Sample records for above-normal temperatures contributing

  1. Effect of temperature on phonon contribution to Green function of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneeva, L. A., E-mail: korneeva_mila@mail.ru; Mazur, E. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The phonon contribution to the nodal electron Green function in cuprates is considered. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the real part of the self-energy component of the Green function for cuprates with a hole doping level close to optimal is described by the electron-phonon interaction in the framework of the extended Eliashberg model.

  2. Assessing the individual contributions of variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation to crop yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Andrew W.

    Short Title:15 Contributions, Temperature, Solar radiation, Precipitation, Crop yield16 Page 1 of 41 The results showed that year-to-year variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation28 in solar radiation showed the strongest isolated impact on simulated yields.34 Its decrease caused

  3. A Discussion of Testing Protocols and LANL's Contribution to High Temperature Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of LANL?s testing protocol work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003

  4. Meals & Lodging: No receipts required for meals within State of LA allowances. Receipts required for meals or lodging claimed above normal rates or at approved U.S. Department of State rates. Any meals included in the registration fee for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for meals or lodging claimed above normal rates or at approved U.S. Department of State rates. Any meals. See the Reimbursement Schedules on the back of this guide for meals & lodging reimbursement rates is prohibited. Conference Lodging: Travelers may be reimbursed for conference lodging at actual rates

  5. Contribution of ion beam analysis methods to the development of 2nd generation high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arendt, Paul N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holesinger, Terry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foltyn, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Depaula, Raymond F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the crucial steps in the second generation high temperature superconducting wire program was development of the buffer layer architecture. The architecture designed at the Superconductivity Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of several oxide layers wherein each layer plays a specific role, namely: nucleation layer, diffusion barrier, biaxially textured template, and an intermediate layer with a good match to the lattice parameter of superconducting Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) compound. This report demonstrates how a wide range of ion beam analysis techniques (SIMS, RBS, channeling, PIXE, PIGE, NRA, ERD) was employed for analysis of each buffer layer and the YBCO films. These results assisted in understanding of a variety of physical processes occurring during the buffet layer fabrication and helped to optimize the buffer layer architecture as a whole.

  6. Contributing to resilience Biodiversitymatters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributing to resilience Biodiversitymatters Results and experiences from the SwedBio Collaborative Programme 2003­2008 #12;Contributing to Resilience. Results and experiences from the Swed cover: Insitute for Culture and Ecology (ICE), ABN National Partner in Kenya (top left), Frej Wells (top

  7. Discovery from Contributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Winston H.

    Knowledge Discovery from Community- Contributed Multimedia Tao Mei Microsoft Research Asia Winston drastically increased the volume of community-contributed multimedia. For example, there are reportedly more. Such a vast amount of photos, videos, and music shared via websites is bound to exert a profound social impact

  8. Mervyn Hine's Contribution

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cérémonie avec plusieurs discours (qui?) et remarques pour honorer la contribution de Marvyn Hine qui prendra sa retraite. La célébration sera suivie d'un "vin d'honneur".

  9. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  10. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

  11. Contributed Papers - WCI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContract ManagementContributed

  12. Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

  13. IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Technology Impacts 5, 1 (2005) 39-58" #12;2 IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOCIOLOGY1 IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOCIOLOGY AND INFORMATION SYSTEM François contributions. Lastly, it seems that if sociology and IS sometimes diverge in the way they study sociotechnical

  14. 7, 77237765, 2007 Contribution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 7723­7765, 2007 Contribution of carbonaceous aerosol to CCN J. R. Pierce et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Contribution of carbonaceous aerosol to cloud condensation nuclei (jrpierce@andrew.cmu.edu) 7723 #12;ACPD 7, 7723­7765, 2007 Contribution of carbonaceous aerosol to CCN J. R

  15. High Performance Computing contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Computing contributions to DoD Mission Success 2002 #12;Approved for public/C nanotube in a field emitter configuration #12;HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING contributions tocontributions ­ SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Introduction 3 Overview of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program 3

  16. Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation A Short to Climate Change Mitigation, A Short Summary / Les herbiers de Magnoliophytes marines de Méditerranée: 1 Evolution of the average temperature and level of the sea since 1850 (after Climate Change 2007

  17. Contribution Vendredi 21 septembre 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    Contribution Vendredi 21 septembre 2012 Quelques points essentiels sur la formation initiale des .................................................................................... 3 2.2 Gestion des flux et professionnalisation de la formation impact, d'une manière ou d'une autre, sur l'enseignement supérieur, dans les Assises de l

  18. Environmental Contributions to Allergic Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    with increased exposure to air pollution and indoor contaminants such as house dust mites, cockroaches linked to the severity of allergic disease. The contribution of house dust mites, cockroaches, animal some of the strongest evidence sug- gests a compelling link between exposure to passive smoking

  19. Beamline Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1 PrintTemperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV

  20. Elastic contribution to interaction of vortices in uniaxial superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, Vladimir [Ames Laboratory, DOE; Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The stress caused by vortices in tetragonal superconductors contributes to the intervortex interaction which depends on vortex orientation within the crystal, on elastic moduli, and is attractive within certain angular regions even in fields along the c crystal axis. For sufficiently strong stress dependence of the critical temperature, this contribution may result in distortions of the hexagonal vortex lattice for H||c. In small fields it leads to formation of a square vortex lattice with a fixed H independent spacing. This should be seen in the magnetization M(H) as a discontinuous jump of magnetization at the transition from the Meissner to mixed states.

  1. IRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Impact: OTRS requires contributions on total compensation (salary plus benefits) without regardIRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs The OSU Defined Contribution Plan (DCP), (for Revenue Code 401(a). The Internal Revenue Code restrictions on employer-paid contributions make

  2. Contribution Games in Networks Elliot Anshelevich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution Games in Networks Elliot Anshelevich Martin Hoefer Abstract We consider network contribution games, where each agent in a network has a budget of effort that he can contribute to different collaborative projects or relationships. Depending on the contribution of the involved agents a relationship

  3. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  4. CONTRIBUTED A Survey of BGP Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Patrick Drew

    sometimes contribute to serious instabilities and outages. While many routing failures have limited impactCONTRIBUTED P A P E R A Survey of BGP Security Issues and Solutions The Border Gateway Protocol

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts to plant diversity at a forest scale.3% were within 4 m of an artefact and 8.4% were located on an artefact. The artefact contribution to total included or not in the artefact contribution. Road verges were the least frequent artefacts but provided

  6. Plant improvement Contribution of some agronomic traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Plant improvement Contribution of some agronomic traits to durum wheat performance in a dry, the contribution of these traits to genotype discrimination proved rather lim- ited when combined with grain yield; Contribution de quelques caractères agronomiques au rendement du blé dur dans une région mé- diterranéenne

  7. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Multidrug Resistance Among Persons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marathe, Achla

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Multidrug Resistance Among Persons With Tuberculosis in California, 1994- tinuestohaveasubstantialpublichealth impact, leading in 2003 to 233 deaths and more than 132 cases diagnosed among children younger

  8. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Pharmacogenetic Study of Statin Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posada, David

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Pharmacogenetic Study of Statin Therapy and Cholesterol Reduction Daniel I apolipoprotein E (APOE), apolipoprotein B (APOB), cho- lesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the LDL

  9. Contributions to Provable Security and Efficient Cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributions to Provable Security and Efficient Cryptography vom Fachbereich Informatik der culture. I am pleased to thank Prof. Johannes Buchmann. He supervised this thesis as a second referee. Remarkably, his contributions have not only been non-academic, but extensive discussions about redundant

  10. Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Biomedical Sciences Contributing to Progress in Human Health as a Leading Integrated Research and global impact. The University also strives to complement this breadth of scholarship with focus Medicine, Nature Genetics, Lancet and Science ­ Contribution to 68 out of the 395 `top' papers from

  11. Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotel, Olly

    Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements Orlena C. Z. Gotel & Anthony C, and hence trace, those who have contributed in the production and refinement of the requirements illustrate the relationship between RT and software quality. In Section 3, we show the restricted impact

  12. WILLIAM VICKREY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PUBLIC POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    WILLIAM VICKREY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PUBLIC POLICY October 1997 Richard Arnott Department of Economics.arnott@bc.edu #12;1 William Vickrey Contributions to Public Policy Bill Vickrey's cast of mind impact on public policy, there is good reason to believe that in the fullness of time his ideas

  13. BIODIVERSITY The contribution of newly established

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernatchez, Louis

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH The contribution of newly established populations to the dynamics of range River and estuary. We first determined genetic origins among several potential wild and cultured source, in Lake Memphremagog. Populations from the Maritime provinces and domestic strains do not contribute

  14. THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY TO THE ARIZONA ECONOMY FY 2009 A Report from Tempe, Arizona 85287-4011 #12;1 Executive Summary One approach to measuring the contribution goods and services. Another round of economic impacts arises from the consumer spending of faculty

  15. Turing's contributions to lambda calculus Henk Barendregta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio, Manzonetto

    Turing's contributions to lambda calculus Henk Barendregta , Giulio Manzonettoa,1 a Radboud for writing recursive programs in functional style. Turing contributed to this subject by providing a fixed Turing - His Work and Impact July 3, 2011 #12;Lambda abstraction is a `binder', therefore a variable x

  16. Cooperatives' contributions to a plural economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    23 Cooperatives' contributions to a plural economy Jérôme Blanc* and Denis Colongo** T he European economy(1) . The central theme of the conference was the contributions of cooperatives to a plural economy and solidarity economy and elsewhere, and some of them draw on Karl Polanyi's conceptual framework (a key

  17. Plans for US Contributions to ITER U.S. ITER Plans for US Contributions to ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    windings 75% cooling for divertor, vacuum vessel, ... 20% blanket/shield pellet injector tokamak exhaust supplies #12;Plans for US Contributions to ITER U.S. ITER Plans for US Contributions to ITER December 4 Exploring: - Seam-less tube conduit - Perforated central cooling tube #12;Plans for US Contributions to ITER

  18. Contributions to automated realtime underwater navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanway, Michael Jordan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents three separate-but related-contributions to the art of underwater navigation. These methods may be used in postprocessing with a human in the loop, but the overarching goal is to enhance vehicle ...

  19. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI)...

  20. Contributions to Metric Number Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dent, Alexander W.

    Contributions to Metric Number Theory Paul Rowe Technical Report RHUL­MA­2002­2 5 December 2002, Professor Glyn Harman, for sug- gestions of problems to attempt, helpful advice on methods and help

  1. Irish Contributions to International Science Fionn Murtagh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtagh, Fionn

    1 Irish Contributions to International Science Fionn Murtagh 1. Introduction The university and in related scientific, technological and cultural expression, but such a study will have to wait for another

  2. Corboy & Demetrio Award for Contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Corboy & Demetrio Award for Contributions to Improve Aviation Safety ©2003 PBI Media, LLC. Federal at the moment of impact. Most likely he had been driven out by the rain of melted plastic and the sudden

  3. The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

  4. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Persson, Per-Olof [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sutton, Brian D. [Department of Mathematics, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  5. Strings at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

  6. Phenomenological solar contribution to the 19002000 global surface N. Scafetta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Phenomenological solar contribution to the 1900­2000 global surface warming N. Scafetta1 and B. J 2006. [1] We study the role of solar forcing on global surface temperature during four periods on four scale-dependent empirical climate sensitive parameters to solar variations. We use two alternative

  7. Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite decomposition methodology, the solar signature on global surface temperature data using the ACRIM total solar minima during solar cycles 21­23 (1980­2002). We estimate that the ACRIM upward trend might have

  8. 6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

  9. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  10. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  11. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  12. Contribution of HD molecules in cooling of the primordial gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. O. Vasiliev; Yu. A. Shchekinov

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of HD molecules on thermochemical evolution of the primordial gas behind shock waves, possibly arised in the process of galaxy formation. We find the critical shock velocity when deuterium transforms efficiently into HD molecules which then dominate gas cooling. Above this velocity the shocked gas is able to cool down to the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. Under these conditions the corresponding Jeans mass depends only on redshift and initial density of baryons $M_J \\propto \\delta_c^{-0.5} (1+z)^{0.5}$. At $z\\simgt 45$ HD molecules heat shocked gas, and at larger redshift their contribution to thermal evolution becomes negligible.

  13. History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selman, Alan

    History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science John E. Savage Department of Computer from theoretical computer science have had enormous impact on the developement of programming languages and other areas of computer science. The impact of reseach in theoret­ ical computer science is now being

  14. CONTRIBUTED Privacy-AwareDesignPrinciples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Stephen

    CONTRIBUTED P A P E R Privacy-AwareDesignPrinciples for Information Networks In this paper a negative impact on both the individual and society, and the public's perception of engi- neered systems/demand response case study to illustrate the impact of the proposed design rules that protect individual privacy

  15. History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selman, Alan

    History and Contributions of Theoretical Computer Science John E. Savage Department of Computer from theoretical computer science have had enormous impact on the developement of programming languages and other areas of computer science. The impact of reseach in theoret- ical computer science is now being

  16. Contributions Carpe Diem and Slow Down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    whole civilisation has been founded on our technological developments to harness cheap energy--coal, oil, clean water, clean air, and a whole range of other "ecosystem services," as they are called. And our as important. Every adult across the planet July 2011 281 #12;Contributions does not just want access to clean

  17. SHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi S. Y. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (3HB/V), several addi- tional factors need to be examined during process analysis and economic and methods Process analysis and economic evaluation of P(3HB/V) production and recovery were carried outSHORT CONTRIBUTION J. Choi á S. Y. Lee Economic considerations in the production of poly(3

  18. Rise of the Biopsychosocial Model Psychoanalytic Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    Infant and Maternal Mortality #12;Rise of the Biopsychosocial Model Escalating Health Care Costs Factors Patterns of Illness Escalating Health Care Costs Research #12;The Mind-Body Relationship: Psychoanalytic contributing to increased costs: i) Technology ii) Insurance iii) Aging Population iv) Defensive Medicine v

  19. NYU Educational Robot With contributions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Bud

    assistant). 1.2 The Role of ED I Robot The ED I robot plays a key role in the entire project. ThusED I: NYU Educational Robot Bud Mishra With contributions from: M. Antoniotti, R. Even, F. Hansen & N. Silver Robotics & Manufacturing Research Lab Courant Institute, New York University #12; Abstract

  20. Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James R.

    Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning JAMES R. MILLER, MARTHA GROOM-use policy is increasingly being recognized as fundamental to biodiversity conservation in the United States to support the conservation of biodiversity at local scales. Yet little is known about the pervasiveness

  1. Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    4 Patent Reform: Aligning Reward and Contribution Carl Shapiro, University of California the current U.S. patent system allows patent holders to capture private rewards that exceed their social with the patent system and discourage in- novation by others. Economic efficiency is promoted if rewards to patent

  2. EIA Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    monitored for this report (Chicago, Kansas City, New York, and Pittsburgh), the composite daily average temperatures were above normal by double digits for 4 of 7 days; on...

  3. Microsoft Word - winter.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in the Midwest and the East remained above normal most days last week. The composite daily average temperatures for the four cities monitored for this report (Chicago,...

  4. EIA Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    monitored for this report (Chicago, Kansas City, New York City, and Pittsburgh), the composite average temperatures have ranged between 11 to 22 degrees above normal for most days...

  5. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  6. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  7. The HST contribution to neutron star astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Mignani

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    While isolated neutron stars (INSs) are among the brightest gamma-ray sources, they are among the faintest ones in the optical, and their study is a challenging task which require the most powerful telescopes. HST has lead neutron star optical astronomy yielding nearly all the identifications achieved since the early 1990s. Here, the major HST contributions in the optical studies of INSs and their relevance for neutron stars' astronomy are reviewed.

  8. Finite temperature Casimir effect for graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat V. Fialkovsky; Valery N. Marachevsky; Dmitri V. Vassilevich

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We adopt the Dirac model for quasiparticles in graphene and calculate the finite temperature Casimir interaction between a suspended graphene layer and a parallel conducting surface. We find that at high temperature the Casimir interaction in such system is just one half of that for two ideal conductors separated by the same distance. In this limit single graphene layer behaves exactly as a Drude metal. In particular, the contribution of the TE mode is suppressed, while one of the TM mode saturates the ideal metal value. Behaviour of the Casimir interaction for intermediate temperatures and separations accessible for an experiment is studied in some detail. We also find an interesting interplay between two fundamental constants of graphene physics: the fine structure constant and the Fermi velocity.

  9. Strange Quark Contribution to the Nucleon - (Dissertation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Darnell

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The strangeness contribution to the electric and magnetic properties of the nucleon has been under investigation experimentally for many years. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) gives theoretical predictions of these measurements by implementing the continuum gauge theory on a discrete, mathematical Euclidean space-time lattice which provides a cutoff removing the ultra-violet divergences. In this dissertation we will discuss effective methods using LQCD that will lead to a better determination of the strangeness contribution to the nucleon properties. Strangeness calculations are demanding technically and computationally. Sophisticated techniques are required to carry them to completion. In this thesis, new theoretical and computational methods for this calculation such as twisted mass fermions, perturbative subtraction, and General Minimal Residual (GMRES) techniques which have proven useful in the determination of these form factors will be investigated. Numerical results of the scalar form factor using these techniques are presented. These results give validation to these methods in future calculations of the strange quark contribution to the electric and magnetic form factors.

  10. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

  11. Contribution of muscular weakness to osteoporosis: Computational and animal models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gefen, Amit

    Contribution of muscular weakness to osteoporosis: Computational and animal models M. Be obtained herein indicate that muscular weakness may be an important factor contributing to osteoporosis. Ó

  12. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  13. High temperature probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  14. Ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in GaAs: Separation of surface and bulk contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Christian B; Tarasenko, Sergey A; Bieler, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We induce ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in a GaAs crystal employing interband excitation with femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature and non-invasively separate surface and bulk contributions to the overall current response. The separation between the different symmetry contributions is achieved by measuring the simultaneously emitted terahertz radiation for different sample orientations. Excitation intensity and photon energy dependences of the magneto-photocurrents for linearly and circularly polarized excitations reveal an involvement of different microscopic origins, one of which we believe is the inverse Spin-Hall effect. Our experiments are important for a better understanding of the complex momentum-space carrier dynamics in magnetic fields.

  15. Secondary Contribution Effects on BNCT Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, E.; Goncalves, M.; Pereira, W.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The aimed of this work consists of evaluating the influence of the dose secondary components (thermal neutrons dose, epithermal neutrons dose, fast neutrons dose and photon dose) in treatment planning with BNCT. MCNP4B Code was used to calculate RBE-Gy doses through the irradiation of the modified Snyder head phantom. A reduction of the therapeutical gain of monoenergetic neutron beans was observed in non invasive treatments, provoked for the predominance of the fast neutron dose component in the skin, showing that the secondary components of dose can to contribute more for to raise the healthy-tissue dose of that in the tumor, reducing the treatment efficiency.

  16. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

  17. Hydrogen contribution to the heat capacity of single phase, face centered cubic scandium deuteride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, M.; Richards, P.M.; Venturini, E.L.; Gieske, J.H.; Graeber, E.J.

    1986-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity at constant pressure, C/sub p/, of single-phase, face-centered cubic ScD/sub x/ (x = 1.75, 1.83, 1.91, and 1.99) was measured from room temperature to 950 K, and analyzed in terms of various contributions of the deuterium and metal constituents. Values ranged from approximately 40 to 80 J mol/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ with increasing temperature. The heat capacity at constant volume was assumed to be composed of lattice contributions from an acoustic vibrational mode, C/sup l/(a)/sub v/, and an optical vibrational mode, C/sup l/(o)/sub v/, plus an electronic contribution, C/sup e//sub v/. The acoustic part, C/sup l/(a)/sub v/, was evaluated as a Debye term with characteristic Debye temperatures calculated from measured values of temperature-dependent acoustic velocities and lattice constants. An isotope-adjusted Einstein temperature, derived from inelastic neutron scattering measurements on ScH/sub 2/, was used to find C/sup l/(o)/sub v/. The C/sup e//sub v/ term was evaluated from a published value of the electronic heat capacity constant for ScH/sub 2/ (assumed to be the same for ScD/sub 2/). Particular attention was paid to the dilation term, C/sup d/ = C/sub p/-C/sub v/, by evaluating it explicitly from the temperature-dependent volume expansion and elastic modulus.

  18. Pionic contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergados, J. D. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 451 10 (Greece); Theory Division, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Faessler, Amand [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Toki, H. [RCNP, Osaka University, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that neutrinoless double decay is going to play a crucial role in settling the neutrino properties, which cannot be extracted from the neutrino oscillation data. It is, in particular, expected to settle the absolute scale of neutrino mass and determine whether the neutrinos are Majorana particles, i.e. they coincide with their own antiparticles. In order to extract the average neutrino mass from the data, one must be able to estimate the contribution of all possible high mass intermediate particles. The latter, which occur in practically all extensions of the standard model, can, in principle, be differentiated from the usual mass term, if data from various targets are available. One, however, must first be able to reliably calculate the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. Such calculations are extremely difficult since the effective transition operators are very short ranged. For such operators processes like pionic contributions, which are usually negligible, turn out to be dominant. We study such an effect in a nonrelativistic quark model for the pion and the nucleon.

  19. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  20. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  1. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orange, T.W.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  2. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  3. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  4. Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Contribution 10 4 * 1,914 1,550 364 15 6 3 2,871 2,326 545 20 8 4 3,828 3,101 727 25 10 5 4,785 3,876 909 30 12,752 1,818 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total,742 4,651 1,091 75 30 5 4,785 3,876 909 80 32 4 3,828 3,101 727 85 34 3 2,871 2,326 545 90 36 3 2,871 2

  5. Contribution to Fusion Materials Semiannual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marian, J; Meier, W

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work are the following: (1) The application of micro and mesoscale modeling techniques to study dislocation properties in ferritic and W-based materials; and (2) The development of computational models and tools to study damage accumulation in >1 dpa (fusion-like) conditions, both for Fe and W-based alloys. The high-temperature strength of structural ferritic alloys (ferritic/martensitic steels, ODS steels, bcc refractory alloys) hinges on the thermal stability of second phase particles and their interactions with dislocations. Irradiation damage can modify the structure and stability of both the particles and dislocations, particularly by the introduction of gas atoms, point defects and point defect clusters. The three aspects of materials strength that we are studying are: (a) Computation of dislocation mobility functions (stress-velocity relations) as a function of temperature and dislocation character. This will be done via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single dislocation motion under applied shear stress. This is a fundamental input to dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and also provides fundamental insights into the high-temperature plastic behavior of ferritic materials. (b) Simulations of dislocation-obstacle interactions using MD and DD. This subtask includes simulating the effect on dislocation glide of precipitates (e.g., {alpha}' Cr precipitates), ODS particles, and irradiation induced defect clusters (e.g. voids, dislocation loops, etc.). (c) Implementation of this information (dislocation mobilities and dislocation-defect interaction rules) into DD codes that will allow us to study plasticity of single crystals Fe alloys under relevant irradiation conditions.

  6. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  7. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  8. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  9. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  10. Temperature Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, David

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

  11. Free energy of Lorentz-violating QED at high temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gomes; T. Mariz; J. R. Nascimento; A. Yu. Petrov; A. F. Santos; A. J. da Silva

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the one- and two-loop contribution to the free energy in QED with the Lorentz symmetry breaking introduced via constant CPT-even Lorentz-breaking parameters at the high temperature limit. We find the impact of the Lorentz-violating term for the free energy and carry out a numerical estimation for the Lorentz-breaking parameter.

  12. Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

  13. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

  14. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  15. Electron scattering by acceptor centers in p-Ag{sub 2}Te at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, F. F., E-mail: farzali@physics.ab.az; Jafarov, M. B.; Askerova, G. Z. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Gojaev, E. M. [Azerbaijan Technical University (Azerbaijan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant electron scattering in p-Ag{sub 2}Te at acceptor concentrations N{sub a} < 4.2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} has been observed in the temperature range of 50-80 K. The contribution of the resonant scattering to the temperature dependences of the conductivity {sigma}(T) and thermopower {alpha}{sub 0}(T) has been calculated. It is shown that this contribution exceeds that of charge carrier scattering by acoustic phonons.

  16. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  17. Amlioration des plantes Une contribution la slection simultane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Amélioration des plantes Une contribution à la sélection simultanée sur plusieurs caractères : l programmation linéaire, outil mathématique souvent utilisé en recherche opérationnelle, permet de compléter l Summary — A contribution to multitrait selection: the use of linear programming. Linear programming

  18. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  19. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply Here you will find the...

  20. Essays on Voluntary Contribution with Private Information and Threshold Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hui-Chun

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation concerns individual voluntary contributions in the subscription game with three important model considerations: private information on public good valuations, threshold uncertainty and the timing of the contribution — simultaneous...

  1. Using Laboratory Experiments to Better Understand Voluntary Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jacob Forrest

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers three papers concerning voluntary contributions. There are competing theories as to why individuals contribute to projects which help others (e.g., charities); many of the theoretical models have at their core...

  2. S71JUNE 2006STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2005 | ber to December, temperatures were over 3C above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produced livestock losses and reduced water levels on the Uruguay River, impact- ing hydroelectric normal, with eastern regions above normal and central and western region slightly below normal. Uruguay than normal in Uruguay. In contrast, cold air advection in September affected the eastern part

  3. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  4. Low Temperature Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

  5. Rubber friction: role of the flash temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    When a rubber block is sliding on a hard rough substrate, the substrate asperities will exert time-dependent deformations of the rubber surface resulting in viscoelastic energy dissipation in the rubber, which gives a contribution to the sliding friction. Most surfaces of solids have roughness on many different length scales, and when calculating the friction force it is necessary to include the viscoelastic deformations on all length scales. The energy dissipation will result in local heating of the rubber. Since the viscoelastic properties of rubber-like materials are extremely strongly temperature dependent, it is necessary to include the local temperature increase in the analysis. At very low sliding velocity the temperature increase is negligible because of heat diffusion, but already for velocities of order 0.01 m/s the local heating may be very important. Here I study the influence of the local heating on the rubber friction, and I show that in a typical case the temperature increase results in a decrease in rubber friction with increasing sliding velocity for v > 0.01 m/s. This may result in stick-slip instabilities, and is of crucial importance in many practical applications, e.g., for the tire-road friction, and in particular for ABS-breaking systems.

  6. Brief Contributions________________________________________________________________________________ Using Indexing Functions to Reduce Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    Brief Contributions context-based predictors for the same hardware budget. Therefore, the adverse impacts of conflict aliases

  7. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  8. The Authorship Dilemma: Alphabetical or Contribution? Margareta Ackerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Margareta

    to analyze the impact of author ordering schemes, we show that contribution-based ordering leads to a denserThe Authorship Dilemma: Alphabetical or Contribution? Margareta Ackerman UC San Diego maackerman under any contribution scheme, and, furthermore, the worst case occurs when ordering by contri- bution

  9. Some Experiences With The "Contributing Student Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    Some Experiences With The "Contributing Student Approach" John Hamer Department of Computer Science experiences with Collis' "contribut- ing student approach" in two computing courses. Depart- ing radically to share with other members of the class. Contributions are peer assessed, lectures become class meetings

  10. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff: In 2004, this award was called the Chancellor's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to the University Mr

  11. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff at the Centre for Mental Health Research, Ms Korten made a major contribution to the field of psychiatric

  12. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff contributions to the understanding of Austronesian languages of the Asia- Pacific region. He has received

  13. Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacci, Michael

    Factors Contributing to Ideal Instructional Interactivity Michael Yacci Paul Hyman Information are the factors that contribute to "ideal" instructional interactivity? In this study, subjects observed different and paralanguage. Introduction The purpose of this project was to determine factors that contribute to an "ideal

  14. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff. As his reputation and expertise grew, Professor Fox's contribution to the University also grew

  15. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff: In 2004, this award was called the Chancellor's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to the University

  16. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff's distinguished service to the University, in particular, his outstanding contribution to the establishment

  17. Identifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    and impact, and we show how it can find text passages that best summarize the original contributionIdentifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling Benyah Shaparenko Cornell that a document contributes to a corpus, focusing on self-referential diachronic corpora such as research pub

  18. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff. He is recognised internationally for his sustained and prolific contributions in the areas of history

  19. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  20. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin Patrick (Metamora, IL)

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  1. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE This award recognises staff and alumni of the University whose contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and alumni of the University whose contributions to the economic, cultural, scientific or social developmentCHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY This award recognises staff's achievements have contributed enormously to the ANU being recognized as a world-class centre for research

  2. Manufacturing High Temperature Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

  3. Condition-based maintenance contribution in machining system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as temperature, lubricating oil, contaminants, pressure, sound, and vibration [1, 7]. Fault detection (FD

  4. Gate-modulated thermoelectric conversion in disordered nanowires: I. Low temperature coherent regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Gate-modulated thermoelectric conversion in disordered nanowires: I. Low temperature coherent as promising thermoelectric devices1 . In comparison to their bulk counterparts, they provide opportunities of thermoelectric conversion at a given temperature T . Indeed, they allow to reduce the phonon contribution ph

  5. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  6. Thermionic Converter Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaner,B. J.; Wolf, Joseph H.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  7. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  8. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  9. Finite temperature topological order in 2D topological color codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Kargarian

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the topological order at finite temperature in two-dimensional color code is studied. The topological entropy is used to measure the behavior of the topological order. Topological order in color code arises from the colored string-net structures. By imposing the hard constrained limit the exact solution of the entanglement entropy becomes possible. For finite size systems, by raising the temperature, one type of string-net structure is thermalized and the associative topological entropy vanishes. In the thermodynamic limit the underlying topological order is fragile even at very low temperatures. Taking first the thermodynamic limit and then the zero-temperature limit and vice versa does not commute, and their difference is related only to the topology of regions. The contribution of the colors and symmetry of the model in the topological entropy is also discussed. It is shown how the gauge symmetry of the color code underlies the topological entropy.

  10. State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological...

  11. The contribution of strange quarks to the proton magnetic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dillon; G. Morpurgo

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with how to extract the s-s(bar) contribution to the proton magnetic moment from the experiments

  12. Y-12 Site Office Recognized For Contributions To Combined Federal...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    To ... Y-12 Site Office Recognized For Contributions To Combined Federal Campaign OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- Employees of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Y-12 Site...

  13. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) Executive summary of a report on the requirements needed...

  14. acid levels contribute: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sea level by 7 m. Keywords: sea level; ice sheet; Greenland; Antarctica; climate change 1 Huybrechts, Philippe 7 Contribution of the Active Site Histidine Residues of...

  15. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  16. The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

  17. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  18. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  19. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  20. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of ...

  1. POSITION PAPER Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    POSITION PAPER Modelling the Contribution Structure Underlying Requirements Orlena C. Z. Gotel, and hence trace, those who have contributed in the production and refinement of the requirements the restricted impact that conventional notions of RT can have on quality, and explain why extensions

  2. Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the Path of Least Resistance support from the MacArthur Foundation and the Sloan Foundation. #12;2 Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the Path of Least Resistance Abstract: We assess the impact on savings

  3. The emergence of cognitive abilities: The contribution of neuropsychology to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    chapter 1 The emergence of cognitive abilities: The contribution of neuropsychology to archaeology of hominins in their own develop- ment and to query about the impact of their activity in the emergence of new, and findings within contemporary cognitive science. This book will serve as an example of the contributions

  4. Identifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    Identifying the Original Contribution of a Document via Language Modeling Benyah Shaparenko the original ideas that a document contributes to a corpus, focusing on self-referential diachronic corpora such as research publications, blogs, email, and news articles. Our statistical model of passage impact defines

  5. INNOVATION IN SERVICES: THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DESIGN THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    INNOVATION IN SERVICES: THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DESIGN THEORY Sylvain LENFLE University of Cergy Technologies (ICTs) has a profound impact on service activities [7-9]. This is all the more true given who made a significant contribution to the formulation of the ideas and concepts that we will develop

  6. Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to ProgrammingLanguage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to Programming­Language Engineering David A's contributions---inductive defini­ tion of semantics, semantic­domain definitions, and calculi for semantic description---are presented, and their consequences on languages research are described. Strachey's impact

  7. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution: Vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution: Vineyards and Wineries of the North of Applied Economics IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: NORTHERN GRAPES PROJECT USDA, SPECIALTY CROPS RESEARCH INITIATIVE: ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION i Partners/Sponsors: Northern Grapes Project, which is funded by USDA's Specialty

  8. University of Massachusetts Economic Contribution Analysis FY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    University of Massachusetts Economic Contribution Analysis FY 2013 Prepared for the UMass President's Office Prepared by UMass Donahue Institute Economic and Public Policy Research May 2014 #12;University of Massachusetts Economic Contribution Analysis FY 2013 UMass Donahue Institute Economic and Public Policy Research

  9. Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    source is perennial snow, firn, or ice. We include all ice caps (ice sheets covering less than 50,000 km21 Seasonal glacier melt contribution to streamflow Neil Schaner Department of Civil is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution

  10. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is LSCF < PSCF < SSCF < YSCF < LSM. The button cell results agree with this ordering indicating that this is an important tool for use in developing our understanding of electrode behavior in fuel cells.

  11. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. Substantial progress has been made on both characterizing thin films as well as developing methods to produce films on nanoporous substrates. The results of electrical conductivity measurements on ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc nanocrystalline thin films under controlled oxygen partial pressure and temperature are presented. The experimental data have been interpreted using a defect model, which describes the interaction between Sc and oxygen vacancies resulting in the formation of donor - (Sc{sub Zr} - V{sub o} - e){sup x} and acceptor - (Sc{sub Zr}-h){sup x} levels. From this the electronic and ionic contribution to the electrical transport has been determined and correlated with the band structure. These results suggest that ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc possesses higher electronic conductivity than ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, which dominates the total conductivity in reducing atmospheres. This is an important result since it indicates that Sc-YSZ maybe useful in the anode regions of the cell. We have made important breakthroughs on depositing dense Ceria films on to porous LSM substrates. In previous studies we have found that in order to produce a surface which is smooth enough to coat with dense polymer precursor derived films, the required thickness of the colloidal film layer is determined by the maximum surface roughness. That is, if we wish to make 2 micron thick colloidal oxide layers, the roughness of the LSM surface can not exceed 2 microns. Currently, we are producing the composite CeO{sub 2}/LSM structures that can be coated with polymer precursor to produce 0.5 to 1.5 micron thickness dense YSZ films. In the next quarter, we will be testing SOFC's using these structures. YSZ/CeO{sub 2}/LSM composites have been formed by annealing at 800 C. Our studies show that the YSZ films are very dense with a 20 nm grain size. SOFC's using these composites are being fabricated and we expect to obtain cell data during the next quarter. As we reported in November 2000, we have had difficulties in making pore free films with larger areas that about 0.2cm{sup 2} which is due to problems in our clean room. Modifications have now been completed on the clean room and we should be approaching a class 100 in the film making area. This level of cleanliness is sufficient to obtain films without pores over areas up to 100cm{sup 2}.

  12. Chemical Equilibration at the Hagedorn Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; C. Greiner; I. A. Shovkovy

    2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    One important question in relativistic heavy ion collisions is if hadrons, specifically anti-hyperons, are in equilibrium before thermal freezeout because strangeness enhancement has long been pointed to as a signature for Quark Gluon Plasma. Because anti-baryons have long equilibration times in the hadron gas phase it has been suggested that they are "born" into equilibrium. However, Hagedorn states, massive resonances, which are thought to appear near the critical temperature, contribute to fast chemical equilibration times for a hadron gas by providing extra degrees of freedom. Here we use master equations to describe the interplay between Hagedorn resonances, pions, and baryon anti-baryon pairs as they equilibrate over time and observe if the baryons and anti-baryons are fully equilibrated within the fireball.

  13. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  14. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  15. Contribution la connaissance de l'exposition en habitacle automobile Contribution to Knowledge of exposure in carpassenger compartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Contribution à la connaissance de l'exposition en habitacle automobile Contribution to Knowledge'habitacle automobile. Pour ce faire, un véhicule a été équipé de deux analyseurs de NOx (TEI), d'un analyseur de CO, automobile, exposition, particules ultrafines, Nox. Abstract 1) Objectives During a typical day a person

  16. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  17. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report...

  18. Gluonic Spin Contribution to Proton Spin at NLO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Andrew [CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988, when the EMC results showed that the quarks had a much smaller contribution to the spin of the proton than previously thought, the 'Proton Spin Crisis' began. Since then, considerable effort has been directed into discovering the main contributors to proton spin and how much each contributes. One such contributor is the gluonic spin component. QCD NLO evolution equations are combined with boundary conditions obtained from heavy quark decoupling expressions to evolve the equations from infinity to the mass of the charm quark in order to determine the gluonic spin contribution.

  19. D.A. Stone A.J. Weaver Factors contributing to diurnal temperature range trends in twentieth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model repre- senting the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface systems. Consistent with past- ing trends stem from increases in the reflection of solar radiation by clouds moderated by decreases, when snow cover reduces the influence of changes in solar radiation and soil moisture. Decreases during

  20. Factors contributing to the degradation of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fibers under elevated temperature and humidity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Joseph M

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerated hydrolytic degradation tests that production procedures used to neutralize the acid present in the fibers have a beneficial effect on the hydrolytic performance of the fiber. The data collected in this study was then compared and contrasted...

  1. Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions to the LCWS99, Sitges, April 1999 TESLA Report 1999-20 #12;Contributions

  2. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  3. Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update is given on the work of the PV Quality Assurance Task Force; Group 3: studying the effects of humidity, temperature, and voltage bias.

  4. High Temperature Processing Symposium 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    } High temperature recycling operations } Materials sustainability } New furnace technology (including solar) We look forward to seeing you in February 2014. Dr M Akbar Rhamdhani (Chairman HTPS 2014) Prof

  5. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  6. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  7. Tuning the response of terahertz metamaterial at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ranjan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Weili [OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV; Tian, Zhen [OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV; Han, Jiaguang [NATIONAL UNIV OF SINGAPORE; Rockstukl, Carsten [FRIEDRICH-SCHILLER-UNIV JENA; Gu, Jianqiang [OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transmission response of planar thin film metamateriaJs were measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The behaviour of metamaterials at low temperatures is shown to have low-loss since the nonradiative losses are strongly suppressed due to higher metal film conductivity. We observe a temperature tunable effect and a gradual increase of 40% in the quality factor of the metamaterial. The emerging field of metamaterial (MM) has opened a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. Planar metamaterials are made of thin metal films with a thickness comparable to the skin depth. In spite of several newly found potential applications of these metafilms, practical use is often hindered by strong losses of the metallic elements. It causes a weakening and a damping of the resonance. This makes dissipation the property that dominates the light propagation. Therefore, the compensation of such losses is currently the most important topic to solve prior to advancing MMs to a higher level. Overall metamaterial losses typically have a radiative contribution, which can be tailored by suitable geometrical modifications, and a non-radiative contribution, associated to the intrinsic absorption of the light in the metal and/or dielectric. Thus, one way to improve their performance is to increase the conductivity of the metals. A simple technique to increase the metal conductivity is to cool it to low temperatures.

  8. Microsoft Word - winter.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Temperatures last week were again above normal in most parts of the country. The composite average daily temperatures in the Midwest and the East, as reported in the four...

  9. CHANCELLOR'S AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    . In addition to leading economic reforms in respect of industry and productivity, Mr Banks has introduced many contribution and commitment to making Australia a better and more prosperous place through economic reform

  10. Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    , Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.36 billion), which includes food service establishments (restaurants and bars) and retail food storesFE935 Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food Industries

  11. CONTRIBUTION A L'TUDE DES COMPORTEMENTS DYSFONCTIONNELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    [1] CONTRIBUTION A L'ÉTUDE DES COMPORTEMENTS DYSFONCTIONNELS DES AUDITEURS SENIORS : UNE APPROCHE MANAGÉRIALE (LE CAS FRANÇAIS) Inès GADDOUR, doctorante, Université Paris-Dauphine, ines avoir un impact significatif sur tels comportements. Ensuite, nous tenterons d'identifier d

  12. Brief Contributions________________________________________________________________________________ A Counter Architecture for Online DVFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eeckhout, Lieven

    Brief Contributions and practical way for estimating its impact on perfor- mance and energy consumption. Existing DVFS profitability impact of DVFS is proportional scaling, i.e., performance is assumed to scale proportionally with supply

  13. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume With Decreased Cognitive was restricted to the study of older in- dividuals, limiting our understanding of the full impact of WMH

  14. Contribution la connaissance de la Faune du Sol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Contribution la connaissance de la Faune du Sol de la Forêt des Maures (Var) LE MASSIF DES PRADELS versant nord du massif des Praclels, dans la chaîne des Maures, dans le but d'y rechercher les coléoptères

  15. Contribution phytocologique et dynamique l'tude des cosystmes forestiers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Contribution phytoécologique et dynamique à l'étude des écosystèmes forestiers. Applications aux forêts du Nord-Est de la France J.-C. RAMEAU Phytoécologie forestière à l'E.N.GProfesseur de

  16. Contributed Paper Eutrophication and Consumer Control of New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertness, Mark D.

    Contributed Paper Eutrophication and Consumer Control of New England Salt Marsh Primary is increasing insect herbivory in these marshes. Experimental nitrogen eutrophication initially increased plant on primary productivity in pristine marshes, but suppressed primary productivity in eutrophic salt marshes

  17. Acknowledgements The following authors contributed significantly to this document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Acknowledgements The following authors contributed significantly to this document: · Amoret L and SOMERS Guidance Document. In addition, the authors would like to acknowledge the assis- tance of Charles;Table of Contents Acknowledgements

  18. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Ahmad (Rochester, MN)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together through a data communications network. Each compute node has a plurality of processors for use in collective parallel operations on the parallel computer. Broadcasting collective operation contributions throughout a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention includes: transmitting, by each processor on each compute node, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on that compute node using intra-node communications; and transmitting on a designated network link, by each processor on each compute node according to a serial processor transmission sequence, that processor's collective operation contribution to the other processors on the other compute nodes using inter-node communications.

  19. An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooner, Scott Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Crashes involving trains and vehicles are a significant safety problem in Texas each year. This research attempts to identify and analyze contributing factors to train-involved accidents in Texas. Three years of accident data (1328 total accidents) were...

  20. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz The GREENS MENS Assistant Secretary for Foreign Affairs #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per

  1. Experiment Hazard Class 3 - High Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation * APS Base Low Temperatures * Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures * Electric Furnace * Optical Furnace * Other High Temperature Lasers * Laser, Class 2 * Laser,...

  2. Modelling of monovacancy diffusion in W over wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukonte, L., E-mail: laura.bukonte@helsinki.fi; Ahlgren, T.; Heinola, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion of monovacancies in tungsten is studied computationally over a wide temperature range from 1300?K until the melting point of the material. Our modelling is based on Molecular Dynamics technique and Density Functional Theory. The monovacancy migration barriers are calculated using nudged elastic band method for nearest and next-nearest neighbour monovacancy jumps. The diffusion pre-exponential factor for monovacancy diffusion is found to be two to three orders of magnitude higher than commonly used in computational studies, resulting in attempt frequency of the order 10{sup 15} Hz. Multiple nearest neighbour jumps of monovacancy are found to play an important role in the contribution to the total diffusion coefficient, especially at temperatures above 2/3 of T{sub m}, resulting in an upward curvature of the Arrhenius diagram. The probabilities for different nearest neighbour jumps for monovacancy in W are calculated at different temperatures.

  3. Configuration and temperature dependence of magnetic damping in spin valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyeux, X.; Devolder, T.; Kim, Joo-Von; Gomez de la Torre, Y.; Eimer, S.; Chappert, C. [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); UMR8622, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using vector-analyzer ferromagnetic resonance, we have studied the microwave susceptibility of a Py/Co/Cu/Co/MnIr spin valve over a large temperature range (5-450 K) and as a function of the magnetic configuration. An effective magnetization and Gilbert damping constant of 1.1 T and 0.021, respectively, are found for the permalloy free layer, with no discernible variation in temperature observed for either quantities. In contrast, the pinned layer magnetization is reduced by heating, and the exchange bias collapses near a temperature of 450 K. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the free layer increases by 500 MHz when the layer magnetizations are aligned in antiparallel, which is attributed to a configuration-dependent contribution to the damping from spin pumping effects.

  4. Chiral dynamics in the low-temperature phase of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian B. Brandt; Anthony Francis; Harvey B. Meyer; Daniel Robaina

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the low-temperature phase of QCD and the crossover region with two light flavors of quarks. The chiral expansion around the point $(T,m=0)$ in the temperature vs. quark-mass plane indicates that a sharp real-time excitation exists with the quantum numbers of the pion. An exact sum rule is derived for the thermal modification of the spectral function associated with the axial charge density; the (dominant) pion pole contribution obeys the sum rule. We determine the two parameters of the pion dispersion relation using lattice QCD simulations and test the applicability of the chiral expansion. The time-dependent correlators are also analyzed using the Maximum Entropy Method, yielding consistent results. Finally, we test the predictions of the chiral expansion around the point $(T=0,m=0)$ for the temperature dependence of static observables.

  5. A Discussion of Testing Protocols and LANL's Contribution to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 120 o C - Low humidity Stationary - >150 o C - Very low humidity *taken from GM abstract High Temperature Membrane Working Group October 17, 2003 120 C Approach * Water...

  6. Electrostatic contribution from solvent in modulating single-walled carbon nanotube association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Patel, Sandeep, E-mail: sapatel@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to compute the potential of mean force (PMF) between two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes solvated in pure nonpolarizable SPC/E and polarizable TIP4P-FQ water, at various temperatures. In general, the reversible work required to bring two nanotubes from a dissociated state (free energy reference) to contact state (free energy minimum) is more favorable and less temperature-dependent in TIP4P-FQ than in SPC/E water models. In contrast, molecular properties and behavior of water such as the spatially-resolved water number density (intertube, intratube, or outer regions), for TIP4P-FQ are more sensitive to temperature than SPC/E. Decomposition of the solvent-induced PMF into different spatial regions suggests that TIP4P-FQ has stronger temperature dependence; the opposing destabilizing/stabilizing contributions from intertube water and more distal water balance each other and suppress the temperature dependence of total association free energy. Further investigation of hydrogen bonding network in intertube water reveals that TIP4P-FQ retains fewer hydrogen bonds than SPC/E, which correlates with the lower water number density in this region. This reduction of hydrogen bonds affects the intertube water dipoles. As the intertube volume decreases, TIP4P-FQ dipole moment approaches the gas phase value; the distribution of dipole magnitude also becomes narrower due to less average polarization/perturbation from other water molecules. Our results imply that the reduction of water under confinement may seem trivial, but underlying effects to structure and free energetics are non-negligible.

  7. Low temperature irradiation tests on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

  8. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gibbs and Boltzmann definitions of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite sized `small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant to biophysics and nanotechnology.

  9. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabyasachi Ghosh

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of the nuclear matter is gradually reducing as temperature and nucleon chemical potential are growing up and therefore the nuclear matter is approaching toward the (nearly) perfect fluid nature.

  10. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Abstract—The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

  11. Shock temperature measurements in ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our first shock temperature measurements on a cryogenic target are reported for NH/sub 3/. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 61 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

  12. A Dynamical Approach to Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Henrik Rugh

    1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

  13. Method for measuring surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  14. Refinements in electroweak contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Czarnecki; William J. Marciano; Arkady Vainshtein

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of strong interactions on the two loop electroweak radiative corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, $a_\\mu=(g_\\mu-2)/2$, are examined. Short-distance logs are shown to be unaffected. Computation of long-distance contributions is improved by use of an effective field theory approach that preserves the chiral properties of QCD and accounts for constraints from the operator product expansion. Small, previously neglected, two loop contributions, suppressed by a $1-4\\sin^2\\theta_W$ factor, are computed and the complete three loop leading short-distance logs are reevaluated. These refinements lead to a reduction in uncertainties and a slight shift in the total electroweak contribution to $a_\\mu^{\\rm EW} = 154(1)(2)\\times 10^{-11}$ where the first error corresponds to hadronic uncertainties and the second is primarily due to the allowed Higgs mass range.

  15. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  16. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  17. Conducting polymer actuators : temperature effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Zio, Michael R. (Michael Robert), 1982-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to utilize conducting polymer actuators as a viable engineering solution, it is necessary to produce usable levels of force with a reasonable bandwidth. Polypyrrole actuated at temperatures as high as 100 °C ...

  18. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  19. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  20. Critical Temperature Associated to Symmetry Breaking of Klein--Gordon fields versus Condensation Temperature in a Weakly interacting Bose--Einstein Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias Castellanos; Tonatiuh Matos

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We deduce the relation between the critical temperature associated to the symmetry breaking of scalar fields with one--loop correction potential immersed in a thermal bath and the condensation temperature of the aforementioned system, assuming a harmonic oscillator type potential. We show that these two temperatures are related through the \\emph{scale} associated to the system. In this aim, we infer the order of magnitude for the \\emph{scale} as a function of the corresponding healing length, in order to give a criterium to compare both temperatures. Additionally, we prove that the condensation temperature is independent of the thermal bath within the semiclassical approximation, for a positive coupling constant, assuming that the thermal bath contribution is the lowest energy associated to the system.

  1. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  2. Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  4. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  5. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION Contributions from the United States National Herbarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    of the Guiana Shield (VENEZUELA: Amazonas, Bolivar, Delta Amacuro; GUYANA, SURINAM, FRENCH GUIANA) by V. Funk, DeltaAmacuro; Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana). Contributions from the United States National Herbarium and Surinam, French Guiana (a part of France) and the Venezuelan states of Amazonas, Bolivar, and Delta

  6. Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaczynski, Lutz, E-mail: lutz.klaczynski@gmx.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@mathematik.hu-berlin.de [Alexander von Humboldt Chair in Mathematical Physics, Humboldt University, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the ?-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the ?-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the ?-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE The contribution of China's Grain to Green Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH ARTICLE The contribution of China's Grain to Green Program to carbon sequestration Dan Liu, the magnitude and distribution of carbon sequestration induced by GGP remain unknown. In this study, we in southern China. The economic benefits of carbon sequestration from the GGP were also estimated according

  8. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc three major sources, the Greenland ice sheet, Antarctica, and other eustatic components. Each has its own predictable spatial signal, and particular attention was paid to the Greenland ice sheet, given

  9. Contributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Rajat Kumar

    Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fuzzy sets; Neural networks; Pattern recognition; Feature a fuzzy set theoretic feature evaluation index and a connectionist model for its evaluation alongContributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis R.K. De, J. Basak, S

  10. ComMod: engaged research's contribution to sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    187 Chapter 8 ComMod: engaged research's contribution to sustainable development sigrid au A stance justified by the needs of sustainable development The emergence of the sustainable development). Sustainable development asserted itself as a response to a preoccupying global situa- tion, notably

  11. The contribution of woodlands to promote sustainable development within the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The contribution of woodlands to promote sustainable development within the regional Structure Plan is a world leader in the research and development of sustainable forestry. Visit us at www development Sustainable development is a popular concept, and was famously articulated in the Brundtland

  12. Note d'information Contribution la matrise des problmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Note d'information Contribution à la maîtrise des problèmes biologiques des stations d et privé (encadré ) qui se consacre à la gestion des aspects biologiques des stations d'épu- ration'une étude de cas ; ou la mise en place d'études spécifiques sur un sujet qui le nécessite. Dans tous les cas

  13. Bernard CALMETTES Contribution l'tude des curriculums.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Bernard CALMETTES Contribution à l'étude des curriculums. Le cas de l'enseignement de l le développement d'une "culture" : «Au niveau d'exécution, même fort élevé dans la hiérarchie-00278552,version1-13May2008 #12;4 dans l'enseignement à une culture scientifique générale, apparemment

  14. CONTRIBUTION A L'TUDE DE LA DIFFRENCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTRIBUTION A L'ÉTUDE DE LA DIFFÉRENCIATION DES SPERMATOZOÏDES MORTS ET DES SPERMATOZOÏDES VIVANTS'Agri- culture de Rennes. #12;Le sperme fut récolté sur 3 taureaux Normand et Pie-Noir breton à l'aide d'un vagin

  15. Contribution l'analyse multi chelle du comportement mcanique non

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Contribution à l'analyse multi échelle du comportement mécanique non linéaire matériau des Impact Comportement non linéaire matériau des structures composites DétailstructuralEprouvetteélémentaire - Caractérisation - Lois de comportement (1D, 2D, 3D) - Micro-Méso-Macro - Développement d'outils, méthodes

  16. Student Gateway the student community page Making a contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Student Gateway ­ the student community page Making a contribution The Student Gateway (www.qub.ac.uk/studentinfo) is for the Queen's community to highlight services, information and events of interest to students. Members of the community (students and staff) can request that items are posted to either: University blog (`In the Know

  17. EM Contributes Expertise to Comprehensive Resource on Managing Nuclear Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM officials wrote a chapter of a recently published book, Managing Nuclear Projects – A Comprehensive Management Resource, which covers a range of areas with emphasis on process, requirements and lessons learned. Authors from France, Germany, Argentina, Belgium, Finland, Austria, and the U.S. contributed to the book.

  18. Contributions of Renewable Energy Resources to Re-source Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    1 Contributions of Renewable Energy Resources to Re- source Diversity George Gross, Fellow, IEEE Resources, Environmental Attributes of Renewable Resources PANEL PRESENTATION SUMMARY HE myriad changes of renewable energy resources in meeting future energy needs. The dwindling oil supplies and their in- creasing

  19. Can migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Working Paper No. 70 March 2005 Manuscript to appear in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews #12;ii energy balance on a yearly basis if supplemented by energy storage of 2.7kWh per household. We findCan migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ? Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom

  20. The contribution of CO2 capture and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The contribution of CO2 capture and storage to a sustainable energy system Policy brief of Energy Models for INtegrated Technology Systems' is partially funded by the EU under the Scientific.html. The following partners are involved in Part 2 of the CASCADE MINTS project: · Energy research Centre

  1. New Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Food For Microbial Fuel Cells Contributed by OJ Fagbire Wednesday, 06 June 2007 According to Penn State researchers, the answer to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells under the sea may be discarded lobster and crab shells. Microbial fuel cells produce energy when the microbes consume organic

  2. Brain donation is one of the most important contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contractor, Anis

    01-19-09 Brain donation is one of the most important contributions to research. Brain donations 200 brain tissue samples to researchers. Some of the major findings that came about through utilization of this precious gift include: In 2006, Todd Preuss and his team showed that certain brain

  3. Brain donation is one of the most important contributions to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contractor, Anis

    01-19-09 Brain donation is one of the most important contributions to research. As researchers work to better understand disorders that affect mental function with aging, brain donations are essential to their progress. By studying the anatomy, pathology, and chemistry of the brains of people with memory problems

  4. Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 1. Crude Oil Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    of the crude oil and the type of separation scheme used, foaming problems can curtail crude oil productionFactors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 1. Crude Oil Systems Michael K. Poindexter,*, Nael N, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 Received August 28, 2001 Gas/oil separation can often be accompanied

  5. Isolation of stimulus characteristics contributing to Weber's law for position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottingham, University of

    Isolation of stimulus characteristics contributing to Weber's law for position David Whitaker a transition between the scales that determine threshold results in the continuum known as Weber's law; Vernier acuity; Weber's law 1. Introduction The ability to accurately and veridically locate objects

  6. Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    to the petroleum industry. Nonaqueous foams occur in the production of and refining of crude oil. Crude oil foamsFactors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems Nael N. Zaki, Michael K can pose major problems for operators of gas/oil separation plants, causing a loss of crude

  7. Contributions of Cell Phones to Economic Development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Contributions of Cell Phones to Economic Development in Africa: An Information Study of Corn development in developing countries #12;Motivation/Development · According to cell phones enhance economic lives of the poor (Ellis, 2006; Lindenberg, 2002) #12;Motivation/Cell Phone Literature · Increased

  8. A Comprehensive Contribution Factor Method for Congestion Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be combined with demand side (load) management to solve the congestion. The congestion management scheme generator re-dispatching alone or combined with demand side management due to the availability of load1 A Comprehensive Contribution Factor Method for Congestion Management H. Song, Student Member

  9. Contributed Paper Using Changes in Agricultural Utility to Quantify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    Contributed Paper Using Changes in Agricultural Utility to Quantify Future Climate-Induced Risk to Conservation LYNDON D. ESTES, LYDIE-LINE PAROZ, BETHANY A. BRADLEY,§ JONATHAN M.H. GREEN, DAVID G. HOLE to be mediated through changes in the agricultural utility of land. As farmers adapt their practices to changing

  10. Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of Plant Invasions LLEWELLYN C. FOXCROFT of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Abstract: Human land uses surrounding protected areas provide propagules for colonization of these areas by non-native species, and corridors between protected-area

  11. Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    #12;Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Industries in FloridaD, Coordinator of Economic Analysis Alan W. Hodges*, PhD, Extension Scientist Rodney L. Clouser, PhD, Professor University of Florida/IFAS, Food & Resource Economics Department PO Box 110240, Gainesville, FL 32611

  12. Estimating the Economic Contributions Utah Science Technology and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Estimating the Economic Contributions of the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative (USTAR Stambro Senior Research Economist Bureau of Economic and Business Research David Eccles School of Business University of Utah February 2012 © 2012 Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Utah #12

  13. Contribution ID : 133 The TAG Collector -A Tool for Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHEP04 Contribution ID : 133 The TAG Collector - A Tool for Atlas Code Release Management Thursday 30 Sep 2004 at 10:00 (00h00') The Tag Collector is a web interfaced database application for release distributed geographically. The Tag Collector was designed and implemented during the summer of 2001

  14. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION The Physician-Scientist Career Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION The Physician-Scientist Career Pipeline in 2005 Build It, and They Will Come, the pipeline of physician- scientists has a serious problem, first de- scribed more than a generation ago.2-scientist career pipeline. Design We assessed recent trends in the physician-scientist career pipeline using data

  15. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz Rotary Club of Patchogue November 9, 2005 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12 Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something about it. What are we doing? #12;370 360 350

  16. Glacier melt contribution to streamflow1 Neil Schaner1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    , firn, or ice. We50 include all ice caps (ice sheets covering less than 50,000 km2 ) and other permanent1 Glacier melt contribution to streamflow1 Neil Schaner1 , Nathalie Voisin2 , Bart Nijssen1 gross domestic product,28 resides in areas that rely on snow or glacier melt for a majority of its water

  17. d Original Contribution IDENTIFYING THE INERTIAL CAVITATION THRESHOLD AND SKULL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    d Original Contribution IDENTIFYING THE INERTIAL CAVITATION THRESHOLD AND SKULL EFFECTS IN AVESSEL unknown. To investigate the pressure threshold for inertial cavitation of pre- formed microbubbles during sonication, passive cavitation detection in conjunction with B-mode imaging was used. A cerebral vessel

  18. What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Neil

    What do grid cells contribute to place cell firing? Daniel Bush1,2 , Caswell Barry3 , and Neil to be generated by input from entorhinal grid cell modules with differing spatial scales. Here, we review recent and direction to environmental boundaries, while grid cells provide a complementary self-motion related input

  19. Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

  20. Updating a Biomedical Database Writing, Reading and Invisible Contribution*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Updating a Biomedical Database Writing, Reading and Invisible Contribution* David PONTILLE chargé part of biomedical research (Bowker 2000; Hine 2006). As a result of developments in molecular biology project on several biomedical databases in France and the issues involved in different forms

  1. Snowmobile Contributions to Mobile Source Emissions in Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were collected from in-use snowmobiles% of the annual emissions of carbon monoxide and 77% of annual emissions of hydrocarbons using an equivalent bestSnowmobile Contributions to Mobile Source Emissions in Yellowstone National Park G A R Y A . B I

  2. THE TEMPERATURES OF RED SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Ben [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Plez, Bertrand [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France)] [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Trager, Scott [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Evans, Chris [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chiavassa, Andrea [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a re-appraisal of the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) using their optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We have obtained data of a sample of RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds using VLT+XSHOOTER, and we fit MARCS model atmospheres to different regions of the spectra, deriving effective temperatures for each star from (1) the TiO bands, (2) line-free continuum regions of the SEDs, and (3) the integrated fluxes. We show that the temperatures derived from fits to the TiO bands are systematically lower than the other two methods by several hundred kelvin. The TiO fits also dramatically overpredict the flux in the near-IR, and imply extinctions which are anomalously low compared to neighboring stars. In contrast, the SED temperatures provide good fits to the fluxes at all wavelengths other than the TiO bands, are in agreement with the temperatures from the flux integration method, and imply extinctions consistent with nearby stars. After considering a number of ways to reconcile this discrepancy, we conclude that three-dimensional effects (i.e., granulation) are the most likely cause, as they affect the temperature structure in the upper layers where the TiO lines form. The continuum, however, which forms at much deeper layers, is apparently more robust to such effects. We therefore conclude that RSG temperatures are much warmer than previously thought. We discuss the implications of this result for stellar evolution and supernova progenitors, and provide relations to determine the bolometric luminosities of RSGs from single-band photometry.

  3. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  4. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  5. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  6. Finite Temperature Closed Superstring Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that the gas of IIA strings undergoes a phase transition into a gas of IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. A gas of free heterotic strings undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless duality transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat but vanishing internal energy at criticality. We examine the consequences of requiring a tachyon-free thermal string spectrum. We show that in the absence of Ramond-Ramond fluxes the IIA and IIB string ensembles are thermodynamically ill-defined. The 10D heterotic superstrings have nonabelian gauge fields and in the presence of a temperature dependent Wilson line background are found to share a stable and tachyon-free ground state at all temperatures starting from zero with gauge group SO(16)xSO(16). The internal energy of the heterotic string is a monotonically increasing function of temperature with a stable and supersymmetric zero temperature limit. Our results point to the necessity of gauge fields in a viable weakly coupled superstring theory. Note Added (Sep 2005).

  7. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despoja, V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, ES-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Depto. de Fysica de Materiales and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pays Vasco, Apdo. 1072, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Sunjic, M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, ES-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Marusic, L. [Maritime Department, University of Zadar, M. Pavlinovica b.b., HR-23000 Zadar (Croatia)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  8. The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Ju

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel...

  9. Effect of optical pumping on the refractive index and temperature in the core of active fibre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gainov, V V; Ryabushkin, Oleg A [V.A.Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Fryazino Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the refractive index change (RIC) induced in the core of Yb{sup 3+}-doped active silica fibres by pulsed pumping. RIC kinetic measurements with a Mach - Zehnder interferometer make it possible to separately assess the contributions of the electronic and thermal mechanisms to the RIC and evaluate temperature nonuniformities in the fibre.

  10. On the Location of Energy Release and Temperature Pro les along Coronal Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Duncan

    On the Location of Energy Release and Temperature Pro#12;les along Coronal Loops K. Galsgaard (klaus@mcs.st-and.ac.uk), D. H. Mackay (duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.uk) and E. R. Priest (eric@mcs.st-and.ac.uk Abstract. Several mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to the heat- ing of the solar corona, each

  11. The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote anomaly dipole we find that the dipole forms mostly in response to changes in the air-sea heat fluxes. The changes in shortwave radiation also contribute to the dipole of net air-sea heat flux. The changes

  12. Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Larry D. (San Diego, CA); Johnson, Jr., William R. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

  13. Mechanical instability at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

  14. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tritt, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Uher, C. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  15. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, Ctirad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential propertymeasurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectricmaterials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectricmeasurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  16. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  17. Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

  18. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  19. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  20. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  1. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  2. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Casanova, Sabrina; Dingus, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  3. New Supersymmetric Contributions to $t \\to cV$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López, J L; Rangarajan, R; Lopez, Jorge L.; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the electroweak-like one-loop supersymmetric contributions= to the rare and flavor-violating decay of the top quark into a charm quark a= nd a gauge boson: $t->c V$, with $V=3D\\gamma,Z,g$. We consider loops of both c= harginos and down-like squarks (where we identify and correct an error in the literature) and neutralinos and up-like squarks (which have not been calc= ulated before). We also account for left-right and generational squark mixing. O= ur numerical results indicate that supersymmetric contributions to $t->cV$ c= an be upto 5 orders of magnitude larger than their Standard Model counterparts. However, they still fall short of the sensitivity expected at the next-generation top-quark factories.

  4. Meson cloud contributions to baryon axial form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Y. Liu; K. Khosonthongkee; A. Limphirat; P. Suebka; Y. Yan

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial form factor as well as the axial charge of octet baryons are studied in the perturbative chiral quark model (PCQM) with the quark wave functions predetermined by fitting the theoretical results of the proton charge form factor to experimental data. The theoretical results are found, based on the predetermined quark wave functions, in good agreement with experimental data and lattice values. This may indicate that the electric charge and axial charge distributions of the constituent quarks are the same. The study reveals that the meson cloud plays an important role in the axial charge of octet baryons, contributing 30%-40% to the total values, and strange sea quarks have a considerable contribution to the axial charge of the $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$.

  5. Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

  6. Results on the disconnected contributions for hadron structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantia Alexandrou; Martha Constantinou; Vincent Drach; Kyriakos Hadjiyiannakou; Karl Jansen; Giannis Koutsou; Alejandro Vaquero

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the disconnected contributions to three point functions entering in studies of hadron structure. We use $N_F = 2+1+1$ twisted mass fermions and give a detailed description on the results of the nucleon {\\sigma}-terms, isoscalar axial charge and first moments of bare parton distributions for a range of pions masses. In addition we give the {\\sigma}-terms and the computations are performed using QUDA code implemented on GPUs.

  7. Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones - porosity caused primarly by dissolution - has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths. 1 figure, 1 table.

  8. Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones-porosity caused primarily by dissolution--has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths.

  9. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  10. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  11. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  12. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

  13. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  14. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  15. Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

  16. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  17. 3, 771789, 2007 temperatures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cooling and the onset of North American glaciation P. Huybers1 and P. Molnar2 1 Department of Earth that gradual cooling in the eastern tropical Pacific led to cooling of North America and the initiation affects North American temperature and ice-ablation. Assuming that the modern relationship holds5 over

  18. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  19. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  20. High temperature synthetic cement retarder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eoff, L.S.; Buster, D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A synthetic cement retarder which provides excellent retardation and compressive strength development has been synthesized. The response properties and temperature ranges of the synthetic retarder far exceed those of commonly used retarders such as lignosulfonates. The chemical nature of the new retarder is discussed and compared to another synthetic retarder.

  1. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  2. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  3. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

  4. Microsoft Word - Test4.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas, and Pittsburgh) ranged from 6 to 8 degrees above normal last week, and the composite average temperature for the week was 22 percent warmer than normal. The American Gas...

  5. Microsoft Word - Test4.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    areas of the country this past week. For the four cities tracked by this report, the composite average temperature was 6 degrees above normal for the week ending Friday, February...

  6. &'()*'%+',-+%./0*/'1% On the card provided, write down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    an implication of global environmental change. (* ~mapping, GIS, remote sensing, GPS applications · Geospatial climatology · Species distribution modeling · Vegetation remote sensing · Your al. , Frontiers Ecol. Env., 2007] Hot Extremes Hot extremes ~ hot and above normal temperatures. Heat

  7. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    river basin. The model is entitled "Monthly Operational Hydrometeorological Simulator (MOHS)." Use of the 30-day meteorological forecast categories of light, moderate, or heavy precipitation and below normal, near normal, or above normal temperature...

  8. High temperature corrosion research at the Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Matthes, Steven A.; Chinn, R.E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) at the Albany Research Center is operational. SECERF consists of 6 modules that share the availability of up to 10 different gases to produce environments for high temperature corrosion and erosion research. Projects to be conducted in the modules include: corrosion sensors for fossil energy systems, thermal gradient effects on high temperature corrosion, the development of sulfidation resistant alloys, determination of the effects of ash on the corrosion of metals and alloys in coal and waste combustion and coal gasification environments, high temperature erosion-corrosion of metals, and molten slag effects on refractories. Results from two areas, the effect of ash deposits on alloy corrosion and thermal gradient effects on the corrosion of metals, will be highlighted. Ash produced in coal gasifiers, coal combustors, and waste combustors, when deposited on metal surfaces, provides sites for corrosion attack and contributes chemical species that participate in the corrosion reaction. Results are presented for the corrosion of 304L stainless steel, that was either uncoated or coated with ash or with ash containing NaCl or Na2SO4, in air-water vapor mixtures at 600 C. The presence of high heat fluxes and temperature gradients in many fossil energy systems creates the need for an understanding of their effects on corrosion and oxidation. Such information would be useful for both improved alloy design and for better translation of isothermal laboratory results to field use. Temperature gradients in a solid oxide result in two changes that modify diffusion within the oxide. The first is when a gradient in point defect concentration is created within the oxide, for example, where more vacancies are expected at a higher temperature. The second change is when the presence of a temperature gradient biases the diffusion jump of an atom. Results of tests are presented for cobalt with metal surface temperatures of approximately 920-950 C in N2 plus 1-10 vol% O2 environments with a heat flux of about 40 kW/m2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics were used to develop oxidation rate equations in temperature gradients that were combined with point defect information of CoO to predict oxidation rates.

  9. AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    426 AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS SEP 2 1196: vuUiJo HIM. . SPECIAL and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS -temperature meter 11 Maintenance and trouble -shooting 12 #12;AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

  10. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  11. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  12. The H+ Region Contribution to [C II] 158 Micron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. P. Abel

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The [C II] 158 micron line is an important emission line diagnostic in Photodissociation Regions (PDRs), but this emission line can also emerge from ionized gas. This work calculates the contribution of [C II] emission from ionized gas over a wide range of parameter space by considering the simplified case of an H+ region and PDR in pressure equilibrium. Additionally, these calculations also predict the strong correlation observed between [N II] 205 micron emission and [C II] discussed by previous authors. Overall, the results of these calculations have wide-ranging applications to the interpretation of [C II] emission in astrophysical environments.

  13. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Contributing Data to the Fleet DNA Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet DNA clearinghouse of commercial fleet transportation data helps vehicle manufacturers and developers optimize vehicle designs and helps fleet managers choose advanced technologies for their fleets. This online tool - available at www.nrel.gov/fleetdna - provides data summaries and visualizations similar to real-world 'genetics' for medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet vehicles operating within a variety of vocations. To contribute your fleet data, please contact Adam Duran of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at adam.duran@nrel.gov or 303-275-4586.

  15. Holographic calculation of hadronic contributions to muon g-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Matsuzaki, Shinya [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoun [Frontier Physics Research Division and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the gauge-gravity duality, we compute the leading order hadronic (HLO) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}. Holographic renormalization is used to obtain a finite vacuum polarization. We find a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}=470.5x10{sup -10} in anti-de Sitter/QCD with two light flavors, which is compared with the currently revised BABAR data estimated from e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-} events, a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}[{pi}{pi}]=(514.1{+-}3.8)x10{sup -10}.

  16. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  17. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  18. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  20. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  1. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  2. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  3. Many-Body Contributions to Green's Functions and Casimir Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Shajesh; M. Schaden

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiple scattering formalism is used to extract irreducible N-body parts of Green's functions and Casimir energies describing the interaction of N objects that are not necessarily mutually disjoint. The irreducible N-body scattering matrix is expressed in terms of single-body transition matrices. The irreducible N-body Casimir energy is the trace of the corresponding irreducible N-body part of the Green's function. This formalism requires the solution of a set of linear integral equations. The irreducible three-body Green's function and the corresponding Casimir energy of a massless scalar field interacting with potentials are obtained and evaluated for three parallel semitransparent plates. When Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed on a plate the Green's function and Casimir energy decouple into contributions from two disjoint regions. We also consider weakly interacting triangular--and parabolic-wedges placed atop a Dirichlet plate. The irreducible three-body Casimir energy of a triangular--and parabolic-wedge is minimal when the shorter side of the wedge is perpendicular to the Dirichlet plate. The irreducible three-body contribution to the vacuum energy is finite and positive in all the cases studied.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon liquids at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, P. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geology); Oelkers, E.H. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Geochimie); Helgeson, H.C. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the organic/inorganic interface in the Earth's crust requires values of the thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon species in crude oil, coal, and natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. Values of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation and the standard partial molal entropies and heat capacities of these organic species can be computed as a function of temperature at 1 bar using the equations of state adopted by Helgeson et al (1991). The pressure dependence of the thermodynamic properties can be calculated from a modified version of the Parameters From Group Contributions (PFGC) equation of state. To improve the accuracy of these predictions, critical evaluation of high-pressure density experiments reported in the literature was used in the present study to characterize b[sub j] as a function of pressure and temperature. The revised PFGC equation of state permits accurate calculation of the standard partial molal volumes of the major hydrocarbon species in the aliphatic, aromatic, and naphthenic fractions of crude oil, as well as fatty acids, phenols, and naphthenic acids at temperatures and pressures to 500 C and 5 kbar. Combining the revised PFGC equation of state and parameters with the standard partial molal properties of these species at one bar and those of aqueous species and minerals permits calculation of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs Free energies of reaction, and thus equilibrium constants for a wide variety of chemical equilibria among organic liquids, solids, and gases, aqueous species, and minerals at temperatures and pressures characteristic of both diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust.

  5. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped boresilicate glass, accurate to .+-.0.5.degree. C. over an operating temperature range of about -196.degree. C. to 400.degree. C.; and a mixture of D.sub.2 O and H.sub.2 O, accurate to .+-.0.1.degree. C. over an operating range of about 5.degree. C. to 90.degree. C.

  7. University of Illinois Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

  8. Additional resonant contribution to the potential model for the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Katsuma

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The additional resonant contribution to the potential model is examined in $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C elastic scattering and the low-energy $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction. The excitation function of elastic scattering below $E_{c.m.}= 5$ MeV seems to be reproduced by the potential model satisfactorily, and it is not profoundly disturbed by the additional resonances. The weak coupling is good enough to describe the $^{16}$O structure in the vicinity of the $\\alpha$-particle threshold, especially below $E_{c.m.}= 8$ MeV, corresponding to the excitation energy $E_x \\approx 15$ MeV. The additional resonances give the complement of the astrophysical $S$-factors from the simple potential model. The $S$-factor of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at $E_{c.m.}=300$ keV is dominated by the $E$2 transition, which is enhanced by the subthreshold 2$^+_1$ state at $E_x= 6.92$ MeV. The contribution from the subthreshold 1$^-_1$ state at $E_x= 7.12$ MeV is predicted to be small. The additional resonances do not give the large contribution to the thermonuclear reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at helium burning temperatures.

  9. Gravitation and the earth sciences: the contributions of Robert Dicke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kragh, Helge

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American physicist Robert Dicke (1916-1997) is primarily known for his important contributions to gravitation, cosmology, and microwave physics. Much less known is his work in geophysics and related areas of the earth sciences in which he engaged himself and several of his collaborators in the period from about 1957 to 1969. Much of Dicke's work in geophysics was motivated by his wish to obtain evidence in support of the non-Einstenian Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation. The idea of a decreasing gravitational constant, as entertained by Dicke and some other physicists (including Pascual Jordan), played some role in the process that transformed the static picture of the Earth to a dynamical picture. It is not by accident that Dicke appears as a minor actor in histories of the plate tectonic revolution in the 1960s.

  10. Electromagnetic Contribution to the Proton-Neutron Mass Splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Thomas; X. G. Wang; R. D. Young

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the electromagnetic contribution to the proton-neutron mass splitting by combining lattice simulations and the modified Cottingham sum rule of Walker-Loud, Carlson and Miller. This analysis yields an estimate of the isovector nucleon magnetic polarizability as a function of pion mass. The physical value, obtained by chiral extrapolation to the physical pion mass, is $\\beta_{p-n}=(-1.12 \\pm 0.40)\\times 10^{-4}\\ \\mathrm{fm}^3$, which is in agreement with the empirical result, albeit with a somewhat smaller error. As a result, we find $\\delta M^{\\gamma}_{p-n}=1.04 \\pm 0.11\\ \\mathrm{MeV}$, which represents a significant improvement in precision.

  11. Resumming soft and collinear contributions in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Altinoluk; B. Pire; L. Szymanowski; S. Wallon

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the quark coefficient function Tq(x,xi) that enters the factorized amplitude for deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) at all order in a soft and collinear gluon approximation, focusing on the leading double logarithmic behavior in x +/- xi, where x +/- xi is the light cone momentum fraction of the incoming/outgoing quarks. We show that the dominant part of the known one loop result can be understood in an axial gauge as the result of a semi-eikonal approximation to the box diagram. We then derive an all order result for the leading contribution of the ladder diagrams and deduce a resummation formula valid in the vicinity of the boundaries of the regions defining the energy flows of the incoming/outcoming quarks, i.e. x = +/- xi. The resummed series results in a simple closed expression.

  12. [On the jet contribution to the AGN cosmic energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cattaneo; P. N. Best

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes release energy via the production of photons in their accretion discs but also via the acceleration of jets. We investigate the relative importance of these two paths over cosmic time by determining the mechanical luminosity function (LF) of radio sources and by comparing it to a previous determination of the bolometric LF of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from X-ray, optical and infrared observations. The mechanical LF of radio sources is computed in two steps: the determination of the mechanical luminosity as a function of the radio luminosity and its convolution with the radio LF of radio sources. Even with the large uncertainty deriving from the former, we can conclude that the contribution of jets is unlikely to be much larger than 10% of the AGN energy budget at any cosmic epoch.

  13. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  14. Magnetic insulation at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedecke, G. H.; Davis, Brian T.; Chen, Chiping [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States); Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite-temperature non-neutral plasma (FTNNP) theory of magnetically insulated (MI) electron flows in crossed-field vacuum devices is developed and applied in planar geometry. It is shown that, in contrast to the single type of MI flow predicted by traditional cold-plasma treatments, the nonlinear FTNNP equations admit five types of steady flow, of which three types are MI flows, including flows in which the electric field and/or the tangential velocity at the cathode may be zero or nonzero. It is also shown that finite-temperature Vlasov-Poisson treatments yield solutions for electron number densities and electrostatic potentials that are a subset of the FTNNP solutions. The algorithms that are used to solve the FTNNP equations numerically are discussed, and the numerical results are presented for several examples of the three types of MI flow. Results include prediction of the existence, boundaries, number density profiles, and other properties of sheaths of electrons in the anode-cathode gap.

  15. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  16. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  17. Temperature Sensor Data Michael W. Bigrigg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    in the room. Sensor networks can be used to identify larger trends in temperature which could be used to report energy usage, HVAC problems, computer failures based on high temperatures, and fire evacuation

  18. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rempe, Joy L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knudson, Darrell L. (Firth, ID); Condie, Keith G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curt (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Chemical Properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Silberstein #12;What is a fuel cell? #12;Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Two phase ionomer (ionic polymer temperatures (thermal history) and relative humidities Temperatures 150o C for 1 hour 100o C, 90o C, 80o C, 70o

  20. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  1. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  2. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  3. Agenda: High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG) meeting on May 18, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia

  4. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates. However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  6. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by grain growth. The concurrence of these two processes makes it difficult to interpret the results of the optical spectrophotometry, but the combination of transmittance and reflectance measurements provides enough data to separate these two influences and to calculate the porosity, particle size and energy band gap separately. XRD, SEM, ellipsometry and mechanical profilometry were used to confirm the results obtained from the spectrophotometric measurements. All these methods gave results, which are in good agreement: the change in the porosity from 50% to 15% and the particle size increased from 5 to 65nm in the temperature region from 400 to 1000 C. An important result of the investigation is the fact that the main optical properties of the coating such as refractive index and band gap energy depend only on the porosity, but not on the grain size. The grain size influences the scattering properties of the coating, which allows the grain size to be estimated from optical measurements.

  7. Study of the effect of {sup 135}Xe poison on the temperature coefficient of TRIGA fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iorgulis, Constantin [TRIGA Reactor Facility, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the influence of {sup 135}Xe on the prompt negative temperature coefficient of the 14-MW Romanian TRIGA reactor has been performed. Because of its large absorption cross section below 0.1 eV, we expected that {sup 135}Xe might make a positive contribution to the temperature coefficient because the higher-energy neutrons are less likely to be absorbed by the Xe. This effect would be largest about 16 hours after reactor shutdown. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we have performed cell and core calculations for various fuel temperatures, burnups, and {sup 135}Xe levels. These calculations indeed show a positive contribution of {sup 135}Xe to the temperature coefficient, especially for high burnups, where little {sup 167}Er remains to absorb the higher-energy neutrons. Work is in progress to evaluate the effect of the smaller negative temperature coefficient on the consequences of reactivity insertion accidents in unfavorable situations of {sup 135}Xe poisoning of the Romanian TRIGA core. (author)

  8. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  9. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

  10. Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

  11. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  12. Employer`s contributions to the training of professional statisticians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rustagi, J.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Statistics Dept.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Mathematical Sciences Section]|[Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical science provides important techniques for decision making in a large variety of fields of human endeavor mainly through statistical practice. According to Deming (1965), ``Statistical practice is mostly a collaborative venture between (professional) statisticians and experts in subject-matter (area).`` The professional statistician must be properly trained in areas of statistical science most suited to the discipline in which the applications are made. Due to a large variety of applications. The education of a professional statistician by universities can only be very general. Higher education provides the theoretical basis of statistical science whereas the specific expertise needed by the professional statistician is given by the application areas. In this paper, the authors review the approach of academic programs which are geared towards applications and discuss some of the innovative strategies for preparing statisticians as consultants in industry and business. A survey (census) of statisticians at the national laboratories of the US Department of Energy was made to assess their training by universities and to get a broad view of additional training which has brought them to their present professional status. A particular interest is the extent to which employers have contributed to the training of statisticians. A few recommendations are made which may serve to improve the future training of statisticians for applied collaborative work by universities and employers.

  13. ISO's Contribution to the Study of Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Metcalfe; D. Fadda; A. Biviano

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with nearby galaxy clusters like Virgo and Coma, and continuing out to the furthest galaxy clusters for which ISO results have yet been published ($z=0.56$), we discuss the development of knowledge of the infrared and associated physical properties of galaxy clusters from early IRAS observations, through the "ISO-era" to the present, in order to explore the status of ISO's contribution to this field. Relevant IRAS and ISO programmes are reviewed, addressing both the cluster galaxies and the still-very-limited evidence for an infrared-emitting intra-cluster medium. ISO made important advances in knowledge of both nearby and distant galaxy clusters, such as the discovery of a major cold dust component in Virgo and Coma cluster galaxies, the elaboration of the correlation between dust emission and Hubble-type, and the detection of numerous Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in several distant clusters. These and consequent achievements are underlined and described. We recall that, due to observing time constraints, ISO's coverage of higher-redshift galaxy clusters to the depths required to detect and study statistically significant samples of cluster galaxies over a range of morphological types could not be comprehensive and systematic, and such systematic coverage of distant clusters will be an important achievement of the Spitzer Observatory.

  14. Fault Current Contribution from Single-Phase PV Inverters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Bravo, R.; Robles, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant increase in photovoltaic (PV) system installations is expected to come on line in the near future and as the penetration level of PV increases, the effect of PV may no longer be considered minimal. One of the most important attributions of additional PV is what effect this may have on protection systems. Protection engineers design protection systems to safely eliminate faults from the electric power system. One of the new technologies recently introduced into the electric power system are distributed energy resources (DER). Currently, inverter-based DER contributes very little to the power balance on all but a few utility distribution systems. As DER become prevalent in the distribution system, equipment rating capability and coordination of protection systems merit a closer investigation. A collaborative research effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Southern California Edison (SCE) involved laboratory short-circuit testing single-phase (240 VAC) residential type (between 1.5 and 7kW) inverters. This paper will reveal test results obtained from these short-circuit tests.

  15. Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry Final Project Report to the Florida Turfgrass Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry in Florida Final Project Report to the Florida of Food and Agricultural Sciences Food and Resource Economics Department Gainesville, FL Corresponding.....................................................................................................................................................21 Economic Contribution Analysis

  16. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gene

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, Texas agriculture generated $14 billion in cash receipts. The production, processing, distribution and consumption of food and fiber products contributes substantially to the economy of Texas. This publication reports the contributions...

  17. GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contribute...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk Designation GAO-11-879T, Federal Real Property, Overreliance on Leasing Contributed to High-Risk...

  18. Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55°F for space humidity control...

  19. How Does the Eye Warm? Part I: A Potential Temperature Budget Analysis of an Idealized Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Does the Eye Warm? Part I: A Potential Temperature Budget Analysis of an Idealized Tropical In this first part of a two-part study, the mechanisms that accomplish the warming in the eye of tropical contributing to warming the eye. However, for a substantial portion of RI, the region of most rapid warming

  20. Temperature and electrical memory of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Jinkai; Zakri, Cécile; Grillard, Fabienne; Neri, Wilfrid; Poulin, Philippe [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal - CNRS, University of Bordeaux, Avenue Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report in this work studies of the shape memory behavior of polymer fibers loaded with carbon nanotubes or graphene flakes. These materials exhibit enhanced shape memory properties with the generation of a giant stress upon shape recovery. In addition, they exhibit a surprising temperature memory with a peak of generated stress at a temperature nearly equal to the temperature of programming. This temperature memory is ascribed to the presence of dynamical heterogeneities and to the intrinsic broadness of the glass transition. We present recent experiments related to observables other than mechanical properties. In particular nanocomposite fibers exhibit variations of electrical conductivity with an accurate memory. Indeed, the rate of conductivity variations during temperature changes reaches a well defined maximum at a temperature equal to the temperature of programming. Such materials are promising for future actuators that couple dimensional changes with sensing electronic functionalities.

  1. Low temperature sodium-beta battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

  2. Effects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    ' contributions over time. Prior studies on peer feedback in online communities have suggested its impactEffects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia Haiyi Zhu, Amy Zhang on contribution, but have been limited by their correlational nature. In this paper, we conducted a field

  3. Evidence of the contribution of legal insider trading to market efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    , there are several important contributions which analyze the impact of insider trading and its regulation on economic2007/14 Evidence of the contribution of legal insider trading to market efficiency Nihat Aktas, Eric de Bodt and Hervé Van Oppens #12;CORE DISCUSSION PAPER 2007/14 Evidence of the contribution

  4. ND Atomic Theory 2005-1 Third-order negative-energy contributions to transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    ND Atomic Theory 2005-1 Third-order negative-energy contributions to transition amplitudes with one negative-energy intermediate state. Although second-order NES contributions to transition interaction and first-order in the interaction with the electromagnetic field) contributions to transition

  5. A SHARED SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY: MONEY VERSUS EFFORT CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE VOLUNTARY PROVISION OF PUBLIC GOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SHARED SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY: MONEY VERSUS EFFORT CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE VOLUNTARY PROVISION to the public good with money instead of time or effort even when the level of total contributions is held take advantage of an offer to buy out, i.e., contribute money in lieu of effort. We find

  6. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  7. Article published in Geothermics 47 (2013) 69-79 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geothermics.2013.02.005 1 Geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .02.005 1 Geothermal contribution to the energy mix of a heating network when using Aquifer Thermal Energy and providing energy to a new low-temperature district heating network heating 7,500 housing-equivalents. Non-geothermal of this geothermal system to meet the load is studied in order to evaluate the time dependent energy mix

  8. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  9. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  10. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  11. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TAMPER INDICATING SEAL: SRNL CONTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krementz, D.; Brinkman, K.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Weeks, G.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are collaborating on development of a Ceramic Seal, also sometimes designated the Intrinsically Tamper Indicating Ceramic Seal (ITICS), which is a tamper indicating seal for international safeguards applications. The Ceramic Seal is designed to be a replacement for metal loop seals that are currently used by the IAEA and other safeguards organizations. The Ceramic Seal has numerous features that enhance the security of the seal, including a frangible ceramic body, protective and tamper indicating coatings, an intrinsic unique identifier using Laser Surface Authentication, electronics incorporated into the seal that provide cryptographic seal authentication, and user-friendly seal wire capture. A second generation prototype of the seal is currently under development whose seal body is of Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) construction. SRNL has developed the mechanical design of the seal in an iterative process incorporating comments from the SNL vulnerability review team. SRNL is developing fluorescent tamper indicating coatings, with recent development focusing on optimizing the durability of the coatings and working with a vendor to develop a method to apply coatings on a 3-D surface. SRNL performed a study on the effects of radiation on the electronics of the seal and possible radiation shielding techniques to minimize the effects. SRNL is also investigating implementation of Laser Surface Authentication (LSA) as a means of unique identification of each seal and the effects of the surface coatings on the LSA signature.

  13. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  14. Temperature Dependent Neutron Scattering Sections for Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger E. Hill; C. -Y. Liu

    2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents neutron scattering cross sections for polyethylene at 296 K, 77 K and 4 K derived from a new scattering kernel for neutron scattering off of hydrogen in polyethylene. The kernel was developed in ENDF-6 format as a set of S(alpha,beta) tables using the LEAPR module of the NJOY94 code package. The polyethylene density of states (from 0 to sub eV) adopted to derive the new kernel is presented. We compare our calculated room temperature total scattering cross sections and double differential cross sections at 232 meV at various angles with the available experimental data (at room temperature), and then extrapolate the calculations to lower temperatures (77K and 4K). The new temperature dependent scattering kernel gives a good quantitative fit to the available room temperature data and has a temperature dependence that is qualitatively consistent with thermodynamics.

  15. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  16. High temperature solder alloys for underhood applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, J.A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Drewien, C.A.; Yost, F.G.; Sackinger, S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weiser, M.W. [Johnson-Mathey Electronics Corp., Spokane, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this continued study, the microstructural evolution and peel strength as a function of thermal aging were evaluated for four Sn-Ag solders deposited on double layered Ag-Pt metallization. Additionally, activation energies for intermetallic growth over the temperature range of 134 to 190{degrees}C were obtained through thickness measurements of the Ag-Sn intermetallic that formed at the solder-metallization interface. It was found that Bi-containing solders yielded higher activation energies for the intermetallic growth, leading to thicker intermetallic layers at 175 and 190{degrees}C for times of 542 and 20.5 hrs, respectively, than the solders free of Bi. Complete reaction of the solder with the metallization occurred and lower peel strengths were measured on the Bi-containing solders. In all solder systems, a Ag-Sn intermetallic thickness of greater than {approximately}7 {mu}m contributed to lower peel strength values. The Ag-Sn binary eutectic composition and the Ag-Sn-Cu ternary eutectic composition solders yielded lower activation energies for intermetallic formation, less microstructural change with time, and higher peel strengths; these solder systems were resilient to the effects of temperatures up to 175{degrees}C. Accelerated isothermal aging studies provide useful criteria for recommendation of materials systems. The Sn-Ag and Sn-Ag-Cu eutectic compositions should be considered for future service life and reliability studies based upon their performance in this study.

  17. Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

    2013-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

  18. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  19. Case histories of temperature surveys in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, B.S.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most crude produced in Kuwait is from naturally flowing wells. Casing, tubing, and cement in these wells remain unchanged after completion. This study discusses the major application of temperature surveys in indicating fluid movement both inside and behind the production string, hence locating any holes in the casing. Some significant cases of temperature anomalies are examined qualitatively, and suggestions are made for a more quantitative interpretation of temperature profiles. 9 refs.

  20. Electronic Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroger, H.; Miracky, R. F.

    ELECfRONIC APPLICAnONS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS HARRY KROGER and ROBERT F. MIRACKY Superconductivity Program MCC Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The possible uses of high temperature superconductors in electronics applications... attempts a sober appraisal of the potential ap plications of high temperature superconductors to electronics. Al though we believe that these applications are very promising, and in some sense unlimited, we offer here an opinion which runs contrary...

  1. Optical temperature indicator using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible optical temperature indicator utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to various temperature levels. The thermochromic material is enclosed in an enamel which provides protection and prevents breakdown at higher temperatures. Cadmium sulfide is the preferred semiconductor material. The indicator may be utilized as a sign or in a striped arrangement to clearly provide a warning to a user. The various color responses provide multiple levels of alarm.

  2. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  3. Low temperature proton conducting oxide devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Payzant, Edward A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Speakman, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Greenblatt, Martha (Highland Park, NJ)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for conducting protons at a temperature below 550.degree. C. includes a LAMOX ceramic body characterized by an alpha crystalline structure.

  4. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Project ID: LM027 DOE 2011 Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit...

  5. SWTDI Geothermal Aquaculture Facility Aquaculture Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations": The following error has been detected in your syntax: * Display map Temperature 57.0 C 135.0...

  6. Intertwined Orders in High Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    Intertwined Orders in High Temperature Superconductors ! Eduardo Fradkin University of Illinois · Electronic liquid crystal phases have also been seen heavy fermions and iron superconductors 7 #12

  7. Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reaction 12 The CO LIF results are semi-quantitative - lending credence to the measured spatial distributions We apply temperature and pressure corrections to the CO absorption...

  8. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  9. Polyelectrolyte Materials for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High 3M (3M) Temperature Fuel Cells John B. Kerr Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Collaborators: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). February 13, 2007 This...

  10. High temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass At a Glance Rapid, selective catalytic system to produce vinyl plastics from renewable biomass Stereoregular...

  11. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Group 3 is chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module lifetime versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  12. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: provide a directional drilling system that can be used at environmental temperatures of up to 300°C; and at depths of 10; 000 meters.

  13. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    neuronet temperature estimates based on well log data derive from: (a) the neuronet "education level" (which depends on the amount and structure of information used for teaching)...

  14. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  15. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  16. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm028laracurzio2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  17. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm01laracurzio.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  18. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE...

  19. Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Oregon Johnson Controls, Inc. Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Klamath Falls, OR...

  20. The temperature dependence of equilibrium plasma density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2002-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature dependence of an electron-nuclear plasma equilibrium density is considered basing on known approaches, which are given in (1)(2). It is shown that at a very high temperature, which is characteristic for a star interior, the equilibrium plasma density is almost constant and equals approximately to $10^{25}$ particles per $cm^3$. At a relatively low temperature, which is characteristic for star surface, the equilibrium plasma density is in several orders lower and depends on temperature as $T^{3/2}$.

  1. Photonic crystals for high temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeng, Yi Xiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design, optimization, fabrication, and experimental realization of metallic photonic crystals (MPhCs) for high temperature applications, for instance thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion ...

  2. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011....

  3. Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV, Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV, Temperature, and Moisture for PV Encapsulants, Frontsheets, and Backsheets Accelerated Laboratory Tests Using Simultaneous UV,...

  4. Relativistic Random Phase Approximation At Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Y. F. [State Key Laboratory for Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory for Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully self-consistent finite temperature relativistic random phase approximation (FTRRPA) has been established in the single-nucleon basis of the temperature dependent Dirac-Hartree model (FTDH) based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings. Illustrative calculations in the FTRRPA framework show the evolution of multipole responses of {sup 132}Sn with temperature. With increased temperature, in both monopole and dipole strength distributions additional transitions appear in the low energy region due to the new opened particle-particle and hole-hole transition channels.

  5. Variable Temperature UHV STM/AFM | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of oxide materials, determining their properties is widely pursued both... Surface Chemistry of 2-Propanol on TiO2(110): Low and High Temperature Dehydration, Isotope...

  6. Biodiesel's Enabling Characteristics in Attaining Low Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Discusses reasons and physical significance of cool-flame behavior of biodiesel on improving low temperature diesel combustion deer11jacobs.pdf More Documents &...

  7. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Temperatures and intervalgeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

  8. Low Temperature Material Bonding Techniq Ue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  9. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperatures, nitrate salt fluids become chemically unstable. In contrast, direct absorption receivers using solid particles that fall through a beam of concentrated solar...

  10. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low...

  11. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F. [Aix-Marseille Univ, IUSTI, UMR CNRS 7343, F-13453 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (? ? 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (? ? 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  12. Correlation and prediction of liquid-phase adsorption on zeolites using group contributions based on adsorbate-solid solution theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berti, C.; Ulbig, P.; Burdorf, A.; Seippel, J.; Schulz, S.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Both correlation as well as prediction of experimental data for the adsorption of various binary liquid mixtures of alkanes and alkenes on NaX at different temperatures are presented. The theoretical background is based on the adsorbate-solid solution theory which conceives the adsorbed phase to be a mixture of the adsorbed species (adsorbate) and the adsorbent as an additional component. With the introduction of the Gibbs excess energy G{sup E*} for this hypothetical mixture, activity coefficients and composition of the adsorbed phase may be calculated. The Biggs excess energy and thus the activity coefficient of the adsorbed species depend strongly on the energetic heterogeneity of the solid surface which may be described by use of so-called group contribution models. These approaches, until now widely applied to predict fluid-phase equilibrium, are derived from statistical thermodynamics and take into account the energetic interactions between the respective components. For the application of this approach on thermodynamics of adsorption zeolites have to be divided into different functional groups such as SiO{sub 2}, AlO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and the respective cations. The interaction energies between these active sites and the functional groups of the adsorbed liquid molecules represent fundamental parameters of activity coefficient models based on group contributions such as UNIFAC. These parameters were determined by fitting four different adsorption systems. With the fitted values, six other systems were predicted. Both correlation and prediction include adsorption data at different temperatures. All calculations show excellent results with a mean relative deviation of 4.2% for the correlation and a mean deviation in the range of 8--17% for the predictions.

  13. High-Temperature Water Splitting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Temperature Water Splitting High-Temperature Water Splitting High-temperature water splitting (a "thermochemical" process) is a long-term technology in the early stages of...

  14. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature,...

  15. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities' dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  16. Studies of nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Quan-Chiu H.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-{Tc} superconductors are studied both theoretically and experimentally. For powdered samples, a novel model is presented in which the metallographically observed superconducting grains in the powder are modeled as superconducting current loops of various areas with weak links. Surprising harmonic generation behavior in an arc field, H{sub 1} cos({omega}t), is predicted by the model; the power at high harmonics show sharp dips almost periodic in a superposing dc magnetic field, revealing flux quantization in the prototype loops in the model. Such oscillation of the harmonic power in dc magnetic field P{sub nf}(H{sub dc}), is indeed experimentally observed in powdered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Other experimental aspects also agree with model predictions. For bulk sintered cylindrical samples, a generalized critical state model is presented. In this model, the nonlinear electrodynamics are due to flux-pinning, somewhat similar to low-temperature type-II superconductors, but with a more generalized critical current densities` dependence on magnetic field -- J{sub c}(H){approximately}H{sub local}{sup -{beta}}, with {beta} being an adjustable parameter. Experiments in ac and dc magnetic fields on a sintered cylindrical rod of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} yield unambiguous evidence of independent inter- and intragranular contributions to the complex harmonic permeability {tilde {mu}}{sub n} = {mu}{prime}{sub n} -i{mu}{double_prime}{sub n}. Temperature- dependence measurements reveal that, while the intragranular supercurrents disappear at {Tc}{ge}91.2 K, the intergranular supercurrents disappear at T{ge}86.6 K. This result is, to our knowledge, the first clear measurement of the phase-locking temperature of the 3-D matrix formed by YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grains, which are in electrical contact with one another through weak links.

  17. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  18. Joint contributions of Ag ions and oxygen vacancies to conducting filament evolution of Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt memory device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Yu-Lung; Cheng, Wen-Hui; Chen, Wei-Chih; Jhan, Sheng-An; Chen, Jen-Sue, E-mail: jenschen@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Jeng, Jiann-Shing [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electroforming and resistive switching behaviors in the Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt trilayer structure are investigated under a continual change of temperatures between 300?K and 100?K to distinguish the contributions of Ag ions and oxygen vacancies in developing of conducting filaments. For either electroforming or resistive switching, a significantly higher forming/set voltages is needed as the device is operated at 100?K, as compared to that observed when operating at 300?K. The disparity in forming/set voltages of Ag/TaO{sub x}/Pt operating at 300?K and 100?K is attributed to the contribution of oxygen vacancies, in addition to Ag atoms, in formation of conducting filament at 100?K since the mobilities of oxygen vacancies and Ag ions become comparable at low temperature. The presence of oxygen vacancy segment in the conducting filament also modifies the reset current from a gradually descending behavior (at 300?K) to a sharp drop (at 100?K). Furthermore, the characteristic set voltage and reset current are irreversible as the operation temperature is brought from 100?K back to 300?K, indicating the critical role of filament constituents on the switching behaviors of Ag/oxide/Pt system.

  19. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These endeavors have lead us to a solution which we think is quite unique and should allow us to obtain flaw free dense films of thickness in the 0.5 to 5 {micro}m range at processing temperatures {le} 900{sup o}. The process involves the deposition of a slurry of nanocrystalline YSZ onto a presintered porous LSM substrate. The key element in the deposition is that the slurry contains sufficient YSZ polymer precursor to allow adhesion of the YSZ particles to each other and the surface after annealing at about 600 C. This allows the formation of a porous film of 0.5 to 5 {micro}m thick which adheres to the surface. After formation of this film, YSZ polymer precursor is allowed to impregnate the porous surface layer (capillary forces tend to confine the polymer solution in the nanoporous layer). After several impregnation/heat treatment cycles, a dense film results. Within the next few months, this process should be developed to the point that single cell measurements can be made on 0.5 to 5 {micro}m films on a LSM substrate. This type of processing allows the formation of essentially flaw free films over areas > 1 cm{sup 2}.

  20. Postgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    the volumetric risk of the energy units sold, rather than the price risk of each unit. Weather derivativesPostgraduate Scholarship Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk: Pricing temperature derivatives and modelling the market price of risk. Main Supervisor: A. Alexandridis

  1. High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term commercialization opportunities #12;Why Use Solar Energy?Why Use Solar Energy? · High concentrations possible (>1000High Temperature Solar Splitting of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon High Temperature Solar Splitting and worldwide) ­ Sufficient to power the world (if we choose to) · Advantages tradeoff against collection area

  2. Temperature-Aware Architecture: Lessons and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    TEMPERATURE-AWARE, NOT JUST POWER-AWARE? To address these thermal concerns requires modeling at every design the two design approaches [2]. First, temperature is proportional to power density, not just power unit area is scaling up faster than the power density is scaling down. This requires more expensive

  3. High temperature hot water systems: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govan, F.A. [NMD and Associates, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental principles of high temperature water (HTW) system technology and its advantages for thermal energy distribution are presented. Misconceptions of this technology are also addressed. The paper describes design principles, applications, HTW properties, HTW system advantages, selecting the engineer, load diversification, design temperatures, system pressurization, pump considerations, constant vs. VS pumps, HTW generator types, and burners and controls.

  4. The University of Edinburgh Space Temperature Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    The University of Edinburgh Space Temperature Standards Addendum to the Energy Policy 2003C causes an estimated 8% extra energy costs / global warming gas emissions. Comfort Levels: Summer, lights and / or solar gain and all other options have been exhausted · Temperature control is required

  5. High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Proof Advanced Reactor and Gas Turbine #12;Flow through Power Conversion Vessel 8 #12;9 TRISO Fuel Particle1 High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ? Professor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts of Brayton vs. Rankine Cycle · High Temperature Helium Gas (900 C) · Direct or Indirect Cycle · Originally

  6. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212" F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  7. THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212° F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

  8. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - activity transiently contributes Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the absorption bands of carotenoids (Junge & Witt, 1968). The extent of the electrochromic transient... ). The electron transfer from QA - to QB contributes about 5% (Hook &...

  10. Wind Power Plant Short Circuit Current Contribution for Different Fault and Wind Turbine Topologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for SC current contribution for different types of WTGs obtained through transient and steady-state computer simulation software.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio contribution Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab initio contribution Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 imageslogoetsf Introduction Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Applications: Nanotubes and Graphene Perspectives Summary:...

  12. Commemorating Black History: Contributions of African Americans to the Manhattan Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned an exhibit documenting the contributions of African Americans to the Manhattan Project at Hanford Reservation.

  13. Short Circuit Current Contribution for Different Wind Turbine Generator Types: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Samaan, N.; Li, J.; Pasupulati, S.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for short-circuit current contribution for different types of WTGs obtained through transient analysis using generic WTG models.

  14. Influence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    -Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) project are analyzed in the vicinity of deep convective outflow to study the variationsInfluence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep upper-tropospheric temperature and humidity by the Mea- surement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In

  15. A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by2 Homogenized a constrained harmonic technique that forces the daily30 temperature normals to be consistent with the monthly, or harmonic even though the annual march of temperatures for some locations can be highly asymmetric. Here, we

  16. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  17. Ultra-High Temperature Distributed Wireless Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Russell; Rumpf, Raymond; Coggin, John; Davis, Williams; Yang, Taeyoung; O'Donnell, Alan; Bresnahan, Peter

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted towards the development of a passive wireless sensor for measurement of temperature in coal gasifiers and coal-fired boiler plants. Approaches investigated included metamaterial sensors based on guided mode resonance filters, and temperature-sensitive antennas that modulate the frequency of incident radio waves as they are re-radiated by the antenna. In the guided mode resonant filter metamaterial approach, temperature is encoded as changes in the sharpness of the filter response, which changes with temperature because the dielectric loss of the guided mode resonance filter is temperature-dependent. In the mechanically modulated antenna approach, the resonant frequency of a vibrating cantilever beam attached to the antenna changes with temperature. The vibration of the beam perturbs the electrical impedance of the antenna, so that incident radio waves are phase modulated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the vibrating beam. Since the beam resonant frequency depends on temperature, a Doppler radar can be used to remotely measure the temperature of the antenna. Laboratory testing of the guided mode resonance filter failed to produce the spectral response predicted by simulations. It was concluded that the spectral response was dominated by spectral reflections of radio waves incident on the filter. Laboratory testing of the mechanically modulated antenna demonstrated that the device frequency shifted incident radio waves, and that the frequency of the re-radiated waves varied linearly with temperature. Radio wave propagation tests in the convection pass of a small research boiler plant identified a spectral window between 10 and 13 GHz for low loss propagation of radio waves in the interior of the boiler.

  18. THERMAL REACTIONS OF OXYGEN ATOMS WITH ALKENES AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON INTERSTELLAR DUST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Michael D.; Price, Stephen D., E-mail: Michael.Ward@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: s.d.price@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments show that the thermal heterogeneous reactions of oxygen atoms may contribute to the synthesis of epoxides in interstellar clouds. The data set also indicates that the contribution of these pathways to epoxide formation, in comparison to non-thermal routes, is likely to be strongly temperature dependent. Our results indicate that an increased abundance of epoxides, relative to the corresponding aldehydes, could be an observational signature of a significant contribution to molecular oxidation via thermal O atom reactions with alkenes. Specifically surface science experiments show that both C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O are readily formed from reactions of ethene and propene molecules with thermalized oxygen atoms at temperatures in the range of 12-90 K. It is clear from our experiments that these reactions, on a graphite surface, proceed with significantly reduced reaction barriers compared with those operating in the gas phase. For both the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + O and the C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O reactions, the surface reaction barriers we determine are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude compared with the barriers in the gas phase. The modeling of our experimental results, which determines these reaction barriers, also extracts desorption energies and rate coefficients for the title reactions. Our results clearly show that the major product from the O + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction is ethylene oxide, an epoxide.

  19. High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

  20. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  1. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Donglu (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  2. Low-temperature thermodynamics with quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varun Narasimhachar; Gilad Gour

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a new characterization of low-temperature processes, which we call "cooling processes", incorporating quantum coherence in the model of thermodynamics for the first time. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the feasibility of state transitions under cooling processes. We also rigorously confirm the intuitive robustness of coherence against low-temperature thermal noise. Additionally, we develop the low-temperature "Gibbs-preserving" model, and by comparing our results on the two models, we argue that the latter is a poor approximation to physical processes.

  3. The temperature sensitivity of a bistable RAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Janet Kay

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is applied to the polycrystalline-silicon resistor of a new bistable RAM cell. The effect of temperature on the resistor is explored with respect to the operation of the RAM cell's refresh mechanism. A temperature range of 0 ? 100'C is investigated... of user defined function, DER 16. TB, fpiy verses doping concentration 17. TB, f ty verses temperature range Page 16 17 26 27' 28 29 30 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The search for small, dense memories has led to the dynamic RAM cell which...

  4. On quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Jarzyna; Marcin Zwierz

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a detailed description of the interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from measurements of the optical phase. For the first time, we rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system with a heated sample. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperature of a sample in the nK regime. Furthermore, we compare the theoretical precision of interferometric thermometers with the precision offered by the idealized pyrometers, which infer the temperature from a measurement of the total thermal radiation emitted by the sample.

  5. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

  6. Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fringer, Oliver B.

    Nonhydrostatic and nonlinear contributions to the energy flux budget in nonlinear internal waves S waves. Our results show that the contributions to the total energy flux from these additional terms as well as non- linearity. The partitioning of the incident internal wave energy over the course

  7. Sa mission Dans le but d'apporter une contribution significative et exclusive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Sa mission Dans le but d'apporter une contribution significative et exclusive à l particulier dans le développement de l'École. Recevoir des dons, legs, contributions en argent, en valeurs Fondation et l'École. Développer la culture philanthropique auprès des diplômés, des étudiants, des amis de

  8. Contribution to the establishment of the R-banded karyotype in dogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Contribution to the establishment of the R-banded karyotype in dogs M Moreno-Millán A Rodero FJ a system of arranging R-bands. We describe a new contribution to the canine karyotype obtained after cultures of integral blood according to the method of de Grouchy et al (1964) slightly mod- ified

  9. Systmes d'information centrs rseau : Contributions la gestion des situations de crise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Systèmes d'information centrés réseau : Contributions à la gestion des situations de crise Le cas d'information centrés réseau : Contributions à la gestion des situations de crise Le cas d'une crise sanitaire chez'une crise sanitaire chez Leclerc Agnès LANCINI Maître de conférences en Sciences de Gestion Université Aix

  10. Conclusions In this concluding chapter we summarize the contributions of this thesis and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakhnarovich, Greg

    Chapter 7 Conclusions In this concluding chapter we summarize the contributions of this thesis and the possible impact as we see it, and discuss the important directions of future work. 7.1 Summary of thesis contributions The central problem addressed in this thesis is the problem of modeling a boolean similarity

  11. WHAT IS INTRUMENTALITY IN NEW DIGITAL MUSICAL DEVICES ? A CONTRIBUTION FROM COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS & PSYCHOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mettre à contribution des outils conceptuels et méthodologiques développés en linguistique cognitive pourWHAT IS INTRUMENTALITY IN NEW DIGITAL MUSICAL DEVICES ? A CONTRIBUTION FROM COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS pluridisciplinaire impliquant sciences physiques et sciences humaines et de la culture. Dans ce cadre, de précédentes

  12. 14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    14 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2008 T THE CONTRIBUTION OF HYDRO- power to modern%, with these differences reflecting respective economic devel- opment. Hydro contributes 17% of the total world electricity hand, the interna- tional antidam lobby demands that major hydro developments be stopped altogether

  13. Journal of Biomechanics 34 (2001) 13871398 Contributions of the individual ankle plantar flexors to support,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Biomechanics 34 (2001) 1387­1398 Contributions of the individual ankle plantar flexors coordination of many muscles. Previous biomechanical studies, based primarily on analyses of the net ankle the individual contributions of the ankle plantar flexors (gastrocnemius (GAS); soleus (SOL)) to the body segment

  14. From Ants to Robots and Back: How Robotics Can Contribute to the Study of Collective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Simon

    From Ants to Robots and Back: How Robotics Can Contribute to the Study of Collective Animal Behavior Simon Garnier Abstract. Swarm robotics has developed partly from biological discoveries that have review some of the ways robotics contributes in return to the study of collective animal behavior. I

  15. Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas- standing of the origins and environmental responses of soil CO2 efflux. For example, despite their large biomass, the contribution of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi to forest soil CO2 efflux and responses to changes

  16. Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1 Geir contribution to global sea level rise of 0.026 mm yrÃ?1 sea level equivalent. Citation: Nuth, C., G. Moholdt, J level rise, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01008, doi:10.1029/2008JF001223. 1. Introduction [2] The most recent

  17. An Evaluation of the Economic and Social Contribution of `Forestry for People' in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Evaluation of the Economic and Social Contribution of `Forestry for People' in Scotland (FR) to prepare a `Description of Work' for an evaluation of the social and economic contribution wherever this is appropriate, but that non- economic quantitative and qualitative evaluations will be used

  18. Energy conservation equations and interaction contributions at a structural interface between two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Energy conservation equations and interaction contributions at a structural interface between two­mails: johana@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz, vcerveny@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary Energy conservation equations is to investigate numeri­ cally the energy conservation equations and the interaction contributions. An attempt

  19. Contribution du gros intestin la digestion des glucides et des matires azotes chez le monogastrique omnivore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Contribution du gros intestin à la digestion des glucides et des matières azotées chez le-en-Josas (France). Summary. Contribution of the large intestine to the digestion of carbohydrates and proteins in omnivorous simple-stomached animals. Owing to its special situation in relation to the rest of the digestive

  20. Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Timothy G.....................................................................................................34 #12;i Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy of the Florida craft brewing industry on the state's economy, which was conducted using the University of Florida

  1. Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Timothy G Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Executive Summary The Florida Brewers on the state's economy, which was conducted using the University of Florida's Food and Resource Economics

  2. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy contributing to the state's economy. The food and fiber system in Texas is evolving and changing. The structure in state and local economies. Of particular interest is the relationship between the food and fiber system

  3. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF HUDSON, CHESAPEAKE, AND ROANOKE STRIPED BASS, MORONE SAXATILIS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Saila. 1969. Final report for the coopera- tive striped bass migration study. U.S. Fish. Wildl. ServoRELATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF HUDSON, CHESAPEAKE, AND ROANOKE STRIPED BASS, MORONE SAXATILIS, STOCKS used in discriminant analysis to quantitatively estimate the relative contribution ofstriped bass

  4. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cassano, Anthony A. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  5. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  6. Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altin, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

  7. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  8. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  9. Finite Temperature Gases of Fermionic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in the absence of a Ramond-Ramond sector both the type IIA and type IIB free string gases have a thermal instability due to low temperature tachyon modes. The gas of free IIA strings undergoes a thermal duality transition into a gas of free IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. The free heterotic string gas is a tachyon-free ensemble with gauge symmetry SO(16)$\\times$SO(16) in the presence of a timelike Wilson line background. It exhibits a holographic duality relation undergoing a self-dual phase transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat. The type IB open and closed string ensemble is related by thermal duality to the type I' string ensemble. We identify the order parameter for the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition from a low temperature gas of short open strings to a high temperature long string phase at or below T_C. Note Added (Sep 2005).

  10. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  11. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  12. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  13. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  14. Photovoltaic cell efficiency at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Katherine Leung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar cell could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic hybrid power generator, we tested the change in efficiency due to higher temperatures of three types of solar ...

  15. Ballistic dispersion in temperature gradient focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    regime is the most familiar regime in microfluidic systems, an oft-overlooked regime is that of purely kinematic (or ballistic) dispersion. In most microfluidic systems, this dispersion regime is transient systems. Keywords: microfluidics; temperature gradient focusing; kinematic dispersion; Taylor

  16. Self Contained Temperature Actuated Control Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirkle, F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a virtually unlimited potential for energy conservation by utilizing self contained temperature actuated valves. As steam costs soar it becomes more and more important to conserve feed stock dollars as well as the energy these dollars...

  17. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

  18. Group 3: Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, focused on humidity, temperature and voltage testing, was originally presented by John Wohlgemuth at the NREL 2013 PV Module Reliability Workshop on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO. It summarizes the activities of a working group chartered to develop accelerated stress tests that can be used as comparative predictors of module life versus stresses associated with humidity, temperature and voltage.

  19. PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Xuehao

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS A Thesis by XUEHAO TAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS A Thesis by XUEHAO TAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  20. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  1. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  2. High Temperature Materials for Aerospace Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczak, Andrea Diane

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    below 430 ?C for exposure times up to 20 minutes. Transition-metal carbides were initially synthesized by carbothermal reduction of transition-metal halides and polymer precursor mixtures, at temperatures that range from 900 to 1500 ?C in an argon... ........................................ 20 2.3 Present/Future Aerospace Applications ......................................... 24 2.4 Ultra-High Temperature Materials ................................................. 27 2.4.1 Transition-Metal Carbides...

  3. Rotating sample holder at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, Sebastien; Perrin, Florian; Ciatto, Gianluca; Palancher, Herve; Steinmann, Ricardo [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low temperature rotary device (cryoturbine) for use in extended x-ray-absorption fine structure measurements in fluorescence mode has been designed and manufactured. The instrument works at a temperature close to liquid Nitrogen and can reach frequencies up to 100 Hz with good stability. The rotation speed is measured with a light-emitting diode driven in stroboscopic mode by a simple electronic circuit.

  4. Comprehensive kinetic model for the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffuri, P.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Cernansky, N.P.; Miller, D. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics; d`Anna, A.; Ciajolo, A. [CNR, Napoli (Italy). Ist. di Richerche sulla Combustione] [CNR, Napoli (Italy). Ist. di Richerche sulla Combustione

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation chemistry in the low- and intermediate-temperature regimes (600--900 K) is important and plays a significant role in the overall combustion process. Autoignition in diesel engines as well as end-gas autoignition and knock phenomena in s.i. engines are initiated at these low temperatures. The low-temperature oxidation chemistry of linear and branched alkanes is discussed with the aim of unifying their complex behavior in various experimental systems using a single detailed kinetic model. New experimental data, obtained in a pressurized flow reactor, as well as in batch- and jet-stirred reactors, are useful for a better definition of the region of cool flames and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) for pure hydrocarbons from propane up to isooctane. Thermochemical oscillations and the NTC region of the reaction rate of the low-temperature oxidation of n-heptane and isooctane in a jet-stirred flow reactor are reproduced quite well by the model, not only in a qualitative way but in terms of the experimental frequencies and intensities of cool flames. Very good agreement is also observed for fuel conversion and intermediate-species formation. Irrespective of the experimental system, the same critical reaction steps always control these phenomena. The results contribute to the definition of a limited set of fundamental kinetic parameters that should be easily extended to model heavier alkanes.

  5. Finite temperature Casimir effect in piston geometry and its classical limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Lim; L. P. Teo

    2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Casimir force acting on a $d$-dimensional rectangular piston due to massless scalar field with periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions and electromagnetic field with perfect electric conductor and perfect magnetic conductor boundary conditions. It is verified analytically that at any temperature, the Casimir force acting on the piston is always an attractive force pulling the piston towards the interior region, and the magnitude of the force gets larger as the separation $a$ gets smaller. Explicit exact expressions for the Casimir force for small and large plate separations and for low and high temperatures are computed. The limits of the Casimir force acting on the piston when some pairs of transversal plates are large are also derived. An interesting result regarding the influence of temperature is that in contrast to the conventional result that the leading term of the Casimir force acting on a wall of a rectangular cavity at high temperature is the Stefan--Boltzmann (or black body radiation) term which is of order $T^{d+1}$, it is found that the contributions of this term from the interior and exterior regions cancel with each other in the case of piston. The high temperature leading order term of the Casimir force acting on the piston is of order $T$, which shows that the Casimir force has a nontrivial classical $\\hbar\\to 0$ limit.

  6. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP`s and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 {mu}s, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity.

  7. Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

  8. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  9. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Fisenko; Igor Fisenko

    2010-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  10. A study of temperature compensating circuits for voltage references which use negative temperature coefficient zener diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Spencer Delano

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Character- istics in Breakdown Region . 13 3f. 1N 751 Zener Diode Voltage vs Current Character- istics in Breakdown Region . 14 3g, lN752 Zener Diode Voltage vs Current Character- istics in Breakdown Region 15 4a. 1N746 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature... vs Voltage Characteristics in Breakdown Region. . . . . . . . . . 16 4b. IN747 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature vs Voltage Characteristics in Breakdown Region. . . . . . . . . . 17 4c. 1N748 Zener Diode Ambient Temperature vs Voltage...

  11. Response Options Aimed at Increasing the ContributionResponse Options Aimed at Increasing the Contribution of Variable Energy Resources in the Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Contribution of Variable Energy Resources in the Electricity Supply Workshop Roskilde June 10 Measures in the electricity tigeneration Henrik Klinge Jacobsen and Erika Zvingilaite, Risø DTUg g , #12;Contents · Impacts of electricity or heat 4 ­ Storage of electricity or heat ­ New demand technologies (heat pumps, hybrid electric

  12. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, K.G. [Xform, Inc., Cohoes, NY (United States); Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J. [Praxair Specialty Powders, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  13. Contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Johnson

    1994-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova is calculated assuming shock acceleration to 10^14 eV in a remnant which was formed several 10^5 years ago along with the Geminga pulsar. The particles are propagated to Earth using a simple diffusion model. In the region below the knee in the spectrum, it is found the supernova may contribute 10% of the local cosmic-ray flux, assuming plausible explosion parameters. The contribution to the amplitude of the anisotropy is not in conflict with the data in this energy region.

  14. Lattice calculation of the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic momen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I present quenched domain wall fermion and 2+1 flavor improved Kogut-Susskind fermion calculations of the hadronic vacuum polarization which are used to calculate the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha^2)$ hadronic contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Together with previous quenched calcuations, the new results confirm that in the quenched theory the hadronic contribution is signifcantly smaller ($\\sim 30%$) than the value obtained from the total cross section of $e^+e^-$ annhilation to hadrons. The 2+1 flavor results show an increasing contribution to $g-2$ as the quark mass is reduced.

  15. Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromichi Nishimura; Michael C. Ogilvie; Kamal Pangeni

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry $\\mathcal{CK}$ of the finite-density action, where $\\mathcal{C}$ is charge conjugation and $\\mathcal{K}$ is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator $P$ at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of $Tr_{F}P$ and $Tr_{F}P^{\\dagger}$ at the saddle point, are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large $T$ and $\\mu$, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the CBM experiment at FAIR.

  16. Infrared nullification of the effective electromagnetic field at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill A. Kazakov; Vladimir V. Nikitin

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of infrared divergence of the effective electromagnetic field at finite temperature (T) is revisited. A model of single spatially localized electron interacting with thermal photons is considered in the limit T to 0 using two different regularization schemes. The first is based on the shift i 0 to i varepsilon of the electron propagator pole in the complex energy plane, and is used to explicitly calculate the effective field in the one-loop approximation. We show that the matrix-valued imaginary part of the electron self-energy can be consistently related to the pole shift, and that the presence of the heat bath leads to appearance of an effective varepsilon sim T, thus providing a natural infrared regulator of the theory. We find that the one-loop effective Coulomb field calculated using this varepsilon vanishes. The other scheme combines an infrared momentum cutoff with smearing of the delta-functions in the interaction vertices. We prove that this regularization admits factorization of the infrared contributions in multi-loop diagrams, and sum the corresponding infinite series. The effective electromagnetic field is found to vanish in this case too. An essentially perturbative nature of this result is emphasized and discussed in connection with the long-range expansion of the effective field.

  17. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Baldwin, Charles; Cheng, Guangfeng; Flood, Roger; Jordan, Kevin; Kneisel, Peter; Morrone, Michael; Nemes, George; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  18. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

  19. PHYS 390 Lecture 12 -Energy and temperature 12 -1 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further copying or resale is strictly prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    · it has a contribution from a mass energy mc 2 . Where does kinetic energy fit into this? By definition: E, thus releasing energy to the system. This definition can be applied to decays as well: QPHYS 390 Lecture 12 - Energy and temperature 12 - 1 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University

  20. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynders, Steven Walton (Fogelsville, PA); Minford, Eric (Laurys Station, PA); Tressler, Richard Ernest (Boalsburg, PA); Taylor, Dale M. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  1. Holographic conductivity of zero temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Konoplya; A. Zhidenko

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently found by G. Horowitz and M. Roberts (arXiv:0908.3677) numerical model of the ground state of holographic superconductors (at zero temperature), we calculate the conductivity for such models. The universal relation connecting conductivity with the reflection coefficient was used for finding the conductivity by the WKB approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the frequency and charge density is discussed. Numerical calculations confirm the general arguments of (arXiv:0908.3677) in favor of non-zero conductivity even at zero temperature. In addition to the Horowitz-Roberts solution we have found (probably infinite) set of extra solutions which are normalizable and reach the same correct RN-AdS asymptotic at spatial infinity. These extra solutions (which correspond to larger values of the grand canonical potential) lead to effective potentials that also vanish at the horizon and thus correspond to a non-zero conductivity at zero temperature.

  2. Thermochemistry of high-temperature corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicomponent gas environments are prevalent in a number of energy systems, especially in those that utilize fossil fuels. The gas environments in these processes contain sulfur-bearing components in addition to oxidants. These complex environments, coupled with the elevated temperatures present in these systems, generally cause significant corrosion of engineering materials. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes occuring in complex gas mixtures are discussed, with emphasis on the role of thermochemical diagrams. The interrelationships between the corrosion behavior of materials and gas composition, alloy chemistry, and temperatures are examined. A number of examples from studies on materials behavior in coal-gasification environments are used to elucidate the role of thermochemistry in the understanding of corrosion processes that occur in complex gas mixtures. 11 figures.

  3. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alekseev, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  4. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  5. Single Interval Rényi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  6. Bibliographical Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Kansas Libraries

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boo\\ of Sir John Oglander (London, 1936), p. 159. Oglander was Lisle's godfather (p. 13n), 123-5). The Victoria County History: A History of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight (5 vols.; Westminster 1903-4), IV, 313. 3. Bulstrode Whitelocke, Memorials...-1664), II, 144, 149, 380. 14. Thomas Nicholas, ed., Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales (2 vols.; London, 1872), I, 345; W. R. Williams, The History of the Great Sessions in Wales, 15424830 (Brecknock, 1899), p. 121...

  7. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED ITER

  8. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED ITERR&D,

  9. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED ITERR&D,for 14%

  10. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED ITERR&D,for

  11. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED ITERR&D,forion

  12. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIED

  13. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIEDcontributes 75% of

  14. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIEDcontributes 75% ofUS

  15. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIEDcontributes 75%

  16. US Contribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIEDcontributes 75%will

  17. US Contribution

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergyUNCLASSIFIEDcontributes

  18. Educational Contributions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1 WinnersEdEducation6 FY2007 K-12

  19. Educational Contributions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1 WinnersEdEducation6 FY2007 K-127

  20. Educational Contributions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1 WinnersEdEducation6 FY2007 K-1278