, although it may be that cosmic rays are simply the indicators of Galactic `conditions' which are influencing the residual CMB fluctuations. Irrespective of the actual cause of the correlations we have endeavoured to extrapolate to the situation where the residual foreground is minimised. The effect on the usually-derived cosmological properties - universal matter content, ionization, the tensor contribution, tilt and curvature - is briefly examined.

  5. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  6. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  8. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the observed climate warming than current...

  9. CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contributes to UT's ... CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program Posted: June 8, 2015 - 5:30pm Mike Beck (center), Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, Vice...

  10. ORNL researchers contribute to major UN bioenergy and sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL researchers contribute to major bioenergy and sustainability report ORNL researchers Keith Kline and Virginia Dale contributed to a major United Nations report on bioenergy...

  11. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  12. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  13. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  14. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  15. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  16. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  17. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  18. Aerosol Working Group Contributions Accomplishments for 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NA LY S IDOEAerosolContributions

  19. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  20. Free energy of Lorentz-violating QED at high temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gomes; T. Mariz; J. R. Nascimento; A. Yu. Petrov; A. F. Santos; A. J. da Silva

    2010-02-25

    In this paper we study the one- and two-loop contribution to the free energy in QED with the Lorentz symmetry breaking introduced via constant CPT-even Lorentz-breaking parameters at the high temperature limit. We find the impact of the Lorentz-violating term for the free energy and carry out a numerical estimation for the Lorentz-breaking parameter.

  1. Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

  2. NOAA Technical Report ERL 455-PMEL 43 A Time Series of Temperature, Salinity, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 September 1999 Contribution 2134 from NOAA/Pacific Marine Sea Shelf, 1995­1999 Ronald K. Reed Abstract. CTD (conductivity/temperature/depth) casts were taken

  3. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  4. Pionic contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergados, J. D. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 451 10 (Greece); Theory Division, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Faessler, Amand [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Toki, H. [RCNP, Osaka University, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    It is well known that neutrinoless double decay is going to play a crucial role in settling the neutrino properties, which cannot be extracted from the neutrino oscillation data. It is, in particular, expected to settle the absolute scale of neutrino mass and determine whether the neutrinos are Majorana particles, i.e. they coincide with their own antiparticles. In order to extract the average neutrino mass from the data, one must be able to estimate the contribution of all possible high mass intermediate particles. The latter, which occur in practically all extensions of the standard model, can, in principle, be differentiated from the usual mass term, if data from various targets are available. One, however, must first be able to reliably calculate the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. Such calculations are extremely difficult since the effective transition operators are very short ranged. For such operators processes like pionic contributions, which are usually negligible, turn out to be dominant. We study such an effect in a nonrelativistic quark model for the pion and the nucleon.

  5. Casimir effect in dielectrics: Surface area contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmen Molina-Paris; Matt Visser

    1997-07-08

    In this paper we take a deeper look at the technically elementary but physically robust viewpoint in which the Casimir energy in dielectric media is interpreted as the change in the total zero point energy of the electromagnetic vacuum summed over all states. Extending results presented in previous papers [hep-th/9609195; hep-th/9702007] we approximate the sum over states by an integral over the density of states including finite volume corrections. For an arbitrarily-shaped finite dielectric, the first finite-volume correction to the density of states is shown to be proportional to the surface area of the dielectric interface and is explicitly evaluated as a function of the permeability and permitivity. Since these calculations are founded in an elementary and straightforward way on the underlying physics of the Casimir effect they serve as an important consistency check on field-theoretic calculations. As a concrete example we discuss Schwinger's suggestion that the Casimir effect might be the underlying physical basis behind sonoluminescence}. The recent controversy concerning the relative importance of volume and surface contributions is discussed. For sufficiently large bubbles the volume effect is always dominant. Furthermore we can explicitly calculate the surface area contribution as a function of refractive index.

  6. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  7. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  8. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  9. UNISUPER DBD/Accumulation 2 -ELECTION TO CONTRIBUTE NORMAL CONTRIBUTION ON A BEFORE-TAX (SALARY SACRIFICE) BASIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    UNISUPER DBD/Accumulation 2 - ELECTION TO CONTRIBUTE NORMAL CONTRIBUTION ON A BEFORE-TAX (SALARY of Newcastle pay the employee contributions otherwise payable by me through a form of salary sacrifice: I acknowledge that: · The salary otherwise payable to me will be reduced by the normal contribution plus the 15

  10. High temperature storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-06-07

    A high temperature electrochemical cell is described comprising: a solid-state divalent cation conducting electrolyte; a positive electrode in contact with the electrolyte; a solid-state negative electrode contacting a divalent cation conducting molten salt mediating agent providing ionic mediation between the solid-state negative electrode and the solid-state electrolyte.

  11. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  12. Transition temperature in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.; Christ, N. H.; Mawhinney, R. D. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Datta, S.; Jung, C.; Schmidt, C.; Umeda, T. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Heide, J. van der; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Miao, C. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Karsch, F. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Petreczky, P. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Petrov, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the transition temperature in QCD with two light and one heavier (strange) quark mass on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=4 and 6. Calculations with improved staggered fermions have been performed for various light to strange quark mass ratios in the range, 0.05{<=}m-circumflex{sub l}/m-circumflex{sub s}{<=}0.5, and with a strange quark mass fixed close to its physical value. From a combined extrapolation to the chiral (m-circumflex{sub l}{yields}0) and continuum (aT{identical_to}1/N{sub {tau}}{yields}0) limits we find for the transition temperature at the physical point T{sub c}r{sub 0}=0.457(7) where the scale is set by the Sommer-scale parameter r{sub 0} defined as the distance in the static quark potential at which the slope takes on the value (dV{sub qq}(r)/dr){sub r=r{sub 0}}=1.65/r{sub 0}{sup 2}. Using the currently best known value for r{sub 0} this translates to a transition temperature T{sub c}=192(7)(4) MeV. The transition temperature in the chiral limit is about 3% smaller. We discuss current ambiguities in the determination of T{sub c} in physical units and also comment on the universal scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the chiral limit.

  13. Contribution to Fusion Materials Semiannual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marian, J; Meier, W

    2012-02-24

    The objectives of this work are the following: (1) The application of micro and mesoscale modeling techniques to study dislocation properties in ferritic and W-based materials; and (2) The development of computational models and tools to study damage accumulation in >1 dpa (fusion-like) conditions, both for Fe and W-based alloys. The high-temperature strength of structural ferritic alloys (ferritic/martensitic steels, ODS steels, bcc refractory alloys) hinges on the thermal stability of second phase particles and their interactions with dislocations. Irradiation damage can modify the structure and stability of both the particles and dislocations, particularly by the introduction of gas atoms, point defects and point defect clusters. The three aspects of materials strength that we are studying are: (a) Computation of dislocation mobility functions (stress-velocity relations) as a function of temperature and dislocation character. This will be done via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single dislocation motion under applied shear stress. This is a fundamental input to dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and also provides fundamental insights into the high-temperature plastic behavior of ferritic materials. (b) Simulations of dislocation-obstacle interactions using MD and DD. This subtask includes simulating the effect on dislocation glide of precipitates (e.g., {alpha}' Cr precipitates), ODS particles, and irradiation induced defect clusters (e.g. voids, dislocation loops, etc.). (c) Implementation of this information (dislocation mobilities and dislocation-defect interaction rules) into DD codes that will allow us to study plasticity of single crystals Fe alloys under relevant irradiation conditions.

  14. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  15. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  16. Citizen Science: Contributions to Astronomy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Carol; Smith, Arfon; Fortson, Lucy; Bamford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of everyday individuals to significant research has grown dramatically beyond the early days of classical birdwatching and endeavors of amateurs of the 19th century. Now people who are casually interested in science can participate directly in research covering diverse scientific fields. Regarding astronomy, volunteers, either as individuals or as networks of people, are involved in a variety of types of studies. Citizen Science is intuitive, engaging, yet necessarily robust in its adoption of sci-entific principles and methods. Herein, we discuss Citizen Science, focusing on fully participatory projects such as Zooniverse (by several of the au-thors CL, AS, LF, SB), with mention of other programs. In particular, we make the case that citizen science (CS) can be an important aspect of the scientific data analysis pipelines provided to scientists by observatories.

  17. Singles correlation energy contributions in solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimeš, Ji?í; Maggio, Emanuele; Kresse, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The random phase approximation to the correlation energy often yields highly accurate results for condensed matter systems. However, ways how to improve its accuracy are being sought and here we explore the relevance of singles contributions for prototypical solid state systems. We set out with a derivation of the random phase approximation using the adiabatic connection and fluctuation dissipation theorem, but contrary to the most commonly used derivation, the density is allowed to vary along the coupling constant integral. This yields results closely paralleling standard perturbation theory. We re-derive the standard singles of G\\"orling-Levy perturbation theory [G\\"orling and Levy, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 50}, 196 (1994)], highlight the analogy of our expression to the renormalized singles introduced by Ren and coworkers [Ren, Tkatchenko, Rinke, and Scheffler, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 106}, 153003 (2011)], and introduce a new approximation for the singles using the density matrix in the random phase approximation. ...

  18. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  19. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  20. Dirac Equation at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Chun-Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose finite temperature Dirac equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature for a relativistic particle of spin-1/2. When the temperature T=0, it become Dirac equation. With the equation, we can study the relativistic quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature.

  1. This guide is about how we can contribute to sustainability as part of the Royal Holloway community. Its aim is to enable all members of our community to contribute to an increasingly important agenda, so that we can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    next to hot radiators. When air conditioning is on keep doors and windows closed, when a comfortable temperature is reached or you leave the area switch the air conditioning off. Water You can contribute and clothes. The majority of buildings have at least one battery recycling point. Other Waste Other types

  2. Tetra(trihaptoallyl)zirconium(IV) Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 12,No. 7, 1973 1535 Contribution from the Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    Tetra(trihaptoallyl)zirconium(IV) Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 12,No. 7, 1973 1535 Contribution from of Interchange of the Syn and Anti Protons of Tetra(trihaptuallyl)zirconium(IV)l JEANNE K. KRIEGER,* J. M. DEUTCH, and GEORGE M. WHITESIDES* Received November 6, 1972 The temperature dependence of the H nmr spectrum of tetra(trihuptoallyl)zirconium

  3. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  4. Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances., Reader, M. C. and Jonsson, A. I. (2010) Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10. pp. 8803

  5. Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science You are...

  6. Using Laboratory Experiments to Better Understand Voluntary Contributions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jacob Forrest

    2014-07-16

    This dissertation covers three papers concerning voluntary contributions. There are competing theories as to why individuals contribute to projects which help others (e.g., charities); many of the theoretical models have ...

  7. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  8. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB 50 at low temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the sum ofmore »SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. Thus, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.« less

  9. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc, orbital cycles, glacial isostatic adjustment and tectonics. Each of these elements contribute different it to be directly observed. This project examined the contribution to sea-level change due to melting of ice from

  10. Motivation Our Results/Contribution Summary Title of the Talk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motivation Our Results/Contribution Summary Title of the Talk A.N. Author Department of Mathematics University of Somewhere Conference on Fabulous Presentations, 2013 #12;Motivation Our Results/Contribution Summary 1 Motivation The Basic Problem That We Studied Previous Work 2 Our Results/Contribution Main

  11. The Michigan Technological University Retirement Plans Roth Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are not eligible to make Roth IRA contributions because of high income The Roth option does not have adjusted gross income (AGI) limits. Want to make Roth contributions greater than the Roth IRA limit Contribution limits are higher than those of the Roth IRA, allowing you to maximize your after-tax retirement savings. Feel

  12. Essays on Voluntary Contribution with Private Information and Threshold Uncertainty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hui-Chun

    2014-07-08

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 3.4 Ex Ante Probability in the Sequential and Simultaneous Contribution Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 4.1 Example of Decision Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 4.2 Example... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 4.2 Ex Ante Probability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 4.3 Average Contribution in Three Treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 4.4 Equilibrium Strategy and Average Contribution for Each Value . . . 79 4.5 Average...

  13. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  14. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  15. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  16. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  17. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  18. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  19. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  20. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  1. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  2. Chemical Equilibration at the Hagedorn Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; C. Greiner; I. A. Shovkovy

    2007-03-23

    One important question in relativistic heavy ion collisions is if hadrons, specifically anti-hyperons, are in equilibrium before thermal freezeout because strangeness enhancement has long been pointed to as a signature for Quark Gluon Plasma. Because anti-baryons have long equilibration times in the hadron gas phase it has been suggested that they are "born" into equilibrium. However, Hagedorn states, massive resonances, which are thought to appear near the critical temperature, contribute to fast chemical equilibration times for a hadron gas by providing extra degrees of freedom. Here we use master equations to describe the interplay between Hagedorn resonances, pions, and baryon anti-baryon pairs as they equilibrate over time and observe if the baryons and anti-baryons are fully equilibrated within the fireball.

  3. Contribution of energy services to the Millennium Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contribution of energy services to the Millennium Development Goals and to poverty alleviation in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  4. State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project...

  5. Y-12 Site Office Recognized For Contributions To Combined Federal...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Site Office Recognized For Contributions To Combined Federal Campaign | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  6. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  7. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) Executive summary of a report on the...

  8. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  9. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  10. Molecular ferroelectric contributions to anomalous hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Jarvist M.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2014-08-01

    We report a model describing the molecular orientation disorder in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, solving a classical Hamiltonian parametrised with electronic structure calculations, with the nature of the motions informed by ab initio molecular dynamics. We investigate the temperature and static electric field dependence of the equilibrium ferroelectric (molecular) domain structure and resulting polarisability. A rich domain structure of twinned molecular dipoles is observed, strongly varying as a function of temperature and applied electric field. We propose that the internal electrical fields associated with microscopic polarisation domains contribute to hysteretic anomalies in the current-voltage response of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells due to variations in electron-hole recombination in the bulk.

  11. Quantum Chaos at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Caron; H. Jirari; H. Kröger; X. Q. Luo; G. Melkonyan; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2001-06-23

    We use the quantum action to study quantum chaos at finite temperature. We present a numerical study of a classically chaotic 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling. We construct the quantum action non-perturbatively and find temperature dependent quantum corrections in the action parameters. We compare Poincar\\'{e} sections of the quantum action at finite temperature with those of the classical action.

  12. Original article Contribution of different solutes to the cell osmotic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Contribution of different solutes to the cell osmotic pressure in tap and lateral and glutamine accounted for about two thirds of cell osmotic pressure with relative contributions depending by soluble sugars, glutamine and/or sodium according to location in the root system. Osmotic pressure

  13. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Contributions from Early Supernova Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich Contributions from Early Supernova Winds Sarah Benjamin Mentor: Steven Furlanetto was to determine the contributions to the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect from supernova winds at high redshift. In order, especially at asymptotic bounds. Finally, the Compton y-parameter of the supernova winds can be found using

  14. GROW, EXPORT, ATTRACT, SUPPORT Universities' contribution to Scotland's economic growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    GROW, EXPORT, ATTRACT, SUPPORT Universities' contribution to Scotland's economic growth #12;Contents Summary Grow 3 Export 5 Attract 10 Support 21 #12;Universities are recognised throughout the world to grow the GVA it contributes to Scotland. Universities have a growing export role, with international

  15. Contribution of Sulfonate Groups and Alginate to Heavy Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Contribution of Sulfonate Groups and Alginate to Heavy Metal Biosorption by the Dry Biomass of heavy metal complexation by the dry biomass of the brown seaweed Sargassum fluitans was investigated. However, sulfonate groups can also contribute, to a lower extent, to heavy metal binding, particularly

  16. The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States, 2006 Brad Gentner Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-94 November 2008 #12;#12;The Economic for Fisheries #12;ii Suggested citation: Gentner, Brad, and Scott Steinback. 2008. The Economic Contribution

  17. RECHARGEABLE HIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2014-01-01

    F. Eshman, High-Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleS. Sudar, High Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleHIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES Elton J. Cairns January 1981 TWO-

  18. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  19. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  20. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  1. Microlaminated high temperature intermetallic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W.; Larsen, M. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)); Heathcote, J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The thrust to weight ratio of aircraft engines is limited by the density and elevated temperature capability of high temperature turbine materials. Single crystal superalloys, which are the current state-of-the-art in high temperature turbine blade materials, have limited potential for further increases in temperature capability. High temperature intermetallics offer the advantage of higher specific strength and higher temperature capability, but lack ductility and fracture toughness below 1,000 C. By compositing these very high temperature intermetallics with ductile metals, toughening may be improved to the point where the composites have applicability in aircraft engine turbine sections. Lamination of ductile metals with continuous intermetallic layers offers one means of producing such composites. Small lamellae thicknesses may have advantages related to intrinsic defect sizes and the effectiveness of ductile reinforcements in load-controlled applications where strength is important. Intermetallic composites will require a refractory metal for toughening because of the need for metal strength at temperatures above 1,100 C. Niobium-base alloys were selected as the toughening layer in this study because of experience with oxidation-resistant niobium alloys with low densities compared to superalloys and the existence of metal-intermetallic systems in equilibrium at high temperatures. Two microlaminated composite systems, Nb[sub 3]Al-Nb and Cr[sub 2]Nb(Cr) were chosen for microstructural and mechanical property evaluation. The choice of systems was partially based upon knowledge of phase relations between the metal and the intermetallic compositions.

  2. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided.

  3. Low-Temperature Scintillation Properties of CaWO4 Crystals for Rare-Event Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivers, M v; Di Stefano, P C F; Erb, A; Gütlein, A; Lanfranchi, J -C; Münster, A; Nadeau, P; Piquemal, M; Potzel, W; Roth, S; Schreiner, K; Strauss, R; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Zöller, A

    2015-01-01

    In prospect of its application in cryogenic rare-event searches, we have investigated the low-temperature scintillation properties of CaWO4 crystals down to 3.4 K under {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} excitation. Concerning the scintillation decay times, we observe a long component in the ms range which significantly contributes to the light yield below 40K. For the first time we have measured the temperature dependence of the {\\alpha}/{\\gamma}- ratio of the light yield. This parameter which can be used to discriminate {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} events in scintillating bolometers is found to be about 8-15% smaller at low temperatures compared to room temperature.

  4. Effect of coal rank and process conditions on temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.; Moniz, M.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor in the integrated TSL process is studied. The effects of gas and slurry superficial velocities, process solvent characteristics, reactor length, and catalyst sulfiding agent on the exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are studied. A substantial temperature difference is observed with subbituminous coal as compared with bituminous coal, at comparable reactor conditions. Some of the factors that are believed to have contributed to the large exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are slow kinetics and high reaction heat for subbituminous coal conversion and pyrrhotite catalysis.

  5. Survival of charged rho condensation at high temperature and density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hao; Huang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The charged vector $\\rho$ mesons in the presence of external magnetic fields at finite temperature $T$ and chemical potential $\\mu$ have been investigated in the framework of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We compute the masses of charged $\\rho$ mesons numerically as a function of the magnetic field for different values of temperature and chemical potential. The self-energy of the $\\rho$ meson contains the quark-loop contribution, i.e. the leading order contribution in $1/N_c$ expansion. The charged $\\rho$ meson mass decreases with the magnetic field and drops to zero at a critical magnetic field $eB_c$, which means that the charged vector meson condensation, i.e. the electromagnetic superconductor can be induced above the critical magnetic field. Surprisingly, it is found that the charged $\\rho$ condensation can even survive at high temperature and density. At zero temperature, the critical magnetic field just increases slightly with the chemical potential, which indicates that the charged $\\rho$ condensatio...

  6. Technique for thermodynamic crystallization temperature of brine fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.E.; Hubbard, J.T.

    1983-03-01

    The application of high density solids free brine fluids has proven to be technically and economically successful in hydrocarbon completion and workover operations. The use of inorganic salts such as calcium chloride, calcium bromide, zinc bromide, and sodium bromide has contributed to the development of complex salt systems. As the density and complexity of these systems becomes more detailed, the requirement for proper fluid design becomes increasingly important. When a brine solution is cooled sufficiently, a temperature is reached where the solution will be saturated. A further decrease in temperature will result in the precipitation of salt from the solution. The temperature at which this transpires, provided no super-cooling occurs, is the crystallization point of the solution. A correctly formulated solids free brine should have the optimum crystallization point for the temperature conditions it will encounter. A recently developed semiautomatic procedure constructs a cooling curve plot of each brine tested. This cooling curve plot allows the determination of the super-cooling potential, the Thermodynamic Crystallization Temperature, and the Last Crystal To Dissolve Temperature. The device provides a permanent record of the cooling curve with repeatable accuracy, which assists in the development of error free brine formulation tables, brine density, and/or crystallization point adjustments, and brine analysis.

  7. The radial temperature distribution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    The radial temperature distribution of a constricted oxygen arc in plasma arc cutting Sung Je Kim Gas supply, O2 RHF Starter 2 Components of cutting system Cutting torch components Plasma Arc Cutting High Temperature & Plasma Laboratory University of Minnesota #12;Rotating anode Torch body Power Supply

  8. New High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    -TEMPERATURE superconductors, materials that carry electricity without resistance at temperatures inexplicably far above one finds its target. Computa- tional biologists in Germany and the United States offered bold new plenty going for them. They're abundant and carbon-free, and their prices are dropping. But they're part

  9. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  11. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  13. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature...

  15. Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Presents concept for hermetic encapsulation of TE modules...

  16. Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions

  17. Electrostatic contribution from solvent in modulating single-walled carbon nanotube association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-09-21

    We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to compute the potential of mean force (PMF) between two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes solvated in pure nonpolarizable SPC/E and polarizable TIP4P-FQ water, at various temperatures. In general, the reversible work required to bring two nanotubes from a dissociated state (free energy reference) to contact state (free energy minimum) is more favorable and less temperature-dependent in TIP4P-FQ than in SPC/E water models. In contrast, molecular properties and behavior of water such as the spatially-resolved water number density (intertube, intratube, or outer regions), for TIP4P-FQ are more sensitive to temperature than SPC/E. Decomposition of the solvent-induced PMF into different spatial regions suggests that TIP4P-FQ has stronger temperature dependence; the opposing destabilizing/stabilizing contributions from intertube water and more distal water balance each other and suppress the temperature dependence of total association free energy. Further investigation of hydrogen bonding network in intertube water reveals that TIP4P-FQ retains fewer hydrogen bonds than SPC/E, which correlates with the lower water number density in this region. This reduction of hydrogen bonds affects the intertube water dipoles. As the intertube volume decreases, TIP4P-FQ dipole moment approaches the gas phase value; the distribution of dipole magnitude also becomes narrower due to less average polarization/perturbation from other water molecules. Our results imply that the reduction of water under confinement may seem trivial, but underlying effects to structure and free energetics are non-negligible.

  18. The Arabic Lexical Contributions to the English Language 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannon, Garland; Kaye, Alan S.

    2007-03-05

    The Arabic lexical contributions to the English language (2nd ed.) contains extensive additions to the main entries and their data from the original 1994 edition by Harrassowitz Verlag of Wiesbaden. It continues Cannon’s ...

  19. Open Access Policies and Practices for Increasing Scholarly Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willinsky, John

    2009-03-26

    John Willinsky, Professor of Education at Stanford University, presents "Open Access Policies and Practices for Increasing Scholarly Contributions," February 19, 2009 at the University of Kansas. Presentation sponsored by ...

  20. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Ahmad (Rochester, MN)

    2012-02-21

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together through a data communications network. Each compute node has a plurality of processors for use in collective parallel operations on the parallel computer. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention includes: transmitting, by each processor on each compute node, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on that compute node using intra-node communications; and transmitting on a designated network link, by each processor on each compute node according to a serial processor transmission sequence, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on the other compute nodes using inter-node communications.

  1. Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to ProgrammingLanguage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to Programming­Language Engineering David A pioneered the analysis of programming languages in terms of semantic features. Three of Strachey programming languages designed by programming­language experts? Sometimes they are, but the requirements

  2. Polyamine pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Nicole M.

    The full complement of molecular pathways contributing to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD) remains unknown. Here we address this issue by taking a broad approach, beginning by using functional MRI to identify ...

  3. Metalinguistic Awareness Contributions: Evidence from Spelling in Korean and English 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Sookkyung

    2012-11-26

    Metalinguistic awareness skills (i.e., phonological awareness, orthographic awareness, morphological awareness) contribute to children’s spelling as well as reading. Although the multidimensional nature of these metalinguistic ...

  4. Environmental Solutions FY05: PNNL Contributions to Fluor Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Paul A.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2006-02-12

    This report describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's scientific and technical contributions to Fluor Hanford in FY05. This includes work on the spent nuclear fuel basins as well as cribs and trenches.

  5. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  6. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  7. EM Highlights Advisory Board Contributions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement |toDepartmentContributesAdvisory Board Contributions

  8. The MAGIC Project: Contributions to ICRC 2005, Pune, India, Part 2: Future Plans and Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Albert i Fort

    2005-08-15

    Contributions by the MAGIC collaboration to ICRC 2005, Pune, India, Part 2: Future Plans and Developments (9 contributions)

  9. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  10. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  11. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1998-03-24

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub (x)},Eu{sub (y)}, wherein: 0.1 wt %{<=}x{<=}20 wt % and 0.1 wt %{<=}y{<=}20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  12. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan (Mississippi State, MS); Shah, Vimal (Houston, TX); Costley, R. Daniel (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Mississippi State, MS)

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W. Weber-induced Defects in HTS Practical Materials HTS4Fusion Conductor Workshop, KIT, 27 May 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Options / Materials "Demo" design (magnetic field, temperature, fluence

  14. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  15. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  16. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  17. Effect of moisture on leaf litter decomposition and its contribution to soil respiration in a temperate forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisneros-Dozal, Luz Maria; Trumbore, Susan E.; Hanson, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    The degree to which increased soil respiration rates following wetting is caused by plant (autotrophic) versus microbial (heterotrophic) processes, is still largely uninvestigated. Incubation studies suggest microbial processes play a role but it remains unclear whether there is a stimulation of the microbial population as a whole or an increase in the importance of specific substrates that become available with wetting of the soil. We took advantage of an ongoing manipulation of leaf litter 14C contents at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to (1) determine the degree to which an increase in soil respiration rates that accompanied wetting of litter and soil, following a short period of drought, could be explained by heterotrophic contributions; and (2) investigate the potential causes of increased heterotrophic respiration in incubated litter and 0-5 cm mineral soil. The contribution of leaf litter decomposition increased from 6 3 mg C m 2 hr 1 during a transient drought, to 63 18 mg C m 2 hr 1 immediately after water addition, corresponding to an increase in the contribution to soil respiration from 5 2% to 37 8%. The increased relative contribution was sufficient to explain all of the observed increase in soil respiration for this one wetting event in the late growing season. Temperature (13 C versus 25 C) and moisture (dry versus field capacity) conditions did not change the relative contributions of different decomposition substrates in incubations, suggesting that more slowly cycling C has at least the same sensitivity to decomposition as faster cycling organic C at the temperature and moisture conditions studied.

  18. Finite-temperature buckling of an extensible rod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshpreet Singh Bedi; Xiaoming Mao

    2015-07-09

    Thermal fluctuations can play an important role in the buckling of elastic objects at small scales, such as polymers or nanotubes. In this paper, we study the finite-temperature buckling transition of an extensible rod by analyzing fluctuation corrections to the elasticity of the rod. We find that, in both two and three dimensions, thermal fluctuations delay the buckling transition, and near the transition, there is a critical regime in which fluctuations are prominent and make a contribution to the effective force that is of order $\\sqrt{T}$. We verify our theoretical prediction of the phase diagram with Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despoja, V.; Marusic, L.

    2011-04-15

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  20. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  1. Lowest Order Hadronic Contribution to the Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Aubin; Tom Blum

    2005-09-20

    We present the most recent lattice results for the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment using 2+1 flavor improved staggered fermions. A precise fit to the low-q^2 region of the vacuum polarization is necessary to accurately extract the muon g-2. To obtain this fit, we use staggered chiral perturbation theory with the inclusion of the vector particles as resonances, to evaluate the vacuum polarization. We discuss the preliminary fit results and attendant systematic uncertainties, paying particular attention to the relative contributions of the pions and vector mesons.

  2. Towards using optical/NIR photometry to measure the temperature of O stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Maíz Apellániz; A. Sota

    2007-02-20

    It has been traditionally stated that it is not possible to use optical/NIR photometry to measure the temperatures of O stars. In this contribution we describe the steps required to overcome the hurdles that have prevented this from happening in the past and we present our preliminary results for the low-extinction case.

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Temperature and Cooling Management in Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Temperature and Cooling Management in Computing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2 Related work on cooling management . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3 Thesis contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Chapter 4 Thermal and Cooling Management in Multisocket CPU Servers 41 4.1 Multi-tier thermal

  4. Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles Juli tailpipe sources to motor vehicle volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Contributions were determined in a highway tunnel were used to define the composition of running vehicle emissions. The chemical mass balance

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON FUSION MAGNET COMPONENTS ­ 1: SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W, Austria Introduction: The ITER-Magnets, Neutron Spectra Low Temperature Superconductors Stabilizer HTS Conclusions WAMSDO Workshop, Geneva 14 November 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Overview: ITER 300

  6. Tuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbonammonia borane nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    the hydrogen storage properties. For example, the dehydrogenation temperature of ammonia borane (ABTuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites Saghar Sepehri, Betzaida temperature and kinetics of coherent carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites prepared by sol­gel synthesis

  7. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  8. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  9. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  10. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Holmes; N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2010-02-16

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50 degrees Celsius. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  11. Narrative Summary - February 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than normal, averaging 54.1F, 1.0 above normal (53.1 F). The warmest October (1988) averaged 59.6 F, while the coolest (1984) averaged 47.9 F. There were no temperature...

  12. Narrative Summary - February 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than normal, averaging 54.1F, 1.1 above normal (53.0 F). The warmest October (1988) averaged 59.6 F, while the coolest (1984) averaged 47.9 F. The following temperature...

  13. Microsoft Word - Test4.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average temperatures in the four cities monitored by this report (Chicago, Kansas City, New York, and Pittsburgh) were above normal most days during the last 2 weeks of December....

  14. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    river basin. The model is entitled "Monthly Operational Hydrometeorological Simulator (MOHS)." Use of the 30-day meteorological forecast categories of light, moderate, or heavy precipitation and below normal, near normal, or above normal temperature...

  15. Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings 12-30 annually for each 10F...

  16. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have...

  17. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  18. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low Temperature...

  19. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

  20. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  1. HYDROGEN SULFIDE -HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE - HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A Foundation. ii #12;HYDROGEN SULFIDE-HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 139

  2. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  3. Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use of Low Heat Rejection Concepts Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use...

  4. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  5. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  6. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  7. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D...

  8. EM Contributes Expertise to Comprehensive Resource on Managing Nuclear Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM officials wrote a chapter of a recently published book, Managing Nuclear Projects – A Comprehensive Management Resource, which covers a range of areas with emphasis on process, requirements and lessons learned. Authors from France, Germany, Argentina, Belgium, Finland, Austria, and the U.S. contributed to the book.

  9. Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems Nael N. Zaki, Michael K to the petroleum industry. Nonaqueous foams occur in the production of and refining of crude oil. Crude oil foams can pose major problems for operators of gas/oil separation plants, causing a loss of crude

  10. Contributions of Renewable Energy Resources to Re-source Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    1 Contributions of Renewable Energy Resources to Re- source Diversity George Gross, Fellow, IEEE Abstract This is a summary of the presentation on the panel entitled "Energy Resource Flexibility and Di, Resource Diversity, Resource Economics, Energy security, Inte- gration and Interconnection of Distributed

  11. The Timetable of Laminar Neurogenesis Contributes to the Specification of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polleux, Franck

    The Timetable of Laminar Neurogenesis Contributes to the Specification of Cortical Areas in Mouse on either side of the 17-18 border suggesting that there might be different timetables of laminar compute the timetable of laminar histogenesis from birthdating experiments. Here we report the results

  12. Physics Contribution Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Physics Contribution Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers. Re- sults showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels or subvolumes can be customized by varying the sizes of the released GNP and brachytherapy source type. These findings provide a useful basis

  13. Physics Contribution Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Physics Contribution Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined of brachytherapy spacers for in situ release of drug eluting nanoparticles to provide tissue residence therapy to enhance the therapeutic ratio Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source

  14. Plans for U.S. Contributions to ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics Laboratory (New Jersey) · Electric Power Systems · Diagnostics Savannah River National LaboratoryPlans for U.S. Contributions to ITER Ned Sauthoff Director, U.S. ITER Project Office Fusion Power built on Spallation Neutron Source set ­ Work Breakdown Structure ­ Configuration Control ­ Quality

  15. Contributed Paper Wood Density as a Conservation Tool: Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributed Paper Wood Density as a Conservation Tool: Quantification of Disturbance to easily identify areas of old-growth forest. The average density of the wood of a tree species is closely wood density can be used to quantify forest disturbance and conservation importance. The average

  16. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION The Physician-Scientist Career Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION The Physician-Scientist Career Pipeline in 2005 Build It, and They Will Come, the pipeline of physician- scientists has a serious problem, first de- scribed more than a generation ago.2-scientist career pipeline. Design We assessed recent trends in the physician-scientist career pipeline using data

  17. Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

  18. New Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be discarded lobster and crab shells. Microbial fuel cells produce energy when the microbes consume organicNew Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire Wednesday, 06 June 2007 According to Penn State researchers, the answer to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells under the sea may

  19. Desert Island Contribution --ASE Journal Software Engineering --A Human Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Desert Island Contribution -- ASE Journal Software Engineering -- A Human Activity Gerhard Fischer of software engineering? Without a doubt, different people will have very different answers to this question their ideas and visions. Software engineering (especially its upstream activities) is a human-oriented field

  20. Quantifying Individual Potential Contributions of the Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Quantifying Individual Potential Contributions of the Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer John A. Staser for the hybrid sulfur electrolyzer is controlled mainly by water transport in the cell. Water is required electrolyzer performance and operation. Experimental The experimental setup was the same as that described

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE The contribution of China's Grain to Green Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH ARTICLE The contribution of China's Grain to Green Program to carbon sequestration Dan Liu to forests. However, the magnitude and distribution of carbon sequestration induced by GGP remain unknown with large sequestration in southern China. The economic benefits of carbon sequestration from the GGP were

  2. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution: Vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PROGRAM NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE #12;#12; WINE GRAPE VINEYARDS AND WINERIES Crops Research Initiative Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, project number 2011 postconsumer waste material. #12; WINE GRAPE VINEYARDS AND WINERIES: ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION ii Table

  3. d Original Contribution ELECTROMECHANICAL WAVE IMAGING OF BIOLOGICALLY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    d Original Contribution ELECTROMECHANICAL WAVE IMAGING OF BIOLOGICALLY AND ELECTRICALLY PACED; in final form 26 August 2013) Abstract--Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) has been show capable of directly and entirely non-invasively mapping the trans mural electromechanical activation in all four

  4. A Comprehensive Contribution Factor Method for Congestion Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for congestion management by using network, generator and load contribution information. When congestion occurs be combined with demand side (load) management to solve the congestion. The congestion management scheme generator re-dispatching alone or combined with demand side management due to the availability of load

  5. Ethanol Can Contribute to Energy and Environmental Goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethanol Can Contribute to Energy and Environmental Goals Alexander E. Farrell,1 * Richard J. Plevin the potential effects of increased biofuel use, we evaluated six representative analyses of fuel ethanol studies indicated that current corn ethanol technologies are much less petroleum-intensive than gasoline

  6. The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe. Jan Manders Deputy President CEWEP 3rd of the Study Demonstrate amount of Renewable Energy generated by various Waste Processing Routes across Europe of the EU Binding Renewable Energy Targets 2020 in the Renewable Energy Directive 3 #12;Treatment of MSW

  7. Contribution to the Chapter on Wind Power Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution to the Chapter on Wind Power Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 Jørgen Lemming; Poul Power Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 Division: Division Risø-R-1674(EN) January 2008 Abstract turbines, are being implemented across all wind energy countries. The cost of wind-generated electricity

  8. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  10. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J. (Clinton, TN); Schulze, Gerald K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  11. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  12. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  13. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application of industrial heat pumps June 21 th 2012 J-L Peureux, E. Sapora, D. Bobelin EDF R&D #12;Achema 2012 Frankfurt There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq Heat exchanger = Cons ~ 0 CO2 ~ -100% Treq

  14. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  16. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  17. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  18. Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions Supply Chain Network Models for Humanitarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions Supply Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical Examples Conclusions 1 Contributions 2 Motivation 3 University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;Contributions Motivation Literature Models Synergy Measure Numerical

  19. Retirement Income Plan (Basic Plan) Salary Reduction Agreement Catch-up Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Retirement Income Plan (Basic Plan) Salary Reduction Agreement Catch-up Contribution IRS-up contribution limit. Option 1: Maximize My Catch-up Contributions on either a pre-tax or after-tax Roth Basis I

  20. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illiminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature. 3 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael (Livermore, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illuminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature.

  2. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  3. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  4. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  5. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  6. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  7. High Temperature | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature Cements Jump

  8. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Casanova, Sabrina; Dingus, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  9. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

    2006-09-12

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  10. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  11. Ted Geballe: A Lifetime of Contributions To Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, G R

    2015-01-01

    The editors have dedicated this special issue on superconducting materials "to Ted Geballe in honor of his numerous seminal contributions to the field of superconducting materials over more than 60 years, on the year of his 95th birthday." Here, as an executive summary, are just a few highlights of his research in superconductivity, leavened with some anecdotes, and ending with some of Teds general insights and words of wisdom.

  12. Single pion contribution to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen Thu Huong; Emi Kou; Bachir Moussallam

    2015-11-19

    We consider the simple one-pion exchange (Yukawa potential) contribution to the 2S hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen which had, until recently, been disregarded. We evaluate the relevant vertex amplitudes, in particular $\\pi^0\\mu^+\\mu^-$, combining low energy chiral expansions together with experimental data on $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ decays. The result for the 2S HFS is found to be small but not irrelevant.

  13. Athletic Success and Contributions to Universities’ Athletic Departments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Kenneth R

    2015-04-15

    with post-season play for football, basketball and baseball, and athletic sanctions or probation. Results for baseball suggest baseball has no significant impact on contributions. Both Grimes and Chressanthis (1994) and Rhoads and Gerking (2000) found... sanctions to decrease donations received by universities. Surprisingly, there have only been two studies, in my review of literature, looking into the effects of NCAA probation or sanctions on donations; both studies found significance decreases...

  14. Single pion contribution to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huong, Nguyen Thu; Moussallam, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    We consider the simple one-pion exchange (Yukawa potential) contribution to the 2S hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen which had, until recently, been disregarded. We evaluate the relevant vertex amplitudes, in particular $\\pi^0\\mu^+\\mu^-$, combining low energy chiral expansions together with experimental data on $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ decays. The result for the 2S HFS is found to be small but not irrelevant.

  15. EM Contributes to Joint Convention Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement |toDepartmentContributes to Joint Convention Meeting

  16. Data Contribution Best Practices Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us| Department ofDispositionDepartmentContribution

  17. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  18. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Marissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced FragmentationThermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced FragmentationAbstract While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF)

  19. Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

  20. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Huang; Leonid A. Sidorenkov; Rudolf Grimm

    2015-04-21

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy-dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are of importance for the precise determination of Efimov resonance positions from experiments at finite temperatures.

  1. The contribution of gas-phase reactions in the Pt-catalyzed conversion of ethane-oxygen mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, M.C.; Androulakis, I.P.; Sinfelt, J.H.; Reyes, S.C.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane on platinum-containing monoliths. The purpose of the work is to make a quantitative assessment of the extent to which homogeneous gas-phase reactions contribute to the overall conversion of the ethane. In making the analysis, extensive use is made of kinetic information obtained and compiled by A.M. Dean and associates for elementary homogeneous reaction steps and by L.D. Schmidt and associates for elementary surface reactions. A critical part of the analysis is concerned with accounting for the heat effects and for the reactor temperature gradient resulting therefrom. This is absolutely essential for meeting the objective of this investigation. The rise in temperature as the gases proceed through the reactor is responsible for a very substantial contribution of homogeneous gas-phase reactions in the chemical transformation occurring. one can view the process as a sequential one in which ethane is first oxidized on the platinum surface to CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the front region of the monolith. The formation of these products causes a substantial temperature increase that drives the dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene (and acetylene) in the gas phase. The heat required to sustain these endothermic reactions in the tail end of the reaction zone is supplied by exothermic gas-phase oxidation reactions that form additional H{sub 2}O and CO. Overall, the system can be viewed as one in which the catalyst initiates gas-phase chemistry through the acceleration of exothermic reactions at the front of the reactor which increase the downstream temperature to the point where gas-phase reactions occur readily.

  2. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  3. Holographic Calculation for Large Interval Rényi Entropy at High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we study the holographic R\\'enyi entropy of a large interval on a circle at high temperature for the two-dimensional CFT dual to pure AdS$_3$ gravity. In the field theory, the R\\'enyi entropy is encoded in the CFT partition function on $n$-sheeted torus connected with each other by a large branch cut. As proposed in 1412.0763, the effective way to read the entropy in the large interval limit is to insert a complete set of state bases of the twist sector at the branch cut. Then the calculation transforms into an expansion of four-point functions in the twist sector with respect to $e^{-\\frac{2\\pi TR}{n}}$. By using the operator product expansion of the twist operators at the branch points, we read the first few terms of the R\\'enyi entropy, including the leading and next-leading contributions in the large central charge limit. Moreover, we show that the leading contribution is actually captured by the twist vacuum module. In this case by the Ward identity the four-point functions can be derived from the correlation function of four twist operators, which is related to double interval entanglement entropy. Holographically, we apply the recipe in 1303.7221 and 1306.4682 to compute the classical R\\'enyi entropy and its 1-loop quantum correction, after imposing a new set of monodromy conditions. The holographic classical result matches exactly with the leading contribution in the field theory up to $e^{-4\\pi TR}$ and $l^6$, while the holographical 1-loop contribution is in exact agreement with next-leading results in field theory up to $e^{-\\frac{6\\pi TR}{n}}$ and $l^4$ as well.

  4. University of Illinois Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

  5. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic inelastic scattering contributions in kappa-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br - transport measurements under hydrostatic pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strack, C.; Akinci, C.; Paschenko, V.; Wolf, B.; Uhrig, E.; Assmus, W.; Schreuer, J.; Wiehl, L.; Schlueter, J.; Wosnitza, J.; Schweitzer, D.; Lang , M.; Materials Science Division; J.W. Goethe-Universitat Frankfurt; Inst.fur Festkorperphysik; Univ. Stuttgart

    2006-12-05

    Interlayer-resistivity measurements have been performed on a variety of single crystals of the quasi-two-dimensional organic superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br. These crystals, which have been synthesized along two somewhat different routes, reveal strongly sample-dependent resistivity profiles: while the majority of samples shows a more or less pronounced {rho}(T) maximum around 90 K with a semiconducting behavior above, some crystals remain metallic at all temperatures T {le} 300 K. In the absence of significant differences in the crystals' structural parameters and chemical compositions, as proved by high-resolution X-ray and electron-probe-microanalysis, these results indicate that real structure phenomena, i.e. disorder and/or defects, may strongly affect the inelastic scattering. Comparative resistivity measurements under He-gas pressure on two crystals with strongly differing {rho}(T) profiles indicate that these additional, sample-dependent scattering contributions are characterized by an extraordinarily strong pressure response which is highly non-monotonous as a function of temperature. No correlations have been found between the strength of these scattering contributions and other characteristic properties such as the glass transition at T{sub g} = 77 K, the temperature T* {approx} 40 K, where the temperature dependence of the resistivity changes rather abruptly, or the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}.

  6. Improved Durability of SOEC Stacks for High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Xiaoyu Zhang; Joseph J. Hartvigsen; Greg Tao

    2013-01-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient and sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology can be realized. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolyte-supported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), respectively, for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technologies developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, espectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. Optimization of electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyte-electrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  7. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  8. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The H+ Region Contribution to [C II] 158 Micron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. P. Abel

    2006-04-10

    The [C II] 158 micron line is an important emission line diagnostic in Photodissociation Regions (PDRs), but this emission line can also emerge from ionized gas. This work calculates the contribution of [C II] emission from ionized gas over a wide range of parameter space by considering the simplified case of an H+ region and PDR in pressure equilibrium. Additionally, these calculations also predict the strong correlation observed between [N II] 205 micron emission and [C II] discussed by previous authors. Overall, the results of these calculations have wide-ranging applications to the interpretation of [C II] emission in astrophysical environments.

  10. Contributing Data to the Fleet DNA Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    The Fleet DNA clearinghouse of commercial fleet transportation data helps vehicle manufacturers and developers optimize vehicle designs and helps fleet managers choose advanced technologies for their fleets. This online tool - available at www.nrel.gov/fleetdna - provides data summaries and visualizations similar to real-world 'genetics' for medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet vehicles operating within a variety of vocations. To contribute your fleet data, please contact Adam Duran of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at adam.duran@nrel.gov or 303-275-4586.

  11. LCLS - Contributions to the 20-Year BES Facilities Roadmap Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762Contributions to the

  12. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  13. Significant groundwater contribution to Antarctic ice streams hydrologic budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoffersen, Poul; Bougamont, Marion; Carter, Sasha P.; Fricker, Helen A.; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    2014-03-26

    et al., 1986; Rooney et al., 1987; Smith, 1997], so far this has only been directly observed at the Siple Coast, where samples collected in boreholes confirmed it to be till [Engelhardt et al., 1990], a glacially produced material with highly non... ] and (B) 2009 [Rignot et al., 2011]. With constant model geometry [Fretwell et al., 2013], climate [Arthern et al., 2006; Comiso, 2000], and geothermal heat flux [Maule et al., 2005; Shapiro and Ritzwoller, 2004], we converge ice temperature, effective...

  14. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  15. Variational Calculation for the Equation of State of Nuclear Matter at Finite Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kanzawa; K. Oyamatsu; K. Sumiyoshi; M. Takano

    2007-06-25

    An equation of state (EOS) for uniform nuclear matter is constructed at zero and finite temperatures with the variational method starting from the realistic nuclear Hamiltonian composed of the Argonne V18 and UIX potentials. The energy is evaluated in the two-body cluster approximation with the three-body-force contribution treated phenomenologically so as to reproduce the empirical saturation conditions. The obtained energies for symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter at zero temperature are in fair agreement with those by Akmal, Pandharipande and Ravenhall, and the maximum mass of the neutron star is 2.2 Msolar. At finite temperatures, a variational method by Schmidt and Pandharipande is employed to evaluate the free energy, which is used to derive various thermodynamic quantities of nuclear matter necessary for supernova simulations. The result of this variational method at finite temperatures is found to be self-consistent.

  16. Recent Developments in High Temperature Superconductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hor, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    New material systems and the experimental progress of high temperature superconductivity are briefly reviewed. We examine both oxides and non-oxides which exhibit stable and/or unstable superconductivity at high temperatures....

  17. Preparation for Warmer Temperatures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparation for Warmer Temperatures Preparation for Warmer Temperatures April 2, 2014 - 11:05am Addthis Ceiling fans are a great way to efficiently cool your house in the summer. |...

  18. Thermal transition temperature from twisted mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Burger; Ernst-Michael Ilgenfritz; Malik Kirchner; Maria Paola Lombardo; Michael Müller-Preussker; Owe Philipsen; Carsten Urbach; Lars Zeidlewicz

    2010-09-20

    We present the current status of lattice simulations with N_f=2 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions at finite temperature. In particular, the determination of the thermal transition temperature is discussed.

  19. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  20. Many-Body Contributions to Green's Functions and Casimir Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Shajesh; M. Schaden

    2011-03-15

    The multiple scattering formalism is used to extract irreducible N-body parts of Green's functions and Casimir energies describing the interaction of N objects that are not necessarily mutually disjoint. The irreducible N-body scattering matrix is expressed in terms of single-body transition matrices. The irreducible N-body Casimir energy is the trace of the corresponding irreducible N-body part of the Green's function. This formalism requires the solution of a set of linear integral equations. The irreducible three-body Green's function and the corresponding Casimir energy of a massless scalar field interacting with potentials are obtained and evaluated for three parallel semitransparent plates. When Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed on a plate the Green's function and Casimir energy decouple into contributions from two disjoint regions. We also consider weakly interacting triangular--and parabolic-wedges placed atop a Dirichlet plate. The irreducible three-body Casimir energy of a triangular--and parabolic-wedge is minimal when the shorter side of the wedge is perpendicular to the Dirichlet plate. The irreducible three-body contribution to the vacuum energy is finite and positive in all the cases studied.

  1. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-06-30

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card. 8 figs.

  2. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  3. Agenda: High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG) meeting on May 18, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia

  4. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

    2011-07-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  5. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  7. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON FUSION MAGNET COMPONENTS Harald W. Weber Vienna Stabilizer Insulation Conclusions ESS, 4th High Power Targetry Workshop, Malmö 5 May 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Overview: ITER 300-500 s INTRODUCTION #12;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS ITER Magnet System (5 K / 6.5 K

  8. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  9. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  10. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

  11. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  12. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Reichert, Patrick (Hayward, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  13. Additional resonant contribution to the potential model for the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Katsuma

    2014-04-15

    The additional resonant contribution to the potential model is examined in $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C elastic scattering and the low-energy $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction. The excitation function of elastic scattering below $E_{c.m.}= 5$ MeV seems to be reproduced by the potential model satisfactorily, and it is not profoundly disturbed by the additional resonances. The weak coupling is good enough to describe the $^{16}$O structure in the vicinity of the $\\alpha$-particle threshold, especially below $E_{c.m.}= 8$ MeV, corresponding to the excitation energy $E_x \\approx 15$ MeV. The additional resonances give the complement of the astrophysical $S$-factors from the simple potential model. The $S$-factor of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at $E_{c.m.}=300$ keV is dominated by the $E$2 transition, which is enhanced by the subthreshold 2$^+_1$ state at $E_x= 6.92$ MeV. The contribution from the subthreshold 1$^-_1$ state at $E_x= 7.12$ MeV is predicted to be small. The additional resonances do not give the large contribution to the thermonuclear reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at helium burning temperatures.

  14. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vollman, Russell E. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  15. Finite-temperature effects on a triatomic Efimov resonance in ultracold cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Bo; Grimm, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We report a thorough investigation of finite-temperature effects on three-body recombination near a triatomic Efimov resonance in an ultracold gas of cesium atoms. Our measurements cover a wide range from a near-ideal realization of the zero-temperature limit to a strongly temperature-dominated regime. The experimental results are analyzed within a recently introduced theoretical model based on a universal zero-range theory. The temperature-induced shift of the resonance reveals a contribution that points to an energy-dependence of the three-body parameter. We interpret this contribution in terms of the finite range of the van der Waals interaction in real atomic systems and we quantify it in an empirical way based on length scale arguments. A universal character of the corresponding resonance shift is suggested by observations related to other Efimov resonances and the comparison with a theoretical finite-temperature approach that explicitly takes the van der Waals interaction into account. Our findings are ...

  16. Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J.; Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th.; Delimitis, A.; Poulopoulos, P.; Fumagalli, P.; Politis, C.

    2012-09-01

    Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  17. Chiral perturbation theory of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift: polarizability contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Manuel Alarcón; Vadim Lensky; Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2013-12-04

    The proton polarizability effect in the muonic-hydrogen Lamb shift comes out as a prediction of baryon chiral perturbation theory at leading order and our calculation yields for it: $\\Delta E^{(\\mathrm{pol})} (2P-2S) = 8^{+3}_{-1}\\, \\mu$eV. This result is consistent with most of evaluations based on dispersive sum rules, but is about a factor of two smaller than the recent result obtained in {\\em heavy-baryon} chiral perturbation theory. We also find that the effect of $\\Delta(1232)$-resonance excitation on the Lamb-shift is suppressed, as is the entire contribution of the magnetic polarizability; the electric polarizability dominates. Our results reaffirm the point of view that the proton structure effects, beyond the charge radius, are too small to resolve the `proton radius puzzle'.

  18. Chiral perturbation theory of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift: polarizability contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The proton polarizability effect in the muonic-hydrogen Lamb shift comes out as a prediction of baryon chiral perturbation theory at leading order and our calculation yields for it: $\\Delta E^{(\\mathrm{pol})} (2P-2S) = 8^{+3}_{-1}\\, \\mu$eV. This result is consistent with most of evaluations based on dispersive sum rules, but is about a factor of two smaller than the recent result obtained in {\\em heavy-baryon} chiral perturbation theory. We also find that the effect of $\\Delta(1232)$-resonance excitation on the Lamb-shift is suppressed, as is the entire contribution of the magnetic polarizability; the electric polarizability dominates. Our results reaffirm the point of view that the proton structure effects, beyond the charge radius, are too small to resolve the `proton radius puzzle'.

  19. Contribution to environmental impact of different uses of industrial districts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corti, A.; Carnevale, E.

    2000-05-01

    Industrial districts are highly characteristic of Italian industry structure, with energy implication due to both electrical and thermal energy demand. The present study represents an environmental methodology approach applied to an area in the Tuscany region characterized by the presence of a high net power output cogeneration plant connected to paper mill processes. The cogeneration unit is based on a innovative gas turbine characterized by low atmospheric environmental impact. Additional impact due to cogeneration plant installation was evaluated in comparison with pollutant concentration levels due to existent energy conversion processes, using atmospheric diffusional models. A comparison was also made with respect to pollutant concentration contribute due to ordinary road and highway traffic emissions existent in the area.

  20. Contribution of mobile genetic elements to Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome plasticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Christopher [University of Washington, Seattle; Stolyar, Sergey [University of Washington; Chivian, Dylan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Pinel, Nicolas [University of Washington, Seattle; Gabster, Jeffrey [University of Washington, Seattle; Dehal, Paramvir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Yen, Huei-Che [University of Missouri, Columbia; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Stahl, David [University of Washington

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain DePue, a sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium isolated from heavy metal-impacted lake sediment, was completely sequenced and compared with the type strain D. vulgaris Hildenborough. The two genomes share a high degree of relatedness and synteny, but harbour distinct prophage and signatures of past phage encounters. In addition to a highly variable phage contribution, the genome of strain DePue contains a cluster of open-reading frames not found in strain Hildenborough coding for the production and export of a capsule exopolysaccharide, possibly of relevance to heavy metal resistance. Comparative whole-genome microarray analysis on four additional D. vulgaris strains established greater interstrain variation within regions associated with phage insertion and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  1. Horizontal displacements contribution to tsunami wave energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutykh, Denys; Chubarov, Leonid; Shokin, Yuriy

    2010-01-01

    The main reason for the generation of tsunamis is the deformation of the bottom of the ocean caused by an underwater earthquake. Usually, only the vertical bottom motion is taken into accound while the horizontal displacements are neglected. In the present paper we study both the vertical and the horizontal bottom motion while we propose a novel methodology for reconstructing the bottom coseismic displacements field which is transmitted to the free surface using a new three-dimensional Weakly Nonlinear (WN) approach. We pay a special attention to the evolution of kinetic and potential energies of the resulting wave while the contribution of horizontal displacements into wave energy balance is also quantified. Approaches proposed in this study are illustrated on the July 17, 2006 Java tsunami.

  2. The solar internetwork. I. Contribution to the network magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goši?, M.; Rubio, L. R. Bellot; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.

    2014-12-10

    The magnetic network (NE) observed on the solar surface harbors a sizable fraction of the total quiet Sun flux. However, its origin and maintenance are not well known. Here we investigate the contribution of internetwork (IN) magnetic fields to the NE flux. IN fields permeate the interior of supergranular cells and show large emergence rates. We use long-duration sequences of magnetograms acquired by Hinode and an automatic feature tracking algorithm to follow the evolution of NE and IN flux elements. We find that 14% of the quiet Sun (QS) flux is in the form of IN fields with little temporal variations. IN elements interact with NE patches and modify the flux budget of the NE either by adding flux (through merging processes) or by removing it (through cancellation events). Mergings appear to be dominant, so the net flux contribution of the IN is positive. The observed rate of flux transfer to the NE is 1.5 × 10{sup 24} Mx day{sup –1} over the entire solar surface. Thus, the IN supplies as much flux as is present in the NE in only 9-13 hr. Taking into account that not all the transferred flux is incorporated into the NE, we find that the IN would be able to replace the entire NE flux in approximately 18-24 hr. This renders the IN the most important contributor to the NE, challenging the view that ephemeral regions are the main source of flux in the QS. About 40% of the total IN flux eventually ends up in the NE.

  3. Low temperature sodium-beta battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-11-19

    A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

  4. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  5. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  6. Temperature monitoring device and thermocouple assembly therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimm, Noel P. (Monroeville, PA); Bauer, Frank I. (Perry Township, Lawrence County, PA); Bengel, Thomas G. (Plum Boro, PA); Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Mavretish, Robert S. (New Stanton, PA); Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Salton, Robert B. (Plum Boro, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A temperature monitoring device for measuring the temperature at a surface of a body, composed of: at least one first thermocouple and a second thermocouple; support members supporting the thermocouples for placing the first thermocouple in contact with the body surface and for maintaining the second thermocouple at a defined spacing from the body surface; and a calculating circuit connected to the thermocouples for receiving individual signals each representative of the temperature reading produced by a respective one of the first and second thermocouples and for producing a corrected temperature signal having a value which represents the temperature of the body surface and is a function of the difference between the temperature reading produced by the first thermocouple and a selected fraction of the temperature reading provided by the second thermocouple.

  7. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  8. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  9. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  10. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

    1997-05-06

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  11. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  12. How water contributes to pressure and cold denaturation of proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianco, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cold- and pressure-denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  13. Article published in Geothermics 47 (2013) 69-79 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geothermics.2013.02.005 1 Geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2013-01-01

    and projected district heating networks. This article focuses on a remaining issue: estimating the geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a district heating network over time when using an ATES. This result would and providing energy to a new low-temperature district heating network heating 7,500 housing-equivalents. Non

  14. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  15. Superfluid effects on gauging core temperatures of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wynn C. G. Ho

    2011-10-06

    Neutron stars accreting matter from low-mass binary companions are observed to undergo bursts of X-rays due to the thermonuclear explosion of material on the neutron star surface. We use recent results on superfluid and superconducting properties to show that the core temperature in these neutron stars may not be uniquely determined for a range of observed accretion rates. The degeneracy in inferred core temperatures could contribute to explaining the difference between neutron stars which have very short recurrence times between multiple bursts and those which have long recurrence times between bursts: short bursting sources have higher temperatures and normal neutrons in the stellar core, while long bursting sources have lower temperatures and superfluid neutrons. If correct, measurements of the lowest luminosity from among the short bursting sources and highest luminosity from among the long bursting sources can be used to constrain the critical temperature for the onset of neutron superfluidity.

  16. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  17. GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contribute...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk Designation GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk...

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass is fossil fuel combustion from gasoline- and diesel- powered vehicles and other industrial activities (e

  19. Show Me the Money! The Geography of Contributions to California's Proposition 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    4370.1037 Shin: The Geography of Contributions to Prop 8Space/American Place: Geographies of the Contemporary UnitedIssue 1 Show Me the Money! The Geography of Contributions to

  20. Show me the money! The geography of contributions to California's Proposition 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Space/American Place: Geographies of the Contemporary UnitedShow me the money! The geography of contributions toSeries Show me the money! The geography of contributions to

  1. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  2. Optical temperature indicator using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A reversible optical temperature indicator utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to various temperature levels. The thermochromic material is enclosed in an enamel which provides protection and prevents breakdown at higher temperatures. Cadmium sulfide is the preferred semiconductor material. The indicator may be utilized as a sign or in a striped arrangement to clearly provide a warning to a user. The various color responses provide multiple levels of alarm.

  3. Charmless 3-body B Decays: Resonant and Nonresonant contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Hai-Yang

    2007-01-01

    Charmless 3-body decays of $B$ mesons are studied using a simple model based on the framework of the factorization approach. We have identified a large source of the nonresonant signal in the matrix elements of scalar densities, e.g. $$. This explains the dominance of the nonresonant background in $B\\to KKK$ decays, the sizable nonresonant fraction of order $(35\\sim 40)%$ in $K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\bar K^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$ modes and the smallness of nonresonant rates in $B\\to \\pi\\pi\\pi$ decays. We have computed the resonant and nonresonant contributions to charmless 3-body decays and determined the rates for the quasi-two-body decays $B\\to VP$ and $B\\to SP$. Time-dependent CP asymmetries $\\sin2\\beta_{\\rm eff}$ and $A_{CP}$ in $K^+K^-K_S,K_SK_SK_S,K_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K_S\\pi^0\\pi^0$ modes are estimated.

  4. The Contribution of the Cyclic Poets to the Aeneid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Martha Philippa

    1898-05-01

    t i n W i l l i a m s , M a r t h a P. 1«9S C o n t r i b u t i o n s of the cyc­ l i c p o e t s t o the Aeneid. The Contribution of the C y c l i c Poets to the ••Affneid. """^ { g ^ % Macrobius, Sat. IV, 17, speaking of the i n v e n t i 6 i r... t e d ) . 2. I l i a d . 3. L i t t l e I l i a d , by Lesches of M i t y l e n e . 4. A e t h i o p o s , by A r c t i n u s of M i l e t u s . 5. Sack of Ilium^TTXc' oo ir^/Qtrul ), by A r c t i n u s , 6. N o s t o r , by Aglas of Troezon. 7...

  5. Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

    2013-05-11

    This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

  6. High-flux magnetorheology at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocalan, Murat

    Commercial applications of magnetorheological (MR) fluids often require operation at elevated temperatures as a result of surrounding environmental conditions or intense localized viscous heating. Previous experimental ...

  7. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories 2012 DOE...

  8. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  9. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm01laracurzio.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  10. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  11. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  12. High-temperature brazed ceramic joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarvinen, Philip O. (Amherst, NH)

    1986-01-01

    High-temperature joints formed from metallized ceramics are disclosed wherein the metal coatings on the ceramics are vacuum sputtered thereon.

  13. Low-Temperature Geothermal Projects Nationwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE Geothermal Technologies

    2013-04-01

    Poster of low-temperature and co-produced geothermal projects nationwide. This map poster summarizes completed, ongoing and proposed projects for FY14.

  14. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling...

  15. Low Temperature Performance Characterization | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization Low Temperature Performance Characterization Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in...

  16. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Areas Using A Neuronet Approach Abstract A method is proposed for predicting the distribution of temperatures in geothermal areas using the neuronet approach and, in particular,...

  17. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  18. Low Temperature/Coproduced/Geopressured Subprogram Overview ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This overview of GTP's Low TemperatureCoproducedGeopressured subprogram was given at GTP's Program Peer Review on May 18, 2010. overviewlowtemp.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  19. BARNSTEAD|THERMOLYNE CORPORATION High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    1 BARNSTEAD|THERMOLYNE CORPORATION High Temperature Muffle Furnace OPERATION MANUAL AND PARTS LIST ....................................................................................................................................................13 Furnace Connection: .........................................................................................................................13 General Operation of Furnace

  20. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  1. Low Temperature Material Bonding Techniq Ue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-08-06

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  2. Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA...

  3. Photonic crystals for high temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeng, Yi Xiang

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the design, optimization, fabrication, and experimental realization of metallic photonic crystals (MPhCs) for high temperature applications, for instance thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion ...

  4. Biodiesel's Enabling Characteristics in Attaining Low Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Discusses reasons and physical significance of cool-flame behavior of biodiesel on improving low temperature diesel combustion deer11jacobs.pdf More Documents &...

  5. Thermochemical Recuperation for High Temperature Furnaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    methods, in preheat combus- tion air temperatures. Applications in Our Nation's Industry Because both steam and CO 2 can be utilized in the TCR process, it is advantageous...

  6. Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Where to insulate. Adding insulation in the areas shown here may be...

  7. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: provide a directional drilling system that can be used at environmental temperatures of up to 300°C; and at depths of 10; 000 meters.

  8. Process c onditions pH, temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Process c onditions · hydraulic · cleaning · recovery · pH, temperature · pressure · ... Components treatment: organic and inorganic fouling, biofouling, energy use, cleaning the membranes, and dispos- ing

  9. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01

    Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  10. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stage expected to show a 5% fuel efficiency improvement in vehicle platform under US06 drive cycle caylor.pdf More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk...

  11. Low Temperature Catalyst for Fuel Injection System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A low temperature oxidation catalyst applied to a DOC and DPF combined with a unique fuel injection system remove soot from a diesel exhaust system.

  12. Tunable quantum temperature oscillations in graphene nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tunable quantum temperature oscillations in graphene nanostructures Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 4, 2016 Title: Tunable...

  13. Relativistic Random Phase Approximation At Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Y. F.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-08-26

    The fully self-consistent finite temperature relativistic random phase approximation (FTRRPA) has been established in the single-nucleon basis of the temperature dependent Dirac-Hartree model (FTDH) based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings. Illustrative calculations in the FTRRPA framework show the evolution of multipole responses of {sup 132}Sn with temperature. With increased temperature, in both monopole and dipole strength distributions additional transitions appear in the low energy region due to the new opened particle-particle and hole-hole transition channels.

  14. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Low-Temperature Laboratory Freezers Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature Laboratory Freezers Ultra-low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some...

  15. Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Fuel injection strategies to extend low temperature combustion...

  16. Develop NREL Center for Low Temperature Research/Project Data...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop NREL Center for Low Temperature ResearchProject Data Collection Develop NREL Center for Low Temperature ResearchProject Data Collection Project objective: Low-Temperature...

  17. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator A low temperature TEG has been built and tested providing...

  18. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Test results for low and high temperature thermoelectric...

  19. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  20. Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency The water...

  1. Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency May 29, 2012 - 7:42pm Addthis Managing Swimming Pool Temperature...

  2. Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    #12;Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy: A Social Contribution 11-373 #12;#12;1 Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy and Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Management University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822

  3. The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Angling Permit Holders in New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Angling Permit Holders in New Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-147 November 2014 #12;#12;The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Recommended citation: Hutt, Clifford, Sabrina Lovell, and George Silva. 2014. The Economic Contributions

  4. The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States, 2011 Sabrina J September 2013 #12;#12;The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States, 2011 Steinback, and James Hilger. 2013. The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United

  5. ND Atomic Theory 2005-1 Third-order negative-energy contributions to transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    ND Atomic Theory 2005-1 Third-order negative-energy contributions to transition amplitudes with one negative-energy intermediate state. Although second-order NES contributions to transition interaction and first-order in the interaction with the electromagnetic field) contributions to transition

  6. Contributions of vital rates to growth of a protected population of American black bears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Mike

    Contributions of vital rates to growth of a protected population of American black bears Michael S have evaluated such contributions of vital rates to l for American black bears (Ursus americanus). We sensitivity and elasticity analyses to examine the actual and potential contributions of variation of vital

  7. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-12-31

    Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc. is to develop a fundamental understanding of the above-listed issues. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of more realistic high temperature NSR catalysts, supplied by JM, are being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature. For this short summary, we will primarily highlight representative results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate high temperature NSR materials.

  8. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities' dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  9. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities` dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double_prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  10. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the undulators to {+-}0.01 C. This note describes the temperature measurement system under construction.

  11. Asymmetry energy of nuclear matter: Temperature and density dependence, and validity of semi-empirical formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordbar, G H; Taghizade, M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have done a completely microscopic calculation using a many-body variational method based on the cluster expansion of energy to compute the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. In our calculations, we have employed the $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. We have also investigated the temperature and density dependence of asymmetry energy. Our results show that the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter depends on both density and temperature. We have also studied the effects of different terms in the asymmetry energy of nuclear matter. These investigations indicate that at different densities and temperatures, the contribution of parabolic term is very substantial with respect to the other terms. Therefore, we can conclude that the parabolic approximation is a relatively good estimation, and our calculated binding energy of asymmetric nuclear matter is in a relatively good agreement with that of semi-empirical mass formula. However, for the accurate calculations, it is better to consider the effects of o...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  13. Prediction of martensite start temperature Mathew Peet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Prediction of martensite start temperature Mathew Peet September 23, 2014 Abstract Methods have been evaluated for the prediction of the martensite­ start temperature as a function of composition to the importance of phase transformations and heat treatments on the mechanical properties of steels, and due

  14. Introduction Importance of temperature in streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toran, Laura

    , fish reproduction, and aquatic metabolism rates. Nearly every species is temperature sensitive a downstream gradient as the surface water is exposed to solar radiation. Theurer et al. (1984) listed sources-radiation. Inverted temperature gradients (downstream cooling) have been observed where clear cutting exposed head

  15. High Temperature Electrochemistry Center - HiTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVay, G.; Williams, M.

    2005-01-27

    This presentation discusses the High Temperature Electrochemistry Center (HiTEC). The mission of HiTEC is to advance the solid oxide technology, such as solid oxide, high temperature electrolysers, reversible fuel cells, energy storage devices, proton conductors, etc., for use in DG and FutureGen applications, and to conduct fundamental research that aids the general development of all solid oxide technology.

  16. EVOLUTION OF THE CONTROL OF BODY TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    , is limited by the maximal oxygen consumption of an animal. If the demand for energy exceeds that which can in endotherms at relatively high levels. In this paper, I wish to discuss Comparative Physiology: Life in Water temperatures? Do animals necessarily have increased speed and stamina with increasing body temperatures

  17. Simulation of Top Oil Temperature for Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of Top Oil Temperature for Transformers Masters Thesis and Final Project Report Power of Mines Georgia Tech · Illinois · Iowa State · Texas A&M · Washington State · Wisconsin Simulation of Top-Oil for the PSERC project "On-Line Peak Loading of Substation Distribution Transformers Through Accurate Temperature

  18. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  19. Postgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    the volumetric risk of the energy units sold, rather than the price risk of each unit. Weather derivativesPostgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk: Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk. Main Supervisor: A. Alexandridis

  20. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  1. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  2. Source Temperatures and Sizes in Central Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; ALADIN collaboration

    1997-04-03

    For midrapidity fragments from central 50-200 AMeV Au+Au collisions temperatures from double ratios of isotopic yields were compared with temperatures from particle unbound states. Temperatures from particle unbound states with T = 4-5 MeV show with increasing beam energy an increasing difference to temperatures from double ratios of isotopic yields, which increase from T = 5MeV to T = 12MeV. The lower temperatures extracted from particle unstable states can be explained by increasing cooling of the decaying system due to expansion. This expansion is driven by the radial flow, and freeze out of particle unstable states might depend on the dynamics of the expanding system. Source sizes from pp-correlation functions were found to be 9 to 11 fm.

  3. Application of High Temperature Superconductors to Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarino, A

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, a large effort has been made by the scientific community to investigate this field towards a possible application of the new oxide superconductors to different devices like SMES, magnetic bearings, flywheels energy storage, magnetic shielding, transmission cables, fault current limiters, etc. However, all present day large scale applications using superconductivity in accelerator technology are based on conventional materials operating at liquid helium temperatures. Poor mechanical properties, low critical current density and sensitivity to the magnetic field at high temperature are the key parameters whose improvement is essential for a large scale application of high temperature superconductors to such devices. Current leads, used for transferring currents from the power converters, working at room temperature, into the liquid helium environment, where the magnets are operating, represent an immediate application of the emerging technology of high t...

  4. Thermoelectric refrigerator having improved temperature stabilization means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falco, Charles M. (Woodridge, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A control system for thermoelectric refrigerators is disclosed. The thermoelectric refrigerator includes at least one thermoelectric element that undergoes a first order change at a predetermined critical temperature. The element functions as a thermoelectric refrigerator element above the critical temperature, but discontinuously ceases to function as a thermoelectric refrigerator element below the critical temperature. One example of such an arrangement includes thermoelectric refrigerator elements which are superconductors. The transition temperature of one of the superconductor elements is selected as the temperature control point of the refrigerator. When the refrigerator attempts to cool below the point, the metals become superconductors losing their ability to perform as a thermoelectric refrigerator. An extremely accurate, first-order control is realized.

  5. Joint contributions of Ag ions and oxygen vacancies to conducting filament evolution of Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt memory device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Yu-Lung; Cheng, Wen-Hui; Chen, Wei-Chih; Jhan, Sheng-An; Chen, Jen-Sue; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-10-28

    The electroforming and resistive switching behaviors in the Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt trilayer structure are investigated under a continual change of temperatures between 300?K and 100?K to distinguish the contributions of Ag ions and oxygen vacancies in developing of conducting filaments. For either electroforming or resistive switching, a significantly higher forming/set voltages is needed as the device is operated at 100?K, as compared to that observed when operating at 300?K. The disparity in forming/set voltages of Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt operating at 300?K and 100?K is attributed to the contribution of oxygen vacancies, in addition to Ag atoms, in formation of conducting filament at 100?K since the mobilities of oxygen vacancies and Ag ions become comparable at low temperature. The presence of oxygen vacancy segment in the conducting filament also modifies the reset current from a gradually descending behavior (at 300?K) to a sharp drop (at 100?K). Furthermore, the characteristic set voltage and reset current are irreversible as the operation temperature is brought from 100?K back to 300?K, indicating the critical role of filament constituents on the switching behaviors of Ag/oxide/Pt system.

  6. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; ,

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  7. Proposal of room-temperature diamond maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang Jin; Matthias Pfänder; Nabeel Aslam; Sen Yang; Jörg Wrachtrup; Ren-Bao Liu

    2015-09-25

    Lasers have revolutionized optical science and technology, but their microwave counterpart, maser, has not realized its great potential due to its demanding work conditions (high-vacuum for gas maser and liquid-helium temperature for solid-state maser). Room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but under such conditions the lifetimes of emitters (usually electron spins) are usually too short (~ns) for population inversion. The only room-temperature solid-state maser is based on a pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal, which has long spin lifetime (~0.1 ms). This maser, however, operates only in the pulse mode and the material is unstable. Here we propose room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in diamond, which feature long spin lifetimes at room temperature (~10 ms), high optical pump efficiency, and material stability. We demonstrate that under readily accessible conditions, room-temperature diamond maser is feasible. Room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  8. Ultra-High Temperature Distributed Wireless Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Russell; Rumpf, Raymond; Coggin, John; Davis, Williams; Yang, Taeyoung; O'Donnell, Alan; Bresnahan, Peter

    2013-03-31

    Research was conducted towards the development of a passive wireless sensor for measurement of temperature in coal gasifiers and coal-fired boiler plants. Approaches investigated included metamaterial sensors based on guided mode resonance filters, and temperature-sensitive antennas that modulate the frequency of incident radio waves as they are re-radiated by the antenna. In the guided mode resonant filter metamaterial approach, temperature is encoded as changes in the sharpness of the filter response, which changes with temperature because the dielectric loss of the guided mode resonance filter is temperature-dependent. In the mechanically modulated antenna approach, the resonant frequency of a vibrating cantilever beam attached to the antenna changes with temperature. The vibration of the beam perturbs the electrical impedance of the antenna, so that incident radio waves are phase modulated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the vibrating beam. Since the beam resonant frequency depends on temperature, a Doppler radar can be used to remotely measure the temperature of the antenna. Laboratory testing of the guided mode resonance filter failed to produce the spectral response predicted by simulations. It was concluded that the spectral response was dominated by spectral reflections of radio waves incident on the filter. Laboratory testing of the mechanically modulated antenna demonstrated that the device frequency shifted incident radio waves, and that the frequency of the re-radiated waves varied linearly with temperature. Radio wave propagation tests in the convection pass of a small research boiler plant identified a spectral window between 10 and 13 GHz for low loss propagation of radio waves in the interior of the boiler.

  9. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

    1999-01-19

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

  10. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Ericson, M. Nance (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature.

  11. High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2008-02-05

    A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

  12. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  13. Managing water temperatures below hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.; Vermeyen, T.B.; O`Haver, G.G.

    1995-05-01

    Due to drought-related water temperature problems in the Bureau of Reclamation`s California Central Valley Project in the early 1990`s, engineers were forced to bypass water from the plants during critical periods. This was done at considerable cost in the form of lost revenue. As a result, an alternative method of lowering water temperature was developed and it has successfully lowered water temperatures downstream from hydroelectric facilities by using flexible rubber curtains. This innovative technology is aiding the survival of endangered fish populations. This article outlines the efforts and discusses the implementation of this method at several hydroelectric facilities in the area.

  14. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  15. Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-86-06-70.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 27871 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-86-06-70.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 LOW TEMPERATURE HEAT... RECOVERY FOR BOILER SYSTEMS James R. Shook & David B. Luttenberger FLUE GAS RESOURCES, INC. Toledo, Ohio ABSTRACT Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers desbgned to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 170 F or lower are now being...

  16. THERMAL REACTIONS OF OXYGEN ATOMS WITH ALKENES AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Michael D.; Price, Stephen D. E-mail: s.d.price@ucl.ac.uk

    2011-11-10

    Laboratory experiments show that the thermal heterogeneous reactions of oxygen atoms may contribute to the synthesis of epoxides in interstellar clouds. The data set also indicates that the contribution of these pathways to epoxide formation, in comparison to non-thermal routes, is likely to be strongly temperature dependent. Our results indicate that an increased abundance of epoxides, relative to the corresponding aldehydes, could be an observational signature of a significant contribution to molecular oxidation via thermal O atom reactions with alkenes. Specifically surface science experiments show that both C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O are readily formed from reactions of ethene and propene molecules with thermalized oxygen atoms at temperatures in the range of 12-90 K. It is clear from our experiments that these reactions, on a graphite surface, proceed with significantly reduced reaction barriers compared with those operating in the gas phase. For both the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + O and the C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O reactions, the surface reaction barriers we determine are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude compared with the barriers in the gas phase. The modeling of our experimental results, which determines these reaction barriers, also extracts desorption energies and rate coefficients for the title reactions. Our results clearly show that the major product from the O + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction is ethylene oxide, an epoxide.

  17. Self Contained Temperature Actuated Control Valves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirkle, F.

    1979-01-01

    There is a virtually unlimited potential for energy conservation by utilizing self contained temperature actuated valves. As steam costs soar it becomes more and more important to conserve feed stock dollars as well as the energy these dollars...

  18. Nonlinear high-temperature superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grady, Nathaniel K.

    We report the observation of a nonlinear terahertz response of split-ring resonator arrays made of high-temperature superconducting films. Intensity-dependent transmission measurements indicate that the resonance strength ...

  19. Temporal variations in temperature over Northeastern Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robby Douglas

    1994-01-01

    unavailable data from Northeastern Africa from 1900 to 1950, the data are analyzed to determine whether thermal patterns are identifiable in maximum and minimum temperatures over smaller scales in the tropics and sub-tropics. First, the Alexandersson Test...

  20. Photovoltaic cell efficiency at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Katherine Leung

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar cell could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic hybrid power generator, we tested the change in efficiency due to higher temperatures of three types of solar ...

  1. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  2. Temperature compensated two-mode fiber interferometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doma, Jagdish Ramchandra

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis we propose an innovative approach of designing and implementing a temperature compensated two-mode optical fiber interferometer in a control system of stabilizing the wavelength of a laser. We give the procedure for designing...

  3. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  4. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  5. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  6. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  7. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  8. Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altin, M.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

  9. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  10. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  11. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  12. High Temperature Materials for Aerospace Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczak, Andrea Diane

    2011-08-08

    ), bismaleimide (b), cyanate ester (c), and imide (d). ....................................................................................... 11 2.4 Use temperatures for common resin matrix composite materials. ............. 12 2.5 PMR-15 chemistry... properties.1-2 Additionally, fiber-reinforced high temperature polymer matrix composites are particularly attractive for aerospace structures because of their low density,2-3 high mechanical strength,2,4-10 high modulus,2,5,7-9 thermo-oxidative stability...

  13. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, focused on humidity, temperature and voltage testing, was originally presented by John Wohlgemuth at the NREL 2013 PV Module Reliability Workshop on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO. It summarizes the activities of a working group chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module life versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  14. Rotating sample holder at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, Sebastien; Perrin, Florian; Ciatto, Gianluca; Palancher, Herve; Steinmann, Ricardo [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-15

    A low temperature rotary device (cryoturbine) for use in extended x-ray-absorption fine structure measurements in fluorescence mode has been designed and manufactured. The instrument works at a temperature close to liquid Nitrogen and can reach frequencies up to 100 Hz with good stability. The rotation speed is measured with a light-emitting diode driven in stroboscopic mode by a simple electronic circuit.

  15. Global temperature deviations as a random walk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, O.

    1996-12-31

    Surface air temperature is the main parameter to represent the earth`s contemporary climate. Several historical temperature records on a global/monthly basis are available. Time-series analysis shows that they can be modelled via autoregressive moving average models closely connected to the classical random walk model. Fitted models emphasize a nonstationary character of the global/monthly temperature deviation from a certain level. The nonstationarity explains all trends and periods, found in the last century`s variability of global mean temperature. This means that the short-term temperature trends are inevitable and may have little in common with a currently increasing carbon dioxide amount. The calculations show that a reasonable understanding of the contemporary global mean climate is attainable, assuming random forcing to the climate system and treating temperature deviation as a response to it. The forcings occur due to volcanic eruptions, redistribution of cloudiness, variations in snow and ice covered areas, changes in solar output, etc. Their impact can not be directly estimated from changes of the earth`s radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, because actual measurements represent mixture of the forcings and responses. Thus, it is impossible empirically to separate the impact of one particular forcing (e.g., that due to increase of CO{sub 2} amount) from the sequence of all existing forcings in the earth climate system. More accurate modelling involving main feedback loops is necessary to ease such a separation.

  16. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Institut fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Koeln (Germany)

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  17. Finite temperature fermionic charge and current densities induced by a cosmic string with magnetic flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadi; E. R. Bezerra de Mello; A. A. Saharian

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the finite temperature expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field with nonzero chemical potential, $\\mu$, in the geometry of a straight cosmic string with a magnetic flux running along its axis. These densities are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from the particles and antiparticles. The charge density is an even periodic function of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the quantum flux and an odd function of the chemical potential. The only nonzero component of the current density corresponds to the azimuthal current. The latter is an odd periodic function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. At high temperatures, the parts in the charge density and azimuthal current induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux are exponentially small. The asymptotic behavior at low temperatures crucially depends whether the value $|\\mu|$ is larger or smaller than the mass of the field quanta, $m$. For $|\\mu|m$, the charge and current densities receive two contributions coming from the vacuum expectation values and from particles or antiparticles (depending on the sign of chemical potential). At large distances from the string the latter exhibits a damping oscillatory behavior with the amplitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance.

  18. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Henkel, Carsten [Theoretical Division, MS B213, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  19. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Contributions Index Vols. 1-39, 1938-1969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1970-01-01

    SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTIONS IndexMaurice. Blackburn, Maurice. Oceanography and the ecology ofPhleger) Sedimentology and oceanography of coastal lagoons

  20. Wind Power Plant Short Circuit Current Contribution for Different Fault and Wind Turbine Topologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents simulation results for SC current contribution for different types of WTGs obtained through transient and steady-state computer simulation software.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 contributes to gut microbe homeostasis in a model of infectious colitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    EJ: Intestinal host-microbe interactions under physiological9 contributes to gut microbe homeostasis in a model ofcolitis in mice. Background Microbe-microbe and host-microbe

  2. Potential for Electrified Vehicles to Contribute to U.S. Petroleum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Potential for Electrified Vehicles to Contribute to U.S. Petroleum and Climate Goals and Implications for Advanced Biofuels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential for...

  3. CTA Contributions to the 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Abeysekara, U; Abril, Ó; Acero, F; Acharya, B S; Actis, M; Agnetta, G; Aguilar, J A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A; Albert, A; Alcubierre, M; Alfaro, R; Aliu, E; Allafort, A J; Allan, D; Allekotte, I; Aloisio, R; Amans, J -P; Amato, E; Ambrogi, L; Ambrosi, G; Ambrosio, M; Anderson, J; Anduze, M; Angüner, E O; Antolini, E; Antonelli, L A; Antonucci, M; Antonuccio, V; Antoranz, P; Aramo, C; Aravantinos, A; Argan, A; Armstrong, T; Arnaldi, H; Arnold, L; Arrabito, L; Arrieta, M; Asano, K; Asorey, H G; Aune, T; Singh, C B; Babic, A; Backes, M; Bais, A; Bajtlik, S; Balazs, C; Balbo, M; Balis, D; Balkowski, C; Ballester, O; Ballet, J; Balzer, A; Bamba, A; Bandiera, R; Barber, A; Barbier, C; Barceló, M; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; Basso, S; Bastieri, D; Bauer, C; Baushev, A; Becciani, U; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Beckmann, V; Bednarek, W; Benbow, W; Ventura, D Benedico; Berdugo, J; Berge, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Bertucci, B; Besel, M -A; Bhatt, N; Bhattacharjee, P; Bhattachryya, S; Biasuzzi, B; Bicknell, G; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Billotta, S; Bilnik, W; Biondo, B; Bird, T; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Bitossi, M; Bigas, O Blanch; Blasi, P; Boehm, C; Bogacz, L; Bogdan, M; Bohacova, M; Boisson, C; Gargallo, J Boix; Bolmont, J; Bonanno, G; Bonardi, A; Bonifacio, P; Bonnoli, G; Borkowski, J; Bose, R; Bosnjak, Z; Bottani, A; Böttcher, M; Bousquet, J -J; Boutonnet, C; Bouyjou, F; Braiding, C; Brandt, L; Brau-Nogué, S; Bregeon, J; Bretz, T; Briggs, M; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brisken, W; Britto, R; Brocato, E; Brook, P; Brown, A M; Brun, P; Brun, P; Brunetti, G; Brunetti, L; Bruno, P; Bryan, M; Buanes, T; Bucciantini, N; Buchholtz, G; Buckley, J; Bugaev, V; Bühler, R; Bulgarelli, A; Bulik, T; Burton, M; Burtovoi, A; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Buss, J; Byrum, K; Cameron, R; Camprecios, J; Canelli, F; Canestrari, R; Cantu, S; Capalbi, M; Capasso, M; Capobianco, G; Caraveo, P; Cardenzana, J; Carius, S; Carlile, C; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Carosi, R; Carr, J; Carroll, M; Carter, J; Carton, P -H; Caruso, R; Casandjian, J -M; Casanova, S; Cascone, E; Casiraghi, M; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Catalanotti, S; Cavazzani, S; Cazaux, S; Cefalà, M; Cerchiara, P; Cereda, M; Cerruti, M; Chabanne, E; Chadwick, P; Champion, C; Chaty, S; Chaves, R; Cheimets, P; Chen, A; Chen, X; Chernyakova, M; Chiappetti, L; Chikawa, M; Chinn, D; Chitnis, V R; Cho, N; Christov, A; Chudoba, J; Cie?lar, M; Cillis, A; Ciocci, M A; Clay, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Colome, J; Colonges, S; Compin, M; Conforti, V; Connaughton, V; Connell, S; Conrad, J; Contreras, J L; Coppi, P; Corbel, S; Coridian, J; Corona, P; Corti, D; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Costa, A; Costantini, H; Cotter, G; Courty, B; Covino, S; Covone, G; Crimi, G; Criswell, S J; Crocker, R; Croston, J; Cusumano, G; Da Vela, P; Dale, Ø; D'Ammando, F; Dang, D; Daniel, M; Davids, I; Dawson, B; Dazzi, F; Costa, B de Aguiar; De Angelis, A; Cardoso, R F de Araujo; De Caprio, V; De Cesare, G; De Franco, A; De Frondat, F; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; de la Calle, I; De La Vega, G A; Lopez, R de los Reyes; De Lotto, B; De Luca, A; Neto, J R T de Mello; de Naurois, M; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; De Palma, F; Filho, L V de Souza; Decock, G; Deil, C; Del Santo, M; Delagnes, E; Deleglise, G; Delgado, C; della Volpe, D; Deloye, P; Depaola, G; Detournay, M; Dettlaff, A; Di Girolamo, T; Di Giulio, C; Di Paola, A; Di Pierro, F; Di Sciascio, G; Díaz, C; Dick, J; Dickinson, H; Diebold, S; Diez, V; Digel, S; Dipold, J; Disset, G; Distefano, A; Djannati-Ataï, A; Doert, M; Dohmke, M; Domainko, W; Dominik, N; Prester, D Dominis; Donat, A; Donnarumma, I; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Dournaux, J -L; Doyle, K; Drake, G; Dravins, D; Drury, L; Dubus, G; Dumas, D; Dumm, J; Durand, D; D'Urso, D; Dwarkadas, V; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Ebr, J; Echaniz, J C; Edy, E; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Einecke, S; Eisch, J; Eisenkolb, F; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsässer, D; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Engelbrecht, C; Engelhaupt, D; Ernenwein, J -P; Errando, M; Etchegoyen, A; Evans, P; Fairbairn, M; Falcone, A; Fantinel, D; Farakos, K; Farnier, C; Farrell, E; Farrell, S; Fasola, G; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Ferenc, D; Fernandez, A; Fernandez-Alonso, M; Ferreira, O; Fesquet, M; Fetfatzis, P; Fiasson, A; Filip?i?, A; Filipovic, M; Fink, D; Finley, C; Finley, J P; Finoguenov, A; Fioretti, V; Fiorini, M; Curcoll, R Firpo; Fleischhack, H; Flores, H; Florin, D; Föhr, C; Fokitis, E; Font, L; Fontaine, G; Fontes, B; Forest, F; Fornasa, M; Förster, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Fouque, N; Franckowiak, A; Franco, F J; Frankowski, A; Frega, N; Albuquerque, I Freire Mota; Coromina, L Freixas; Fresnillo, L; Fruck, C; Fuessling, M; Fugazza, D; Fujita, Y; Fukami, S; Fukazawa, Y; Fukuda, T; Fukui, Y; Funk, S; Gäbele, W; Gabici, S; Gadola, A; Galante, N; Gall, D D; Gallant, Y

    2015-01-01

    List of contributions from the CTA Consortium presented at the 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference, 30 July - 6 August 2015, The Hague, The Netherlands.

  4. Antiquark Makes Positive Contribution to Proton Spin | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Antiquark Makes Positive Contribution to Proton Spin Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science...

  5. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

    2006-01-01

    of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

  6. The Pierre Auger Observatory: Contributions to the 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohá?ová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Brogueira, P; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filip?i?, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; García, B; García-Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; G?as, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Hérve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A W Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Louedec, K; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mari?, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Martraire, D; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meissner, R; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; P?kala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; ?mia?kowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanca, D; Stani?, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of the Pierre Auger Collaboration to the 34th International Cosmic Ray Conference, 30 July - 6 August 2015, The Hague, The Netherlands

  7. Charmonium at finite temperature in quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Umeda; Kouji Nomura; Hideo Matsufuru

    2003-02-28

    We study charmonium correlators in pseudoscalar and vector channels at finite temperature using lattice QCD simulation in the quenched approximation. Anisotropic lattices are used in order to have sufficient numbers of degrees of freedom in the Euclidean temporal direction. We focus on the low energy structure of the spectral function, corresponding to the ground state in the hadron phase, by applying the smearing technique to enhance the contribution to the correlator from this region. We employ two analysis procedures: the maximum entropy method (MEM) for the extraction of the spectral function without assuming a specific form, to estimate the shape of the spectral function, and the standard $\\chi^2$ fit analysis using typical forms in accordance with the result of MEM, for a more quantitative evaluation. To verify the applicability of the procedures, we first analyze the smeared correlators as well as the point correlators at zero temperature. We find that by shortening the $t$-interval used for the analysis (a situation inevitable at $T>0$) the reliability of MEM for point correlators is lost, while it subsists for smeared correlators. Then the smeared correlators at $T\\simeq 0.9 T_c$ and $1.1 T_c$ are analyzed. At $T\\simeq 0.9 T_c$, the spectral function exhibits a strong peak, well approximated by a delta function corresponding to the ground state with almost the same mass as at T=0. At $T\\simeq 1.1 T_c$, we find that the strong peak structure still persists at almost the same place as below $T_c$, but with a finite width of a few hundred MeV. This result indicates that the correlators possess a nontrivial structure even in the deconfined phase.

  8. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisenko, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  9. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Fisenko; Igor Fisenko

    2010-06-27

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  10. Long-memory effects in linear-response models of Earth's temperature and implications for future global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rypdal, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A linearized energy-balance model for global temperature is formulated, featuring a scale-free long-range memory (LRM) response and stochastic forcing representing the influence on the ocean heat reservoir from atmospheric weather systems. The model is parametrized by an effective response strength, the stochastic forcing strength, and the memory exponent. The instrumental global surface temperature record and the deterministic component of the forcing are used to estimate these parameters by means of the maximum-likelihood method. The residual obtained by subtracting the deterministic solution from the observed record is analyzed as a noise process and shown to be consistent with a long-memory time-series model and inconsistent with a short-memory model. By decomposing the forcing record in contributions from solar, volcanic, and anthropogenic activity one can estimate the contribution of each to 20'th century global warming. The LRM model is applied with a reconstruction of the forcing for the last millenni...

  11. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 265.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 265.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probable of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecendented rate. The average change in phase is not coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.

  12. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, D.J. [AT& T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1995-04-07

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 365.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 365.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probably of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecedented rate. The average change in phase is now coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 80 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Linear response functions to project contributions to future Ricarda Winkelmann Anders Levermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    Linear response functions to project contributions to future sea level Ricarda Winkelmann · Anders linear response functions to separately estimate the sea-level contributions of thermal expansion to sea- level rise considered here, we will restrict the approach to linear response functions

  14. Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Security constrained control under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Security Secure control systems UC Berkeley #12;Motivation to study security of control systems. Our Results/Contribution. Summary. Outline. Motivation to study security of control systems. Distributed control systems

  15. 14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 T THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO- power to modern%, with these differences reflecting respective economic devel- opment. Hydro contributes 17% of the total world electricity hand, the interna- tional antidam lobby demands that major hydro developments be stopped altogether

  16. On Impedance Spectroscopy Contribution to Failure Diagnosis in Wind Turbine Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    On Impedance Spectroscopy Contribution to Failure Diagnosis in Wind Turbine Generators Mohamed Becherif1 , El Houssin El Bouchikhi2 and Mohamed Benbouzid2 Abstract ­ Wind turbines proliferation impedance spectroscopy contribution to the failure diagnosis of doubly-fed induction generator-based wind

  17. How ambitious can we be in contributing to the world's energy needs with bioenergy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How ambitious can we be in contributing to the world's energy needs with bioenergy, wind, solar on Sustainable Energies, Technical University of Denmark, 14 ­ 15 January 2009 #12;Editor: Henrik Bindslev Title: How ambitious can we be in contributing to the world's energy needs with bioenergy, wind, solar

  18. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INUIT ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TO UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRIBUTIONS OF INUIT ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TO UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE further research concerning the impacts of climate change. Since time immemorial, Inuit have made links in contributing an understanding of climate change impacts on the Bathurst caribou herd in Nunavut, Canada. Within

  19. IMPACTS ON U.S. ECONOMY NIH Funding Contributes Directly to Local Economies Across the Country

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    June 2015 IMPACTS ON U.S. ECONOMY NIH Funding Contributes Directly to Local Economies Across and supported 7 million jobs in 2011.4 The Impact of Genomics on the U.S. Economy report estimates that the $12 Healthier Citizens Lead to a Healthier Economy NIHfueled advances contribute to the health of the nation

  20. Managing Open Source Contributions for Software Project Sustainability Bhuricha Deen Sethanandha1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Bart

    is its leverage of outside innovation. All are free to take open source software and use it, evaluate it, application. An improved patch contribution process will lower the contribution barrier, helping to improve developer comes at high cost, particularly in mature OSS projects. It takes a significant amount of time

  1. Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone the turbulent burning velocity under the conditions corresponding to the thin reaction zones regime. Approaches turbulence on flam- elet burning velocity. An expression was derived to estimate the contribution of flame

  2. Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fringer, Oliver B.

    Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves S waves. Our results show that the contributions to the total energy flux from these additional terms as well as non- linearity. The partitioning of the incident internal wave energy over the course

  3. Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Contribution potential of glaciers to water availability in different climate regimes Georg Kaser availability in river systems under the influence of ongoing global climate change. We estimate the contribution potential of seasonally delayed glacier melt water to total water availability in large river

  4. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 73897400 Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 7389­7400 Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol estimate the contributions from biomass burning (summer wildfires, other fires, residential biofuel, and industrial biofuel) to seasonal and annual aerosol concentrations in the United States. Our approach

  5. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  6. Field Dependence of Blocking Temperature in Magnetite Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Goya; M. P. Morales

    2011-03-22

    Spherical magnetite nanoparticles having average particle size = 5 nm have been synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts in KOH with Polyvinylalcohol (PVA). The resulting dry powder displayed superparamgnetic (SPM) behaviour at room temperature, with a transition to a blocked state at TB ~ 45 K for applied field Happ = 500 Oe. The effect of dipolar interactions was investigated by measuring the dependence of TB on the applied field Hap and driven ac field in susceptibility data. A thermally activated model has been used to fit the dynamic data to obtain the single-particle energy barriers Ea = KeffV, allowing us to estimate the contributions of dipolar interactions to the single-particle effective magnetic anisotropy Keff. We have measured the dependence of TB with Hap in order to draw the transition contours of a H-T diagram. Two different regimes are found for the (TB-T0) ~H{\\lambda} dependence at low and high fields, that can be understood within a pure SPM relaxation-time (N\\'eel-Brown) landscape. The TB(H) data shows a crossover from {\\lambda} = 2/3 to {\\lambda} ~2 for applied magnetic fields of \\approx 550 Oe.

  7. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Baldwin, Charles; Cheng, Guangfeng; Flood, Roger; Jordan, Kevin; Kneisel, Peter; Morrone, Michael; Nemes, George; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  8. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  9. How temperature and pressure affect clear brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.T.

    1984-04-01

    The correct application of the expansivity and compressibility of brine fluids under the influence of temperature and pressure is needed to calculate the actual hydrostatic pressure in a well. Well operations can benefit by reducing unintentional overbalance, lessening fluid losses, and lowering recommended fluid densities, hence reducing fluid costs. Since the early 1970s, the effects of temperature and pressure on the density of clear brine fluids have been questioned. As early as 1973, studies were started to define density loss with increased temperature in zinc bromide brines. This article describes a continuing study, begun in 1978, which has characterized the expansivity and compressibility of single salt brine solutions, such as are used in workover and completion fluids.

  10. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Thorlacius, Larus; Zarembo, Konstantin; Krikun, Alexander; Kedem, Yaron

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  11. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynders, Steven Walton (Fogelsville, PA); Minford, Eric (Laurys Station, PA); Tressler, Richard Ernest (Boalsburg, PA); Taylor, Dale M. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  12. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  13. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alekseev, A

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  14. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  15. Effects of temperature and temperature shock on the performance and microbial community structure of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    in biogas pro- duction rate and biogas composition. However, temperature shocks resulted in an increase in biogas pro- duction temporarily. The SAnMBR could tolerate the 5 and 10 °C temperature shocks at 37 °C). The effects of digestion temperature and temperature shock on the biogas yields, temperature shocks

  16. Search for temperature and N/Z dependent effects in the decay of A=98 compound nuclei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moretto, S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Pesente, S.; Rizzi, V.; Viesti, G.; Barbui, M.; Cinausero, M.; Fioretto, E.; Prete, G.; Brondi, A.; Vardaci, E.; Lucarelli, F.; Azhari, A.; Tang, XD; Hagel, K.; Ma, Y.; Makeev, A.; Murray, M.; Natowitz, J. B.; Qin, L.; Smith, P.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Wada, R.; Wang, J.

    2004-01-01

    it would have a strong impact on the actual knowledge of the supernova collapse and explosion dynamics. A consistent temperature parametrization of the nuclear mass in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi model has also been proposed by Pi, Vinas... to better reflect the decay of the compound nucleus populated in the fusion reaction and to minimize the contribution from projectile breakup [20]. Furthermore, we note that the statistical uncertainties as- sociated with the experimental results...

  17. Low-temperature specific heat of rare-earth-doped silicate glasses D. A. van de Straat, J. Baak, and H. B. Brom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Thomas

    Low-temperature specific heat of rare-earth-doped silicate glasses D. A. van de Straat, J. Baak, The Netherlands Received 31 July 1995 The specific heat Cv of Pr3 - and Eu3 -doped silicate glasses has been for the two-level-system TLS contribution to the specific heat, Cv TLS . The values of Cv TLS and noticeably

  18. Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Cross-Cut Research | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Cross-Cut Research LES Applied to Low-Temperature, Diesel and Hydrogen...

  19. Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for Nano-scaled Circuits Seyab #12;#12;Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for Nano-scaled Circuits Proefschrift: Semiconductor reliability, Failure mechanisms, Negative Bias Temperature Instability, Failure monitoring, Static

  20. Graphical analysis facilitates evaluation of stream-temperature monitoring data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth W.; Lile, David F.; Lancaster, Donald L.; Porath, Marni L.; Morrison, Julie A.; Sado, Yukako

    2005-01-01

    of Forestry. 1994. Water temperature monitoring proto- col.evaluation of stream-temperature monitoring data Kenneth W.Service Fig. 1. Stream-temperature monitoring loca- tions on

  1. Graphical Analysis Facilitates Evaluation of Stream Temperature Monitoring Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth W; Lile, David; Lancaster, Donald; Porath, Marni; Morrison, Julie; Sado, Yukako

    2005-01-01

    of Forestry. 1994. Water temperature monitoring proto- col.evaluation of stream-temperature monitoring data Kenneth W.Service Fig. 1. Stream-temperature monitoring loca- tions on

  2. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truchan, Thomas G. (Chicago, IL); Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Foley, Robert (Chicago, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  3. Low temperature ion source for calutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veach, Allen M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jr., William A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Howell, Jr., George D. (Clinton, TN)

    1981-01-01

    A new ion source assembly for calutrons has been provided for the efficient separation of elements having high vapor pressures. The strategic location of cooling pads and improved insulation permits operation of the source at lower temperatures. A vapor valve constructed of graphite and located in a constantly increasing temperature gradient provides reliable control of the vapor flow from the charge bottle to the arc chamber. A pronounced saving in calutron operating time and equipment maintenance has been achieved with the use of the present ion source.

  4. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  5. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  6. Finite Temperature Lattice QCD with Clover Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Thomas A. DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; Jim Hetrick; Craig McNeile; Kari Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint; Matt Wingate

    1996-07-31

    We report on our simulation of finite temperature lattice QCD with two flavors of ${\\cal O}(a)$ Symanzik-improved fermions and ${\\cal O}(a^2)$ Symanzik-improved glue. Our thermodynamic simulations were performed on an $8^3 \\times 4$ lattice, and we have performed complementary zero temperature simulations on an $8^3 \\times 16$ lattice. We compare our results to those from simulations with two flavors of Wilson fermions and discuss the improvement resulting from use of the improved action.

  7. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL); Pardini, John A. (Brookfield, IL); Walker, David E. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  8. Grain-scale thermoelastic stresses and spatiotemporal temperature gradients on airless bodies, implications for rock breakdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molaro, Jamie L; Langer, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    Thermomechanical processes such as fatigue and shock have been suggested to cause and contribute to rock breakdown on Earth, and on other planetary bodies, particularly airless bodies in the inner solar system. In this study, we modeled grain-scale stresses induced by diurnal temperature variations on simple microstructures made of pyroxene and plagioclase on various solar system bodies. We found that a heterogeneous microstructure on the Moon experiences peak tensile stresses on the order of 100 MPa. The stresses induced are controlled by the coefficient of thermal expansion and Young's modulus of the mineral constituents, and the average stress within the microstructure is determined by relative volume of each mineral. Amplification of stresses occurs at surface-parallel boundaries between adjacent mineral grains and at the tips of pore spaces. We also found that microscopic spatial and temporal surface temperature gradients do not correlate with high stresses, making them inappropriate proxies for investig...

  9. On the Derivative Expansion for the Electromagnetic Casimir Free Energy at High Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Fosco; F. C. Lombardo; F. D. Mazzitelli

    2015-10-04

    We study the contribution of the thermal zero modes to the Casimir free energy, in the case of a fluctuating electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of real materials described by frequency-dependent, local and isotropic permittivity ($\\epsilon$) and permeability ($\\mu$) functions. Those zero modes, present at any finite temperature, become dominant at high temperatures, since the theory is dimensionally reduced. Our work, within the context of the Derivative Expansion (DE) approach, focusses on the emergence of non analyticities in that dimensionally reduced theory. We conclude that the DE is well defined whenever the function $\\Omega(\\omega)$, defined by $[\\Omega(\\omega)]^2 \\equiv \\omega^2\\epsilon(\\omega)$, vanishes in the zero-frequency limit, for at least one of the two material media involved.

  10. On the Derivative Expansion for the Electromagnetic Casimir Free Energy at High Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fosco, C D; Mazzitelli, F D

    2015-01-01

    We study the contribution of the thermal zero modes to the Casimir free energy, in the case of a fluctuating electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of real materials described by frequency-dependent, local and isotropic permittivity ($\\epsilon$) and permeability ($\\mu$) functions. Those zero modes, present at any finite temperature, become dominant at high temperatures, since the theory is dimensionally reduced. Our work, within the context of the Derivative Expansion (DE) approach, focusses on the emergence of non analyticities in that dimensionally reduced theory. We conclude that the DE is well defined whenever the function $\\Omega(\\omega)$, defined by $[\\Omega(\\omega)]^2 \\equiv \\omega^2\\epsilon(\\omega)$, vanishes in the zero-frequency limit, for at least one of the two material media involved.

  11. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  12. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  13. Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    Surface temperature trends in Russia over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole in Russia and nearby areas to reconstruct the ground surface temperature history (GSTH) over the past five centuries. The data are drawn principally from three regions: the Urals, southwest Siberia, and northeast

  14. Foliar respiration acclimation to temperature and temperature variable Q10 alter ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    of mass- and area-based foliar dark respiration, above ground net primary production (ANPP), and foliar respiration­ photosynthesis ratios. The Rdacclim algorithm adjusted dark respiration downwards at temperatures above 18 1C, and adjusted rates up at temperatures below 5 1C. The Q10var algorithm adjusted dark

  15. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption & Low-Temperature Desorption (HALD) Previous Next List Joos, Lennart; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Huck, Johanna M.; Van...

  16. High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

  17. Osmotic Heat Engine for Energy Production from Low Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Osmotic Heat Engine for Energy Production from Low Temperature Geothemal Resources Osmotic Heat Engine for Energy Production from Low Temperature Geothemal Resources Osmotic Heat...

  18. A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for the high temperature superconductivity. Summary Superconductivity enables the flow of electricity without any loss of energy, but this extremely-low temperature...

  19. High-Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging High-Temperature, Air-Cooled Traction Drive Inverter Packaging 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

  20. Roadmap Finalized for Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap Finalized for Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Technologies Roadmap Finalized for Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Technologies March 23, 2011 -...

  1. Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines 2012...

  2. Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  3. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx...

  4. Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature...

  5. Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Geothermal Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Geothermal Power Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Geothermal Power The Geothermal Technology Program (GTP)...

  6. Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative Fuels in a Motored Engine Low Temperature Heat Release Behavior of Conventional and Alternative Fuels in a...

  7. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Project objectives: Techno-economic analysis of the potential of...

  8. Low-temperature plasma-deposited silicon epitaxial films: Growth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low-temperature plasma-deposited silicon epitaxial films: Growth and properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-temperature plasma-deposited silicon epitaxial films:...

  9. Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Full Reviews: Low-temperature and Exploration Demonstration Projects Below are the project presentations and respective peer...

  10. Are ‘Class A’ temperature requirements realistic or desirable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Humphreys, Michael A.; de Dear, Richard; Zhang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Are ‘Class A’ Temperature Requirements Realistic orthe acceptability of three classes of temperature rangealternatively identified as Class A, B, and C, or Category

  11. Project Profile: Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems Project Profile: Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt...

  12. Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  13. Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  15. Caliente Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Caliente Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  16. Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  17. Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. Camperworld Hot Springs SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Camperworld Hot Springs SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  19. Charles Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Charles Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  20. Camp Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...