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Sample records for abo sussex-shannon muddy

  1. ABO Wind Espana SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ABO Wind Espana SA Place: Valencia, Spain Zip: 46002 Sector: Wind energy Product: Spanish branch of project developer ABO Wind AG. Coordinates: 39.468791, -0.376913 Show...

  2. ABO Wind AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: ABO Wind AG Place: Hessen, Germany Zip: 65193 Sector: Bioenergy, Wind energy Product: German developer of wind and bioenergy generation assets....

  3. Muddy Boots, Y-12 and looking to the future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muddy Boots, Y-12 and looking to the future On Tuesday, December 01, 2009, the East Tennessee Economic Council's 2009 annual Meeting an Awards Celebration was held in the...

  4. Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R.K.

    1988-11-30

    An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

  5. ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name: ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen-Anhalt GmbH & Co. KG Place: Wiesbaden, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip: 65193 Product: Company...

  6. Origin of the Diverse Behavior of Oxygen Vacancies in ABO3 Perovskites: A Symmetry Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, W. J.; Wei, S. H.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Yan, Y. F.

    2012-05-15

    Using band symmetry analysis and density functional theory calculations, we reveal the origin of why oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) energy levels are shallow in some ABO{sub 3} perovskites, such as SrTiO{sub 3}, but are deep in some others, such as LaAlO{sub 3}. We show that this diverse behavior can be explained by the symmetry of the perovskite structure and the location (A or B site) of the metal atoms with low d orbital energies, such as Ti and La atoms. When the conduction band minimum (CBM) is an antibonding {Gamma}12 state, which is usually associated with the metal atom with low d orbital energies at the A site (e.g., LaAlO{sub 3}), then the V{sub O} energy levels are deep inside the gap. Otherwise, if the CBM is the nonbonding {Gamma}25{prime} state, which is usually associated with metal atoms with low d orbital energies at the B site (e.g., SrTiO{sub 3}), then the V{sub O} energy levels are shallow and often above the CBM. The V{sub O} energy level is also deep for some uncommon ABO{sub 3} perovskite materials that possess a low s orbital, or large-size cations, and an antibonding {Gamma}{sub 1} state CBM, such as ZnTiO{sub 3}. Our results, therefore, provide guidelines for designing ABO{sub 3} perovskite materials with desired functional behaviors.

  7. Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1998-11-10

    Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

  8. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, James; Reddy, T. B.K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Spring, Stefan; Gö ker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Tindall, Brian J.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Pati, Amrita

    2014-11-26

    Pontibacter roseus Suresh et al 2006 is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. The 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes and is a part of Genomic encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

  9. High quality draft genome sequence and analysis of Pontibacter roseus type strain SRC-1T (DSM 17521T) isolated from muddy waters of a drainage system in Chandigarh, India

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Lapidus, Alla; Shapiro, Nicole; Cheng, Jan -Fang; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; et al

    2015-01-01

    Pontibacter roseus is a member of genus Pontibacter family Cytophagaceae, class Cytophagia. While the type species of the genus Pontibacter actiniarum was isolated in 2005 from a marine environment, subsequent species of the same genus have been found in different types of habitats ranging from seawater, sediment, desert soil, rhizosphere, contaminated sites, solar saltern and muddy water. Here we describe the features of Pontibacter roseus strain SRC-1T along with its complete genome sequence and annotation from a culture of DSM 17521T. In conclusion, the 4,581,480 bp long draft genome consists of 12 scaffolds with 4,003 protein-coding and 50 RNA genesmore » and is a part of Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains: KMG-I project.« less

  10. Y-12's historian receives 2013 Muddy Boot Award | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thursday, December 19, 2013 - 3:27pm Y-12 historian Ray Smith was among the recipients at ... Smith came to Y-12 in 1970 as an electronics technician, but it wasn't until 2005 that he ...

  11. Big Muddy Field Low-Tension Flood Demonstration Project. Third annual report, April 1980-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.G.; Ferrell, H.H.; Stewart, W.C.

    1981-11-01

    Objectives of the project are: evaluate a commercial-scale field test using cost-optimized chemical slug size and composition; field test a surfactant system which could be made available in commercial quantities; demonstrate oil recovery effectiveness in multiple patterns; and demonstrate the feasibility of applying a low-tension process to low-permeability sands by using propped fractures in injection and producing wells. The first annual report dealt primarily with drilling, formation evaluation, and preliminary plant design. The second annual report emphasized plant construction and completion of laboratory work to specify the chemicals needed for the project. This report discusses the project operation during the preflush and problems arising during start-up of chemical injection. The most significant operating problem during the preflush was failure of the monel filter screens due to chlorine attack. The monel screens were replaced with polyester cloth screens. The cloth screens worked very well filtering the preflush water. After a short term test in which the 200-square-foot filter showed that the cloth screens would also filter the polymer, polyester cloth screens were ordered as replacement screens for the 800-square-foot product filter. All of the construction and installation necessary for the chemical phase handling and blending were completed, individual components were checked out, and the low-tension slug injection was scheduled to begin the latter half of January. In spite of the preparation, low-tension slug injection has been delayed because of continued faulty filter operation. The exact cause of the erratic filter operation is still being evaluated.

  12. Lead-free and lead-based ABO3 perovskite relaxors with mixed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD ...

  13. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  14. Big Horn County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype B. Places in Big Horn County, Montana Busby, Montana Crow Agency, Montana Fort Smith, Montana Hardin, Montana Lodge Grass, Montana Muddy, Montana Pryor, Montana St....

  15. CLIMATE OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA ANDREW S. GORELOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... of the valley, including the Muddy Mountains, the Black Mountains and the Eldorado Range. ... Winters on the whole, are mild and pleasant. Afternoon temperatures average near 60 ...

  16. p-Type transparent conducting oxides and methods for preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahriari, Dean Y.; Barnabe, Antoine; Mason, Thomas O.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    2005-12-27

    A facile, low temperature and low pressure method for the preparation of a wide range of phase pure ABO.sub.2 compositions.

  17. p-Type transparent conducting oxides and methods for preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahriari, Dean Y.; Barnabe, Antoine; Mason, Thomas O.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    2011-05-31

    A facile, low temperature and low pressure method for the preparation of a wide range of phase pure ABO.sub.2 compositions.

  18. CX-011619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Muddy Pass-Walden 69-kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012 3rd Qtr Package.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Commission uses zero-based budgeting for j stif ing the R&D b dget abo e a p esc ibed le el and Reliabilit Cente ed Maintenance justifying the R&D budget above a...

  20. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... AAF ABoVE ACME ARM ATQ BRW CARVE CCSP DOE ESRL FT GCM GHG IVO JPL LGR LSM LTER m NACP NASA ... Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment, a NASA project U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Overview 5.3.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Reverse Well - 10 Mgal of Pu-bearing liquid waste discharged directly to GW from 1945-1947 The onl location here P is ro tinel detected in the GW abo e the drinking - The only ...

  2. Norrby_TAMU.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clusters in 32 S, 34 S and 40 Ca M. Norrby Department of Physics, ˚ Abo Akademi University, 20500 Turku, Finland email: mnorrby@abo.fi The three nuclei 32 S, 34 S and 40 Ca have been examined with the relatively new method of inverse kinematics and a thick gas target. Experiments were carried out using the K-130 cyclotron at Jyv¨ askyl¨ a University, accelerating 150 MeV beams of 28 Si, 30 Si and 36 Ar into a scattering chamber filled with helium gas. Detectors at forward angles recorded

  3. CX-008793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gore Pass to Muddy Pass: Single Pole and Multiple Cross Arm Replacements Grand County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B4.6 Date: 09/16/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  4. CX-011721: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gore Pass-Muddy Pass 69 Kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management in Grand and Jackson Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/31/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  5. CX-013947: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Muddy Pass-Walden 69 Kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management Jackson County, CO CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/26/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  6. Towards 3D mapping of BO? octahedron rotations at perovskite heterointerfaces, unit cell by unit cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qian; Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R.; Qiao, Liang; Moon, Eun Ju; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S.; May, Steven J.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-07-15

    The rich functionalities in the ABO? perovskite oxides originate at least partly from the ability of the corner-connected BO? octahedral network to host a large variety of cations through distortions and rotations. Characterizing these rotations, which significantly affect both fundamental aspects of materials behavior and possible applications, remains a major challenge. In this work, we have developed a unique method of investigating BO? rotation patterns in complex oxides ABO? with unit cell resolution at heterointerfaces, where novel properties often emerge. Our method involves column shape analysis in annular bright field - scanning transmission electron microscope images of the ABO? heterointerfaces taken in specific orientations. The rotating phase of BO? octahedra can be identified for all three spatial dimensions without the need of case-by-case simulation. In several common rotation systems, it is now possible to quantitatively measure all three rotation angles. With this method, we examined interfaces between perovskites with distinct tilt systems as well as interfaces between tilted and untilted perovskites, identifying an unusual coupling behavior at the CaTiO?/LSAT interface. We believe this unique method will significantly improve our knowledge of the complex oxide heterointerfaces.

  7. Microalgae bioprospecting at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Prospecting for elusive fast-growing, oily microalgae is a soggy, muddy, rewarding job for NREL researcher Lee Elliott. Not only do algae grow in unlikely settings, but their ability to convert the light they receive into biomass has the potential to outperform that of land plants. Trees, grasses and shrubs typically are not very efficient in capturing and converting the sun's energy into biomass, but some algae are believed to be capable of much higher efficiencies, with some scientists thinking ideal strains may be able to approach the maximum theoretical photosynthetic efficiency under the right conditions.

  8. Microalgae bioprospecting at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Prospecting for elusive fast-growing, oily microalgae is a soggy, muddy, rewarding job for NREL researcher Lee Elliott. Not only do algae grow in unlikely settings, but their ability to convert the light they receive into biomass has the potential to outperform that of land plants. Trees, grasses and shrubs typically are not very efficient in capturing and converting the sun's energy into biomass, but some algae are believed to be capable of much higher efficiencies, with some scientists thinking ideal strains may be able to approach the maximum theoretical photosynthetic efficiency under the right conditions.

  9. Jan-Feb_14Times.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 inside this issue ... What's the latest on UPF? Page 2 History in the making: Historian receives Muddy Boot Page 4 A heartfelt thanks Page 6 ... and other Y-12 news Dave Richardson (center), B&W Y-12 president and general manager, gets the latest information about a production process. Taking on special assignments is part of most jobs, and it's something Chuck Spencer did when he accepted the role as B&W Y-12's president and general manager in August 2012.

  10. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  11. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  12. Clay mineralogy of Lower Cretaceous deep-sea fan sediments, western North Atlantic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    The Lower Cretaceous of the eastern North American continent was a time of extensive deltaic progradation. The effects of deltaic deposition on sedimentation in the western North Atlantic were unknown until May 1982, when, at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 603 off Cape Hatteras, over 260 m of micaceous, muddy turbidites were recovered that correlate with deltaic progradation on eastern North America. The results of clay mineral studies from onshore and offshore equivalents indicate that during the Cretaceous, some sorting of clay minerals by transport processes occurred. Kaolinite tends to accumulate in continental environments, illite in transitional to marine environments, and smectite in deep sea sediments as pelagic clay. In the sediments from the western North Atlantic, illite tended to be more abundant in thick bedded sandy muds, whereas kaolinite tended to be more abundant in thin bedded muddy sands. Although the occurrence of illite and kaolinite in pelagic sediments indicates a general increased terrigenous influence, the results of this study indicate that these two clays behave independently in these sediments. The presence of large amounts of kaolinite at certain levels in these sediments corresponds to phases of maximum deep-sea fan development, and so indicates a more direct input of continental material, with less sorting of sediments by continental and shelf processes (pericontinental fractionation) prior to redeposition.

  13. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot dry rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.; Baroid, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo Formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred.

  14. Are green lots worth more than brown lots? An economic incentive for erosion control on residential developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzog, M.; Harbor, J.; McClintock, K.; Law, J.; Bennett, K.

    2000-03-01

    Construction sites are major contributors to nonpoint source (NPS) pollution. However, a lack of personnel to enforce erosion control regulations and limited voluntary compliance means that few developers apply effective erosion control. New approaches are needed to increase erosion control on construction sites if this source of NPS pollution is to be significantly reduced. This study tests whether an economic advantage exists for developers who use vegetative cover for erosion control, independent of advantages gained in addressing environmental or regulatory concerns. Improving residential lot appearance from muddy brown to green grass may increase the appeal of the lot to buyers. A market survey shows that homebuyers and realtors perceive vegetated lots to be worth more than unvegetated lots, and this increased value exceeds the cost of seeding. Thus, developers can now be encouraged to invest in vegetative cover because of the potentially high return on the investment.

  15. Structure and ferroelectricity of nonstoichiometric (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jared; Aksel, Elena; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-17

    Stoichiometric (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3} (NBT) adopts the ABO{sub 3} perovskite structure with the A-site equally occupied by Na{sup +} and Bi{sup 3+} ions. However, non-stoichiometric compositions can be synthesized intentionally or unintentionally. To determine the effect of A-site nonstoichiometry on the crystal structure and ferroelectricity of NBT, the composition of (Na{sub 0.5?x}Bi{sub 0.5+x})TiO{sub 3+x} was varied using x?=??0.01, ?0.005, 0, 0.005, and 0.01. High resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement revealed that a shift in either direction from x = 0 results in a decrease in the spontaneous ferroelastic strain. Ferroelectric hysteresis and piezoelectric coefficients were found to be optimum in the stoichiometric composition.

  16. Strain Accommodation By Facile WO6 Octahedral Distortion and Tilting During WO3 Heteroepitaxy on SrTiO3(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Gu, Meng; Varga, Tamas; Wang, Chong M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-27

    In this paper, we show that compared to other BO6 octahedra in ABO3 structured perovskite oxides, the WO6 octahedra in tungsten trioxide (WO3) can withstand a much larger degree of distortion and tilting to accommodate interfacial strain, which in turn strongly impact the nucleation, structure, and defect formation during the epitaxial growth of WO3 on SrTiO3(001). A meta-stable tetragonal phase can be stabilized by epitaxy and a thickness dependent phase transition (tetragonal to monoclinic) is observed. In contrast to misfit dislocations to accommodate the interfacial stain, the facial WO6 octahedral distortion and tilting give rise to three types of planar defects that affect more than 15 monolayers from the interface. These atomically resolved, unusual interfacial defects may significantly alter the electronic, electrochromic, and mechanical properties of the epitaxial films.

  17. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  18. Static ferroelectric memory transistor having improved data retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric FET structure in which the ferroelectric layer is doped to reduce retention loss. A ferroelectric FET according to the present invention includes a semiconductor layer having first and second contacts thereon, the first and second contacts being separated from one another. The ferroelectric FET also includes a bottom electrode and a ferroelectric layer which is sandwiched between the semiconductor layer and the bottom electrode. The ferroelectric layer is constructed from a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4 in sufficient concentration to impede shifts in the resistance measured between the first and second contacts with time. The ferroelectric FET structure preferably comprises Pb in the A-site. The first and second elements are preferably Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred B-site dopants are Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten at concentrations between 1% and 8%.

  19. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  20. Do yield and quality of big bluestem and switchgrass feedstock decline over winter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M.F. Johnson; Garold L. Gresham

    2014-03-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerdardii Vitman) are potential perennial bioenergy feedstocks. Feedstock storage limitations, labor constraints for harvest, and environmental benefits provided by perennials are rationales for developing localized perennial feedstock as an alternative or in conjunction with annual feedstocks (i.e., crop residues). Little information is available on yield, mineral, and thermochemical properties of native species as related to harvest time. The study’s objectives were to compare the feedstock quantity and quality between grasses harvested in the fall or the following spring. It was hypothesized that biomass yield may decline, but translocation and/or leaching of minerals from the feedstock would improve feedstock quality. Feedstock yield did not differ by crop, harvest time, or their interactions. Both grasses averaged 6.0 Mg ha-1 (fall) and 5.4 Mg ha-1 (spring) with similar high heating value (17.7 MJ kg-1). The K/(Ca + Mg) ratio, used as a quality indicator declined to below a 0.5 threshold, but energy yield (Megajoule per kilogram) decreased 13% by delaying harvest until spring. Only once during the four study-years were conditions ideal for early spring harvest, in contrast during another spring, very muddy conditions resulted in excessive soil contamination. Early spring harvest may be hampered by late snow, lodging, and muddy conditions that may delay or prevent harvest, and result in soil contamination of the feedstock. However, reducing slagging/fouling potential and the mass of mineral nutrients removed from the field without a dramatic loss in biomass or caloric content are reasons to delay harvest until spring.

  1. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] monthly progress report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Accomplishments for the month of January are briefly described for the following tasks: energy production research; fuels research; and supplemental government programs. Energy production research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORI research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modifications, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluid in porous media. Fuel research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen and diheteroatom containing compounds. supplemental Government program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; field application of foams for oil production symposium; technology transfer to independent producers; and compilations and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond formations.

  2. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  3. Megabreccia deposits in an extensional basin: The Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, J.G.; Brown, C.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Three varieties of megabreccia deposits are present in alluvial-lacustrine extensional basin fill of the Miocene-Pliocene Horse Camp Formation of east-central Nevada. Coherent debris sheets (150-300 m thick; up to 1,500 m long) consist of Oligocene-Miocene volcanic rock masses which are internally fractured yet retain their stratigraphic integrity. Fracture zones show variable amounts of displacement (up to 5 cm) and brecciation. These debris sheets overlie horizontally stratified sandstone and laminated claystone interpreted as playa deposits and are overlain by lithified grus. Emplacement of these coherent debris sheets was by landslide or block slide. Associated deposits of large boulders within playa facies suggest gliding of blocks broken from the edges of the landslides across wet playa surfaces. Large (1.6 - 2.4 km-long) allochthonous blocks consist of intact Paleozoic and Tertiary volcanic stratigraphic sequences which are brecciated and attenuated. Brecciation is accompanied in places by incorporation of muddy sand matrix. These blocks may be fragments of the upper plate of low-angle detachment faults which broke away as gravity-driven blocks from the nearby Horse Range and slid along the uplifted former detachment surface into the adjacent Horse Camp basin. Megabreccia deposits characterize Teritary extensional basins in western North America. Detailed analysis of their stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and structural relations can provide a better understanding of the complex tectonosedimentary history of these basins.

  4. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] quarterly technical report for April--June 30, 1993. Volume 2, Energy Production Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Progress reports are presented for: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology. Chemical flooding includes; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; and surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Gas displacement research covers: gas flooding performance prediction improvement; and mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding. Thermal recovery research includes: thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region: Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; and organization of UNITAR 6th International Conference on Heavy Crude and Tar Sands. Geoscience technology covers: three-phase relative permeability; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Resource assessment technology includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; upgrade the BPO Crude Oil Analysis Data Base; compilation and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond Formations; and horizontal well production from fractured reservoir. Microbial Technology covers: development of improved microbial flooding methods; and microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project.

  5. Monthly progress report for April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Accomplishments for the month of April are described briefly for the following tasks: energy production research; fuels research; and supplemental government program. Energy production research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteratom-containing compounds. Supplemental government program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process- engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; field application of foams for oil production symposium; technology transfer to independent producers; compilations and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond Formations; implementation of oil and gas technology transfer initiative; and horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs.

  6. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research], monthly progress report for March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Accomplishments for the month of April are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuels Research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nigrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process- engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; field application of foams of oil production symposium; technology transfer to independent producers; compilations and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond formations; and horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs.

  7. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research monthly progress report, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Accomplishments for the month of May are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuels Research covers: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteratom-containing compounds. Supplemental Government Program covers: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; field application of foams for oil production symposium; technology transfer to independent producers; compilation and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond formations; implementation of oil and gas technology transfer initiative; horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs; and chemical EOR workshop.

  8. Countercurrent fixed-bed gasification of biomass at laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Blasi, C.; Signorelli, G.; Portoricco, G.

    1999-07-01

    A laboratory-scale countercurrent fixed-bed gasification plant has been designed and constructed to produce data for process modeling and to compare the gasification characteristics of several biomasses (beechwood, nutshells, olive husks, and grape residues). The composition of producer gas and spatial temperature profiles have been measured for biomass gasification at different air flow rates. The gas-heating value always attains a maximum as a function of this operating variable, associated with a decrease of the air-to-fuel ratio. Optical gasification conditions of wood and agricultural residues give rise to comparable gas-heating values, comprised in the range 5--5.5 MJ/Nm{sup 3} with 28--30% CO, 5--7% CO{sub 2}, 6--8% H{sub 2}, 1--2% CH{sub 4}, and small amounts of C{sub 2}- hydrocarbons (apart from nitrogen). However, gasification of agricultural residues is more difficult because of bed transport, partial ash sintering, nonuniform flow distribution, and the presence of a muddy phase in the effluents, so that proper pretreatments are needed for largescale applications.

  9. Depositional architecture of lacustrine-delta and fluvial systems of the Permian Epsilon and Toolachee Formations at Dullingari field, southeastern Cooper basin, south Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose, W.A.; Hamilton, D.S.; Holtz, M.H. )

    1996-01-01

    The Epsilon and Toolachee Formations record a transition from lacustrine deltas to fluvial depositional systems in the southeastern part of the Cooper Basin. Gas reservoirs in these formations occur mainly in narrow (typically less than 2 mi [3.2 km] wide) belts of distributary- and fluvial-channel sandstones in structurally high areas in Dullingari field and neighboring areas. In a study by the Bureau of Economic Geology and Santos to document distribution of Epsilon and Toolachee lithotacies, we mapped multiple depositional axes and projected them into undeveloped areas in the field. We performed a high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic study, defining four operational Epsilon subunits bounded by lacustrine mudstones recording periods of delta-platform abandonment and subsidence. In contrast, six genetic Toolachee subunits are bounded by regionally extensive coal seams recording pervasive sediment-supply shutoff and peat-swamp development over broad areas. Epsilon lacustrine deltas prograded northwestward over a muddy substrate on a broad, shallow basin floor. Distributary-channel axes, defined by narrow, northwest-trending belts of upward-fining sandstones less than 20 ft (6 m) thick, are projected across the field area. However, the younger Toolachee Formation contains northeast-trending sandstones in structural troughs, suggesting tectonic control on deposition. Detailed lithofacies maps of these formations provide a framework for assessing potential development targets at Dullingari field.

  10. Depositional architecture of lacustrine-delta and fluvial systems of the Permian Epsilon and Toolachee Formations at Dullingari field, southeastern Cooper basin, south Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose, W.A.; Hamilton, D.S.; Holtz, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The Epsilon and Toolachee Formations record a transition from lacustrine deltas to fluvial depositional systems in the southeastern part of the Cooper Basin. Gas reservoirs in these formations occur mainly in narrow (typically less than 2 mi [3.2 km] wide) belts of distributary- and fluvial-channel sandstones in structurally high areas in Dullingari field and neighboring areas. In a study by the Bureau of Economic Geology and Santos to document distribution of Epsilon and Toolachee lithotacies, we mapped multiple depositional axes and projected them into undeveloped areas in the field. We performed a high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic study, defining four operational Epsilon subunits bounded by lacustrine mudstones recording periods of delta-platform abandonment and subsidence. In contrast, six genetic Toolachee subunits are bounded by regionally extensive coal seams recording pervasive sediment-supply shutoff and peat-swamp development over broad areas. Epsilon lacustrine deltas prograded northwestward over a muddy substrate on a broad, shallow basin floor. Distributary-channel axes, defined by narrow, northwest-trending belts of upward-fining sandstones less than 20 ft (6 m) thick, are projected across the field area. However, the younger Toolachee Formation contains northeast-trending sandstones in structural troughs, suggesting tectonic control on deposition. Detailed lithofacies maps of these formations provide a framework for assessing potential development targets at Dullingari field.

  11. Preservation of high primary porosity in Paleozoic crinoidal and bioclastic grainstones: Mississippian and Permian subsurface examples from western Canada and Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eby, D.E. ); Kirkby, K.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Limestone reservoirs with anomalously high porosity and permeability exist in several Paleozoic basinal settings in western North America. They are commonly either crinoidal or bioclastic grainstones that escaped the varied diagenetic environments that most carbonate shelves and slopes experience during sea-level fluctuations. Thus, these diagenetically 'conservative' settings can preserve most of the primary depositional porosity in calcarenites because of sedimentation and burial within normal marine basinal waters. These excellent reservoirs are often encased in deep marine, highly organic shales which may serve as both source rock and seal. Several subsurface examples of remarkable primary porosity occur within Mississippian Waulsortian buildups of western Canada and north-center Texas. Buildups within the Pekisko Formation of Alberta, for instance, contain abundant flanking crinoidal/bryozoan grainstones with up to 25% primary porosity and 10 d permeability. Muddy core facies with productive flank and capping calcarenites are up to 300 ft (90 m) thick and 600-1,200 ft (182-364 m) in diameter. The Bowar 'reef complex' in the Chappel Formation of Stephens County, Texas (2.6 MMBO to date) is similar in many respects to the Canadian buildups. Diagenetic 'conservatism' has also promoted excellent reservoir quality within the outer slope to basinal lower Permian bioclastic grain-flow deposit ('Wolfcamp detrital') plays of the eastern Midland basin where significant diagenesis was arrested after basinal deposition. Interpretations of these examples based upon core and outcrop control provide analogs for future exploration and exploitation in highly porous basinal carbonate reservoirs.

  12. Classification of AB O 3 perovskite solids: a machine learning study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pilania, G.; Balachandran, P. V.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2015-07-23

    Here we explored the use of machine learning methods for classifying whether a particularABO3chemistry forms a perovskite or non-perovskite structured solid. Starting with three sets of feature pairs (the tolerance and octahedral factors, theAandBionic radii relative to the radius of O, and the bond valence distances between theAandBions from the O atoms), we used machine learning to create a hyper-dimensional partial dependency structure plot using all three feature pairs or any two of them. Doing so increased the accuracy of our predictions by 2–3 percentage points over using any one pair. We also included the Mendeleev numbers of theAandBatoms tomore » this set of feature pairs. Moreover, doing this and using the capabilities of our machine learning algorithm, the gradient tree boosting classifier, enabled us to generate a new type of structure plot that has the simplicity of one based on using just the Mendeleev numbers, but with the added advantages of having a higher accuracy and providing a measure of likelihood of the predicted structure.« less

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  14. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  15. Spatial Control Of Functional Properties Via Octahedral Modulations In Complex Oxide Superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, E. J.; Colby, Robert J.; Wang, Q.; Karapetrova, E.; Schleputz, C. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; May, Steven J.

    2014-12-15

    The design of distortions and rotations of the corner-connected BO6 octahedra across interfaces has emerged as an exciting platform to control electronic or ferroic behavior in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures. Here, we investigate isovalent manganite superlattices, [(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n/(Eu0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n]×m, as a route to spatial control over electronic bandwidth and ferromagnetism through the creation of octahedral superstructures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms a uniform Mn valence state throughout the superlattices. In contrast, the presence of modulations of the MnO6 octahedral rotations along the growth direction commensurate with the superlattice period is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. We show that the Curie temperatures of the constituent materials can be systematically engineered via the octahedral superstructures leading to a modulated magnetization in samples where the superlattice period is larger than the interfacial octahedral coupling length scale, while a single magnetic transition is observed in the short period superlattices.

  16. Effect of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy diffusion pathways in double perovskites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Pilania, Ghanshyam

    2015-07-08

    Perovskite structured oxides (ABO3) are attractive for a number of technological applications, including as superionics because of the high oxygen conductivities they exhibit. Double perovskites (AA’BB’O6) provide even more flexibility for tailoring properties. Using accelerated molecular dynamics, we examine the role of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy mobility in one model double perovskite SrLaTiAlO6. We find that the mobility of the vacancy is very sensitive to the cation ordering, with a migration energy that varies from 0.6 to 2.7 eV. In the extreme cases, the mobility is both higher and lower than either of the two end member single perovskites.more » Further, the nature of oxygen vacancy diffusion, whether one-dimensional, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional, also varies with cation ordering. We correlate the dependence of oxygen mobility on cation structure to the distribution of Ti4+ cations, which provide unfavorable environments for the positively charged oxygen vacancy. The results demonstrate the potential of using tailored double perovskite structures to precisely control the behavior of oxygen vacancies in these materials.« less

  17. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  18. Cation Intermixing And Electronic Deviations At The Insulating LaCrO3/SrTiO3(001) Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Robert J.; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Hongliang; Shutthanandan, V.; Ciston, Jim; Kabius, Bernd C.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-10-29

    The interface between polar perovskite LaCrO3 (LCO) and non-polar SrTiO3(001) (STO), grown by molecular beam epitaxy, is examined using a combination of electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The LCO/STO(001) interface is insulating, a potential counter example for the claim that polar/nonpolar perovskite interfaces should be conductive by virtue of an electronic reconstruction to alleviate the polar discontinuity. The A-site cations of these ABO3 perovskites are found to diffuse across the interface to a greater extent than the B-site cations, based on high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The B-site cation valences are shown to be partially reduced near the interface by analysis of EELS near-edge structures. The location and direction of these electronic modifications do not intuitively compensate the charge imbalance imposed by uneven cation inter-diffusion, and yet both the film and interface are insulating. These results highlight the importance of both the physical and electronic structure of such complex interfaces in determining their characteristics. Furthermore, the extent of inter-diffusion is shown to increase with increasing LCO film thickness, suggesting a potential mechanism behind the critical thickness for interfacial conductivity in other polar/non-polar oxide systems, and a fundamental limitation on the formation of abrupt interfaces in LCO/STO(001).

  19. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G.; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-12-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}. However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO{sub 3}), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable.

  20. New interpretations of Pennsylvanian and Permian stratigraphy, San Juan basin and southeast Paradox basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, A.C. Jr.; Condon, S.M. )

    1989-09-01

    The Honaker Trail, Paradox, and Pinkerton Trail Formations of the Hermosa Group are recognized throughout most of the San Juan basin. The Paradox Formation is extended southeastward beyond the limits of its evaporite facies into the basin, where it consists of thick shelf-carbonate rocks and thin black shale, sandstone, and siltstone interbeds. Where the Hermosa Group thins onto the marginal uplifts, the Paradox loses the thick carbonate rocks and becomes indistinguishable from the rest of the Hermosa. The Hermosa is correlated in the subsurface with the Madera and Sandia Formations to the southeast. The transitional Rico Formation, between the marine Hermosa Group and the continental Cutler Formation, is identified throughout the subsurface of the San Juan basin and is correlated with similar deposits out-cropping along the northern and eastern margins. The Cutler Formation includes the Organ Rock, Cedar Mesa, and Halgaito members throughout most of the basin. In the vicinity of the Hogback monocline, the Cedar Mesa Sandstone Member undergoes a gradational eastward facies change from cyclic evaporite and sandstone to thick-bedded sandstone. The subsurface Cedar Mesa is correlated in part with similar rocks in the outcropping Abo and Supai Formations.

  1. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  2. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  3. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  4. Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

    2004-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribe’s CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

  5. Anatomy of a dolomitized carbonate reservoir - Mission Canyon formation at little Knife field, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The Mission Canyon Formation is a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate to anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. From its base upsection, the formation is mostly subtidal in origin and emergent at its top, and consists of (1) deeper water carbonates, (2) major cycles of open shallow-marine mudstones grading up into skeletal packstone or rainstone, (3) minor cycles of dolomitized transitional open to restricted marine mudstone grading up into skeletal wackestone, (4) dolomitized restricted marine pelletal wackestone or packstone, (5) partially dolomitized marginal marine skeletal wackestone, (6) slightly skeletal, oolitic-pisolitic wackestone, or grainstone barrier-island buildups with storm washover aprons, (7) thin lagoonal limestones, (8) tidal-flat anhydrite, and (9) sabkha anhydrite. The oil is structurally trapped on the north, east, and west, within the northward plunging Little Knife anticline. Facies changes entrap the oil southward; the vertical seal is the overlying anhydrite beds. Closure is less than 100 ft 930 m). Porous, hydrocarbon-bearing beds were deposited as transitional open-to-restricted marine, restricted marine, and marginal marine lime muds. These became porous dolomitic reservoir rock by undergoing three diagenetic changes: (1) anhydrite replacement of skeletal fragments, (2) dolomitization of the muddy matrix, and (3) later, leaching of the anhydrite to create moldic porosity. The reservoir's pore system is composed of moldic pores and three types of dolomite intercrystalline pores-polyhedral, tetrahedral, and interboundary-sheet pores. Pore throats in productive beds are of two general sizes (1.2-1.6..mu.. and 5.2..mu..).

  6. Carbonate gravity-flow processes on the Lower Permian slope, northwest Delaware basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Brown, A.A.; Achauer, C.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Wolfcampian carbonate gravity-flow deposits accumulated on a low-angle slope in front of a platform of relatively low relief ({approximately}220 m). A 25 m core, located approximately 15 km basinward of the self margin, was examined to determine processes of carbonate deposition in the middle to distal slope environments. The majority of the deposits are cohesive debris-flows composed of clast-supported conglomerates with a calcareous siliciclastic mudstone matrix. Other deposits include high- and low-density turbidites of lime packstones (sand- to boulder-size range), lime grainstones, and siliclastic muddy silstones and suspension deposits of calcareous siliciclastic mudstones. Cohesive debris flows are generally massive and structureless, although several flows show an inverse-graded zone at their base indicating dispersive pressure forces that developed in a traction carpet. Other flows display coarse-tail fining-upward sequences indicating deposition by suspension settling from liquefied flow. At the base of each high-density, gravelly turbidite is one to several inversely graded zones of carbonated clasts indicating a traction carpet zone. These traction carpets are overlain by normal-graded units of shell and clast material. The upper units appear to be deposited directly out of suspension. The low-density turbidites are interpreted to be the residual products of more shelfward-deposited debris flows and high-density turbidity currents. Many of the depositional features described here for carbonate gravity-flow deposits are identical to those in siliclastic deposits, therefore the depositional processes controlling these features are probably similar.

  7. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  8. Temporal and spatial variability of ooid sand shoals: Comparison of Mississippian of Kentucky and Quaternary of Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA))

    1989-08-01

    An examination of the lithology and topography of Andros Island, Bahamas, reveals it is a Pleistocene ooid sand shoal. A comparison with Joulters Cays (a modern ooid sand shoal directly to the north) shows that much of the original depositional topography is preserved through at least one cycle of sea level highstand and lowstand. Both the Pleistocene and the Holocene ooid sand bodies are a few kilometers to tens of kilometers wide. The total vertical relief of a single episode of Quaternary ooid sand deposition is more than 10 m and includes accumulation in tidal channels, shallow flat areas, and eolian dunes. Today, much of Andros Island is within 2 m of present sea level and is the site of a belt several kilometers wide consisting of muddy tidal flat sediments overlying an exposure surface. The site of ooid sand deposition and shoal complex formation is not continuous along shorelines, especially windward margins, but shifts abruptly along the margins of platforms as a result of minor fluctuations of sea level. Thus, it should be expected that ooid sand shoals (ancient and modern) should be in direct lateral and vertical contact with lagoons, tidal flats, and reefs. The Mississippian Slade Formation contains many of the features of Quaternary ooid sand accumulation: abrupt vertical and lateral gradations between oolitic grainstones, packstones, and lime mudstones, vertical relief of individual oolitic sedimentary packages up to 30 m (perhaps with eolian dunes) and numerous exposure surfaces of varying intensities. These characteristics suggest that this formation represents a time of rapid fluctuations of relative sea level and abrupt shifts in the sites of ooid sand shoal complexes.

  9. Tectonic and eustatic controls on the carbonate stratigraphy of the Leonardian-Guadalupin (Permian) section, northwestern Delaware basin, New Mexico and Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, K.S.; Vail, P.R. ); Jordan, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of tectonics and eustasy on carbonate sedimentation have been determined using seismic, well logs, and outcrop data for the middle Permian of the Delaware basin. Sequence and chronostratigraphic analyses indicate the section contains a broad, tectonically controlled aggradational/progradational cycle overprinted by eustatic sea level cycles. Early Leonardian deposition of the Abo Formation and the third Bone Spring sand occurred during a period of rapid subsidence, producing the aggradational geometry observed on seismic and well logs. This followed a time of uplift to the northwest of the study area, which caused enhanced shelf erosion during the late Wolfcampian. The aggradational style of deposition continued through the middle Leonardian. Late Leonardian time is characterized by progradational geometry, due to a slower subsidence rate. This resulted in a 15-km progradation of the Bone Spring shelf margin in the northwestern part of the Delaware basin. A second period of uplift to the northwest followed, leading to the deposition of the sands of the Brushy Canyon Formation (Guadalupian). This aggradational/progradational cycle is followed by a similar cycle which ends after the deposition of the Capitan Formation. Within the carbonate-dominated Leonardian aggradational/progradational cycle, nine sea level cycles are recognized. The lowstand systems tracts within this package are of two types. The lowstands within the aggradational part of the section consist primarily of slope fans, while those associated with progradation contain large lowstand prograding wedges. Steep margins are associated with aggradation, while progradation is characterized by a ramplike geometry. Highstands are widespread on the shelf and prograde into the basin throughout this interval.

  10. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

  12. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  13. Scale-Up of Palladium Powder Production Process for Use in the Tritium Facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC/Summary of FY99-FY01 Results for the Preparation of Palladium Using the Sandia/LANL Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Baldwin; Daniel S. Zamzow; R. Dennis Vigil; Jesse T. Pikturna

    2001-08-24

    Palladium used at Savannah River (SR) for process tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to understand the processes involved in preparing this material, SR is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material. The material specifications are shown in Table 1. An improved understanding of the chemical processes should help to guarantee a continued reliable source of Pd in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Ames Laboratory (AL) was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing Pd powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies, USDOE (the Mound muddy water process) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. During FY99 and FY00, the process for producing Pd powder that has been used previously at Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories (the Sandia/LANL process) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in the morphology of the final Pd product. During FY01, scale-up of the process to batch sizes greater than 600 grams of Pd using a 20-gallon Pfaudler reactor was conducted by the Iowa State University (ISU) Chemical Engineering Department. This report summarizes the results of FY99-FY01 Pd processing work done at AL and ISU using the Sandia/LANL process. In the Sandia/LANL process, Pd is dissolved in a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids. A number of chemical processing steps are performed to yield an intermediate species, diamminedichloropalladium (Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, or DADC-Pd), which is isolated. In the final step of the process, the Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} intermediate is subsequently redissolved, and Pd is precipitated by the addition of a reducing agent (RA) mixture of formic acid and sodium formate. It is at this point that the morphology of the Pd product is