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Sample records for abandoned uranium mines

  1. Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry Day In January 2015, the United States (U.S.) and the Anadarko Litigation Trust ("Litigation Trust") entered into a...

  2. Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Abandoned Uranium Mines

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Uranium Mines Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management completed a report on defense-related uranium mines in consultation with...

  4. Effect of Biogeochemical Redox Processes on the Fate and Transport of As and U at an Abandoned Uranium Mine Site: an X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Stone, James J.; Borch, Thomas

    2014-01-28

    Although As can occur in U ore at concentrations up to 10 wt-%, the fate and transport of both U and As at U mine tailings have not been previously investigated at a watershed scale. The major objective of this study was to determine primary chemical and physical processes contributing to transport of both U and As to a down gradient watershed at an abandoned U mine site in South Dakota. Uranium is primarily transported by erosion at the site, based on decreasing concentrations in sediment with distance from the tailings. equential extractions and U X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) fitting indicate that U is immobilised in a near-source sedimentation pond both by prevention of sediment transport and by reduction of UVI to UIV. In contrast to U, subsequent release of As to the watershed takes place from the pond partially due to reductive dissolution of Fe oxy(hydr)oxides. However, As is immobilised by adsorption to clays and Fe oxy(hydr)oxides in oxic zones and by formation of Assulfide mineral phases in anoxic zones down gradient, indicated by sequential extractions and As XANES fitting. This study indicates that As should be considered during restoration of uranium mine sites in order to prevent transport.

  5. About the Uranium Mine Team | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Uranium Mine Team About the Uranium Mine Team Text coming

  6. Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress (August 2014) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress (August 2014) Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress (August 2014) Section 3151 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior and the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to undertake a review of, and prepare a report on, abandoned uranium mines in the United States that provided

  7. Illinois abandoned mined lands reclamation program: a progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, T.J.; Jenkusky, S.M.; Massie, S.

    1985-12-01

    The Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (AMLRC), created in 1975, is responsible for the abatement of hazardous and environmental problems associated with pre-law abandoned coal mines throughout the State. The availability of federal funds for reclamation, through passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), greatly expanded the program. With funds provided through early cooperative agreements and current annual grants from the federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM), the State has reclaimed, or is currently reclaiming, 182 mine sites and has assisted OSM in the abatement of 67 emergency situations. This paper reviews the progress made by the AMLRC in dealing with the State's abandoned mine problems. Specifically, the numbers and types of problem sites reclaimed annually, their costs, and reclamation methods are identified. Progress of the program relative to the entire State's abandoned mine problems is reviewed. The effects of other reclamation factors, such as natural revegetation, remaining privately-funded reclamation, and secondary carbon recovery, on the overall scope of the State's program are also examined. General comments are made concerning grant preparation, State-OSM cooperation and AML-Inventory control. Selected reclamation projects and techniques are also discussed. 11 references, 3 tables.

  8. Remining to reclaim abandoned mined lands: Virginia`s initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Lambert, B.

    1998-12-31

    Abandoned Mined Lands (AML) are lands that were mined prior to implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) in 1977, but were inadequately reclaimed. Re-mining of AML is being conducted on a routine basis by coal-mining operations in eastern states such as Virginia. Re-mining is a potentially important means of reclaiming AML. However, under current policies, re-mining operations often fail to permit and reclaim priority 1, 2, and 3 AML, especially those areas which present the most severe environmental problems. This paper describes policy issues which affect the potential for AML reclamation by re-mining operations in mountainous mining areas, such as Virginia; efforts underway in Virginia which seek to resolve those issues; and progress achieved to date under that initiative.

  9. Restoration of abandoned mine lands through cooperative coal resource evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskins, D.M.; Smith, M.

    1996-12-31

    The public reclamation cost of reclaiming all of Pennsylvania`s abandoned mine lands is estimated at $15 billion. Drainage from abandoned mines poses another $5 billion water pollution clean-up problem. Although it is unlikely that public reclamation alone could ever tackle these problems, much can be done to alleviate the nuisances through the remining of previously mined areas to recover remaining reserves, restore the land and improve water quality in the same process. Remining of priority areas is encouraged through a new Pennsylvania policy which provides incentives to mining companies. One incentive, initiated under Pennsylvania`s comprehensive mine reclamation strategy, is to identify and geologically map reminable coal resources in selected watersheds, and then to expedite mine permitting in these watersheds. At present, two such priority watersheds, Little Toby Creek in Elk County and Tangascootak Creek in Clinton County, are the focus of geologic map compilation based on recent quadrangle mapping, or new, directed, geologic mapping, including new research core drilling to establish the geologic stratigraphic framework. In order to maximize environmental benefits the comprehensive mine reclamation strategy identifies watersheds which are affected by acid mine drainage (AMD), but that are reasonably capable of restoration, if sufficient coal reserves remain. Pennsylvania`s geochemical quality database of rock overburden, in combination with detailed coal resource mapping by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey, and the cooperation of coal companies and leaseholders, is being used by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to identify and design remining projects which will not only allow the recovery of coal resources, but will also improve the water quality through a variety of innovative mining techniques.

  10. Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund - a view from the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Congress created the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund (AML) in 1977 as part of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. The AML is funded by a special tax on coal mining. About one-third of AML fees will be paid by coal operators in the western states. The author examines the disbursement of AML funds under the Reagan Administration. He describes how the western state governments expected a generous portion of the AML funds for coal and non-coal reclamation, as well as community impact assistance projects in their states. Finally, the author shows how the Office of Surface Mining has largely frustrated the western expectations through its interpretation of the AML disbursement priorities.

  11. Surface mining: State management of abandoned mine land funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 promotes the reclamation of areas severely damaged in the past by coal mining operations. GAO reviewed the reclamation programs in Colorado, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wyoming and found that they implemented financial control procedures and practices to ensure that the expenditures of reclamation funds are proper. Only one state, however, is complying with all related grant payment, audit, and inventory requirements. The states are generally reclaiming eligible, high priority projects as required under the act and are managing their reclamation projects in compliance with federal requirements.

  12. DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in Western Colorado DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in Western...

  13. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado | Department of Energy Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado PDF icon Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado More Documents & Publications EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EA-1037: Final Environmental Assessment Final Uranium Leasing

  14. LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress July 12, 2013 - 10:50am Addthis As reported in an earlier Program Update...

  15. Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Potential Impacts of Uranium Transfers on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries May 1, 2015 ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Department of Energy ("Department" or "DOE") plans to transfer the equivalent of up to 2,100 metric tons ("MTU") of natural uranium per year (with a higher total for calendar year 2015, mainly because of transfers already executed or under way before today's determination). These transfers would include 1,600

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Legacy Uranium Mine Site Reclamation - Lessons Learned - 12384

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Cotter, Ed

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management is responsible for administering the DOE Uranium Leasing Program (ULP) and its 31 uranium lease tracts located in the Uravan Mineral Belt of southwestern Colorado (see Figure 1). In addition to administering the ULP for the last six decades, DOE has also undertaken the significant task of reclaiming a large number of abandoned uranium (legacy) mine sites and associated features located throughout the Uravan Mineral Belt. In 1995, DOE initiated a 3-year reconnaissance program to locate and delineate (through extensive on-the-ground mapping) the legacy mine sites and associated features contained within the historically defined boundaries of its uranium lease tracts. During that same time frame, DOE recognized the lack of regulations pertaining to the reclamation of legacy mine sites and contacted the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) concerning the reclamation of legacy mine sites. In November 1995, The BLM Colorado State Office formally issued the United States Department of the Interior, Colorado Bureau of Land Management, Closure/Reclamation Guidelines, Abandoned Uranium Mine Sites as a supplement to its Solid Minerals Reclamation Handbook (H-3042-1). Over the next five-and-one-half years, DOE reclaimed the 161 legacy mine sites that had been identified on DOE withdrawn lands. By the late 1990's, the various BLM field offices in southwestern Colorado began to recognize DOE's experience and expertise in reclaiming legacy mine sites. During the ensuing 8 years, BLM funded DOE (through a series of task orders) to perform reclamation activities at 182 BLM mine sites. To date, DOE has reclaimed 372 separate and distinct legacy mine sites. During this process, DOE has learned many lessons and is willing to share those lessons with others in the reclamation industry because there are still many legacy mine sites not yet reclaimed. DOE currently administers 31 lease tracts (11,017 ha) that collectively contain over 220 legacy (abandoned) uranium mine sites. This contrasts to the millions of hectares administered by the BLM, the U.S. Forest Service, and other federal, tribal, and state agencies that contain thousands of such sites. DOE believes that the processes it has used provide a practical and cost-effective approach to abandoned uranium mine-site reclamation. Although the Federal Acquisition Regulations preclude DOE from competing with private industry, DOE is available to assist other governmental and tribal agencies in their reclamation efforts. (authors)

  17. Radiochronological Age of a Uranium Metal Sample from an Abandoned Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, L A; Williams, R W; Glover, S E; LaMont, S P; Stalcup, A M; Spitz, H B

    2012-03-16

    A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940s and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope {sup 230}Th from the decay of {sup 234}U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 {+-} 1.5 years.

  18. Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    » Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts are actively held under lease and two tracts have been placed in inactive status indefinitely. Administrative duties include ongoing

  19. National inventory of abandoned mine land problems: an emphasis on health, safety, and general welfare impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honea, R.B.; Baxter, F.P.

    1984-07-01

    In 1977 Congress passed the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, which provided for the abatement of abandoned mine land (AML) problems through a reclamation program funded by a severance tax on current mining. AML was defined as any land, including associated buildings, equipment, and affected areas, that was no longer being used for coal mining by August 1977. This act also created the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) in the Department of the Interior to administer the AML program and to assume other regulatory and research responsibilities. This report documents the design, implementation, and results of a National inventory of the most serious problems associated with past mining practices. One of the objectives of the Inventory was to help OSM and the participating states locate, identify, and rank AML problems and estimate their reclamation costs. Other objectives were to encourage states and Indian tribes to collect such data and to provide OSM with the information necessary to guide its decision-making processes and to quantify the progress of the reclamation program. Because only limited funds were available to design and implement the National inventory and because the reclamation fund established by the Act may never be sufficient to correct all AML problems, OSM has focused on only the top-priority problems. It is stressed that this is not an inventory of AML features but rather an inventory of AML impacts. It should be noted that the data and analysis contained in this report are based on a data collection effort conducted by the states, Indian tribes, and OSM contractors between 1979 and mid-1982.

  20. Abandoned mine lands: a mid-course review of the national reclamation program for coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The Committee on Abandoned Mine Lands (CAML) analyzed how the U.S. Department of the Interior's (DOI) Office of Surface Mining (OSM) has and is administering the Title IV (Abandoned Mine Lands) Program of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. In the course of focusing on the effectiveness of the program, the Committee evaluated the program not only in terms of its probable accomplishments over its fifteen-year life, between 1977 and 1992, when the program statutorily ends, but also the magnitude and nature of the AML problems remaining to be remedied in the post-1992 period, if Congress decides to extend it. The Committee made nineteen recommendations about how OSM could improve the AML program's current effectiveness as well as prepare to assist Congress in reaching a decision to terminate or extend the program. Over the fifteen-year life of the program, some $3.3 billion will have been spent.

  1. Glionitrin A, an antibiotic-antitumor metabolite derived from competitive interaction between abandoned mine microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H.B.; Kown, H.C.; Lee, C.H.; Yang, H.O.

    2009-02-15

    The nutrient conditions present in abandoned coal mine drainages create an extreme environment where defensive and offensive microbial interactions could be critical for survival and fitness. Coculture of a mine drainage-derived Sphingomonas bacterial strain, KMK-001, and a mine drainage-derived Aspergillus fumigatus fungal strain, KMC-901, resulted in isolation of a new diketopiperazine disulfide, glionitrin A (1). Compound 1 was not detected in monoculture broths of KMK-001 or KMC-901. The structure of 1, a (3S,10aS) diketopiperazine disulfide containing a nitro aromatic ring, was based on analysis of MS, NMR, and circular dichroism spectra and confirmed by X-ray crystal data. Glionitrin A displayed significant antibiotic activity against a series of microbes including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. An in vitro MTT cytotoxicity assay revealed that 1 had potent submicromolar cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines: HCT-116, A549, AGS, and DU145. The results provide further evidence that microbial coculture can produce novel biologically relevant molecules.

  2. Remediation of former uranium mining and milling activities in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggitt, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Several of the Central Asian countries of the former Soviet Union were involved in the uranium mining and milling industry from about 1945 for varying periods until the break up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and beyond. Some facilities are still producing in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. However, before the break up, many facilities had been abandoned and in only a few cases had any remediation been undertaken. Since 1991 the newly independent states of the region have been seeking assistance for the remediation of the multitude of tailings piles, waste rock stockpiles and abandoned, and often semi dismantled, production facilities that may be found throughout the region. Many of these sites are close to settlements that were established as service towns for the mines. Most towns still have populations, although the mining industry has departed. In some instances there are cases of pollution and contamination and in many locations there is a significant level of public concern. The IAEA has been undertaking a number of Technical Cooperation (TC) projects throughout the region for some time to strengthen the institutions in the relevant states and assist them to establish monitoring and surveillance programs as an integral part of the long term remediation process. The IAEA is liaising with other agencies and donors who are also working on these problems to optimise the remediation effort. The paper describes the objectives and operation of the main TC regional program, liaison efforts with other agencies, the achievements so far and the long term issues for remediation of these legacies of the 'cold war' era. (authors)

  3. Application and analysis of anchored geosynthetic systems for stabilization of abandoned mine land slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitton, S.J.; Whitman, F.; Liang, R.Y.; Harris, W.W.

    1996-12-31

    An anchored geosynthetic system (AGS) was used in the remediation of a landslide associated with an abandoned coal mine located near Hindman, Kentucky. In concept, AGS is a system that provides in-situ stabilization of soil slopes by combining a surface-deployed geosynthetic with an anchoring system of driven reinforcing rods similar to soil nailing. Installation of the system of driven reinforcing rods similar to soil nailing. Installation of the system involves tensioning a geosynthetic over a slope`s surface by driving anchors through the geosynthetic at a given spacing and distance. By tensioning the geosynthetic over the slope`s surface, a compressive load is applied to the slope. Benefits of AGS are described to include the following: (1) increase soil strength due to soil compression including increased compressive loading on potential failure surfaces, (2) soil reinforcement through soil nailing, (3), halt of soil creep, (4) erosion control, and (5) long term soil consolidation. Following installation of the AGS and one year of monitoring, it was found that the anchored geosynthetic system only provided some of the reported benefits and in general did not function as an active stabilization system. This was due in part to the inability of the system to provide and maintain loading on the geosynthetic. The geosynthetic, however, did tension when slope movement occurred and prevented the slope from failing. Thus, the system functioned more as a passive restraint system and appeared to function well over the monitoring period.

  4. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  5. Elevated concentrations of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a northeastern Arizona Native American community

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blake, Johanna M.; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul -Mehdi S.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm. Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; et al

    2015-07-09

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67–169 μg L–1) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 μg L–1. Elevated U (6,614 mg kg–1), V (15,814 mg kg–1), and As (40 mg kg–1) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Femore » were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (~pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (~pH 8.3). These results suggest that U–V mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and As–Fe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites.« less

  6. Elevated concentrations of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a northeastern Arizona Native American community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Johanna M.; Avasarala, Sumant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ali, Abdul -Mehdi S.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Shuey, Christopher; Robinson, Wm. Paul; Nez, Christopher; Bill, Sadie; Lewis, Johnnye; Hirani, Chris; Pacheco, Juan S. Lezama; Cerrato, Jos M.

    2015-07-09

    The chemical interactions of U and co-occurring metals in abandoned mine wastes in a Native American community in northeastern Arizona were investigated using spectroscopy, microscopy and aqueous chemistry. The concentrations of U (67169 ?g L1) in spring water samples exceed the EPA maximum contaminant limit of 30 ?g L1. Elevated U (6,614 mg kg1), V (15,814 mg kg1), and As (40 mg kg1) concentrations were detected in mine waste solids. Spectroscopy (XPS and XANES) solid analyses identified U (VI), As (-I and III) and Fe (II, III). Linear correlations for the release of U vs V and As vs Fe were observed for batch experiments when reacting mine waste solids with 10 mM ascorbic acid (~pH 3.8) after 264 h. The release of U, V, As, and Fe was at least 4-fold lower after reaction with 10 mM bicarbonate (~pH 8.3). These results suggest that UV mineral phases similar to carnotite [K2(UO2)2V2O8] and AsFe-bearing phases control the availability of U and As in these abandoned mine wastes. Elevated concentrations of metals are of concern due to human exposure pathways and exposure of livestock currently ingesting water in the area. This study contributes to understanding the occurrence and mobility of metals in communities located close to abandoned mine waste sites.

  7. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  8. Source and Fate of Inorganic Soil Contamination Around the Abandoned Phillips Sulfide Mine Hudson Highlands New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Gilchrist; A Gates; E Elzinga; M Gorring; z Szabo

    2011-12-31

    The abandoned Phillips sulfide mine in the critical Highlands watershed in New York has been shown to produce strongly acidic mine drainage (AMD) with anomalous metal contaminants in first-order streams that exceeded local water standards by up to several orders of magnitude (Gilchrist et al., 2009). The metal-sulfide-rich tailings also produce contaminated soils with pH < 4, organic matter < 2.5% and trace metals sequestered in soil oxides. A geochemical transect to test worst-case soil contamination showed that Cr, Co and Ni correlated positively with Mn, (r = 0.72, r = 0.89, r = 0.80, respectively), suggesting Mn-oxide sequestration and that Cu and Pb correlated with Fe (r = 0.76, r = 0.83, respectively), suggesting sequestration in goethite. Ubiquitous, yellow coating on the mine wastes, including jarosite and goethite, is a carrier of the metals. Geochemical and {mu}-SXRF analyses determined Cu to be the major soil contaminant, {mu}-SXRF also demonstrated that the heterogeneous nature of the soil chemistry at the micro-meter scale is self-similar to those in the bulk soil samples. Generally metals decreased, with some fluctuations, rapidly downslope through suspension of fines and dissolution in AMD leaving the area of substantial contamination << 0.5 km from the source.

  9. H. R. 2095: Abandoned Mine Reclamation Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to reauthorize the collection of reclamation fees. This bill explains the additions to the Act relating to collection of interest on that portion of the fund not currently needed; the allocation of funds; the fund objectives; eligible lands and waters; state reclamation programs; voids and tunnels; emergency program; certification; and abandoned minerals and mineral materials mine reclamation fund.

  10. DOE Submits Its Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Ernest Moniz, the U.S. Secretary of Energy, submitted the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress on September 2, 2014. Section 3151 of the National...

  11. Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work on a report to Congress regarding defense-related legacy uranium mines. LM was directed by the U.S. Congress in the...

  12. Safeguards on uranium ore concentrate? the impact of modern mining and milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Increased purity in uranium ore concentrate not only raises the question as to whether Safeguards should be applied to the entirety of uranium conversion facilities, but also as to whether some degree of coverage should be moved back to uranium ore concentrate production at uranium mining and milling facilities. This paper looks at uranium ore concentrate production across the globe and explores the extent to which increased purity is evident and the underlying reasons. Potential issues this increase in purity raises for IAEA's strategy on the Starting Point of Safeguards are also discussed.

  13. Fluid placement of fixated scrubber sludge to reduce surface subsidence and to abate acid mine drainage in abandoned underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiers, R.J.; Golden, D.; Gray, R.; Yu, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL) began researching the use of fluid placement techniques of the fixated scrubber sludge (FSS) to reduce surface subsidence from underground coal mines to develop an economic alternative to low strength concrete grout. Abandoned underground coal mines surround property adjacent to IPL`s coal combustion by-product (CCBP) landfill at the Petersburg Generating Station. Landfill expansion into these areas is in question because of the high potential for sinkhole subsidence to develop. Sinkholes manifesting at the surface would put the integrity of a liner or runoff pond containment structure for a CCBP disposal facility at risk. The fluid placement techniques of the FSS as a subsidence abatement technology was demonstrated during an eight week period in September, October, and November 1994 at the Petersburg Generating Station. The success of this technology will be determined by the percentage of the mine void filled, strength of the FSS placed, and the overall effects on the hydrogeologic environment. The complete report for this project will be finalized in early 1996.

  14. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  15. H. R. 4053: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the remining of certain abandoned coal mine lands. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, February 21, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the remining of certain abandoned coal mine lands. The bill describes definitions; state remining insurance programs; state self-sustaining remining insurance fund; penalties and enforcement; special rules applicable to remining operations; and abandoned coal refuse and disposal piles.

  16. H. R. 4804: A bill to amend titles I, II, IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, and to add a new title X, to encourage the remining and reclamation of abandoned mined lands by active mining operations, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, June 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Surface coal mining operations can be effective in the reclamation of abandoned mined lands and are being encouraged by the amendments to the existing Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The new section X - Remining spells out the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to enter into agreements with mining companies to use excess spoil from an active surface mine to reclaim an abandoned site, to develop a bond guarantee program whereby the operators may be compensated with reclamation bond credits for up to 80% of the reclamation costs incurred, and to make funds available on a matching basis to states or tribes to collect certain geologic and hydrologic data for watersheds or regions adversely affected by past coal mining abuses for the use of regulatory authorities to assist applicants for surface mining permits within such areas.

  17. Port Radium Canada's Original Radium/Uranium Mine, The Complete Story of Canada's Historic Radium/Uranium Mine, 1932 to 2012 - 13159

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, Doug; Wiatzka, Gerd; Brown, Steve

    2013-07-01

    This paper provides the life story of Canada's original radium/uranium mine. In addition to the history of operations, it discusses the unique and successful approach used to identify the key issues and concerns associated with the former radium, uranium and silver mining property and the activities undertaken to define the remedial actions and subsequent remedial plan. The Port Radium Mine site, situated approximately 275 km north of Yellowknife on the east shore of Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories, was discovered in 1930 and underground mining began in 1932. The mine operated almost continuously from 1932 to 1982, initially for recovery of radium, then uranium and finally, for recovery of silver. Tailings production totaled an estimated 900,000 tons and 800,000 tons from uranium and silver processing operations respectively. In the early days of mining, Port Radium miners were exposed to radon and associated decay product levels (in Working Level Months of exposure - WLM) hundreds of times greater than modern standards. The experience of the Port Radium miners provides important contribution to understanding the risks from radon. While the uranium mine was originally decommissioned in the early 1960's, to the standards of the day, the community of Deline (formerly Fort Franklin) had concerns about residual contamination at the mine site and the potential effects arising from use of traditional lands. The Deline people were also concerned about the possible risks to Deline Dene arising from their work as ore carriers. In the late 1990's, the community of Deline brought these concerns to national attention and consequently, the Government of Canada and the community of Deline agreed to move forward in a collaborative manner to address these concerns. The approach agreed to was to establish the Canada-Deline Uranium Table (CDUT) to provide a joint process by which the people of Deline could have their concerns expressed and addressed. A great deal of work was done through the CDUT, including efforts to assess site environment and safety issues in the context of modern reclamation standards. In addition to the environmental and remediation studies, an assessment of historic exposures of Deline ore carriers to radiation and a follow-up epidemiological feasibility study were performed. SENES Consultants Limited (SENES) carried out the dose reconstruction for the Port Radium miners in the 1990's, was the environmental consultant to the CDUT from 2000 to 2005, developed the Remedial Action Plan (RAP), engineering plans and specifications for decommissioning the Port Radium mine and vicinity sites in 2005/6, supervised the remedial works in 2007 and carried out the long term post closure monitoring from 2008 to 2012. Our firsthand experience from working cooperatively with the CDUT provides insights into effective decommissioning of historic contaminated sites. (authors)

  18. Environmental control technology for mining and milling low-grade uranium resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weakley, S.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Long, L.W.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01

    This study examined the type and level of wastes that would be generated in the mining and milling of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ from four potential domestic sources of uranium. The estimated costs of the technology to control these wastes to different degrees of stringency are presented.

  19. Characterization of cores from an in-situ recovery mined uranium deposit in Wyoming: Implications for post-mining restoration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Cheshire, M.; Reimus, P.; Heikoop, J.; Conradson, S. D.; Batuk, O.; Havrilla, G.; House, B.; et al

    2014-10-08

    In-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium (U) from sandstone-type roll-front deposits is a technology that involves the injection of solutions that consist of ground water fortified with oxygen and carbonate to promote the oxidative dissolution of U, which is pumped to recovery facilities located at the surface that capture the dissolved U and recycle the treated water. The ISR process alters the geochemical conditions in the subsurface creating conditions that are more favorable to the migration of uranium and other metals associated with the uranium deposit. There is a lack of clear understanding of the impact of ISR mining on themore » aquifer and host rocks of the post-mined site and the fate of residual U and other metals within the mined ore zone. We performed detailed petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses of several samples taken from about 7 m of core of the formerly the ISR-mined Smith Ranch–Highland uranium deposit in Wyoming. We show that previously mined cores contain significant residual uranium (U) present as coatings on pyrite and carbonaceous fragments. Coffinite was identified in three samples. Core samples with higher organic (> 1 wt.%) and clay (> 6–17 wt.%) contents yielded higher 234U/238U activity ratios (1.0–1.48) than those with lower organic and clay fractions. The ISR mining was inefficient in mobilizing U from the carbonaceous materials, which retained considerable U concentrations (374–11,534 ppm). This is in contrast with the deeper part of the ore zone, which was highly depleted in U and had very low 234U/238U activity ratios. This probably is due to greater contact with the lixiviant (leaching solution) during ISR mining. EXAFS analyses performed on grains with the highest U and Fe concentrations reveal that Fe is present in a reduced form as pyrite and U occurs mostly as U(IV) complexed by organic matter or as U(IV) phases of carbonate complexes. Moreover, U–O distances of ~ 2.05 Å were noted, indicating the potential formation of other poorly defined U(IV/VI) species. We also noted a small contribution from Udouble bond; length as m-dashO at 1.79 Å, which indicates that U is partially oxidized. There is no apparent U–S or U–Fe interaction in any of the U spectra analyzed. However, SEM analysis of thin sections prepared from the same core material reveals surficial U associated with pyrite which is probably a minor fraction of the total U present as thin coatings on the surface of pyrite. Our data show the presence of different structurally variable uranium forms associated with the mined cores. U associated with carbonaceous materials is probably from the original U mobilization that accumulated in the organic matter-rich areas under reducing conditions during shallow burial diagenesis. U associated with pyrite represents a small fraction of the total U and was likely deposited as a result of chemical reduction by pyrite. Our data suggest that areas rich in carbonaceous materials had limited exposure to the lixiviant solution, continue to be reducing, and still hold significant U resources. Because of their limited access to fluid flow, these areas might not contribute significantly to post-mining U release or attenuation. Areas with pyrite that are accessible to fluids seem to be more reactive and could act as reductants and facilitate U reduction and accumulation, limiting its migration.« less

  20. Socio-economic, subsidence, transportation, and legal ramifications of potential liquefaction plant sitings. Task B. Prediction of subsidence potential over abandoned mine land. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Su, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Subsidence over active longwall mines, which occurs concurrently with mining or is completed within a few days following coal extraction has been studied extensively over the past decade. On the other hand, subsidence over abandoned coal mines is difficult to predict and may take place decades after mining has ceased. Two types of delayed subsidence are normally observed: troughs, which are shallow depressions, and sinks, which are steep-sided pits. Both types of delayed subsidence may cause damages to surface structures. Most of the abandoned coal mines in the Appalachian coal field were mined by the room-and-pillar method. These mines generally are very shallow and are very irregular with unsupported roof spans of varying widths. The approach adopted in this research for predicting the subsidence potential over abandoned coal mines focuses on the development of a mathematical model, essentially a finite element model capable of modeling the viscoelastic behavior of rocks and coal. The simulation of the viscoelastic behavior of rocks and coal is needed for predicting the delayed subsidence. The assessment of subsidence potential over abandoned mine land is currently being conducted on two sites. Site investigation is aimed at obtaining the following data: surface topography, information on the overburden, local geology and ground crater hydrology, the physical and mechanical properties of the rock strats, past subsidence damages, if any, in the area, and the old mine maps. Most of the physical and mechanical properties of the rock strata will be obtained, if possible, from previous tests performed on similar types of rocks. Information on the viscoelastic behavior of the rocks and coals, however, are very scarce.

  1. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul William

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  2. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (asmore » nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross α activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.6–8.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.42–0.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y–1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.« less

  3. Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G. [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B. [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation)] [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation); Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including {sup 222}Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess. Possible ways to improve the situation are considered. (authors)

  4. A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

  5. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  6. Effects of uranium-mining releases on ground-water quality in the Puerco River Basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Wirt, L.; Lopes, T.J.; Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe: (1) the water quality of the Puerco River alluvial aquifer, (2) the movement of water between the Puerco River and underlying alluvial aquifer, and (3) changes in the water quality of the alluvial and bedrock aquifers related to releases of contaminants by uranium-mining activities. This report focuses on the alluvial aquifer near the reach of the Puerco River that was subjected to continuous flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow from the tailings-pond spill.

  7. Characterization of cores from an in-situ recovery mined uranium deposit in Wyoming: Implications for post-mining restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Cheshire, M.; Reimus, P.; Heikoop, J.; Conradson, S. D.; Batuk, O.; Havrilla, G.; House, B.; Simmons, A.; Clay, J.; Basu, A.; Christensen, J. N.; Brown, S. T.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-10-08

    In-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium (U) from sandstone-type roll-front deposits is a technology that involves the injection of solutions that consist of ground water fortified with oxygen and carbonate to promote the oxidative dissolution of U, which is pumped to recovery facilities located at the surface that capture the dissolved U and recycle the treated water. The ISR process alters the geochemical conditions in the subsurface creating conditions that are more favorable to the migration of uranium and other metals associated with the uranium deposit. There is a lack of clear understanding of the impact of ISR mining on the aquifer and host rocks of the post-mined site and the fate of residual U and other metals within the mined ore zone. We performed detailed petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses of several samples taken from about 7 m of core of the formerly the ISR-mined Smith RanchHighland uranium deposit in Wyoming. We show that previously mined cores contain significant residual uranium (U) present as coatings on pyrite and carbonaceous fragments. Coffinite was identified in three samples. Core samples with higher organic (> 1 wt.%) and clay (> 617 wt.%) contents yielded higher 234U/238U activity ratios (1.01.48) than those with lower organic and clay fractions. The ISR mining was inefficient in mobilizing U from the carbonaceous materials, which retained considerable U concentrations (37411,534 ppm). This is in contrast with the deeper part of the ore zone, which was highly depleted in U and had very low 234U/238U activity ratios. This probably is due to greater contact with the lixiviant (leaching solution) during ISR mining. EXAFS analyses performed on grains with the highest U and Fe concentrations reveal that Fe is present in a reduced form as pyrite and U occurs mostly as U(IV) complexed by organic matter or as U(IV) phases of carbonate complexes. Moreover, UO distances of ~ 2.05 were noted, indicating the potential formation of other poorly defined U(IV/VI) species. We also noted a small contribution from Udouble bond; length as m-dashO at 1.79 , which indicates that U is partially oxidized. There is no apparent US or UFe interaction in any of the U spectra analyzed. However, SEM analysis of thin sections prepared from the same core material reveals surficial U associated with pyrite which is probably a minor fraction of the total U present as thin coatings on the surface of pyrite. Our data show the presence of different structurally variable uranium forms associated with the mined cores. U associated with carbonaceous materials is probably from the original U mobilization that accumulated in the organic matter-rich areas under reducing conditions during shallow burial diagenesis. U associated with pyrite represents a small fraction of the total U and was likely deposited as a result of chemical reduction by pyrite. Our data suggest that areas rich in carbonaceous materials had limited exposure to the lixiviant solution, continue to be reducing, and still hold significant U resources. Because of their limited access to fluid flow, these areas might not contribute significantly to post-mining U release or attenuation. Areas with pyrite that are accessible to fluids seem to be more reactive and could act as reductants and facilitate U reduction and accumulation, limiting its migration.

  8. Excess Uranium Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department's Notice of Issues for Public Comment on the effects of DOE transfers of excess uranium on domestic uranium mining, conversion, and enrichment industries.

  9. uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to prepare surplus plutonium for disposition, and readiness to begin the Second Uranium Cycle, to start processing spent nuclear fuel.

    H Canyon is also being...

  10. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (as nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross ? activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.68.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.420.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.

  11. Uranium Resources Inc URI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    exploring, developing and mining uranium properties using the in situ recovery (ISR) or solution mining process. References: Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)1 This article...

  12. DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in Western Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (ULP PEIS) is available for public review and comment.

  13. Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global positioning location data were...

  14. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, Donald K.; Hicks, Allison H.

    2012-07-01

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  15. DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Western Colorado | Department of Energy 21, 2014 - 1:49pm Addthis News Contact: Bob Darr, S.M. Stoller LMS Public Affairs, Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy 720-377-9672 ULinfo@lm.doe.gov GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is available to the public. In the final Uranium Leasing Program PEIS, DOE identified the preferred alternative of continued

  16. Mining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply and cost management–including energy costs–pose key challenges for U.S. mining companies. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for increasing energy efficiency and reducing costs.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Office of Legacy Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management Abandoned Uranium Mines Abandoned Uranium Mines Read more Amchitka, Alaska, Site Amchitka, Alaska, Site Read more Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site...

  19. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling Exploration and Development Drilling Expenditures 1 Mine Production of Uranium Uranium Concentrate Production Uranium Concentrate Shipments Employment Year (million feet) (million dollars) (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) (million pounds U 3 O 8 )

  20. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014" ,"Exploration and Development Surface ","Exploration and Development Drilling","Mine Production of Uranium ","Uranium Concentrate Production ","Uranium Concentrate Shipments ","Employment " "Year","Drilling (million feet)"," Expenditures 1 (million dollars)","Mine Production (million pounds U3O8)","(million pounds

  1. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or dissolving-out from mined rock, of the soluble uranium constituents by the natural action of percolating a prepared chemical solution through mounded (heaped) rock material. ...

  2. Acid mine drainage: Balancing environmental protection and mining realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgill, B.J. Jr.; Poland, K.B.

    1995-12-31

    A major environmental concern leading to the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) was the degradation of streams and waterways from discharges of acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal mining operations. Although SMCRA and its regulatory scheme contains specific provisions addressing the drainage of acidic water from mine sites, as do various other agencies statutes and regulations, AMD from active and abandoned mines remains a major environmental problem in the Appalachian region. The formation of acidic water during coal mining operations is pervasive and some believe impossible to prevent.

  3. S. 943: A Bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to facilitate the use of abandoned mine reclamation fund moneys to replace water supplies that have been contaminated or diminished by coal mining practices. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, May 9, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The bill describes mandatory and discretionary allocations of funds to a state or Indian reservation for the purpose of water reclamation. The stated objectives of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act are amended to allow 50 percent of a state's mandatory allocation to be used for the construction of public water treatment plants and distribution facilities to take the place of water supplies that have been contaminated as a result of coal practices undertaken prior to August 3, 1977, regardless of whether the contamination has been exacerbated by coal mining practices since that date, when construction would be more economical than repair of existing facilities.

  4. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by Mining Method, Year-End 2008 Mining Method 50 per pound 100 per pound Ore (million tons) Gradea (percent U3O8) U3O8 (million pounds) Ore...

  5. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commissions Mid-Term Appraisal of the countrys current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of Indias uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  6. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2013 and 2014 million pounds U3O8 End of 2013 End of 2014 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 130.7 W W 154.6 Properties Under Development for Production and Development Drilling W

  7. Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion | Department of Energy on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium

  8. 4th Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or dissolving-out from mined rock, of the soluble uranium constituents by the natural action of percolating a prepared chemical solution through mounded (heaped) rock material. ...

  9. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014 Year Exploration and development surface drilling (million feet) Exploration and development drilling expenditures 1 (million dollars) Mine production of uranium (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate production (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate shipments (million pounds U3O8) Employment (person-years) 1993 1.1 5.7 2.1 3.1 3.4 871 1994 0.7 1.1 2.5 3.4 6.3 980 1995 1.3 2.6 3.5 6.0 5.5 1,107 1996 3.0 7.2 4.7 6.3

  10. Brawley Power Plant Abandoned | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Abstract NA Authors California Division of Oil, Gas and and Geothermal Resources Published Journal Geothermal Hot Line, 1985 DOI Not...

  11. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  12. Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Leasing Program » Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary The Atomic Energy Act and other legislative actions authorized the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor agency to the DOE, to withdraw lands from the public domain and then lease them to private industry for mineral exploration and for development and mining of uranium and vanadium ore. A total of 25,000 acres of land in southwestern

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-14 Production / Mining method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452

  14. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  15. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2013 and 2014" "million pounds U3O8" ,"End of 2013",,,"End of 2014" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound","$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration

  16. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-14 Activity at U.S. mills and In-Situ-Leach plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Estimated contained U3O8 (thousand pounds) Ore from Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at

  17. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-14" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds

  18. File:HI well abandonment.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HI well abandonment.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:HI well abandonment.pdf Size of this preview: 364 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,275 ...

  19. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 130.7 W W 154.6 Properties Under Development for Production and Development Drilling W 31.8 W W 38.2 W Mines in Production W 19.6 W

  20. Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted

    2012-07-01

    Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

  1. Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act: A Utah perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authority to regulate the coal industry at the state level, under state statute and rules, the importance of the coal industry to the state, the importance of an environmentally sound regulatory program, and the benefit of a state-managed abandoned mine reclamation program, in short the ability of the state to manage its own natural resources, make state primacy a necessity, not an option. Implementation of SMCRA cannot be measured in the myriad of oversight statistics. Effectiveness means cost-effective, timely reclamation of abandoned sites; consistent, workable rules and regulatory practices; responsive program management; and compliance which is internalized in the mine's operations.

  2. Coal recovery from mine wastes of the historic longwall mining district of north-central illinois. Illinois mineral notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Camp, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of coal from mine wastes produced by historic longwall mines in northeastern Illinois was studied as part of a project undertaken in 1982 for the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council. About 100 of these mines operated in the Wilmington and La Salle Districts of the Illinois Coal Field between about 1870 and 1940; all worked the Colchester (No. 2) Coal Seam, using a manual high-extraction mining method. Large samples of the three major kinds of mine waste - gray mining gob, preparation gob, and preparation slurry - were collected from deposits at nine of the larger mine sites and analyzed to determine their general ranges of sulfur, ash, and heating values. Preparation gob and slurry from six of the sites had significant combustible contents, and were evaluated by a simple procedure in which ash analyses and wet-screening tests were used to determine the washability and yield of combustibles to recovery processes.

  3. Longwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-14

    As part of EIA`s program to provide information on coal, this report, Longwall-Mining, describes longwall mining and compares it with other underground mining methods. Using data from EIA and private sector surveys, the report describes major changes in the geologic, technological, and operating characteristics of longwall mining over the past decade. Most important, the report shows how these changes led to dramatic improvements in longwall mining productivity. For readers interested in the history of longwall mining and greater detail on recent developments affecting longwall mining, the report includes a bibliography.

  4. Microsoft Word - L15 01-22 Uranium Tranfers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    To: Office of Nuclear Energy Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 From: Nan Swift Federal Affairs Manager National Taxpayers Union 108 N. Alfred Street Alexandria, VA 22314 Subject: Request for Information: Excess Uranium Management: Effects of DOE Transfers of Excess Uranium on Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries To whom it may concern: On behalf of the members of the National Taxpayers Union (NTU), I write to express our concerns

  5. DOE and Calpine Corporation Tap Geothermal Energy from Abandoned Steam

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wells | Department of Energy DOE and Calpine Corporation Tap Geothermal Energy from Abandoned Steam Wells DOE and Calpine Corporation Tap Geothermal Energy from Abandoned Steam Wells April 9, 2015 - 3:48pm Addthis The Geysers geothermal complex, where the Energy Department’s geothermal exploration at Caldwell Ranch is located, remains the largest operating geothermal field in the world. Caldwell Ranch has achieved a first-ever replicable strategy to reopen an abandoned steam field

  6. Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low-Enriched Uranium | Department of Energy Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and

  7. Hawaii Well Abandonment Report Form (DLNR Form WAR) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notice Form Topic Well Abandonment Report Organization State of Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Published Publisher Not Provided, 012008 DOI Not Provided Check...

  8. Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Thus, increased demand in China and Russia will consume capacity with which URENCO would ... recent years has been from the Asian markets, specifically Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea. ...

  9. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-14 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 2013 149 392 W W 199 1,156 2014 86 246 W W 161

  10. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Marvin E.; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2007-04-01

    This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

  11. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This book presents the GAO's views on the Department of Energy's (DOE) program to develop a new uranium enrichment technology, the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process (AVLIS). Views are drawn from GAO's ongoing review of AVLIS, in which the technical, program, and market issues that need to be addressed before an AVLIS plant is built are examined.

  12. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W.

    1980-06-01

    A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

  13. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W

  14. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector.

  15. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-14" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014 "Estimated contained U3O8 (thousand pounds)" "Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1",0,"W","W","W",0,"W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other Feed Materials

  16. URANIUM-SERIES CONSTRAINTS ON RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND GROUNDWATER FLOW AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. J. Goldstein, S. Luo, T. L. Ku, and M. T. Murrell

    2006-04-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the vicinity of the Nopal I uranium ore deposit are used to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes at this site, and also, by analogy, at Yucca Mountain. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 suggest that groundwater flow rates are low (< 10 m/yr). Field tests, well productivity, and uranium isotopic constraints also suggest that groundwater flow and mixing is limited at this site. The uranium isotopic systematics for water collected in the mine adit are consistent with longer rock-water interaction times and higher uranium dissolution rates at the front of the adit where the deposit is located. Short-lived nuclide data for groundwater wells are used to calculate retardation factors that are on the order of 1,000 for radium and 10,000 to 10,000,000 for lead and polonium. Radium has enhanced mobility in adit water and fractures near the deposit.

  17. African mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  18. Skimming Uranium from the Sea | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    This is the first known demonstration of a bacterial system used to mine ocean-based uranium that reduces the expense while increasing the selectivity of current methods available. ...

  19. ARM 36-21-810 - Well Abandonment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    36-21-810 - Well AbandonmentLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2010 Legal Citation ARM 36.21.810 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  20. Inherently Safe In-Situ Uranium Recovery - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Inherently Safe In-Situ Uranium Recovery Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (1,140 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryAs uranium mining continues to grow in the United States, so does the concerns over its environmental impact. An approach that may alleviate some of these problems may be in situ

  1. Precision Mining

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precision Mining Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Precision Mining at WIPP is Routine All tunnels that make up the WIPP underground are mined with the same precision that is exhibited in this photo. Typical drift cross sections are about 8m x 4m. Custom excavation and maintenance of openings of any configuration can be made. In 2005, WIPP completed renovations to the 6,000 cubic meter North Experimental Area (NExA). The area, located at the northern end

  2. Setting the course for the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 focuses on ensuring reclamation of the land after mining by restoring land affected to a condition capable of supporting prior uses and sets up a program for reclaiming abandoned mined land to be financed by a tax on coal produced. This article discusses the landmark legal decisions which represent major efforts to limit the federal role in the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 through the Commerce Clause, the Tenth Amendment, and statutory interpretation.

  3. National uranium resource evaluation, Marble Canyon Quadrangle, Arizona and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, M T; Blauvelt, R P

    1982-05-01

    The Marble Canyon Quadrangle (2/sup 0/), northeast Arizona, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Known mines and prospects were examined; field reconnaissance was done in selected areas of the quadrangle; and a ground-water geochemical survey was made in the southeast third of the quadrangle. The Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Triassic Chinle Formation, which is exposed in the western and northeastern parts of the quadrangle and is present beneath the surface of much of the quadrangle, were found favorable for channel-sandstone uranium deposits. A portion of the Cretaceous Toreva Formation in the southeast part of the quadrangle was found favorable for peneconcordant-sandstone uranium deposits. The western part of the quadrangle was found favorable for uranium concentrations in breccia pipes.

  4. final ERI-2142 18-1501 Analysis of Potential Effects on Domestic Industries of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory 2015-2024.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ERI-2142.18-1501 Analysis of the Potential Effects on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion and Enrichment Industries of the Introduction of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory During CY 2015 Through 2024 ENERGY RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1015 18 th Street, NW, Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 USA Telephone: (202) 785-8833 Facsimile: (202) 785-8834 ERI-2142.18-1501 Analysis of the Potential Effects on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion and Enrichment Industries of the Introduction of DOE

  5. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  6. PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-01-26

    A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

  7. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-04-26

    A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

  8. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Inventories of uranium by owner as of end of year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Inventories at the end of the year Owner of uranium inventory 2010 2011 2012 2013...

  9. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Inventories of natural and enriched uranium by material type as of end of year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Inventories at the end of the year Type of uranium...

  10. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2012-14 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. American Fuel Resources, LLC AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ARMZ (AtomRedMetZoloto) BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd CAMECO

  11. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing...

  12. ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap PDF icon emroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002)

  13. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 2013 149 392 W W 199 1,156 2014 86 246 W W 161 787 Figure 3. Employment in

  14. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541

  15. ARM 36-21-671 - Abandonment of Flowing Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    671 - Abandonment of Flowing Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 36-21-671 - Abandonment of Flowing...

  16. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  17. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  18. Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Operation of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant 2008 Information Date: December 31, 2008 1 Introduction The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation

  19. Russian Experience in the Regulatory Supervision of the Uranium Legacy Sites - 12441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiselev, M.F.; Romanov, V.V.; Shandala, N.K.; Titov, A.V.; Kiselev, S.M.; Seregin, V.A.; Metlyaev, E.G.; Novikova, N.; Khokhlova, E.A.

    2012-07-01

    Management of the uranium legacy is accompanied with environmental impact intensity of which depends on the amount of the waste generated, the extent of that waste localization and environmental spreading. The question is: how hazardous is such impact on the environment and human health? The criterion for safety assurance is adequate regulation of the uranium legacy. Since the establishment of the uranium industry, the well done regulatory system operates in the FMBA of Russia. Such system covers inter alia, the uranium legacy. This system includes the extent laboratory network of independent control and supervision, scientific researches, regulative practices. The current Russian normative and legal basis of the regulation and its application practice has a number of problems relating to the uranium legacy, connected firstly with the environmental remediation. To improve the regulatory system, the urgent tasks are: -To introduce the existing exposure situation into the national laws and standards in compliance with the ICRP system. - To develop criteria for site remediation and return, by stages, to uncontrolled uses. The similar criteria have been developed within the Russian-Norwegian cooperation for the purpose of remediation of the sites for temporary storage of SNF and RW. - To consider possibilities and methods of optimization for the remediation strategies under development. - To separate the special category - RW resulted from uranium ore mining and dressing. The current Russian RW classification is based on the waste subdivision in terms of the specific activities. Having in mind the new RW-specific law, we receive the opportunity to separate some special category - RW originated from the uranium mining and milling. Introduction of such category can simplify significantly the situation with management of waste of uranium mining and milling processes. Such approach is implemented in many countries and approved by IAEA. The category of 'RW originated from uranium mining and milling' is to be introduced as the legal acts and regulatory documents. The recent ICRP recommendations provide the flexible approaches for solving of such tasks. The FMBA of Russia recognizes the problems of radiation safety assurance related to the legacy of the former USSR in the uranium mining industry. Some part of the regulatory problems assumes to be solved within the EurAsEC inter-state target program 'Reclamation of the territories of the EurAsEC member states affected by the uranium mining and milling facilities'. Using the example of the uranium legacy sites in Kyrgyz and Tajikistan which could result in the tran-boundary disasters and require urgent reclamation, the experience will be gained to be used in other states as well. Harmonization of the national legislations and regulative documents on radiation safety assurance is envisaged. (authors)

  20. Active mines in Arizona and Arizona exploration offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book is a directory that lists 91 mining operations and 107 sand and gravel operations. It lists the company name, address, key personnel, mine, mill, or smelter location, and a description of the operation. A map plotting the locations of all the active mines is also available ($2). Arizona Exploration Offices is a directory that lists 68 exploration companies in Arizona, 80% of whom list gold or silver as their principal exploration target. Other exploration companies are searching for industrial minerals, uranium, beryllium, rare earths, ferroalloys, and sulfur.

  1. ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies PDF icon ccroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

  2. Potential of Melastoma malabathricum as bio-accumulator for uranium and thorium from soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saat, Ahmad; Kamsani, Ain Shaqina; Kamri, Wan Nur Aina Nadzira; Talib, Nur Hasyimah Mat; Wood, Ab Khalik; Hamzah, Zaini

    2015-04-29

    Uranium and Thorium are naturally occuring radionuclides. However, due to anthropogenic activities in some locations their concentrations in the soils could be elevated. This study explores the potential of Melastoma malabathricum (locally known as pokok senduduk) as bio-accumulator of uranium and thorium from soils of three different study areas, namely former tin mining, industrial and residential/commercial areas in Peninsular Malaysia. The study found elevated concentrations of uranium and thorium in former tin mining soils as compared to natural abundance. However in industral and residential/commercial areas the concentrations are within the range of natural abundance. In terms of transfer factor (TF), in ex-mining areas TF > 1 for uranium in the leaf, stem and roots, indicating accumulation of uranium from soil. However for thorium TF < 1, indicating the occurence of transfer from soil to root, stem and leaf, but no accumulation. For other areas only transfer of uranium and thorium were observed. The results indicated the potential of Melastoma malabathricum to be used as bio-accumulatior of uranium, especially in areas of elevated concentration.

  3. ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future | Department of Energy The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future PDF icon vision.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  4. Uranium-series constraints on radionuclide transport and groundwater flow at the Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, S.J.; Abdel-Fattah, A.I.; Murrell, M.T.; Dobson, P.F.; Norman, D.E.; Amato, R.S.; Nunn, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the Nopal I uranium ore deposit were obtained to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes for a nuclear waste repository located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 are consistent with a simple physical mixing model that indicates that groundwater velocities are low ({approx}10 m/y). Uranium isotopic constraints, well productivities, and radon systematics also suggest limited groundwater mixing and slow flow in the saturated zone. Uranium isotopic systematics for seepage water collected in the mine adit show a spatial dependence which is consistent with longer water-rock interaction times and higher uranium dissolution inputs at the front adit where the deposit is located. Uranium-series disequilibria measurements for mostly unsaturated zone samples indicate that {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.005-0.48 and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.006-113. {sup 239}Pu/{sup 238}U mass ratios for the saturated zone are <2 x 10{sup -14}, and Pu mobility in the saturated zone is >1000 times lower than the U mobility. Saturated zone mobility decreases in the order {sup 238}U{approx}{sup 226}Ra > {sup 230}Th{approx}{sup 239}Pu. Radium and thorium appear to have higher mobility in the unsaturated zone based on U-series data from fractures and seepage water near the deposit.

  5. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  6. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  7. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    S2. Uranium feed deliveries, enrichment services, and uranium loaded by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8 equivalent million separative work units (SWU) Year Feed deliveries by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors Uranium in fuel assemblies loaded into U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors U.S.-origin enrichment services purchased Foreign-origin enrichment services purchased Total purchased enrichment services

  8. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  9. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  10. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table S3a. Foreign purchases, foreign sales, and uranium ...

  11. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table S2. Uranium feed deliveries, enrichment services, and uranium loaded by owners ...

  12. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  13. Uranium Purchases Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

  14. highly enriched uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and radioisotope supply capabilities of MURR and Nordion with General Atomics' selective gas extraction technology-which allows their low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets to remain...

  15. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  16. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (20...

  17. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (20...

  18. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2010-14)....

  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of the United States. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2010...

  20. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2011...

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013...

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2010-...

  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013...

  4. U.S.Uranium Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Reserves Data for: 2003 Release Date: June 2004 Next Release: Not determined Uranium Reserves Estimates The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has reported the...

  5. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2015 Independent ... DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2014 ... Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium ...

  6. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Uranium Production Report April 2015 Independent ... by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), ... Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium ...

  7. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand ...

  8. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Minimum ...

  9. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 ""Uranium Marketing Annual Survey"" (2012-14)." "32 U.S. Energy Information Administration 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

  10. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Origin of ...

  11. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willit, James L.; Ackerman, John P.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  12. Fiscal year 1996 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from August 1995 through August 1996. A total of 27 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  13. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. American Fuel Resources, LLC AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ARMZ (AtomRedMetZoloto) BHP Billiton Olympic Dam

  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007)1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium Foreign-origin uranium Spot contracts2 Short, medium, and long-term contracts3 1994

  15. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by supplier and delivery year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent, dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Purchased from U.S. producers Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 350 550 W W W Weighted-average price 47.13 58.12 W W W Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 11,745 14,778 11,545 12,835 17,111

  16. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  17. Approval of State and Indian Reclamation Program grants under Title IV of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977: final environmental import statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Approval of annual grant applications to states and Indian tribes is proposed in accordance with Title IV of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The grants are financed through assessments for abandoned coal mine reclamation. Fund collections are to continue through 1992. Granting of all available funds would provide the maximum possible amount of money and promote the highest level of reclamation of mined areas. Health and safety hazards associated with unreclaimed mines would be lessened, and habitat for fish, wildlife, and vegetation would be enhanced significantly. Mining reclamation projects would require evacuation of residents in affected areas. Reclamation activities would create dust and sediments, degrading air quality and surface flows. Endangered bat species dwelling in mine openings would be displaced or destroyed due to mine closures.

  18. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by purchaser, 2012-14 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8...

  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2010-14 thousands pounds U3O8...

  20. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2014, by delivery year, 2015-24 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0. U.S. broker and trader purchases of uranium by origin, supplier, and delivery year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2010...

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a. Foreign purchases, foreign sales, and uranium inventories owned by U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8...

  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type and material type, 2014 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars...

  4. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4. Deliveries of uranium feed for enrichment by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin country and delivery year, 2012-14 thousand pounds U3O8...

  5. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by quantity, 2012-14 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8...

  6. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  7. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  8. Surface coal mining operations in two Oklahoma Counties raise questions about prime farmland reclamation and bond adequacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-08

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 allows prime farmland to be mined but requires the coal operator to reclaim it according to special reclamation standards. To be considered prime farmland, the soil must meet the Secretary of Agriculture's definition of prime soil and have historically been used for intensive agricultural purposes. In Oklahoma, the historical-use provision has generally been applied to lands that have been used for cropland for 5 of the preceding 10 years. GAO's review of mining activities in two Oklahoma counties showed that the land comprising 54 of the 58 mine permits issued since the act's passage contained some prime soil. None, however, required reclamation to prime farmland standards because landowners signed letters stating that the land had not been farmed for crops for five of the preceding 10 years. GAO also found that numerous sites in the two counties were abandoned by mining companies after the act was passed. Since abandonment, no reclamation has occurred on most of these sites. The Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining questions whether the bonds on the unreclaimed sites, if collected, will be adequate to do the necessary reclamation. Oklahoma's Department of Mines has taken action to increase bond amounts on newly-issued permits and on some older permitted areas in order to prevent future reclamation problems.

  9. Mining landforms - A renewable energy development opportunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A {open_quotes}landforming{close_quotes} land development opportunity unique to metals mining is described. {open_quotes}Landforming{close_quotes}, wherein the earth`s surface is reconfigured with mining waste rock and tails for the capture of renewable energy, is proposed by the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM) to be ecologically acceptable and, in selected cases, economically superior to conventional mineral extraction, reclamation, and minesite abandonment practices. Landforming is primary land construction that uses mining waste and applies the principles of land overlay architecture. Landforms can be layered, shaped, and configured through the use of binders and plastic sheeting to the engineering specifications necessary for the support of physical structures and passage or retention of fluids. Landforms that are terraced and south facing (in the Northern Hemisphere) are an ideal mount for sun-tracking mirror (heliostat) arrays. In {open_quotes}blue sky{close_quotes}. solar-rich environments, the mirrors can be targeted on a common area to form a {open_quotes}solar furnace.{close_quotes} The heat generated at the focal point of the solar array can be used to flash generate steam and run a turbine electric generator. The solar steam power generation cycle coproducers distilled water that can be sprayed onto the surfaces of the landform to create {open_quotes}greenscape.{close_quotes} Waters not consumed or evaporated in the site greening process percolate into and are stored by the landform if it is underlain with plastic. The landform serves, in effect as a shallow aquifer. The terrace-landform development of mineral properties in remote, infrastructurally destitute areas creates renewable energy, sustainable, electric power-water {open_quotes}oases.{close_quotes} The landform development of mineral properties adjacent to metropolitan areas creates utilities expansions and recreational {open_quotes}greenspace{close_quotes} in areas of growing urban need.

  10. Mining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mining Mining Supply and cost management-including energy costs-pose key challenges for U.S. mining companies. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for increasing energy efficiency and reducing costs. Analytical Studies & Other Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy use, energy loss, and carbon emissions for selected industry sectors. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (2007) Documents for historical reference Water

  11. Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing

  12. file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glossary Home > Nuclear > U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates Data for: 2008 Report Released: July 2010 Next Release Date: 2012 Summary The U.S. Energy...

  13. Mountaintop mining update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-07-15

    In a bad year for the US mining industry's safety record and public image, Morehead State University hosted a public meeting titled 'Mountaintop mining, health and safety forum'. This was a balanced event, with representatives from the mining industry as well as activists from the environmental community. A full account is given of the presentations and debate at the forum. 6 photos.

  14. Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2013 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2013 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000

  15. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  16. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  17. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-08-27

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colorado School of Mines - CO 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    School of Mines - CO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Colorado School of Mines ( CO.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Licensed operation Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Golden , Colorado CO.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CO.01-1 CO.01-2 Site Operations: Research and Development on testing and processing of uranium ores. CO.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Engaged in state licensed operations CO.01-1 CO.01-2 Radioactive Materials

  20. Uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.W.; Arengi, J.T.; Parrish, I.S.

    1980-04-01

    This report is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program designed to identify criteria favorable for the occurrence of the world's significant uranium deposits. This project deals specifically with uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States and, in particular, their distribution and origin. From an extensive literature survey and field examination of 44 pegmatite localities in the United States and Canada, the authors have compiled an index to about 300 uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States, maps giving location of these deposits, and an annotated bibliography to some of the most pertinent literature on the geology of pegmatites. Pegmatites form from late-state magma differentiates rich in volatile constituents with an attendant aqueous vapor phase. It is the presence of an aqueous phase which results in the development of the variable grain size which characterizes pegmatites. All pegmatites occur in areas of tectonic mobility involving crustal material usually along plate margins. Those pegmatites containing radioactive mineral species show, essentially, a similar distribution to those without radioactive minerals. Criteria such as tectonic setting, magma composition, host rock, and elemental indicators among others, all serve to help delineate areas more favorable for uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. The most useful guide remains the radioactivity exhibited by uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. Although pegmatites are frequently noted as favorable hosts for radioactive minerals, the general paucity and sporadic distribution of these minerals and inherent mining and milling difficulties negate the resource potential of pegmatites for uranium and thorium.

  1. Uranium-titanium-niobium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gail M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A uranium alloy having small additions of Ti and Nb shows improved strength and ductility in cross section of greater than one inch over prior uranium alloy having only Ti as an alloying element.

  2. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 Weighted-average price ...

  3. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Year Maximum ...

  4. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries Uranium concentrate Natural UF 6 Enriched UF 6 Total Purchases 2,004 1,312 ...

  5. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table S1a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power ...

  6. METHOD OF SINTERING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henderson, C.M.; Stavrolakis, J.A.

    1963-04-30

    This patent relates to a method of sintering uranium dioxide. Uranium dioxide bodies are heated to above 1200 nif- C in hydrogen, sintered in steam, and then cooled in hydrogen. (AEC)

  7. The strategy on rehabilitation of the former uranium facilities at the 'Pridneprovsky chemical plant' in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voitsekhovich, O.; Lavrova, T. [Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Skalskiy, A.S. [Institute of Geological Sciences of Ac.of Sc., Kiev (Ukraine); Ryazantsev, V.F. [State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, 9/11 Arsenalna str., Kyiv-11, 01011 (Ukraine)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes current status of the former Uranium Facilities at the Pridneprovsky Chemical Plant in Ukraine, which are currently under development of action plan for its territory rehabilitation. The monitoring data carried out during recent several years show its impact to the Environment and gives a basis for justification of the number of measures aiming to reduce radiological and ecological risks of the Uranium tailings situated at the territory of PChP. The monitoring data and strategy for its remediation are considered in the presentation. Uranium mining has been intensively conducted in Ukraine since the end of the 40-s. Most of the uranium deposits have been explored in the Dnieper river basin, while some smaller deposits can be found within the basins of the Southern Bug and Severskiy Donets rivers. There also several large Uranium Milling facilities were in operation since the end of the 40-s till 1991, when due to disintegration of the former Soviet Union system the own uranium production has been significantly declined. The Milling Plant and Uranium extraction Facilities in ZhevtiVody is still in operation with UkrAtomprom Industrial Consortium. Therefore rehabilitation programme for all Uranium facilities in this site are in duty of the East Mining Combine and the Consortium. The most difficult case is to provide rehabilitation Action Plan for Uranium tailings and number of other facilities situated in Dnieprodzerzhinsk town and which were in operation by the former State Industrial Enterprise Pridneprovskiy Chemical Plant (PChP). In past PChP was one of the largest Uranium Milling facilities of the Former Soviet Union and has been in operation since 1948 till 1991. During Soviet time the Uranium extraction at this legacy site has been carried out using the ore raw products delivered also from Central Asia, Germany and Checz Republic. After extraction the uranium residue has been putting to the nearest landscape depressions at the vicinity of the Milling facilities. This plant is being in the sanitation stage since 1991 with the 9 Uranium tailings dumps at its territory, containing about 42 million tonnes of Uranium Residues. There were no engineering barriers created at most of the tailings. After fulfilment of the tailing dumps capacity their surfaces usually were covering by the local soils, debris and other industrial wastes. (authors)

  8. U.S. mine production of uranium, 1993-2011

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

  9. Microsoft Word - Defense Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (EPA's) acceptable range of 10 -6 to 10 -4 for an incremental lifetime cancer risk. ... by State ...... 5 Figure 3. Cancer Risk Estimates for Various Receptors ...

  10. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM CARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.E.; Stethers, H.L.; Johnson, T.R.

    1964-03-24

    A process of preparing uranium monocarbide is de scribed. Uranium metal is dissolved in cadmium, zinc, cadmium-- zinc, or magnesium-- zinc alloy and a small quantity of alkali metal is added. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of carbon at 500 to 820 deg C then precipitates uranium monocarbide. (AEC)

  11. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  12. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Weighted-average price of uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased (weighted-average price) Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007)1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium (weighted-average price)

  13. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  14. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  15. Uranium Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-15

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range {approx} 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases. Four case studies are presented: Water and Soil Characterization, Subsurface Stabilization of Uranium and other Toxic Metals, Reductive Precipitation (in situ bioremediation) of Uranium, and Physical Transport of Particle-bound Uranium by Erosion.

  16. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  17. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  18. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Union Mines Development Corp - NY 0-22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mines Development Corp - NY 0-22 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNION MINES DEVELOPMENT CORP. (NY.0-22) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Union Carbide NY.0-22-1 Location: New York , New York NY.0-22-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-22-1 Site Operations: The company owned uranium mines or reserves located in the western U.S. NY.0-22-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No reason to believe radioactive material was used at this site NY.0-22-1

  20. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  1. IDAPA 37.03.04.045 - Abandonment of Geothermal Resource Wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .045 - Abandonment of Geothermal Resource Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: IDAPA 37.03.04.045 -...

  2. Colorado - C.R.S. 43-2-106 et seq., Abandoned State Highways...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Colorado - C.R.S. 43-2-106 et seq., Abandoned State Highways Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  3. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap PDF icon mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & ...

  4. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  5. Fiscal year 1995 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from September 1994 through August 1995. A total of 67 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned if (1) its construction did not meet current standards (substandard construction); (2) it was irreparably damaged or had deteriorated beyond practical repair; (3) its location interfered with or otherwise impeded site operations, construction, or closure activities; or (4) special circumstances existed as defined on a case-by-case basis and approved by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Manager. This summary report contains: general geologic setting of the Y-12 Plant and vicinity; discussion of well plugging and abandonment methods, grouting procedures, and waste management practices (a Waste Management Plan for Drilling Activities is included in Appendix C); summaries of plugging and abandonment activities at each site; and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) and health and safety protocols used during the FY 1995 Plugging and Abandonment Program.

  6. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Knighton, Gaven C.; Clark, Curtis R.

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  7. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. Enrichment service sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2012-14 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. AREVA NC, Inc AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. .CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services)

  8. recycled_uranium.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic

  9. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  10. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  11. Office of Legacy Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Legacy Management Abandoned Uranium Mines Abandoned Uranium Mines Read more Amchitka, Alaska, Site Amchitka, Alaska, Site Read more Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Read more Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Read more Rifle, Colorado, Disposal Site Rifle, Colorado, Disposal Site Read more Announcements We invite you to review the draft LM 2016-2025 Strategic Plan which is now posted for public comment. We are updating

  12. VANE Uranium One JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VANE Uranium One JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: VANE-Uranium One JV Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: EC4V 6DX Product: JV between VANE Minerals Plc & Uranium One....

  13. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bane, R.W.

    1959-09-01

    A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

  14. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Delivery year Total purchased (weighted- average price) Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007) 1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium (weighted- average price) Foreign-origin uranium (weighted-

  15. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Appropriations Subcommittee, is shown some of the technology in the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility by Warehousing and Transportation Operations Manager Byron...

  16. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jab and Antelope Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing Developing Developing Developing Developing Uranium One Americas, Inc. Moore Ranch Campbell, Wyoming 500,000 Permitted And ...

  17. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ing","Developing","Developing","Developing","Developing" "Uranium One Americas, Inc.","Moore Ranch","Campbell, Wyoming",500000,"Permitted And Licensed","Permitted And ...

  18. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  19. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Quantity with reported price ...

  20. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  1. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Apparatus, systems, and methods for...

  2. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting You are accessing a document from...

  3. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium ...

  4. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

  5. Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

  6. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  7. Mine roof support system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culley, D.H.

    1982-01-26

    A mine roof support system is disclosed having sets of laterally spaced pairs of elongated support members adapted to be moved into and out of abutting relation with a mine roof. Wheel supported frames extend between and connect adjacent end portions of each pair of support members with adjacent wheel supported frames at the ends of the support members being in spaced tandem relation and connected to each other by connector members. Extensible prop members are connected to and move the wheel supported frames and the elongated support members connected thereto selectively toward and away from the mine roof.

  8. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Contracted purchases of uranium from suppliers by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, in effect at the end of 2014, by delivery year, 2015-24 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Contracted purchases from U.S. suppliers Contracted purchases from foreign suppliers Contracted purchases from all suppliers Year of delivery Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum 2015 8,405 8,843 31,468 34,156 39,873 42,999 2016 7,344 7,757 29,660 31,787 37,004 39,544 2017 5,980 6,561

  9. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-14 person-years State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 531 416 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 198 105 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W W W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W W 0 California, Montana,

  10. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2010-14 Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility name County, state (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating status at end of the year 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Processing Alternate Feed Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corp Pinon Ridge Mill Montrose,

  11. Indonesian coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-15

    The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment | Department of Energy Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment PDF icon Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries EA-1574: Final Environmental

  13. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  14. Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

  15. Occupational safety data and casualty rates for the uranium fuel cycle. [Glossaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Hoy, H.C.

    1981-10-01

    Occupational casualty (injuries, illnesses, fatalities, and lost workdays) and production data are presented and used to calculate occupational casualty incidence rates for technologies that make up the uranium fuel cycle, including: mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment of uranium; fabrication of reactor fuel; transportation of uranium and fuel elements; generation of electric power; and transmission of electric power. Each technology is treated in a separate chapter. All data sources are referenced. All steps used to calculate normalized occupational casualty incidence rates from the data are presented. Rates given include fatalities, serious cases, and lost workdays per 100 man-years worked, per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output, and per other appropriate units of output.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines - UT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. BUREAU OF MINES (UT.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Salt Lake City , Utah UT.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 UT.01-1 Site Operations: Research and development on uranium recovery from ore in the late 1940s. UT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria UT.01-1 UT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium UT.01-2

  17. Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly,...

  18. Uranium hexafluoride bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports written about the transportation, handling, safety, and processing of uranium hexafluoride. An on-line literature search was executed using the DOE Energy files and the Nuclear Science Abstracts file to identify pertinent reports. The DOE Energy files contain unclassified information that is processed at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information of the US Department of Energy. The reports selected from these files were published between 1974 and 1983. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains unclassified international nuclear science and technology literature published from 1948 to 1976. In addition, scientific and technical reports published by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration, as well as those published by other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations, are included in the Nuclear Science Abstracts file. An alphabetical listing of the acronyms used to denote the corporate sponsors follows the bibliography.

  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Deliveries of uranium feed by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by enrichment country and delivery year, 2012-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Feed deliveries in 2012 Feed deliveries in 2013 Feed deliveries in 2014 Enrichment country U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total China 0 W W 0 W W W W W France 0 4,578 4,578 0 1,606 1,606 0 3.055 3,055 Germany W W 1,904 W W W W W 2,140 Netherlands W W 2,674 1,058

  20. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-14 Exploration drilling Development drilling Exploration and development drilling Year Number of holes Feet (thousand) Number of holes Feet (thousand) Number of holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904

  1. ORS 517 - Mining and Mining Claims | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Mining and Mining ClaimsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation ORS 517 (2013) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  2. Summary history of domestic uranium procurement under US Atomic Energy Commission contracts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrethsen, H. Jr.; McGinley, F.E.

    1982-09-01

    During the period 1947 through 1970, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) fostered the rapid development and expansion of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry by providing a market for uranium. Some thirty-two mills were constructed during that period to produce U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ concentrates for sale to the AEC. In addition, there were various pilot plants, concentrators, upgraders, heap leach, and solution mining facilities that operated during the period. The purpose of this report is to compile a short narrative history of the AEC's uranium concentrate procurement program and to describe briefly each of the operations that produced uranium for sale to the AEC. Contractual arrangements are described and data are given on quantities of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ purchased and prices paid. Similar data are included for V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, where applicable. Mill and other plant operating data were also compiled from old AEC records. These latter data were provided by the companies, as a contractual requirement, during the period of operation under AEC contracts. Additionally, an effort was made to determine the present status of each facility by reference to other recently published reports. No sites were visited nor were the individual reports reviewed by the companies, many of which no longer exist. The authors relied almost entirely on published information for descriptions of facilities and milling processes utilized.

  3. Review of the NURE Assessment of the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Susan M.

    2013-09-15

    Historic exploration and development were used to evaluate the reliability of domestic uranium reserves and potential resources estimated by the U.S. Department of Energy national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province. NURE estimated 87 million pounds of reserves in the $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cost category in the Coast Plain uranium resource region, most in the Gulf Coast Uranium Province. Since NURE, 40 million pounds of reserves have been mined, and 38 million pounds are estimated to remain in place as of 2012, accounting for all but 9 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the reserve or production categories in the NURE estimate. Considering the complexities and uncertainties of the analysis, this study indicates that the NURE reserve estimates for the province were accurate. An unconditional potential resource of 1.4 billion pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 600 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the forward cost category of $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1980 prices), was estimated in 106 favorable areas by the NURE program in the province. Removing potential resources from the non-productive Houston embayment, and those reserves estimated below historic and current mining depths reduces the unconditional potential resource 33% to about 930 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and that in the $30/lb cost category 34% to 399 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Based on production records and reserve estimates tabulated for the region, most of the production since 1980 is likely from the reserves identified by NURE. The potential resource predicted by NURE has not been developed, likely due to a variety of factors related to the low uranium prices that have prevailed since 1980.

  4. NETL, Pennsylvania Pen Data-Sharing Agreement to Address State’s Abandoned Wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection have entered into a new data-sharing agreement that promises to improve methods of locating abandoned oil and gas wells.

  5. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 350 550 W W W Weighted-average price 47.13 58.12 W W W Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 11,745 14,778 11,545 12,835 17,111 Weighted-average price 44.98 53.29 54.44 50.44 42.90 Purchases 0 0 0 0 0 Weighted-average price -- -- -- -- -- Purchases of U.S.-origin and

  6. Y-12 and uranium history

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    did happen six days after he was given the assignment. The history of uranium at Y-12 began with that decision, which will be commemorated on September 19, 2012, at...

  7. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Annual Cumulative Annual Cumulative 2014 2,494 2,494 - -- 2015 6,014 8,507 3,496 3,496 ...

  8. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent U.S.-origin Foreign- origin Total U.S.-origin ...

  9. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries to foreign suppliers and utilities 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Foreign sales ...

  10. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent; dollars per pound U 3 O 8 equivalent Deliveries ...

  11. ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) ITP Mining: Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals (December 2002) PDF icon edroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond Education and Outreach Fact Sheet Building America Building Science Education

  12. Mine roof support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmann, A.

    1982-01-05

    A mine roof support has a base, a supporting prop extending upwardly from the base, an elongated roof-supporting element having one portion supported by the supporting prop and another portion telescopable relative to the one portion toward a mine face and having a free end formed as a housing with a width corresponding to the width of the one portion, and a thrust prop arranged to support the free end section of the telescopable portion of the roof-supporting element and having a roof-side end section which is forcedly displaceable in the housing in direction of elongation of a mine and pivotable in a substantially vertical plane about an axle arranged in the housing.

  13. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-06-10

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  14. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 2012 2013 2014 Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC / AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services) LES, LLC (Louisiana Energy Services) NUKEM, Inc.

  15. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A. (Kennewick, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  16. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Lakeview Uranium Mill site in Lakeview, Oregon, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide technical assistance for the project. The purpose of this report is to describe an assessment of the site for possible development of a geothermal power generation facility and to estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts for the facility. In addition, the report recommends development pathways that could assist in the implementation of a geothermal power system at the site.

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bureau of Mines - CO 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bureau of Mines - CO 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bureau of Mines (CO.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: National Radium Institute CO.0-02-1 Location: Denver , Colorado CO.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CO.0-02-1 Site Operations: Radium processing and process development; produced radium, uranium oxide, and vanadium oxide from June 1914 to January 1917. CO.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Work not performed by

  19. Economic evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, J H

    1982-12-01

    Mountain States Research and Development was contracted on March 1, 1981 to make an economic evaluation study at each of 12 abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the western states. The objective of this work was to obtain the data necessary at each site to determine the possible revenue that could be derived from reprocessing the tailings. To accomplish this objective a drilling and sampling program was established for each site to determine the total amount of tailings and subbase material available for treatment and the amount of recoverable uranium, vanadium and molybdenum. These three metals were selected due to their common occurrence in uranium ores and common extractability in the leaching process. Laboratory leaching was then conducted on the samples obtained to determine the extractability of each of these metals and the optimum plant process to be applied. As the metal contents were generally low and represented mineral that had not been leached during previous processing, the economic evaluation is limited to consideration of the direct capital and operating costs required in connection with processing of each respective site material. Excavating, transportation and disposal of the material from each site in an environmentally acceptable location and manner was not within the scope of this project. It will be necessary to complete a separate study of these areas in order to determine the total costs involved. This report contains the results of the investigations of the Old Rifle Site.

  20. ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry PDF icon water_use_mining.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  1. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-14 million dollars Year Drilling1 Production2 Land and other 3 Total expenditures Total land and other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines - PA 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PA 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. BUREAU OF MINES (PA.36) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bruceton , Pennsylvania PA.36-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.36-2 Site Operations: Conducted studied on explosiveness of Uranium, Thorium and Beryllium. PA.36-1 PA.36-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Small amounts of radioactive materials used - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote PA.36-2

  3. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  4. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL ...

  5. Uranium Management and Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Management and Policy Uranium Management and Policy The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is located 3 miles south of the Ohio River and is 12 miles west of Paducah, Kentucky. Paducah remains the only operating gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plant in the United States. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is located 3 miles south of the Ohio River and is 12 miles west of Paducah, Kentucky. Paducah remains the only operating gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plant in the United

  6. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 2010 2011 2012 2013 P2014 Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors inventories 86,527 89,835 97,647 113,077 116,047 Uranium concentrate (U 3 O 8 ) 13,076 14,718 15,963 18,131 20,501 Natural UF 6 35,767 35,883 29,084 38,332 40,972 Enriched UF 6 25,392 19,596 38,428 40,841

  7. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States Uranium concentrate processing facilities End of Mills - conventional milling 1 Mills - other operations 2 In-situ-leach plants 3 Byproduct recovery plants 4 Total 1996 0 2 5 2 9 1997 0 3 6 2 11 1998 0 2 6 1 9 1999 1 2 4 0 7 2000 1 2 3 0 6 2001 0 1 3 0 4 2002 0 1 2 0 3 2003 0 0 2 0 2 2004 0 0 3 0 3 2005 0 1 3 0 4 2006 0 1 5 0 6 2007 0 1 5 0 6 2008 1 0 6 0 7 2009 0 1 3 0 4 2010 1 0 4 0 5 2011 1 0 5 0 6 2012 1

  8. Continuous reduction of uranium tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMint, A.L.; Maxey, A.W.

    1993-10-21

    Operation of a pilot-scale system for continuous metallothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4} or green salt) has been initiated. This activity is in support of the development of a cost- effective process to produce uranium-iron (U-Fe) alloy feed for the Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program. To date, five runs have been made to reduce green salt (UF{sub 4}) with magnesium. During this quarter, three runs were made to perfect the feeding system, examine feed rates, and determine the need for a crust breaker/stirrer. No material was drawn off in any of the runs; both product metal and by-product salt were allowed to accumulate in the reactor.

  9. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  10. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  11. Government Decision to Abandon Yucca Mountain Negatively Impacts Central Savannah River Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release Contact: Rick McLeod Monday, November 9, 2009 803.593.9954 x1411 Government Decision to Abandon Yucca Mountain Negatively Impacts Central Savannah River Area AIKEN, SC - The Federal Government's failure to complete construction of its only option for long-term nuclear waste storage at Yucca Mountain in the Nevada desert will result in the Savannah River Site becoming the permanent home to tons of high- level nuclear waste, a local community group says. The SRS Community

  12. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  13. Mine roof support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmann, A.

    1981-02-24

    A mine roof support has a base and a roof shield pivoted to the base and carrying at its upper end a pivoted cap which is urged upwardly against the mine roof by a hydraulic pit prop reacting between the cap and the base. The lower end of the roof shield is connected to the base by two links each having a pivot cooperating with a pivot on the roof shield, and a pivot cooperating with a pivot on the base. In addition, the base and/or the lower end of the roof shield has an auxiliary for each link and each link has an auxiliary pivot which can be connected with one of the auxiliary pivots of the base or lower end.

  14. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  15. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 531 416 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 198 105 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W W W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0

  16. 2014 Uranium Market Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Purchase contract type (Signed in 2014) Quantity of deliveries received in 2014 Weighted-average price Number of purchase contracts for deliveries in 2014 Spot W W 67 Long-term W W 2 Total 12,263 34.83 69 Table 8. Contracts signed in 2014 by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type thousand

  17. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  18. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status Operating status at the end of Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility name County, state (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2014 1st quarter 2015 2nd quarter 2015 3rd quarter 2015 4th Quarter 2015 Anfield Resources Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000

  19. Colorado School of Mines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado School of Mines - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Germany knows mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-11-15

    Whether it is the nuance of precision or robust rock breaking strength, German suppliers have the expertise. Germany has about 120 companies in the mining equipment industry, employing some 16,000 people. The article describes some recent developments of the following companies: DBT, Liebherr, Atlas Copco, BASF, Boart Longyear, Eickhoff, IBS, Maschinenfabrik Glueckauf, Komatsu, TAKRA, Terex O & R, Thyssen Krupp Foerdertechnik and Wirtgen. 7 photos.

  1. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Characterization of Uranium and Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Rodney J.; Kelly, Ann Marie; Clarke, Amy J.; Field, Robert D.; Wenk, H. R.

    2012-07-25

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to examine the microstructures of unalloyed uranium, U-6Nb, U-10Mo, and U-0.75Ti. For unalloyed uranium, we used EBSD to examine the effects of various processes on microstructures including casting, rolling and forming, recrystallization, welding, and quasi-static and shock deformation. For U-6Nb we used EBSD to examine the microstructural evolution during shape memory loading. EBSD was used to study chemical homogenization in U-10Mo, and for U-0.75Ti, we used EBSD to study the microstructure and texture evolution during thermal cycling and deformation. The studied uranium alloys have significant microstructural and chemical differences and each of these alloys presents unique preparation challenges. Each of the alloys is prepared by a sequence of mechanical grinding and polishing followed by electropolishing with subtle differences between the alloys. U-6Nb and U-0.75Ti both have martensitic microstructures and both require special care in order to avoid mechanical polishing artifacts. Unalloyed uranium has a tendency to rapidly oxidize when exposed to air and a two-step electropolish is employed, the first step to remove the damaged surface layer resulting from the mechanical preparation and the second step to passivate the surface. All of the alloying additions provide a level of surface passivation and different one and two step electropolishes are employed to create good EBSD surfaces. Because of its low symmetry crystal structure, uranium exhibits complex deformation behavior including operation of multiple deformation twinning modes. EBSD was used to observe and quantify twinning contributions to deformation and to examine the fracture behavior. Figure 1 shows a cross section of two mating fracture surfaces in cast uranium showing the propensity of deformation twinning and intergranular fracture largely between dissimilarly oriented grains. Deformation of U-6Nb in the shape memory regime occurs by the motion of twin boundaries formed during the martensitic transformation. Deformation actually results in a coarsening of the microstructure making EBSD more practical following a limited amount of strain. Figure 2 shows the microstructure resulting from 6% compression. Casting of U-10Mo results in considerable chemical segregation as is apparent in Figure 2a. The segregation subsists through rolling and heat treatment processes as shown in Figure 2b. EBSD was used to study the effects of homogenization time and temperature on chemical heterogeneity. It was found that times and temperatures that result in a chemically homogeneous microstructure also result in a significant increase in grain size. U-0.75Ti forms an acicular martinsite as shown in Figure 4. This microstructure prevails through cycling into the higher temperature solid uranium phases.

  2. Comments on proposed legislation to restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This book focuses on H.R.145, H.R.788, and S.210. Each of the proposed bills would restructure DOE's enrichment program as a government corporation with private financing and would encourage the eventual sale of the corporation to the private sector. In doing so, the bills would, among other things, allow the corporation to set prices to maximize long-term returns; establish a fund to meet the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, and other environmental cleanup costs associated with uranium enrichment activities; transfer interest in DOE's new atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process to the new corporation; and, except for H.R. 145, require the government to pay its share of the costs to clean up mill tailings (mining wastes) generated under government contracts.

  3. Ground control for highwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipf, R.K.; Mark, C.

    2007-09-15

    Perhaps the greatest risk to both equipment and personnel associated with highwall mining is from ground control. The two most significant ground control hazards are rock falls from highwall and equipment entrapment underground. In the central Appalachians, where the majority of highwall mining occurs in the USA, hillseams (or mountain cracks) are the most prominent structure that affects highwall stability. The article discusses measures to minimise the risk of failure associated with hillstreams. A 'stuck' or trapped highwall miner, and the ensuring retrieval or recovery operation, can be extremely disruptive to the highwall mining process. Most entrapment, are due to roof falls in the hole. The options for recovery are surface retrieval, surface excavation or underground recovery. Proper pillar design is essential to maintain highwall stability and prevent entrapments. NIOSH has developed the Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar stability-Highwall Mining (ARMPS-HWM) computer program to help mine planners with this process. 10 figs.

  4. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  5. Process for alloying uranium and niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Northcutt, Jr., Walter G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Masters, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Chapman, Lloyd R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uraniun sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

  6. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2014 | Release Date: April 30, 2015 | Next Release Date: May 2016 | full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-14 Total uranium drilling was 1,752 holes covering 1.3 million feet, 67% fewer holes than in 2013 and the lowest since 2004. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $28

  7. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Year of delivery Minimum Maximum 2015 2,838 2,838 2016 3,573 3,573 2017 2,718 2,818 ...

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites Michael Hillesheim and Gail Mosey Produced under direction of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under

  9. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earths history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earths crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  10. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  11. Imaging Ahead of Mining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging Ahead of Mining Imaging Ahead of Mining Radio-Imaging Method (RIM(tm)) Improves Mine Planning and Products Coal mining is becoming more difficult as machines must extract the coal from deeper, thinner, and more geologically complex coal beds. This type of mining also includes the need to reduce risk and costs. To address these mining issues, Stolar Horizon, with support from AMO, redesigned and improved a technology developed twenty years ago. The Radio-Imaging Method (RIM) uses wireless

  12. Hydraulic mining method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huffman, Lester H. (Kent, WA); Knoke, Gerald S. (Kent, WA)

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  13. Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - October 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of Mine Safety, Stabilization, and Habitability at the...

  14. Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    This document represents the roadmap for education in the U.S. mining industry. It was developed based on the results of an Education Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held February 23, 2002 in Phoenix, Arizona.

  15. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agreement | Department of Energy Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement establishes a plan to bring DOE's Uranium Enrichment Plants (and support facilities) located in Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky and DOE's former Uranium Enrichment Plant (and support

  16. Proceedings, 26th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.

    2007-07-01

    Papers are presented under the following topic headings: multiple-seam mining, surface subsidence, coal pillar, bunker and roadway/entry supports, mine design and highwall mining, longwall, roof bolting, stone and hardrock mining, rock mechanics and mine seal.

  17. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steblay, Bernard J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  18. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209

  19. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand separative work units (SWU) Country of enrichment service (SWU-origin) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 China 0 W W W 636 France W W 0 0 0 Germany 681 1,539 1,075 753 1,005 Netherlands 2,292 1,506 1,496 2,112 1,801 Russia 5,055 5,308 6,560 2,491 3,083 United Kingdom 2,119 2,813 2,648 2,674 2,435 Europe 1 W 670 W 0 W Other 2 W

  20. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Purchases 2,226 1,668 1,194 W 410 Weighted-average price 43.36 54.85 51.78 W 33.55 Purchases 27,186 24,695 24,606 W 28,743 Weighted-average price 41.42 49.69 47.75 W 38.42 Purchases 29,412 26,363 25,800 30,191 29,153 Weighted-average price 41.57 50.02 47.94 42.95 38.35 Purchases 24,693

  1. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Purchases Weighted- average price Purchases Weighted- average price Purchases Weighted- average price Purchases Weighted- average price Purchases Weighted- average price Australia 7,112 51.35 6,001 57.47 6,724 51.17 10,741 49.92 10,511 48.03 Brazil W W W W W W W W W W Canada 10,238 50.35 10,832 56.08 13,584 56.75 7,808 52.61 9,789 45.87 China 0 -- W W W W W W W W Czech

  2. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price Weighted- average price Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price Weighted- average price Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price Weighted- average price First 8 10,981 45.58 8 12,328 42.01 8 11,681 37.64 Second 7 11,659 53.03 8 13,143 49.94 7 8,493 42.68 Third 7 21,146 57.22 7 18,057 53.43 7 21,805 48.04

  3. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  4. Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; ACTINIDES; BINDING ENERGY; CALCIUM; CARBON; CARBONATES; ELECTRONS; GROUND WATER; MINING; NUCLEAR WEAPONS;...

  5. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corp Pinon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed

  6. uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home

  7. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO -

  8. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  9. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.

    1995-10-01

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

  10. Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 March 26, 2010 Issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to ...

  11. Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, H.; Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G.; Diggle, A.; Orr, R.

    2013-07-01

    Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

  12. Potentiometric determination of uranium in organic extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodnar, L.Z.

    1980-05-01

    The potentimetric determination of uranium in organic extracts was studied. A mixture of 30% TBP, (tributylphosphate), in carbon tetrachloride was used, with the NBL (New Brunswick Laboratory) titrimetric procedure. Results include a comparative analysis performed on organic extracts of fissium alloys vs those performed on aqueous samples of the same alloys which had been treated to remove interfering elements. Also comparative analyses were performed on sample solutions from a typical scrap recovery operation common in the uranium processing industry. A limited number of residue type materials, calciner products, and presscakes were subjected to analysis by organic extraction. The uranium extraction was not hindered by 30% TBP/CCl/sub 4/. To fully demonstrate the capabilities of the extraction technique and its compatibility with the NBL potentiometric uranium determination, a series of uranium standards was subjected to uranium extraction with 30% TBP/CCl/sub 4/. The uranium was then stripped out of the organic phase with 40 mL of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, 15 mL of H/sub 2/0, and 1 mL of 1M FeSO/sub 4/ solution. The uranium was then determined in the aqueous phosphoric phase by the regular NBL potentiometric method, omitting only the addition of another 40 mL of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Uranium determinations ranging from approximately 20 to 150 mg of U were successfully made with the same accuracy and precision normally achieved. 8 tables. (DP)

  13. Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processing Facility ... Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement Posted: July 18, 2014 - 4:39pm Front row, left to right: Bill Priest, Consolidated Nuclear...

  14. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J. G.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; van der Laan, G.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T. -C.; Yu, S. W.; Bagus, P. S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Nordlund, D.

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  15. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVol, Timothy A.; Hixon, Amy E.; DiPrete, David P.

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  16. Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Continued on Next Page * Stein, F., Instructor Competencies: the Standards. International ... and acute exposures to significant amounts of uranium may result in kidney damage. ...

  17. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial ... Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's ...

  18. Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site. The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant is massive. It is longer than three football fields, stands 64 feet above the ground, and extends another 40 feet below ground....

  19. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highly Enriched Uranium ... Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility HEUMF The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility is our nation's central repository for highly enriched uranium, a vital national security asset. HEUMF is a massive concrete and steel structure that provides maximum security for the highly enriched uranium material that it protects. Approximately 300 feet by 475 feet, HEUMF has areas for receiving, shipping and providing long-term storage of the enriched uranium, as well

  20. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  1. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-07-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) relies on analytical studies to identify large energy reduction opportunities in energy-intensive industries and uses these results to guide its R&D portfolio. The energy bandwidth illustrates the total energy-saving opportunity that exists in the industry if the current processes are improved by implementing more energy-efficient practices and by using advanced technologies. This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining. These opportunities were analyzed in key mining processes of blasting, dewatering, drilling, digging, ventilation, materials handling, crushing, grinding, and separations.

  2. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  3. Surface mine regulations complicate reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltz-Patrash, A.

    1980-09-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 is a landmark environmental law intended to protect U.S. lands from stripmining effects. However, coal mine operators claim that some SMCRA regulations are misguidedcosting time and money, but yielding no substantial environmental benefit. Unlike other environmental acts, SMCRA details specifically the goals of reclamation and the methods that must be implemented to meet these goals. Coal industry representatives believe that this discourages innovation, promotes inefficiency by ignoring regional differences among sites, and results in unnecessary expense to the industry. Reclamation practices and progress among western coal mining companies are evaluated. (1 map, 5 photos)

  4. Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  6. DOE/NNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog DOENNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback ... DOENNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease ...

  7. Decommissioning of U.S. Uranium Production Facilities

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report analyzes the uranium production facility decommissioning process and its potential impact on uranium supply and prices. 1995 represents the most recent publication year.

  8. DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Operations at Ohio and Kentucky Facilities DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Operations at...

  9. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

  10. DOE Extends Contract to Operate Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extends Contract to Operate Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants DOE Extends Contract to Operate Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants December 24, 2015 -...

  11. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl...

  12. 3rd Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, ""Domestic Uranium Production Report.""" " U.S. Energy Information Administration Domestic Uranium...

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report 4th Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 4th Quarter 2015 February ... DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | ... Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium ...

  14. Mining fatty acids from algae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mining fatty acids from algae Mining fatty acids from algae Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Washington are exploring the use of lipids for energy: as a starting material for creating biofuels. February 24, 2016 Chrysochromulina tobin cell structure. (A) Scanning electron micrograph of C. tobin. Two flagella are visible (marked F) along with the prominent coiled haptonema (white arrow). Scale bar represents 2.5 microns. (B) Electron micrograph of whole cell:

  15. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Enrichment service contract type U.S. enrichment Foreign enrichment Total Spot W W 628 Long-term W W 12,310 Total 3,773 9,165 12,939 Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2014 thousand separative work units (SWU) W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not

  16. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table S3b. Weighted-average price of foreign purchases and foreign sales by U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 Delivery year Foreign purchases by U.S. suppliers Foreign purchases by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors Total foreign purchases (weighted-average price) U.S. broker and trader purchases from foreign suppliers

  17. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-14" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512,531,416 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248,198,105 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W","W","W" "Arizona, Utah, and

  18. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Enrichment service sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2012-14" 2012,2013,2014 "Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd.","AREVA NC, Inc.","AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC / AREVA NC, Inc." "AREVA NC, Inc.","CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation)","CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation)" "CNEIC (China Nuclear Energy Industry Corporation)","LES, LLC (Louisiana

  19. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by quantity, 2012-14 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Quantity distribution 1","Deliveries in 2012",,"Deliveries in 2013",,"Deliveries in 2014" ,"Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity with reported

  20. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by purchaser, 2012-14 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Distribution of purchasers","Deliveries in 2012",,,"Deliveries in 2013",,,"Deliveries in 2014" ,"Number of purchasers","Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Number of

  1. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type and material type, 2014 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Material Type","Spot Contracts 1",,"Long-Term Contracts 2",,"Total" ,"Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity

  2. Proceedings, 27th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.

    2008-07-01

    Topics covered include: coal bumps and rockbursts, surface subsidence, surface mining, mine seals, longwall mining, pillars, roof bolting, rock mechanics and standing supports.

  3. Westinghouse Earns Mine Safety Award for Exceptional Underground...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On September 19, New Mexico State Inspector of Mines Gilbert Miera and the New Mexico Mining Association presented Westinghouse with the "Mine Operator of the Year" award. The...

  4. Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shahe Huada Mining Co Ltd Place: Hebei Province, China Sector: Biomass Product: Shahe-based private mining company....

  5. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  6. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  7. Mine roof supporting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, P.F.

    1981-06-23

    A stabilizing arrangement for mine roof support systems of the type in which a series of support units, each including a transverse beam supported at opposite ends by extensible props, are interconnected by extensible struts in a manner to be selfadvancing by alternate retraction of support units from a roof supporting condition and extension of the struts to advance such retracted units relative to others of such units which are in an extended roof engaging condition. The connection of each prop to the beam in a given unit is pivotal to allow deflection of the beam and props of a supporting unit from a normal perpendicular relationship under load. The stabilizing means restores the props and beam to a normal perpendicular relationship for advancing movement of each support unit. The supporting units are further stabilized relative to the struts by prop supporting brackets permitting canting movement of the props from a perpendicular relationship with respect to the struts but maintaining the props in a generally upright position for unit advance.

  8. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO₂ storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO₂ research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO₂ were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation of the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO₂ injection. The experience with the first CO₂ well killing operation will be reviewed.

  9. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO₂ storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO₂ research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO₂ were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation ofmore » the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO₂ injection. The experience with the first CO₂ well killing operation will be reviewed.« less

  10. Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

  11. Isotopic evidence of enhanced carbonate dissolution at a coal mine drainage site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Shikha; Sack, Andrea; Adams, James P.; Vesper, Dorothy; J Capo, Rosemary C.; Hartsock, Angela; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to determine the sources and fate of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in the circumneutral pH drainage from an abandoned bituminous coal mine in western Pennsylvania. The C isotope signatures of DIC (?{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) were intermediate between local carbonate and organic C sources, but were higher than those of contemporaneous Pennsylvanian age groundwaters in the region. This suggests a significant contribution of C enriched in {sup 13}C due to enhanced carbonate dissolution associated with the release of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} from pyrite oxidation. The Sr isotopic signature of the drainage was similar to other regional mine waters associated with the same coal seam and reflected contributions from limestone dissolution and cation exchange with clay minerals. The relatively high ?{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and ?{sup 18}O{sub SO4} isotopic signatures of the mine drainage and the presence of presumptive SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria suggest that SO{sub 4} reduction activity also contributes C depleted in {sup 13}C isotope to the total DIC pool. With distance downstream from the mine portal, C isotope signatures in the drainage increased, accompanied by decreased total DIC concentrations and increased pH. These data are consistent with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} dissolution of carbonate rocks, enhanced by cation exchange, and C release to the atmosphere via CO{sub 2} outgassing.

  12. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    2000-04-20

    We have compiled a topical reference on the phenomena, experiences, experiments, and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) with specific applications to SNFP process and situations. The purpose of the compilation is to create a reference to integrate and preserve this knowledge. Decades ago, uranium and zirconium fires were commonplace at Atomic Energy Commission facilities, and good documentation of experiences is surprisingly sparse. Today, these phenomena are important to site remediation and analysis of packaging, transportation, and processing of unirradiated metal scrap and spent nuclear fuel. Our document, bearing the same title as this paper, will soon be available in the Hanford document system [Plys, et al., 2000]. This paper explains general content of our topical reference and provides examples useful throughout the DOE complex. Moreover, the methods described here can be applied to analysis of potentially pyrophoric plutonium, metal, or metal hydride compounds provided that kinetic data are available. A key feature of this paper is a set of straightforward equations and values that are immediately applicable to safety analysis.

  13. Uranium Leasing Program Environmental Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Documents Uranium Leasing Program Environmental Documents Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0472 (November 2014) Record of Decision Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS)

  14. Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map PDF icon Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map More Documents & Publications EA-1037: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EIS-0472: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

  15. Survey of nine surface mines in North America. [Nine different mines in USA and Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, L.G.; Brackett, R.D.; Floyd, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the information gathered by three mining engineers in a 1980 survey of nine surface mines in the United States and Canada. The mines visited included seven coal mines, one copper mine, and one tar sands mine selected as representative of present state of the art in open pit, strip, and terrace pit mining. The purpose of the survey was to investigate mining methods, equipment requirements, operating costs, reclamation procedures and costs, and other aspects of current surface mining practices in order to acquire basic data for a study comparing conventional and terrace pit mining methods, particularly in deeper overburdens. The survey was conducted as part of a project under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023 titled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  16. Amend Section 402 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Mineral Resources Development and Production of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on S. 643, March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Jed D. Christensen of the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Department of the Interior, was the principal witness at a hearing on S. 643, which amends the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The amendment would allow states to set aside as much as 10% from the reclamation trust fund to apply to abandoned sites. Senators speaking in favor of the bill reported problems with obtaining home loans and insurance due to subsidence from abandoned sites. Christensen supported the bill in principle, but noted possible problems with handling interest and the actual transfer of the money. He also noted a possible breakdown in regulation with the current wording of the bill. Additional material submitted for the record from representatives and officials of the State of Wyoming follows the text of S. 643 and the testimony of the five witnesses.

  17. Nuclear forensic analysis of an unknown uranium ore concentrate sample seized in a criminal investigation in Australia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keegan, Elizabeth; Kristo, Michael J.; Colella, Michael; Robel, Martin; Williams, Ross; Lindvall, Rachel; Eppich, Gary; Roberts, Sarah; Borg, Lars; Gaffney, Amy; et al

    2014-04-13

    In early 2009, a state policing agency raided a clandestine drug laboratory in a suburb of a major city in Australia. While searching the laboratory, they discovered a small glass jar labelled “Gamma Source” and containing a green powder. The powder was radioactive. This paper documents the detailed nuclear forensic analysis undertaken to characterize and identify the material and determine its provenance. Isotopic and impurity content, phase composition, microstructure and other characteristics were measured on the seized sample, and the results were compared with similar material obtained from the suspected source (ore and ore concentrate material). While an extensive rangemore » of parameters were measured, the key ‘nuclear forensic signatures’ used to identify the material were the U isotopic composition, Pb and Sr isotope ratios, and the rare earth element pattern. These measurements, in combination with statistical analysis of the elemental and isotopic content of the material against a database of uranium ore concentrates sourced from mines located worldwide, led to the conclusion that the seized material (a uranium ore concentrate of natural isotopic abundance) most likely originated from Mary Kathleen, a former Australian uranium mine.« less

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines Reno Station - NV

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    06 Reno Station - NV 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U.S. BUREAU OF MINES RENO STATION (NV.06) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: U.S. BOM Metallurgy Research Center, Dept of the Interior NV.06-1 Location: 1605 Evans Avenue , Reno , Nevada NV.06-1 NV.06-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NV.06-1 Site Operations: Research and development activities involving uranium. NV.06-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NV.06-3

  19. uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a>

    NNSA Removes U.S.-Origin HEU from Jamaica, Makes the Caribbean HEU Free http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesnnsa-removes-u.s.-origin-heu-jamaica-mak...

  20. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL NGuessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  1. Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium, May 15, 2012 PDF icon Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium.pdf More Documents & Publications Secretarial Determination Pursuant to USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium Before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

  2. Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued its Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program on May 6, 2014, announcing that it will continue managing the Uranium Leasing Program for another 10 years. PDF icon Record of Decision for the Uranium

  3. Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Uranium-233 | Department of Energy Waste Management » Nuclear Materials & Waste » Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a

  4. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (PEIS) | Department of Energy Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing Program-Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado EIS-0472 evaluated the environmental impacts of management alternatives for DOE's Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and

  5. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM CARBONATE LEACH LIQUORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, H.F.

    1958-07-01

    An improved process is described for the recovery of uranium from vanadifrous ores. In the prior art such ores have been digested with alkali carbonate solutions at a pH of less than 10 and then contacted with a strong base anion exchange resin to separate uranium from vanadium. It has been found that if the exchamge resin feed solution has its pH adjusted to the range 10.8 to 11.8, that vanadium adsorption on the resin is markedly decreased and the separation of uranium from the vanadium is thereby improved.

  6. Electrolytic process for preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An electrolytic process for making uranium from uranium oxide using Cl.sub.2 anode product from an electrolytic cell to react with UO.sub.2 to form uranium chlorides. The chlorides are used in low concentrations in a melt comprising fluorides and chlorides of potassium, sodium and barium in the electrolytic cell. The electrolysis produces Cl.sub.2 at the anode that reacts with UO.sub.2 in the feed reactor to form soluble UCl.sub.4, available for a continuous process in the electrolytic cell, rather than having insoluble UO.sub.2 fouling the cell.

  7. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  8. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaff, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.65.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (UC bond distance at ~2.88 ), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  9. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, J.R. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J.A. . Water Resources Div.)

    1999-07-15

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. The authors have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of [triple bond]FeO[sub surface]-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  10. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Uranium (VI)-Carbonato Adsorption Complexes on Hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-05-04

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of FeO{sub surface}-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  11. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  12. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves...

  13. Thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to provide reliable and consistent data on the thermophysical properties of reactor materials for reactor safety studies, this revision is prepared for the thermodynamic properties of the uranium dioxide portion of the fuel property section of the report Properties for LMFBR Safety Analysis. Since the original report was issued in 1976, there has been international agreement on a vapor pressure equation for the total pressure over UO/sub 2/, new methods have been suggested for the calculation of enthalpy and heat capacity, and a phase change at 2670 K has been proposed. In this report, an electronic term is used in place of the Frenkel defect term in the enthalpy and heat capacity equation and the phase transition is accepted.

  14. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 As of As of December 31, 2013 December 31, 2014 2015 45,498 48,206 2,708 2,708 2016 48,693 46,529 -2,164 544 2017 47,005 49,924 2,919 3,463 2018 52,138 51,169 -969 2,494 2019 50,041 46,184 -3,857 -1,363 2020 49,726 49,598 -128 -1,491 2021 50,455 51,793 1,338 -153 2022 49,320 50,286 966 813 2023 49,688 49,118 -570 243 2024 - 51,829 -- -- thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Cumulative Figure 14. Shipments

  15. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Foreign purchases 24,985 19,318 20,196 23,233 24,199 Weighted-average price 41.30 48.80 46.80 43.25 39.13 Foreign purchases 30,362 35,071 36,037 34,095 34,404 Weighted-average price 51.69 56.87 54.08 51.64 47.62 Foreign purchases 55,347 54,388 56,233 57,328 58,603 Weighted-average price 47.01 54.00 51.44 48.24 44.11 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Figure 17.

  16. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 2010 2011 2012 2013 P2014 Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors 86,527 89,835 97,647 113,007 116,047 U.S. brokers and traders 11,125 6,841 5,677 7,926 5,798 U.S. converter, enrichers, fabricators, and producers 13,608 15,428 17,611 13,416 12,766 Total commercial inventories 111,259 112,104 120,936 134,418 134,611 thousand pounds U 3 O 8

  17. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Quantity with reported price Weighted- average price First 7,119 38.24 7,175 34.34 6,665 30.26 Second 7,119 48.64 7,175 41.29 6,665 35.11 Third 7,119 51.16 7,175 45.89 6,665 39.29 Fourth 7,119 54.15 7,175 49.84 6,665 43.36 Fifth 7,119 56.93 7,175 53.17 6,665 46.74 Sixth 7,119 59.98 7,175 57.24 6,665

  18. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 4th quarter 2015 pounds U3O8 Calendar-year quarter 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter Calendar-year total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683 983,330 981,948 973,585 3,975,545 2001 709,177 748,298 628,720 553,060

  19. WIPP Takes Second in Mine Rescue Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – EM’s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mine rescue team placed second in the Southwestern Regional Mine Rescue Competition this past spring in Carlsbad, and it took home more than a trophy.

  20. MINES ParisTech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. MINES ParisTech was created in 1783, when the exploitation of mines was a high-technology industry. Quite naturally, the skills of the School followed the development of...

  1. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 {+-} 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 234}U, 19.8336 {+-} 0.0059 wt. % {sup 235}U, 0.1337 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 236}U, and 79.9171 {+-} 0.0057 wt. % {sup 238}U.

  2. Synthesis of uranium nitride and uranium carbide powder by carbothermic reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunwoody, J.T.; Stanek, C.R.; McClellan, K.J.; Voit, S.L.; Volz, H.M.; Hickman, R.R.

    2007-07-01

    Uranium nitride and uranium carbide are being considered as high burnup fuels in next generation nuclear reactors and accelerated driven systems for the transmutation of nuclear waste. The same characteristics that make nitrides and carbides candidates for these applications (i.e. favorable thermal properties, mutual solubility of nitrides, etc.), also make these compositions candidate fuels for space nuclear reactors. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of depleted uranium nitride and carbide for a space nuclear reactor program. Importantly, this project emphasized that to synthesize high quality uranium nitride and carbide, it is necessary to understand the exact stoichiometry of the oxide feedstock. (authors)

  3. Table 4.10 Uranium Reserves, 2008 (Million Pounds Uranium Oxide)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Uranium Reserves,1 2008 (Million Pounds Uranium Oxide) State Forward-Cost 2 Category (dollars 3 per pound) $50 or Less $100 or Less Total 539 1,227 Wyoming 220 446 New Mexico 179 390 Arizona, Colorado, Utah 63 198 Texas 27 40 Others 4 50 154 1The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) category of uranium reserves is equivalent to the internationally reported category of "Reasonably Assured Resources" (RAR). Notes: * Estimates are at end of year. * See "Uranium Oxide"

  4. Table 17. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2013 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Table 17. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2013 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Underground Surface Total Mine Production Range (thousand short

  5. UK mining invests, suppliers profit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    In the midst of a major economic crisis in the United Kingdom, equipment suppliers have been reporting a number of considerable purchases by British coal mining companies. In December 2008, Liebherr-Great Britain delivered the first two of four Rq350 Litronic hydraulic excavators for use at the Broken Cross opencast coal site in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Ten Terex TR100 rigid haulers were delivered to the site in late 2008. Hatfield Colliery at Stainforth, South Yorkshire, has been reopened by PowerFuel. The main equipment for two longwall faces was supplied by Joy Mining Machinery UK Ltd. 2 photos.

  6. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  7. Turnaround team revitalizes mining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2005-11-01

    Starting from scratch, the Broe Companies' Century Coal trains the next generation. The article describes how the newly created Century Coal LLC, controlled by Denver-based Broe Companies investment firm, is rebuilding and expanding its highwall mining operations, increasing production from a current 1 million tons to 5 to 6 million tons in 2006 and 2007. The company has a $100,000 outreach program with 95% of these funds going to local communities. Present coal mining operations are spread around Bell, Clay, Harlan Knox and Leslie Counties. A priority is the renovation of the WenLar preparation plant in Bell County. 5 photos.

  8. 2008 Underground/Longwall Mining Buyer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-15

    The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to mines. An index by product category is included.

  9. 2009 underground/longwall mining buyer's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-15

    The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to underground mining operations. An index by product category is included.

  10. Colorado School of Mines | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Colorado School of Mines Colorado School of Mines Back row: Alex Dell, Zachary Weber, Aaron Troyer, Cabe Bonner, Jeremy Webb. Front row: Katherine Rooney, Jyotsana Gandhi, Kevin Tan, Kelsey Wokasch. Photo from Colorado School of Mines. Back row: Alex Dell, Zachary Weber, Aaron Troyer, Cabe Bonner, Jeremy Webb. Front row: Katherine Rooney, Jyotsana Gandhi, Kevin Tan, Kelsey Wokasch. Photo from Colorado School of Mines. Project Description Named after the Greek god of the west wind, Team Zephyrus

  11. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  12. Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    needs primarily by down-blending, or converting, it into low enriched uranium (LEU). Once down-blended, the material can no longer be used for nuclear weapons. To the extent...

  13. The Uranium Resource: A Comparative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Erich A.; Sailor, William C.

    2007-07-01

    An analogy was drawn between uranium and thirty five minerals for which the USGS maintains extensive records. The USGS mineral price data, which extends from 1900 to the present, was used to create a simple model describing long term price evolution. Making the assumption that the price of uranium, a geologically unexceptional mineral, will evolve in a manner similar to that of the USGS minerals, the model was used to project its price trend for this century. Based upon the precedent set by the USGS data, there is an 80% likelihood that the price of uranium will decline. Moreover, the most likely scenario would see the equilibrium price of uranium decline by about 40% by mid-century. (authors)

  14. Ex Parte Communications- Uranium Producers of America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Thursday, February 12, 2015, representatives from the Uranium  Producers  of America (UPA) met with the Department of Energy (DOE) officials to discuss the management of the federal excess...

  15. PROCESSES OF RECLAIMING URANIUM FROM SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zumwalt, L.R.

    1959-02-10

    A process is described for reclaiming residual enriched uranium from calutron wash solutions containing Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn as impurities. The solution is adjusted to a pH of between 2 and 4 and is contacted with a metallic reducing agent, such as iron or zinc, in order to reduce the copper to metal and thereby remove it from the solution. At the same time the uranium present is reduced to the uranous state The solution is then contacted with a precipitate of zinc hydroxide or barium carbonate in order to precipitate and carry uranium, iron, and chromium away from the nickel and manganese ions in the solution. The uranium is then recovered fronm this precipitate.

  16. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

  17. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Methodology The U.S. uranium ore reserves reported by EIA for specific MFC categories represent the sums of quantities estimated to occur in known deposits on properties where data...

  18. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  19. Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program reduces nuclear risk by monitoring the conversion of 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear weapons, into low enriched uranium (LEU). ...

  20. Federal Actions to Address Impacts of Uranium

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Federal Actions to Address Impacts of Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation 2014 Page | i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 2 Summary of Work Completed 2008-2012

  1. Program of mining research, 1998--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The paper contains: Reflections on 1998; Project summaries; Noise; Injury prevention, ergonomics, and human factors; Surface, sand and gravel, and stone mines; Hazard detection and warning devices; Ground control -- metal/nonmetal mines; Ground control -- coal mines; Explosion and fire detection and suppression; Methane detection; Electrical hazards; Emerging technologies; Surveillance; Construction; Training and education; and Communication activity.

  2. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  3. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  4. Uranium Leasing Program Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents Uranium Leasing Program Documents U.S. District Court's Order of October 18, 2011, in Colorado Environmental Coalition v. Office of Legacy Management, Civil Action No. 08-cv-01624 (D. Colo.). The Court has issued the injunctive relief described on pages 51-52 of the Order. U.S. District Court's Order of February 27, 2012, in Colorado Environmental Coalition v. Office of Legacy Management, Civil Action No. 08-cv-01624 (D. Colo.). Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map

  5. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, H. Wayne (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode.

  6. Robot to the Mine Rescue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To increase the speed of rescue efforts, scientists and engineers at the Energy Department’s Sandia National Laboratories recently developed a new robot, called the Gemini-Scout Mine Rescue Robot, that quickly finds dangers and provides relief to trapped miners.

  7. The quest data mining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Mehta, M.; Shafer, J.; Srikant, R.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the Quest project at the IBM Almaden Research center is to develop technology to enable a new breed of data-intensive decision-support applications. This paper is a capsule summary of the current functionality and architecture of the Quest data mining System.

  8. Corner-cutting mining assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    This invention resulted from a contract with the United States Department of Energy and relates to a mining tool. More particularly, the invention relates to an assembly capable of drilling a hole having a square cross-sectional shape with radiused corners. In mining operations in which conventional auger-type drills are used to form a series of parallel, cylindrical holes in a coal seam, a large amount of coal remains in place in the seam because the shape of the holes leaves thick webs between the holes. A higher percentage of coal can be mined from a seam by a means capable of drilling holes having a substantially square cross section. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved mining apparatus by means of which the amount of coal recovered from a seam deposit can be increased. Another object of the invention is to provide a drilling assembly which cuts corners in a hole having a circular cross section. These objects and other advantages are attained by a preferred embodiment of the invention.

  9. Corner-cutting mining assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, John A. (San Antonio, TX)

    1983-01-01

    A mining assembly includes a primary rotary cutter mounted on one end of a support shaft and four secondary rotary cutters carried on the same support shaft and positioned behind the primary cutters for cutting corners in the hole cut by the latter.

  10. Mining into the new millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-06-15

    After more than 3 years of production and a billion tons of coal shipped, Foundation Coal West, a subsidiary of Foundation Coal Holding Inc., continues to operate two of the original surface mines in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. The article describes equipment (conveyors, trucks, surface miners etc.) deployed at Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte PRB operations. 3 photos.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  13. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  14. Bioaccumulation of cesium-137 in yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis) inhabiting an abandoned nuclear reactor reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Glickman, L.T.; Jagoe, C.H.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs was investigated in yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis) inhabiting an abandoned reactor reservoir, Pond B, Savannah River Site, Barnwell Co., South Carolina. The authors collected fish by trap-netting, and determined ages from pectoral spines. Muscle and other tissues were assayed for {sup 137}Cs by NaI-scintillation. Music {sup 137}Cs was unrelated to sex or mass of fish, but was related to age. Examination of least-squares means suggested that {sup 137}Cs in muscle increased up to about age 3, but did not increase with greater age. A modified Richards model showed equilibrium {sup 137}Cs concentration in muscle was acquired in approximately 2.4 years. Growth differed between sexes and the time to asymptotic body mass was longer than the time to attain equilibrium {sup 137}Cs concentration. Males attained an asymptotic mass of 577 g in approximately 6.3 years; females attained an asymptotic mass of 438 g in approximately 5.9 years. The cumulative {sup 137}Cs burden of the population was 4.9 {times} 10{sup 6} Bq, representing <0.001% of the {sup 137}Cs inventory of the reservoir. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs varied among tissues with gill and muscle the lowest and highest. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs in ovaries declined with increasing ovary mass. Until equilibrium is attained in these fish, {sup 137}Cs concentration is directly related to increasing age rather than size.

  15. Longwall mining of thin seams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curth, E A

    1981-01-01

    Thin seam operations pose a challenge to the ingenuity of mining engineers to overcome the factor of human inconvenience in the restricted environment and associated high cost production. Surprisingly, low seam longwalls in the Federal Republic of Germany in an average thickness of 35 in. and dipping less than 18/sup 0/ come close to achieving the average production rate of all German longwall operations. They are all plow faces, and a consistent production of 3300 tons per day and a productivity of 40 tons per man shift are reported from one of the thin seam longwalls. These results were attained by reliable high-capacity equipment and roof support by shields that can be collapsed to as low as 22 inches. Maximum mining height for plow operated faces lies at 31.5 inches. Technology for mechanized mining of flat lying coalbeds less than 31.5 inches in thickness without rock cutting is not available, and firmness of coal, undulation of the strata, coalbed thickness variation, and the necessity of cutting rock, particularly through faults, set limits to plow application. The in-web shearer can be used in firm coal to a minimum mining height of 40 inches, and a daily production of 1650 to 2200 tons is reported from a longwall in the Saar district of Germany equipped with such a shearer and shields. Numerous in-web shearers are employed in the United Kingdom; reports as to their success are contradictory. Also, experience in the United States, though limited, has been negative. The steady increase in output from single drum shearer faces in Pennsylvania is a remarkable achievement, and occasional record breaking peaks in production indicate the potential of such mining. Technology development for the future is discussed.

  16. Remedial Investigation Report on the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Program; Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid pipeline (ANAP). This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately}4800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. During the mid-1980s, sections of the pipeline were removed during various construction projects. A total of 19 locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The 19 samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant`s laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. Uranium activities in the soil samples ranged from 0.53 to 13.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U, from 0.075 to 0.75 pCi/g for {sup 235}U, and from 0.71 to 5.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U. Maximum total values for lead, chromium, and nickel were 75.1 mg/kg, 56.3 mg/kg, and 53.0 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum nitrate/nitrite value detected was 32.0 mg-N/kg. One sample obtained adjacent to a sewer line contained various organic compounds, at least some of which were tentatively identified as fragrance chemicals commonly associated with soaps and cleaning solutions. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the ANAP contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health.

  17. Mines in the Four Corners anticipate growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2008-02-15

    Productive mines in the southwest deplete reserves, while the government drags its heels on new power projects. Production in Arizona and New Mexico has fallen 18% over the last four years to 34.1 million tons. With Chevron Mining's McKinley mine rapidly depleting its reserves the industry will continue to contract. In the last three years at least three large mines in the Four Corners have terminated operations. Three others remain captive operations: BHP Billiton's San Juan Underground and Navajo Surface operations and Peabody Energy's Kayenta surface mine. In 2006 the Black Mesa mine stopped producing coal. These four mines are isolated from the national railways. Peabody's new El Segundo surface mine near Grants, NM is increasing production. If the planned $3 billion Desert Rock coal-fired power plant is built this will present a new market for the Navajo mine. The article gives details about the state of the aforementioned mines and of the new King II coal mine on the northern periphery of the San Juan basin and discusses the state of plans for the Desert Rock Energy Project. 5 photos.

  18. Summary of the radiological assessment of the fuel cycle for a thorium-uranium carbide-fueled fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Meyer, H.R.; Morse, L.E.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A large fraction of the potential fuel for nuclear power reactors employing fissionable materials exists as ores of thorium. In addition, certain characteristics of a fuel system based on breeding of the fissionable isotope {sup 233}U from thorium offer the possibility of a greater resistance to the diversion of fissionable material for the fabrication of nuclear weapons. This report consolidates into a single source the principal content of two previous reports which assess the radiological environmental impact of mining and milling of thorium ore and of the reprocessing and refabrication of spent FBR thorium-uranium carbide fuel.

  19. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Total Land and Other 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3

  20. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  1. LM Updates the Public on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of the Interior, to undertake a review of, and...

  2. Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) has made substantial progress researching and consulting with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S....

  3. Mining machine having vibration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.R.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a mining machine having means for sensing property variations of the materials associated with a seam of a mine comprising: a cutting tool including a member rotatable about an axis, at least one cutter carried by the rotatable member at a point spaced from the axis for cutting material from the seam, a conductor rod carried by the rotatable member and held in releasable engagement with the cutter, the rod extending to the axis of the rotatable member to conduct to the axis, strain waves which are induced by variations in cutter vibration as the cutter encounters property variations of the materials associated with the seam, and a transducer located at the axis of the rotatable member in communication with the conductor rod to convert the strain waves in the rod to electric signals.

  4. WIRELESS MINE-WIDE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvi H. Meiksin

    2004-03-01

    A comprehensive mine-wide, two-way wireless voice and data communication system for the underground mining industry was developed. The system achieves energy savings through increased productivity and greater energy efficiency in meeting safety requirements within mines. The mine-wide system is comprised of two interfaced subsystems: a through-the-earth communications system and an in-mine communications system. The mine-wide system permits two-way communication among underground personnel and between underground and surface personnel. The system was designed, built, and commercialized. Several systems are in operation in underground mines in the United States. The use of these systems has proven they result in considerable energy savings. A system for tracking the location of vehicles and people within the mine was also developed, built and tested successfully. Transtek's systems are being used by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in their underground mine rescue team training program. This project also resulted in a spin-off rescue team lifeline and communications system. Furthermore, the project points the way to further developments that can lead to a GPS-like system for underground mines allowing the use of autonomous machines in underground mining operations, greatly reducing the amount of energy used in these operations. Some products developed under this program are transferable to applications in fields other than mining. The rescue team system is applicable to use by first responders to natural, accidental, or terrorist-caused building collapses. The in-mine communications system can be installed in high-rise buildings providing in-building communications to security and maintenance personnel as well as to first responders.

  5. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  6. Uranium at Y-12: Inspection | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inspection Uranium at Y-12: Inspection Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:36pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Inspection of enriched uranium is performed by dimensional checks...

  7. Uranium at Y-12: Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery Uranium at Y-12: Recovery Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:44pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Recovery involves reclaiming uranium from numerous sources and...

  8. Uranium at Y-12: Accountability | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Uranium at Y-12: Accountability Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:37pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Accountability of enriched uranium is facilitated by the ability to put...

  9. Think Uranium. Think Y-12 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Uranium fever: Much like the California gold rush of 1849, the uranium flurry of 1949 led Geiger counter-toting prospectors to scour...

  10. Y-12 Bulletin Uranium Articles | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bulletin Uranium ... Y-12 Bulletin Uranium Articles Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:13pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 These and other articles can be found in archived...

  11. EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United...

  12. Uranium distribution in relation to sedimentary facies, Kern Lake, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merifield, P.M.; Carlisle, D.; Idiz, E.; Anderhalt, R.; Reed, W.E.; Lamar, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    Kern Lake has served as a sink for drainage from the southern Sierra Nevada and, in lesser amounts, from the southern Temblor Range. Both areas contain significant uranium source rocks. The uranium content in Holocene Kern Lake sediments correlates best with the mud (silt and clay) fraction. It correlates less well with organic carbon. Biotite grains could account for much of the uranium in the sand fraction, and perhaps the silt fraction as well. The data suggest that fixation of uranium by adsorption on mineral grains is a dominant process in this lake system. Further work is required to determine the importance of cation-exchange of uranium on clays and micas and of organically complexed uranium adsorbed to mineral surfaces. These findings also raise the question of whether uranium transport down the Kern River occurs largely as uranium adsorbed to mineral surfaces.

  13. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Whitney, Paul (Richland, WA); Thomas, Jim (Richland, WA)

    2004-03-23

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  14. The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco PDF icon The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion More Documents & Publications SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects October 2009 Seismic

  15. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Terence L.

    2013-07-30

    Our contribution to the larger project (ANL) was the phylogenetic analysis of evolved communities capable of reducing metals including uranium.

  16. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Print Sunday, 14 October 2012 00:00 The ocean is an important source of uranium if it can be extracted economically. Extraction of uranium from seawater is very challenging, not only because it is in an extremely low concentration, but also because

  17. Manhattan Project: Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, and James Conant discuss uranium research, Berkeley, March 29, 1940. EARLY URANIUM RESEARCH (1939-1941) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt responded to the call for government support of uranium research

  18. DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Excess Uranium Inventory Plan DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan December 16, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) today issued its Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan (the Plan), which outlines the Department's strategy for the management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. The Plan highlights DOE's ongoing efforts to enhance national security and promote a healthy domestic nuclear infrastructure through the efficient

  19. Testing for Uranium Deuteride Initiation in Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Go, J.

    2015-10-29

    This report offers a description of the testing related to Uranium foil and its interaction with liquid deuterium.

  20. Los Alamos probes mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity Los Alamos probes mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity New research is showing that the thermal conductivity of cubic uranium dioxide is strongly affected by interactions between phonons carrying heat and magnetic spins. August 4, 2014 Illustration of anisotropic thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide (UO2). Scientists are studying the thermal conductivity related to the material's different crystallographic directions, hoping

  1. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department's surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical environmental cleanup and national security missions. The Plan is not a commitment to specific activities beyond those that have already been contracted nor is it a restriction on actions that the Department may undertake in the

  2. Uranium Leasing Program Draft Programmatic EIS Issued for Public Comment |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Uranium Leasing Program Draft Programmatic EIS Issued for Public Comment Uranium Leasing Program Draft Programmatic EIS Issued for Public Comment March 15, 2013 - 11:08am Addthis Uranium Leasing Program Draft Programmatic EIS Issued for Public Comment DOE has issued the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (ULP PEIS)(DOE/EIS-0472D) for public review and comment. The document is available here and on the ULP PEIS website. Under the

  3. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  4. Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (1967) | Department of Energy Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967) Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967) Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967) PDF icon Borehole Logging Methods for Exploration and Evaluation of Uranium Deposits (1967) More Documents & Publications Gamma-Ray Logging Workshop (February 1981) Grade Assignments for Models Used for

  5. Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed on Time and

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration Library / Press Releases / Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed ... Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed on Time and Under Budget Press Release Mar 13, 2015 Washington D.C.--The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) project celebrates its first major milestone with the completion of site readiness work, delivered on time and under budget. "UPF is essential to our Nation's uranium

  6. Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report | Department of Energy Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites, Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites, Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites, Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Status Report (March 2010) PDF icon Reimbursements to Licensees of Active Uranium and Thorium

  7. Method for fluorination of uranium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01

    Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

  8. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  9. Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security

  10. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A process for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  11. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  12. Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed on Time and

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration Field Offices / Welcome to the NNSA Production Office / NPO News Releases / Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed ... Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed on Time and Under Budget The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) project celebrates its first major milestone with the completion of site readiness work, delivered on time and under budget.

  13. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private landincluding abandoned mined landsis dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  14. Injury experience in coal mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  15. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 1998, the Chairman of the National Mining Association and the Secretary of energy entered into a Compact to pursue a collaborative technology research partnership, the Mining Industry of the Future.

  16. ORS 517.705 Exploration Permit Regulations for Mining and Mining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .705 Exploration Permit Regulations for Mining and Mining Claims Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 517.705...

  17. Method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes for coal recovery: a case history from the historical longwall district in the northeastern Illinois coal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    A method for describing and evaluating coal mine wastes evolved in 1982 from studies at more than 100 historic longwall mine sites conducted by the Illinois State Geological Survey and partially funded by the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council (IAMLRC). The primary purpose was to locate and identify different types of waste materials at these sites and to evaluate them for future reclamation. The method which involves geologic characterization, sampling, standard analyses, and evaluation tests, can be used to determine the potential of a mine waste deposit for secondary recovery of coal. It yields data relating to three factors involved in secondary recovery: quality (ash content, heating value), quantity (recoverable tonnages), and the net effect of the recovery operation (product value relative to operations costs; social and environmental assets relative to liabilities). The longwall study did not directly address the question of recoverable tonnages of coal but provided information that can be used to make this evaluation, minimize the amount of drilling required for accurate forecasts of profitability, and measure the economic and environmental benefits of secondary recovery steps in a reclamation plan.

  18. CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

    2003-06-01

    Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

  19. Evaluation of an automatic uranium titration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, K.

    1980-01-01

    The titration system utilizes the constant current coulometric titration of Goldbeck and Lerner. U(VI) is reduced to U(IV) by Fe(II). V(V) is generated to titrate the U(IV), and the titration is followed potentiometrically. The evaluation shows that the recovery of uranium is 100% at the 40-mg level. The accuracy is generally +-0.10% or better. The smallest sample weight at which reliable results were obtained was 40 mg of uranium. Time for one analysis is 15 minutes. Advantages and disadvantages of the automated titrator are listed. (DLC)

  20. Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report With Data for 2014 | Release Date: May 13, 2015 | Next Release Date: May 2016 | full report Previous reports Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Go Uranium purchases and prices Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ("civilian owner/operators" or "COOs") purchased a total of 53 million pounds U3O8e (equivalent1) of deliveries from U.S.

  2. Uranium in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.G.; Bauer, L.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Hayes, D.W.; Martin, H.L.; McDowell, W.L.; Pickett, J.B.

    1992-12-09

    The purpose of this report is to consolidate the history of environmental uranium studies conducted by SRS and to describe the status of uranium in the environment. The report is intended to be a living document'' that will be updated periodically. This draft issue, February 1992, documents studies that occurred from 1954 to 1989. Data in this report are taken primarily from annual and semiannual environmental reports for SRS. Semiannual reports were published from 1954 through 1962. Annual reports have been published since 1963. Occasionally unpublished data are included in this report for completeness.

  3. Uranium in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.G.; Bauer, L.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Hayes, D.W.; Martin, H.L.; McDowell, W.L.; Pickett, J.B.

    1992-12-09

    The purpose of this report is to consolidate the history of environmental uranium studies conducted by SRS and to describe the status of uranium in the environment. The report is intended to be a ``living document`` that will be updated periodically. This draft issue, February 1992, documents studies that occurred from 1954 to 1989. Data in this report are taken primarily from annual and semiannual environmental reports for SRS. Semiannual reports were published from 1954 through 1962. Annual reports have been published since 1963. Occasionally unpublished data are included in this report for completeness.

  4. METHOD OF HOT ROLLING URANIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufmann, A.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method is given for quickly and efficiently hot rolling uranium metal in the upper part of the alpha phase temperature region to obtain sound bars and sheets possessing a good surface finish. The uranium metal billet is heated to a temperature in the range of 1000 deg F to 1220 deg F by immersion iii a molten lead bath. The heated billet is then passed through the rolls. The temperature is restored to the desired range between successive passes through the rolls, and the rolls are turned down approximately 0.050 inch between successive passes.

  5. Bauma returns with a large mining component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteel, K.

    2007-04-15

    The world's largest construction trade fair is also a major mining show covering equipment from excavation to product load out. This comprehensive preview of the bauma 2007 exposition (23-29 April 2007) describes construction equipment which will be displayed, concentrating on mining equipment. It includes drilling equipment; earthmoving, excavation and grading machinery; loading and hauling machines; underground mining equipment; crushing and screening equipment; conveyors; and pumps. 25 photos.

  6. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ?U/?U (??U), ?U/?U activity ratio, and ?S/S (??S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The ??U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61 to -2.49, with a trend toward lower ??U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and ??U with an ? of 0.48 0.08 is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ?U/?U activity ratio and ??S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  7. Mining Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These mined minerals include coal, metals such as iron, copper, or zinc, and industrial minerals such as potash, limestone, and other crushed rocks. Oil and natural gas extraction ...

  8. DOE - Fossil Energy: Coal Mining and Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mining Fossil Energy Study Guides Coal Mining and Transportation Coal Miners - One type of mining, called "longwall mining", uses a rotating blade to shear coal away from the underground seam. - In the centuries since early humans learned that the black rocks they picked up on the ground would burn, we have had to look for coal below that was hidden below the earth's surface. One of the areas it was easiest to find was where it appeared as one of many layers of materials along the side

  9. PP-85-A Westmin Mines, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presidential Permit authorizing Westmin Mines, Inc. to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. -Canada Border.

  10. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Colorado Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including the current National Mine Rescue Competition Champions (OCI, Inc. from Rock Springs, Wyoming) and three former national champions. Faced with solving problems in the...

  11. Microbial transformations of uranium in wastes and implication on its mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki,Y.; Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A.J.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2008-09-14

    Uranium exists in several chemical forms in mining and mill tailings and in nuclear and weapons production wastes. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of U in wastes by altering the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of U in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of U is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect nonenzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of U have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the mechanisms of microbial transformations of various chemical forms of U in the presence of electron donors and acceptors.

  12. Possibility of nuclear pumped laser experiment using low enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obara, Toru; Takezawa, Hiroki [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-19, Ookayama Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2012-06-06

    Possibility to perform experiments for nuclear pumped laser oscillation by using low enriched uranium is investigated. Kinetic analyses are performed for two types of reactor design, one is using highly enriched uranium and the other is using low enriched uranium. The reactor design is based on the experiment reactor in IPPE. The results show the oscillation of nuclear pumped laser in the case of low enriched uranium reactor is also possible. The use of low enriched uranium in the experiment will make experiment easier.

  13. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-05

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  14. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uraniums and uranium carbides surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U??Ga??, (UC)??Ga?? and U??Cs?, (UC)??Cs??, respectively.

  15. Statistical design of a uranium corrosion experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendelberger, Joanne R; Moore, Leslie M

    2009-01-01

    This work supports an experiment being conducted by Roland Schulze and Mary Ann Hill to study hydride formation, one of the most important forms of corrosion observed in uranium and uranium alloys. The study goals and objectives are described in Schulze and Hill (2008), and the work described here focuses on development of a statistical experiment plan being used for the study. The results of this study will contribute to the development of a uranium hydriding model for use in lifetime prediction models. A parametric study of the effect of hydrogen pressure, gap size and abrasion on hydride initiation and growth is being planned where results can be analyzed statistically to determine individual effects as well as multi-variable interactions. Input to ESC from this experiment will include expected hydride nucleation, size, distribution, and volume on various uranium surface situations (geometry) as a function of age. This study will also address the effect of hydrogen threshold pressure on corrosion nucleation and the effect of oxide abrasion/breach on hydriding processes. Statistical experiment plans provide for efficient collection of data that aids in understanding the impact of specific experiment factors on initiation and growth of corrosion. The experiment planning methods used here also allow for robust data collection accommodating other sources of variation such as the density of inclusions, assumed to vary linearly along the cast rods from which samples are obtained.

  16. Uranium Battery Development Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, Paul D; Lee-Desautels, Rhonda

    2007-06-01

    This report summarizes the research funded by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Labs, and the Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation. This report briefly presents the theory behind our experimental methods and the most important experiments that were performed. This research focused on the reuse of uranium materials in lithium ion batteries. The majority of experiments involved lithium salts and organic solvents.

  17. Data mining for ontology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, George S.; Strasburg, Jana; Stampf, David; Neymotin,Lev; Czajkowski, Carl; Shine, Eugene; Bollinger, James; Ghosh, Vinita; Sorokine, Alexandre; Ferrell, Regina; Ward, Richard; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2010-06-01

    A multi-laboratory ontology construction effort during the summer and fall of 2009 prototyped an ontology for counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. This effort included an ontology development team and an ontology validation methods team. Here the third team of the Ontology Project, the Data Analysis (DA) team reports on their approaches, the tools they used, and results for mining literature for terminology pertinent to counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. A discussion of the value of ontology-based analysis is presented, with insights drawn from other ontology-based methods regularly used in the analysis of genomic experiments. Finally, suggestions for future work are offered.

  18. Self advancing mine roof supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seddon, J.; Jones, F.

    1985-03-19

    A self-advancing mine-roof-support for use in or aligned with a main roadway or gate has a floor-engaging part and a roof engaging part spaced apart by extensible load-bearing prop or jack means, and engagement means for a face-conveyor and a transversely acting transfer conveyor whereby their relative positions are constrained to facilitate discharge of mineral from one conveyor to the other. The engagement means for the face conveyor comprises sliding anchor beams that assure maintenance of the relative attitudes of the support and the face conveyor and the transfer conveyor is held fore and aft of the support.

  19. Longwall mining thrives in Colorado's North Fork Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-08-15

    With mining units poised for record-setting capacity and rail service restored, these mines in Colorado's North Fork valley are ready to cut coal. 4 photos.

  20. Colorado School of Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado School of Mines - Colorado Energy Research Institute Address: 1500 Illinois Street Place:...

  1. Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital information on Montana's geology. Author Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology...

  2. Inner Mongolia Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inner Mongolia Fengwei New Energy Mining Co Ltd Place: Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Product:...

  3. U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining.

  4. Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhangjiajie Guinie Mining Co Ltd Place: Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province, China Product: Miner, refiner and processor...

  5. Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show ...

  6. Colorado School of Mines Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado School of Mines Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The...

  7. Progress Toward Remediation of Uranium Tailings in Mailuu-Suu, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, P B; Ranville, J; Honeyman, B D; Smith, D K; Rosenberg, N; Knapp, R B

    2003-07-09

    The town of Mailuu-Suu in Kyrgyzstan inherited 23 distinct tailings deposits from Soviet-Era uranium mining operations. Mailuu-Suu is located in the narrow landslide-prone valley of the Mailuu-Suu River about 25 km from the Uzbekistan border. Large-scale release of the radioactive tailings, as a result of landslides, could lead to irreversible contamination of the river and downstream areas. The Mailuu-Suu River is a tributary to the Syr-Darya River, the Fergana valley's main source of irrigation water. The Fergana Valley is a key agricultural region and major population center that spans Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. The trans-boundary nature of the Mailuu-Suu tailings issue presents an opportunity for collaboration among these Central Asian states. A cooperative approach to addressing environmental issues such as Mailuu-Suu may contribute to the region's stability by facilitating peaceful associations. Experience from remediation of sites in the US under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project (UMTRA) will be useful in progressing toward remediation at Mailuu-Suu.

  8. Coal mine directory: United States and Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    The directory gives a state-by-state listing of all US and Canadian coal producers. It contains contact information as well as the type of mine, production statistics, coal composition, transportation methods etc. A statistical section provides general information about the US coal industry, preparation plants, and longwall mining operations.

  9. Statistically significant relational data mining :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Jonathan W.; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Pinar, Ali; Robinson, David Gerald; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Casleton, Emily; Kaiser, Mark; Nordman, Daniel J.; Wilson, Alyson G.

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the project (3z(BStatitically significant relational data mining.(3y (BThe goal of the project was to add more statistical rigor to the fairly ad hoc area of data mining on graphs. Our goal was to develop better algorithms and better ways to evaluate algorithm quality. We concetrated on algorithms for community detection, approximate pattern matching, and graph similarity measures. Approximate pattern matching involves finding an instance of a relatively small pattern, expressed with tolerance, in a large graph of data observed with uncertainty. This report gathers the abstracts and references for the eight refereed publications that have appeared as part of this work. We then archive three pieces of research that have not yet been published. The first is theoretical and experimental evidence that a popular statistical measure for comparison of community assignments favors over-resolved communities over approximations to a ground truth. The second are statistically motivated methods for measuring the quality of an approximate match of a small pattern in a large graph. The third is a new probabilistic random graph model. Statisticians favor these models for graph analysis. The new local structure graph model overcomes some of the issues with popular models such as exponential random graph models and latent variable models.

  10. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  11. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore » clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production.« less

  12. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  13. Uranium enrichment management review: summary of analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    In May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within the Department of Energy requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. After extensive investigation, analysis, and discussion, the review group presented its findings and recommendations in a report on December 2, 1980. The following pages contain background material on which that final report was based. This report is arranged in chapters that parallel those of the uranium enrichment management review final report - chapters that contain summaries of the review group's discussion and analyses in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. Further information, in-depth analysis, and discussion of suggested alternative management practices are provided in five appendices.

  14. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactors lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  15. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  16. Mined land reclamation in Wisconsin since 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Reclamation has long been recognized as an essential action necessary to mitigate the degradation of land caused by mining activities. But, it is only within the past several decades that reclamation has become an integral component of the mineral extraction process. While the Metallic Mining Reclamation Act (MMRA) was passed in 1973, Wisconsin is yet to enact comprehensive state-wide reclamation requirements for mining other than metallic minerals and the code for metallic mining has yet to establish procedures and standards for reclamation success, specifically revegetation and postmining land use. This study integrates several interdisciplinary methodologies including a history of reclamation; an inventory and status report of mined lands; a critique and comparison of existing reclamation policy with previous state and current federal reclamation policies; in-field case studies of revegetation parameters, procedures, and performance standards; and an economic analysis of reclamation technology. This study makes three major recommendations: (1) The metallic mining code should be amended to establish vegetation parameters, measuring methods, and performance standards for revegetation success similar to those contained in the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA); (2) The metallic mining code should be amended to resolve semantic loopholes by clearly defining the endpoints of terms such as restoration, reclamation, and rehabilitation and by utilizing the reclamation continuum as a planning tool for determining acceptable postmining land use alternatives; and (3) Mandatory statewide nonmetallic legislation should be enacted to strengthen the mineral resource management program in Wisconsin by systematically and uniformly regulating the mining and reclamation of nonmetallic minerals, the state's most important mineral resource.

  17. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  18. highly enriched uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    highly enriched uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  19. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, S.A.

    1980-03-21

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from uranium-235. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen.

  20. The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Marlow, Johnna B; Menlove, Howard O; Rael, Carlos D; Iwamoto, Tomonori; Tamura, Takayuki; Aiuchi, Syun

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.