National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for a2 a9 a11

  1. A9R72A2.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. A=11, 2012 evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 (2012KE01) (Revised Manuscript from 2012) An evaluation of A = 11 was published in Nuclear Physics A880 (2012) p. 88. The version here differs from the published version in that we have corrected a few errors discovered after the article went to press. PDF HTML A = 11 11He,11Li, 11Be, 11B, , 11C, , 11N, , 11O, , 11F, ,11Ne Adobe Reader Download Last modified: 23 April 2012

  3. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 Existing Regulations A11: Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 20, 2016 CX-100664 Categorical Exclusion Determination Physics-Based Interval Data Models to Automate and Scale Home Energy Performance Evaluations Award Number: DE-EE0007571 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Building Technologies Office Date:

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Available in the following years: (2012), (1990), (1985), (1980), (1975), (1968), (1959) A=11 Energy Level Diagrams from (2012KE01) PNG (Graphic Interchange Format): 11Li (26 KB) 11Be (66 KB) 11Li decay scheme (95 KB) 11B (147 KB) 11C (109 KB) 11N (25 KB) Isobar diagram (74 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 11Li (28 KB) 11Be (126 KB) 11Li decay scheme (185 KB) 11B (287 KB) 11C (185 KB) 11N (28 KB) Isobar diagram (245 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 11Li (1807 KB) 11Be (2213 KB) 11Li decay

  5. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 9Li (24 KB) 9Be (44 KB) 9B (36 KB) 9C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 9Li (36 KB) 9Be (60 KB) 9B (48 KB) 9C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 9Li (1.7 MB) 9Be (1.7 MB) 9B (1.6 MB) 9C (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.8 MB) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic

  6. A=11-12, 1990 evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - 12 (1990AJ01) (Revised Manuscript from 1990) An evaluation of A = 11 - 12 was published in Nuclear Physics A506 (1990), p. 1. This version differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press and changed reference key numbers to the NNDC/TUNL scheme. Introduction and overview tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Figures are now present in these pdf documents, and are also available elsewhere on this server (see below).

  7. A=11Li (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been observed in the bombardment of iridium by 24 GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). The cross section for its formation is ~ 50 μb (1976TH1A). 11Li is bound: Eb for break up into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 158 ± 80 and 960 ± 250 keV, respectively [see (1979AJ01) for discussions of the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. The half-life of 11Li is 8.5 ± 0.2 msec (1974RO31): it decays to neutron unstable states of 11Be [Pn =

  8. A=9He (1974AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He is predicted to be particle unstable: its calculated mass excess > 40.17 MeV (1970WA1G, 1972WA07), = 43.54 MeV (1972TH13). Particle instability with respect to 8He + n, 7He + 2n and 6He + 3n implies atomic mass excesses greater than 39.7, 42.25 and 41.812 MeV, respectively. See also (1968CE1A). 9He has not been observed in a pion experiment [9Be(π-, π+)9He] (1965GI10) nor in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf (1967CO1K

  9. Attachment A2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A2 GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 2013 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October ...

  10. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  11. Th1A.2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Th1A.2.pdf OFC 2015 © OSA 2015 WAN Virtualization and Dynamic End-to-End Bandwidth Provisioning Using SDN Adrian Lara 1 , Byrav Ramamurthy 1 , Eric Pouyoul 2 and Inder Monga 2 1 University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln NE 68504 {alara,byrav}@cse.unl.edu 2 Energy Science Network, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 {lomax,imonga}@es.net Abstract: We evaluate a WAN-virtualization framework in terms of delay and scalability and demonstrate that adding a virtual layer between

  12. A=11 Nuclides

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    A short list of corrections to mistakes found after the evaluation was published Elsevier Electronic Online: Elsevier (Nuclear Physics A) has made available PDF versions of A...

  13. A9_ISO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2014 1 November 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell from $95/barrel (bbl) on October 1 to $84/bbl at the end of the month. The causes included weakening outlooks for global economic and oil demand growth, the return to the market of previously disrupted Libyan crude oil production, and continued growth in U.S. tight oil production. Brent crude oil spot prices averaged $87/bbl in October, the first month Brent prices have

  14. A=9 Nuclides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A short list of corrections to mistakes found after the evaluation was published Elsevier Electronic Online: Elsevier (Nuclear Physics A) has made available PDF versions of A...

  15. A = 9 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The General Table for 9Li is subdivided into the following categories: Shell Model Cluster Model Theoretical Ground State Properties Special States Other Model Calculations...

  16. A2Wind Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Startup with strong capability in carbon fibre design targeting the wind turbine blade space. References: A2Wind Limited1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  17. Microsoft Word - table_A2.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    195 19 4 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2014 2014 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2014 (million cubic feet per ...

  18. Data:B0c510db-7e64-4d8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    d8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  19. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, Hany A.; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; Salama, Samir A.; Arab, Hany H.; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Aktnuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of AktNF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. OSU-A9 targeted signaling

  20. A11_ISO.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  1. TU-A-9A-10: Verification of Photoacoustic Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Using DCE-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, A; Krutulis, M; Verleker, A; Stantz, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to verify quantifiable perfusion information generated by a Photoacoustic Computed Tomography (PCT) scanner using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT (DCE-CT), and to investigate physicsbased models of acoustic properties of tissue and photon transport to improve quantification. These corrections first necessitate a skin identifying algorithms to reduce speed-of-sound blurring and empirical photon correction methods. Methods: Xenograft mice (n=5) of breast cancer was imaged using DCE-CT which was followed by DCE-PCT. To obtain CT perfusion data, each mouse was i.v. injected (0.2mL Isovue @0.5mL/min) and subsequent radio-opaque time curves fit to a 2-compartmental model on a voxel-wise basis. For DCE-PCT, different concentrations of ICG (250, 125, and 62.5 micro-Molar) were injected at the same rate, but also acquired at different sampling rates (3, 6, and 12 seconds). The time intensity curves from PCT were fit to a 1-compartmental model on a voxel by voxel basis. The images were coregistered (Oncentra) based on the structural similarities of the tumor vasculature after which we compared both the contrastenhanced dynamics and the vascular physiology. Results: Moderate to high doses of ICG impact the washin phase of the PCT contrast due to photon losses as a function of depth. A semi-automatic algorithm has been developed to identify the skin margin, and subsequent MC and empirical models of photon transport and variations in speed-of-sound are being evaluated. Conclusion: From our results we find that there is a need to apply photon and speed-of-sound corrections to our PCT data to improve the quantifiable image data at depth in the tumor for PCT. The dose and injection rate may help in reducing large systematic effects. Our project is partially funded by a NIH SBIR grant.

  2. A9R7296.tmp

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  3. A9R7298.tmp

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  4. A9_ISO.PDF

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  5. A9_iso.PDF

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  6. File:FormA2.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FormA2.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:FormA2.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full resolution...

  7. A2BE Carbon Capture LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Name: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Address: 2301 Panorama Ave Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80304 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A2 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 Existing Regulations A2: Clarifying or administrative contract actions Contract interpretations, amendments, and modifications that are clarifying or administrative in nature. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 2, 2014 CX-012110: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cowlitz Falls Fish Facility Access Agreement Extension CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 04/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 1, 2012 CX-009195:

  9. Hawaii Revised Statute 523A-2, Definition of Mineral Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Revised Statute 523A-2, Definition of Mineral Resources Citation...

  10. Structure and function of lysosomal ;#8203;phospholipase A2 and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    function of lysosomal ;8203;phospholipase A2 and ;8203;lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and function of lysosomal...

  11. A2E High Fidelity Modeling: Strategic Planning Meetings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew F.; Hammond, Steven; Sprague, Michael; Womble, David E.

    2015-10-01

    This report documents the combined work of the two meetings and serves as a key part of the foundation for the A2e/HFM effort for predictive modeling of whole wind plant physics.

  12. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A=11Be (2012KE01)

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    0.8. The data related to states involved in neutron emission have ambiguous interpretation connected with uncertainty in placement of neutron decay branches; the observed...

  14. A=11C (59AJ76)

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    3. 9Be(3He, n)11C Qm 7.565 See (PO52B, KU53A, MO54B). 4. 10B(p, )11C Qm 8.700 For Ep 0.7 to 3 MeV, the main capture radiation is to the ground state. Weaker radiations, ...

  15. A=11C (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (See Table Prev. Table 11.38 preview 11.38 (in PDF or PS), Table Prev. Table 11.39 preview 11.39 (in PDF or PS) and Energy Level Diagram for 11C and Isobar Diagram) ...

  16. A = 11B (68AJ02)

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    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E, TR61, UM61, AM64, NE64C, CO65I, FA65A, FA65C, HA66F, MA66S, CO67M, FA67A, KU68A). Collective model:(BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, MA64HH, NE65E, EL66B, MI66J, RI67J, GO68). Ground state properties:(BE62L, BE63T, LI64H, LI64I, ST64, HU65C, RI66F, WI66E, BA67E, RH67A, SH67C, BA68B). Other:(SE63G, OL64A, TH64A, WI66F, BA67HH, PO67G).

  17. A11_1975iso.PDF

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  18. A=11B (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (See Table Prev. Table 11.18 preview 11.18 (in PDF or PS), Table Prev. Table 11.19 preview 11.19 (in PDF or PS) and Energy Level Diagram for 11B and Isobar Diagram) μ = +2.6886489 (10) nm (1989RA17), Q = 40.65 ± 0.26 mb (1970NE05), B(E2; 3/2- → 1/2-) = 2.6 ± 0.4 e2 ⋅ fm4 (1980FE07). 1. 4He(7Li, α0) Eb = 8.6641 A 13.7 MeV 7Li beam impinged on a thick 4He gas filled chamber and the spectrum of elastically scattered α particles, measured in a position sensitive ΔE-E Si

  19. A=11Be (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See also (1975AJ02) and Table 11.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974TA1E, 1975MI12, 1976IR1B, 1977SE1D, 1978BO31, 1979BE1H). Special reactions: (1975FE1A, 1976OS04, 1977AR06, 1977YA1B). Muon capture (See also reaction 2.): (1978DE15). Pion reactions: (1975CO06, 1976CO1M, 1977DO06, 1977GE1D). Ground state of 11Be: (1975BE31, 1978BO31). 1. 11Be(β-)11B Qm = 11.508 The decay proceeds to 11B*(0, 2.12, 5.02, 6.79,

  20. A=11Be (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    85AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1981RA06, 1981SE06, 1983MI1E, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic transitions:(1980MI1G). Complex reactions involving 11Be:(1979BO22, 1980WI1L, 1983EN04, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A). Hypernuclei:(1979BU1C, 1982IK1A, 1982KA1D, 1982KO11, 1983FE07, 1983KO1D, 1983MI1E). Other topics:(1981SE06, 1982NG01). Ground-state properties of 11Be:(1981AV02, 1982NG01,

  1. A=11Be (1990AJ01)

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    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 11.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1984MI1H, 1984VA06, 1986WI04). Electromagnetic transitions:(1984MI1H, 1984VA06, 1987HO1L). Complex reactions involving 11Be:(1985BO1A, 1986AV1B, 1987TR05, 1987WA09, 1988BA53, 1988RU01, 1988TA1N, 1988TR03, 1989SA10). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions:(1984KO24). Hypernuclei:(1985IK1A, 1986ME1F). Other topics:(1984MI1H, 1985AN28, 1986AN07).

  2. A=11Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: Mass of 11Be: From the decay energy, 11Be(β-)11B, and using the Wapstra mass (WA55C) for 11B, the mass excess of 11Be, M - A = 23.39 ± 0.15 MeV (WI59). The binding energies of a neutron, deuteron and triton in 11Be are, respectively, 0.54, 18.4 and 15.76 MeV. 1. 11Be(β-)11B Qm = 11.48 The decay proceeds to 11Bg.s. and to several excited states. For the ground-state transition, Eβ(max) = 11.48 ± 0.15 MeV; τ1/2 = 13.57 ± 0.15 sec, log ft = 6.77 (AL58E,

  3. A=11Be (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See Table 11.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 11Be: The Q-value of the 9Be(t, p)11Be reaction is given as Q = -1.164 ± 0.015 MeV by (PU62) (based on 12C(t, p)14C*). This value has been adjusted by (RY65) to -1.170 MeV, leading to M - A for 11Be = 20.181 ± 0.015 MeV (relative to 12C) (MA65A). See (TA60D, TA60L, DO61, RO66S, DE67P). The ground state of 11Be has even parity (AL64I). 1. 11Be(β-)11B Qm = 11.513 The decay

  4. A=11C (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1975AJ02) and Table 11.19 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special levels: (1976IR1B). Astrophysical questions: (1976VI1A, 1977SC1D, 1977SI1D, 1978BU1B). Special reactions: (1975HU14, 1976BE1K, 1976BU16, 1976DI01, 1976HE1H, 1976LE1F, 1976SM07, 1977AR06, 1977AS03, 1977SC1G, 1978DI1A, 1978GE1C, 1978HE1C, 1979KA07, 1979VI05). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1975DO1F, 1976DO1G). Pion capture and reactions (See also

  5. A=11C (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 11.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1981RA06, 1983SH38). Special states:(1981RA06). Complex reactions involving 11C:(1979BO22, 1980GR10, 1980WI1K, 1980WI1L, 1981MO20, 1982GE05, 1982LY1A, 1982RA31, 1983FR1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A). Electromagnetic transitions:(1978KR19). Applied work:(1979DE1H, 1982BO1N, 1982HI1H, 1982KA1R, 1982ME1C, 1982NE1D, 1982PI1H, 1982YA1C,

  6. A=11C (1990AJ01)

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    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 11.16 [Table of Energy Levels] (PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1988WO04) Special states: (1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1988KW02) Astrophysical Questions: (1987RA1D) Complex reactions involving 11C:(1981AS04, 1985AR09, 1985HI1C, 1985MO08, 1986AV1B, 1986AV07, 1986BA3G, 1986HA1B, 1986HI1D, 1986UT01, 1987AR19, 1987BA38, 1987DE37, 1987NA01, 1987RI03, 1987SN01, 1987ST01, 1987YA16, 1988CA06, 1988KI05, 1988KI06, 1988SA19,

  7. A=11F (1975AJ02)

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    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed: see (1974IR04

  8. A=11F (1980AJ01)

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    0AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  9. A=11F (1985AJ01)

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    5AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01) and (1982NG01, 1983ANZQ

  10. A=11F (1990AJ01)

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    90AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01) and (1986AN07, 1987SA15

  11. A=11F (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  12. A=11He (1975AJ02)

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    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed: see (1974IR04

  13. A=11He (1980AJ01)

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    0AJ01) (Not illustrated) 11He has not been observed: see (1976IR1B; theor.

  14. A=11He (1985AJ01)

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    5AJ01) (Not illustrated) 11He has not been observed: see (1980AJ01) and (1983ANZQ

  15. A=11He (1990AJ01)

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    1990AJ01) (Not illustrated) 11He has not been reported: see (1980AJ01). The ground state of 11He is predicted to have

  16. A=11He (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) 11He has not been reported: see (1980AJ01). The ground state of 11He is predicted to have Jπ = 1/2+ (1993PO11). Also see

  17. A=11Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) GENERAL: The mass excess of 11Li is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). [(A.H. Wapstra, private communication) suggests 40.91 ± 0.11 MeV.] Using the value reported by (1975TH08) 11Li is bound with respect to 9Li + 2n by 156 ± 80 keV and with respect to 10Li + n by 966 ± 260 keV [see (1984AJ01) for the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. Systematics suggest Jπ = 1/2- for 11Lig.s.. See also (1979AZ03, 1980AZ01, 1980BO31, 1981BO1X, 1982BO1Y, 1982OG02), (1981HA2C),

  18. A=11Li (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been identified in the 5.3 GeV proton bombardment of uranium. It is particle stable (PO66H). See also (GA66C, CO67A

  19. A=11N (1975AJ02)

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    75AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11N) The 14N(3He, 6He)11N reaction has been studied at E(3He) = 70 MeV (1974BE20). A 6He group is observed which corresponds to a state in 11N with an atomic mass excess of 25.23 ± 0.10 MeV and Γ = 740 ± 100 keV. The cross section for forming this state is 0.5 μb/sr at 10°. The observed state is interpreted as being the Jπ = 1/2- mirror of 11Be*(0.32) because of its width; the 1/2+ mirror of 11Beg.s. would be expected to be much broader (1974BE20). The

  20. A=11N (1980AJ01)

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    0AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11N) The 14N(3He, 6He)11N reaction has been studied at E(3He) = 70 MeV. A 6He group is observed which corresponds to a state in 11N with an atomic mass excess of 25.23 ± 0.10 MeV and Γ = 740 ± 100 keV. The cross section for forming this state is 0.5 μb/sr at 10°. The observed state is interpreted as being the Jπ = 1/2- mirror of 11Be*(0.32) because of its width; the 1/2+ mirror of 11Beg.s. would be expected to be much broader (1974BE20). The 11N state is

  1. A=11N (1985AJ01)

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    85AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11N) The 14N(3He, 6He)11N reaction has been studied at E(3He) = 70 MeV. A 6He group is observed which corresponds to a state in 11N with an atomic mass excess of 25.23 ± 0.10 MeV and Γ = 740 ± 100 keV. The cross section for forming this state is 0.5 μb/sr at 10°. The observed state is interpreted as being the Jπ=1/2- mirror of 11Be*(0.32) because of its width; the 1/2+ mirror of 11Beg.s. would be expected to be much broader (1974BE20). The 11N state is

  2. A=11N (1990AJ01)

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    90AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11N) The 14N(3He, 6He)11N reaction has been studied at E(3He) = 70 MeV. A 6He group is observed which corresponds to a state in 11N with an atomic mass excess of 25.23 ± 0.10 MeV and Γ = 740 ± 100 keV. The cross section for forming this state is 0.5 μb/sr at 10°. The observed state is interpreted as being the Jπ = 1/2- mirror of 11Be*(0.32) because of its width; the 1/2+ mirror 11Beg.s. would be expected to be much broader (1974BE20). This 11N state is

  3. A=11N (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (See Table Prev. Table 11.45 preview 11.45 (in PDF or PS) and Energy Level Diagram for 11N and Isobar Diagram ) Experimental evidence supporting states in 11N have produced a generally consistent picture of the 11N structure. However, sizeable inconsistencies persist amongst measured values for the ground state energy (mass excess) and the widths of states. There are essentially three high resolution measurements of the 11N ground state mass. They do not have overlap in their

  4. A=11N (68AJ02)

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    68AJ02) (Not illustrated) See (GO60P, KE66C

  5. A=11Ne (1980AJ01)

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    0AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  6. A=11Ne (1985AJ01)

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    5AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01) and (1982NG01, 1983ANZQ

  7. A=11Ne (1990AJ01)

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    90AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01) and (1986AN07, 1987SA15

  8. A=11Ne (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  9. A=11O (1975AJ02)

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    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed: see (1972WA07, 1974IR04

  10. A=11O (1980AJ01)

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    80AJ01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1975BE31, 1976IR1B; theor.

  11. A=11O (2012KE01)

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    2012KE01) (Not illustrated) These nuclei have not been observed: see (1980AJ01, 1985AJ01

  12. A=11B (59AJ76)

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    10-15 sec, assuming J 52. On the same assumption, the intensity ratio of quadrupole to dipole transitions is 0.2 (RA58A). A mean life of 1.5 x 10-15 sec is calculated by...

  13. A=11B (1990AJ01)

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    a broad maximum at E 5.1 MeV (max 40 mb) is observed (1984OL05). For the earlier work see Table 11.7 (in PDF or PS) in (1980AJ01) and Table 11.7 (in PDF or PS) in...

  14. A=11Li (1975AJ02)

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    by GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.9 0.1 MeV (1973KL1C). 11Li is bound: Eb for breakup into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 0.2 and 0.3 MeV, respectively see (1974AJ01) for a...

  15. A=11Li (2012KE01)

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    E(11Li) 246 MeVA, analysis of a complete three-body kinematical measurement of 11Li breakup on a 12C target indicates the reaction mechanism is 11Li inelastic scattering to...

  16. A=11Li (1990AJ01)

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    increase in matter radii with increasing A and do not support the idea of a neutron halo in 11Li (1988POZS; prelim.). See, however, (1988TA1A). Fragmentation cross sections of...

  17. A=11B (1975AJ02)

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    1970CO1H, 1971BA2Y, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03, 1973SA30, 1974ME19). Cluster and collective models: (1969BA1J, 1970BA1Q, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03). Special...

  18. A=11B (1985AJ01)

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    PDF or PS). Shell and deformed models:(1981BO1Y, 1981RA06, 1982BO01, 1983VA31, 1984VA06). Cluster model:(1979NI06, 1980FU1G, 1983SH38). Special states:(1979NI06, 1980RI06,...

  19. A=11B (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977BO07, 1977JA14, 1977TE01, 1978BO31). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1976BR26, 1977BO07, 1977NI1A, 1977OK1C,...

  20. A=11C (68AJ02)

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    cross sections vary from 20 to 160 mb and tend to increase with increasing Q. For the groups that do not show the broad resonance, the cross sections are all below 5 mb and...

  1. A=11C (1975AJ02)

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    of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973SA30, 1974ME19). Cluster and collective model: (1972LE1L). Special levels: (1969HA1G, 1969HA1F, 1972MS01,...

  2. A=11Be (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special reactions: (1969AR13, 1971AR02, 1972VO06, 1973BA81, 1973KO1D, 1973WI15). Muon capture (See also reaction 2.): (1967DE1E, 1968DE20, 1969BE41, 1970VA24, 1971BE57,...

  3. LARGE PARTICLES IN ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-02-10

    The previously unknown asteroid P/2010 A2 rose to prominence in 2010 by forming a transient, comet-like tail consisting of ejected dust. The observed dust production was interpreted as the result of either a hypervelocity impact with a smaller body or a rotational disruption. We have re-observed this object, finding that large particles remain a full orbital period after the initial outburst. In the intervening years, particles smaller than {approx}3 mm in radius have been dispersed by radiation pressure, leaving only larger particles in the trail. Since the total mass is dominated by the largest particles, the radiation pressure filtering allows us to obtain a more reliable estimate of the debris mass than was previously possible. We find that the mass contained in the debris is {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} kg (assumed density 3000 kg m{sup -3}), the ratio of the total debris mass to the nucleus mass is {approx}0.1, and that events like P/2010 A2 contribute <3% to the Zodiacal dust production rate. Physical properties of the nucleus and debris are also determined.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex (areas of contamination A4, A7, and A9), Middlesex County, MA, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The US Army Sudbury Annex (the Annex) is a National Priorities List (NPL) site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This Record of Decision addresses past releases of contaminants to all media at area of contamination (AOC) A4-Waste Dump, and past releases to groundwater at AOC A7-Old Gravel Pit Landfill and AOC A9-Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Burn Area.

  5. A9R729A.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. A9R729C.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. A9R729E.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  8. A9R72A0.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. A9R72A4.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. A9R72A6.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. A9R72A8.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. A9R72AA.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. A9R72AC.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. A9R72AE.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. A9R72B0.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. A9RB1B5.tmp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Real Gross State Product (Billion $2009) New England ................ 858 869 863 867 869 874 878 883 888 892 896 901 864 876 894 Middle Atlantic .............. 2,399 2,435 2,450 2,455 2,459 2,473 2,487 2,499 2,507 2,519 2,531 2,542 2,435 2,479 2,525 E. N. Central ................. 2,236 2,250 2,269 2,277 2,278 2,288 2,298 2,309 2,322 2,333 2,344 2,353 2,258 2,293 2,338 W. N. Central ................ 1,048 1,055 1,057 1,058 1,060 1,066 1,072 1,078 1,084 1,090 1,096 1,102 1,054 1,069 1,093 S.

  17. A=9Be (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978AR1H, 1979LA06, 1981BO1Y, 1982OR03). Cluster and -particle models: (1978AR1H, 1978RE1A, 1979CH1D, 1979FO16, 1979LU1A, 1979OK02,...

  18. A=9Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (1975KU27, 1975SC1K, 1977CA08, 1977JA14, 1978BO31). and cluster models: (1974CH19, 1974GR42, 1974PA1B, 1975AB1E, 1975CH28, 1975KR1D, 1975RO1B,...

  19. A=9Be (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excited state is 4 times less (HO61G: see also (JA57)). Angular distributions for both groups show maxima in the forward hemisphere. It is suggested that the large cross section...

  20. A=9B (1974AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967ST1C, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967BA59, 1967ST1C, 1969HA1G, 1970TO1E, 1971CO28, 1971LI30, 1972BE1E). Astrophysical questions: (1970BA1M). Other topics: (1967CA17, 1967CH1H, 1970SA05, 1972AN05, 1972HA57, 1972CA37, 1972LE1L, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26,

  1. A=9B (1979AJ01)

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    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1977HO1F, 1977OK01, 1978HO1E). Special levels: (1974IR04, 1975WI1E, 1976IR1B, 1978HO1E). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D). Pion reactions: (1974KA07). Other topics: (1974HA1C, 1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31, 1977OK01). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm = -1.975 Eb = 16.603 (b) 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.7878 (c) 6Li(3He, d)7Be Qm = 0.113

  2. A=9B (1984AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1978AR1H, 1979LA06, 1979MA1J, 1981KO1Q). Special states: (1981KO1Q). Reactions involving pions: (1978WA1B, 1979AL1J, 1982EL07, 1982HI02, 1983HU02). Hypernuclei: (1978PO1A, 1978SO1A, 1979MA1L, 1981WA1J, 1982KO11). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Ground state of 9B: (1982NG01). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, γ)9B Qm = 16.601 (b) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm =

  3. A=9B (1988AJ01)

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    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983SH38, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1983AU1B, 1983FE07, 1983GO28, 1984KO40, 1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1987BA54, 1987VOZU). Complex reactions involving 9B: (1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1987AR19, 1987PO03). Reactions involving pions: (1985PN01). Hypernuclei: (1982KA1D, 1983KO1D, 1983SH38, 1983SH1E, 1984ZH1B, 1985AH1A, 1985PN01, 1986DA1B,

  4. A=9B (2004TI06)

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    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9B published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9B located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9b.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.13 preview 9.13 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). The low-lying levels of 9B have mainly [441] spatial symmetry and

  5. A=9B (59AJ76)

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    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 9B) GENERAL: See also Table 9.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.786 Eb = 16.598 The excitation functions for protons leading to the ground and 2.9-MeV excited states of 8Be have been measured for E(3He) = 0.9 to 5.1 MeV (θ = 0° and 150°, lab.). Resonances are observed at E(3He) = 1.6 MeV (Γ = 0.25 MeV, 9B* = 17.6 MeV) and 3.0 MeV (Γ = 1.5 MeV, 9B* = 18.6 MeV) (SC56F). However, J.W. Butler (private communication)

  6. A=9B (66LA04)

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    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See (BA59N, PH60A, SP60, TA60L, BA62G, IN62, GR64C, RE64A, ST64). See also Table 9.10 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.787 Eb = 16.601 (b) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm = -1.975 The excitation functions for protons leading to the ground and 2.9 MeV states of 8Be (p0 and p1) have been measured for E(3He) = 0.9 to 17 MeV. Resonances are reported at E(3He) = 1.6 MeV (Γ = 0.25 MeV) and E(3He) = 3.0 MeV (Γ = 1.5 MeV)

  7. A=9Be (1974AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965GR18, 1965VO1A, 1966AD06, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967ST1C, 1968GO01, 1969BO1V, 1969BO19, 1969BO33, 1969GU03, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971CO28, 1971GR02, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Aplha and cluster models: (1965NE1B, 1966HI1A, 1967TA1C, 1968KU1B, 1969BA1J, 1969NE1C, 1970BA1Q, 1971LE1N, 1971NO02,

  8. A=9Be (1988AJ01)

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    1988AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983VA31, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1987KI1C, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1983MI1E, 1983SH38, 1985HA1P, 1985KW02, 1986CR1B, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1981PL1A, 1983AU1B, 1983GO28, 1983MI08, 1983VA31, 1984BA49, 1984KO40, 1984VA06, 1984WO09, 1984ZW1A, 1985GO1A, 1985HA1J, 1985PO19, 1985SH24,

  9. A=9Be (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.2 preview 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ = -1.1778 ± 0.0009 μN: see (1978LEZA); Q = 52.88 ± 0.38 mb:

  10. A=9Be (59AJ76)

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    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 9Be) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (DA55D, FR55H, BL56A, DE56, KU56, BA57, PA57A, KU58B). 1. (a) 6Li(t, d)7Li Qm = 0.994 Eb = 17.687 (b) 6Li(t, p)8Li Qm = 0.803 (c) 6Li(t, n)8Be Qm = 16.021 (d) 6Li(t, α)5He Qm = 15.158 (e) 6Li(t, n)4He + 4He Qm = 16.115 The differential cross section at 90° for reaction (a) rises steeply from 8.8 mb/sr at Et = 0.72 MeV to 19 mb at 0.90 MeV, and then more slowly to 21

  11. A=9C (1974AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Other topics: (1966BA26, 1966MC1C, 1972AN05, 1972CA37, 1973LA19). Ground state properties, including theoretical mass predictions: (1965GO1D, 1966BA26, 1966GO1B, 1966KE16, 1969GA1P, 1969JA1M, 1972CE1A, 1973HA77). Mass of 9C: From the threshold energy of 7Be(3He, n)9C (1971MO01) the atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.908 ± 0.004 MeV. This value

  12. A=9C (1979AJ01)

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    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Pion reactions: (1974KA07, 1976HE1G, 1978SE1D). Other topics: (1974IR04, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B, 1977CE05). Ground state properties: (1975BE31). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28912 ± 3 keV (1975KA18) based on the Q-value of the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (1971TR03) and the threshold energy of the 7Be(3He, n)9C reaction

  13. A=9C (1984AJ01)

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    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: (See also (1979AJ01) for other references in this category and for some reactions on which no new work has been done.) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1981MO20). Reactions involing pions: (1979AS01, 1979NA1E, 1980BU15, 1983HU02). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Mass of 9C: The recent Q0 value for the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (see reaction 3)

  14. A=9C (1988AJ01)

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    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1983AU1B). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1983FR1A, 1983OL1A, 1986HA1B, 1987SN01). Reactions involving pions: (1983AS1B, 1984BR22, 1985PN01). Other topics: (1982KA1D, 1985AN28, 1986AN07). Ground state of 9C: (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B, 1985AN28, 1987SA15). 1. 9C(β+)9B Qm = 16.498 The half-life of 9C is 126.5 ± 0.9 msec: see (1974AJ01). The decay is

  15. A=9C (2004TI06)

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    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9C) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9C published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9C located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9c.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.16 preview 9.16 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = -1.3914 ± 0.0005 μN (1996MA38). See

  16. A=9C (59AJ76)

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    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Comparison with the mass of 9Li leads to an estimated mass excess of 32.3 ± 2 MeV (55AJ61). Analysis of a single star attributed to β-decay of 9C and subsequent breakup into p + 2α yields Q > 15.4 MeV, mass excess > 30.2 MeV (SW56A). Stability against 8B + p requires a mass excess < 32.9 MeV. Two reactions leading to 9C which have not been reported are 7Be(3He, n)9C (Qm = -7) and 12C(γ, 3n)9C (Qm = -54

  17. A=9C (66LA04)

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    66LA04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See (55AJ61, SW56A, GR64C, WI64E, JA65C, WO65). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.99 ± 0.07 MeV: see 12C(3He, 6He)9C (CE65). 1. 9C(β+)9B → 8Be + p Qm = 16.76 Two groups of delayed protons are observed, indicating a component of the β+ decay to a level of 9B at 12.05 ± 0.2 MeV with Γ = 800 ± 100 keV which then decays to p + 8Be(0) and 8Be*(2.9). The half-life is 127 ± 3 msec. The allowed character of the decay suggests Jπ =

  18. A=9He (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He has not been observed: see (1974AJ01). It is predicted to be particle unstable. Particle instability with respect to 8He + n, 7He + 2n and 6He + 3n implies atomic mass excesses greater than 39.667, 42.253 and 41.808 MeV, respectively. The calculated mass excess of 9He is 43.49 MeV based on the modified form of the mass equation (1975JE02). See also (1974TH01) and (1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1976IR1B; theor.

  19. A=9He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He has been observed in the 9Be(π-, π+)9He reaction at Eπ- = 194 MeV; the atomic mass excess is 40.81 ± 0.12 MeV. 9He is then unstable with respect to decay into 8He + n by 1.14 MeV (1981SE1B, 1980NA1D, 1980SE1C, 1980SE1F). See also (1979AJ01) and (1982PO1C; hypernuclei) and (1982NG01; theor

  20. A=9He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9He) 9He has been observed in the 9Be(14C, 14O) reaction at E(14C) = 158 MeV (1987BEYI) and in the 9Be(π-, π+) reaction at Eπ- = 180 and 194 MeV (1987SE05): the atomic mass excesses are 41.5 ± 1.0 MeV and 40.80 ± 0.10 MeV, respectively. We adopt the latter value. 9He is then unstable with respect to decay into 8He + n by 1.13 MeV. (1987SE05) also report the population of excited states of 9He at 1.2, 3.8 and 7.0 MeV, while (1987BEYI) suggest an excited

  1. A=9He (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9he.shtml). Mass of 9He: Although the value adopted in the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation (2003AU02) for the 9He ground state is 40.939 ± 0.029 MeV based on the results

  2. A=9Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Special reactions: (1965DO13, 1966GA15, 1966KL1C, 1967AU1B, 1967CA1J, 1967HA10, 1968DO1C, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D, 1973MU12, 1973WI15). Other topics: (1972CA37, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26, , 1969JA1M). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value of 18O(7Li, 16O)9Li, the atomic mass excess of 9Li is 24.9654 ± 0.005 MeV (1969NE1E; prelim.

  3. A=9Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1977JA14). Special reactions: (1975AB1D, 1975ZE01, 1976AL1F, 1976BE67, 1976BU16, 1977YA1B). Pion and kaon reactions (See also reaction 3.): (1973CA1C, 1976TR1A, 1977BA1Q, 1977DO06, 1977SH1C). Other topics: (1970KA1A, 1973TO16, 1974IR04, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31). μ = 3.4359 ± 0.0010 nm (1976CO1L;

  4. A=9Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1978DU1B, 1979AL22, 1979BO22, 1979JA1C, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO1Y). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1980MU1B). Reactions involving pions and other mesons (See also reaction 3.): (1978FU09, 1979BO21, 1979PE1C, 1979WI1E, 1980NI03, 1980ST15, 1981YA1A). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A,

  5. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06). Special states: (1983KU17, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic interactions: (1983KU17). Astrophysical questions: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MO17, 1986CS1A, 1986HA1B, 1986SA30, 1986WE1C, 1987BA38, 1987CH26, 1987JA06, 1987KO1Z, 1987SH1K, 1987TAZU, 1987WA09,

  6. A=9Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.1 preview 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = 3.4391 ± 0.0006 μN (1983CO11). See

  7. A=9Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Mass of 9Li: From the threshold for 9Be(d, 2p)9Li, Ed = 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C), the mass excess of 9Li is determined as M - A = 28.1 ± 1 MeV. 1. 9Li(β-)9Be* --> 8Be + n Qm = 12.4 9Li decays to excited states of 9Be which decay by neutron emission. The mean of the reported half-lives is 0.169 ± 0.003 sec (GA51C, HO52B). See also (SH52, FR53A, BE55D, FL56, TA58B). 2. 9Be(d, 2p)9Li Qm = -15.5 The threshold is 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C). 3. 11B(γ, 2p)9Li Qm = -31.4 See (SH52,

  8. A=9Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See (GR64C). See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value for 7Li(t, p)9Li: Q = -2.397 ± 0.020 MeV, the mass excess of 9Li is 24.965 ± 0.020 MeV (MI64E, MA65A). 1. 9Li(β-)9Be Qm = 13.615 9Li decays to the ground state (25 ± 15 %) and to the 2.43 MeV, neutron-unstable state of 9Be (75 ± 15 %). The β-endpoints are 13.5 ± 0.3 MeV and 11.0 ± 0.4 MeV; log ft = 5.5 ± 0.2 and 4.7 ± 0.2,

  9. A=9N (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  10. A=9N (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). See also (1982NG01

  11. A=9N (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1984AJ01) and (1983ANZQ, 1986AN40

  12. A=9N (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1988AJ01). Mass excesses of 46.56 and 46.40 MeV have been estimated from two different mass formulae (2000PO32). 9N would then be proton unbound by ~ 4 MeV. However, mass formulae neither take into account the fact that the last occupied orbit(s) may change near the drip lines nor the fact that an extended low-l orbit leads to a lowered Coulomb energy. The suggested s-wave ground-state of 9He and a Coulomb energy estimated from the 11N ground state

  13. A=9n (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1977DE08

  14. A=9n (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01) and (1983BE55; theor.

  15. SNOiioaroad A9U3N3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF 1997 Household Income Category Less than $5,000 ......................................... 3.8 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 16.2 $5,000 to $9,999 ......................................... 9.6 0.9 1.1 0.6 0.7 14.2 $10,000 to $14,999

  16. A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag ...

  17. Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid 21-Hydroxylase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid 21-Hydroxylase: Structure of the Enzyme ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid ...

  18. A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

  19. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1999 421 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  20. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1995 467 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  1. Evolution of mitochondrial cell death pathway: Proapoptotic role of HtrA2/Omi in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igaki, Tatsushi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Tokushige, Naoko; Aonuma, Hiroka; Takahashi, Ryosuke . E-mail: ryosuket@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miura, Masayuki . E-mail: miura@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-05-18

    Despite the essential role of mitochondria in a variety of mammalian cell death processes, the involvement of mitochondrial pathway in Drosophila cell death has remained unclear. To address this, we cloned and characterized DmHtrA2, a Drosophila homolog of a mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi. We show that DmHtrA2 normally resides in mitochondria and is up-regulated by UV-irradiation. Upon receipt of apoptotic stimuli, DmHtrA2 is translocated to extramitochondrial compartment; however, unlike its mammalian counterpart, the extramitochondrial DmHtrA2 does not diffuse throughout the cytosol but stays near the mitochondria. RNAi-mediated knock-down of DmHtrA2 in larvae or adult flies results in a resistance to stress stimuli. DmHtrA2 specifically cleaves Drosophila inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein 1 (DIAP1), a cellular caspase inhibitor, and induces cell death both in vitro and in vivo as potent as other fly cell death proteins. Our observations suggest that DmHtrA2 promotes cell death through a cleavage of DIAP1 in the vicinity of mitochondria, which may represent a prototype of mitochondrial cell death pathway in evolution.

  2. External Merit Review for the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy held an External Merit Review in Washington, DC, on February 4-5, 2014. The External Review Panel reviewed the current program planning and provided suggestions on the formulation of A2e strategy, goals and implementation approaches.

  3. Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    human HepG2 hepatoma cell line Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human HepG2 hepatoma cell line Diterpenoid ...

  4. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - W 73.5 See footnotes at end of table. A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present Energy Information Administration ...

  5. Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept Experimental ...

  6. Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The Effect of a Strong ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ...

  7. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-RELIABILITY & A2E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability and A2e March 24-27, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents Reliability and A2e CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) Database & Analysis Program-Valerie Hines, Sandia National Laboratories Blade Reliability Collaborative Targeted Effects of Manufacturing Defects Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics-Joshua Paquette, Sandia National Laboratories Gearbox Reliability Collaborative-Jonathan Keller, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Gearbox Failure Database,

  8. Impaired osteoblast differentiation in Annexin A2- and -A5-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genetos, Damian C.; Wong, Alice; Weber, Thomas J.; Karin, Norman J.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2014-09-15

    Annexins are a class of calcium-binding proteins with diverse functions in the regulation of lipid rafts inflammation,fibrinolysis, transcriptional programming and ion transport. Within bone, they are well-characterized as components of mineralizing matrix vesicles, although little else is known as to their function during osteogenesis. We generated annexin A2 (AnxA2)- or annexin A5 (AnxA5)-knockdown pre-osteoblasts, and asked whether proliferation or osteogenic differentiation was altered in knockdown cells, compared to vector controls. We report that DNA content, a marker of proliferation, was significantly reduced in both AnxA2 and AnxA5 knockdown cells. Alkaline phosphatase expression and staining activity were also suppressed in AnxA2- or AnxA5-knockdown after 14 days of culture. The pattern of osteogenic gene expression was altered in knockdown cells, with Col1a1 expressed more rapidly in knock-down cells, compared to controls. In contrast, Runx2, Ibsp, and Bglap all revealed decreased expression after 14 days of culture. Using a murine fracture model, we demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 are rapidly expressed within the fracture callus. These data demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 can influence bone formation via regulation of osteoprogenitor proliferation and differentiation in addition to their well-studied function in matrix vesicles.

  9. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  10. Wind Technology Testing Center Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing Wind Technology Testing Center Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing October 1, 2012 - 12:16pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The Massachusetts Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC), a joint effort by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was recently accredited

  11. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_depetrillo.pdf (184.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Sub-50 HP Engines with Low Exhaust Temperature

  12. DYNAMICS OF LARGE FRAGMENTS IN THE TAIL OF ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Jessica; Jewitt, David; Weaver, Harold

    2013-05-20

    We examine the motions of large fragments at the head of the dust tail of the active asteroid P/2010 A2. In previous work, we showed that these fragments were ejected from the primary nucleus in early 2009, either following a hypervelocity impact or by rotationally induced breakup. Here, we follow their positions through a series of Hubble Space Telescope images taken during the first half of 2010. The orbital evolution of each fragment allows us to constrain its velocity relative to the main nucleus after leaving its sphere of gravitational influence. We find that the fragments constituting a prominent X-shaped tail feature were emitted in a direction opposite to the motion of the asteroid and toward the south of its orbital plane. Derived emission velocities of these primary fragments range between 0.02 and 0.3 m s{sup -1}, comparable to the {approx}0.08 m s{sup -1} gravitational escape speed from the nucleus. Their sizes are on the order of decimeters or larger. We obtain the best fits to our data with ejection velocity vectors lying in a plane that includes the nucleus. This may suggest that the cause of the disruption of P/2010 A2 is rotational breakup.

  13. Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

  14. Progress report on LLTR Series II Test A-2 (Part 1). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freede, W.J.; Neely, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This document contains a complete set of valid and final digital and analog data plots for LLTR Series II, Test A-2. Included is an Accuracy Statement regarding this data as required by Revision 0 of the GE Test Request, Specification No. 23A2062. The Series II, Sodium-Water Reaction Test A-2 was performed in the Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). This was the third of three planned double-edged guillotine (DEG) rupture tests of a single tube which will be followed by a number of small leak tests. The test article is the LLTI which is a full-size diameter internals, shortened in length and prototypic of the CRBR steam generator. It is installed in the Large Leak Test Vessel (LLTV). The overall test program was formulated by General Electric (GE) as Test Requester to establish steam generator design and to verify analytical models/codes to estimate the effect of large leak accidents in an LMFBR demonstration plant steam generator and system.

  15. Materials experience of the public domain portions of Tube Bank E' during Test Series A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The tube banks at the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized bed combustion facility are discussed. Tube Bank E'' was designed for operation as the in bed heat exchanger during Test Series A2 at the Grimethorpe PFBC Establishment between March and November 1987. The supply of the tube bank resulted from an agreement between Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC), the US Department of Energy, and the Operating Agent for the British Coal/CEGB Joint Programme on PFBC. The tube bank incorporated features, designed to produce acceptable and predictable wastage characteristics, suggested by both FWDC and BCC/CEGB interests. As part of the agreement between the various parties, it was agreed only data from 55% of the tube bank would enter the public domain. This report describes the tube bank, and describes and discusses the public domain wastage results following a total operating period approaching 1450 hours. It is concluded that although conditions varied throughout Test Series A2, there were no major differences in the aggressiveness of the bed. Armouring devices suggested by FWDC were not successful, but their chromised coatings offered promise. The results from UK proprietary parts of the tube bank indicated that the tube bank metal wastage need not be a life limiting problem for PFBC in-bed heat exchangers. 5 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. CX-004066: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide CaptureCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 10/01/2010Location(s): Menlo Park, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-005952: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina Offshore Wind Feasibility Study: Ocean Wind Energy Analysis - RevisedCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.1Date: 05/27/2011Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-006479: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fenestration System Energy Performance Rating Development and ResearchCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B1.2, B5.1Date: 08/12/2011Location(s): Greenbelt, MarylandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-006556: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 08/17/2011Location(s): Cambridge, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-006555: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 08/17/2011Location(s): Lexington, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solidmore » velocity prediction in the column wall region.« less

  2. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  3. THE WHITE DWARF COMPANION OF A 2 M{sub sun} NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalerao, Varun B.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2011-08-10

    We report the optical discovery of the companion to the 2 M{sub sun} millisecond pulsar PSR J1614-2230. The optical colors show that the 0.5 M{sub sun} companion is a 2.2 Gyr old He-CO white dwarf. We infer that M-dot during the accretion phase is <10{sup -2} M-dot{sub edd}. We show that the pulsar was born with a spin close to its current value, well below the rebirth line. The spin-down parameters, the mass of the pulsar, and the age of the system challenge the simple recycling model for the formation of millisecond pulsars.

  4. Determination of chemical concentration with a 2 dimensional CCD array in the Echelle grating spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, D.K.; Stevens, C.G.

    1994-11-15

    The Echelle grating spectrometer (EGS) uses a stepped Echelle grating, prisms and a folded light path to miniaturize an infrared spectrometer. Light enters the system through a slit and is spread out along Y by a prism. This light then strikes the grating and is diffracted out along X. This spreading results in a superposition of spectral orders since the grating has a high spectral range. These orders are then separated by again passing through a prism. The end result of a measurement is a 2 dimensional image which contains the folded spectrum of the region under investigation. The data lies in bands from top to bottom, for example, with wavenumber increments as small as 0.1 lying from left to right such that the right end of band N is the same as the left end of band N+1. This is the image which must be analyzed.

  5. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solid velocity prediction in the column wall region.

  6. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  7. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer May 2, 2014 - 4:48pm Addthis The U.S. Department ...

  8. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  9. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... June 11, 2016 CX-100630 Categorical Exclusion Determination Interfacial Work Function ... May 26, 2016 CX-100621 Categorical Exclusion Determination Linear Fresnel Reflector Award ...

  10. Modeling of leachate generation from MSW landfills by a 2-dimensional 2-domain approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann

    2010-11-15

    The flow of water through Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills is highly non-uniform and dominated by preferential pathways. Thus, concepts to simulate landfill behavior require that a heterogeneous flow regime is considered. Recent models are based on a 2-domain approach, differentiating between channel domain with high hydraulic conductivity, and matrix domain of slow water movement with high water retention capacity. These models focus on the mathematical description of rapid water flow in channel domain. The present paper highlights the importance of water exchange between the two domains, and expands the 1-dimensional, 2-domain flow model by taking into account water flows in two dimensions. A flow field consisting of a vertical path (channel domain) surrounded by the waste mass (matrix domain) is defined using the software HYDRUS-2D. When the new model is calibrated using data sets from a MSW-landfill site the predicted leachate generation corresponds well with the observed leachate discharge. An overall model efficiency in terms of r{sup 2} of 0.76 was determined for a simulation period of almost 4 years. The results confirm that water in landfills follows a preferential path way characterized by high permeability (K{sub s} = 300 m/d) and zero retention capacity, while the bulk of the landfill (matrix domain) is characterized by low permeability (K{sub s} = 0.1 m/d) and high retention capacity. The most sensitive parameters of the model are the hydraulic conductivities of the channel domain and the matrix domain, and the anisotropy of the matrix domain.

  11. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toole, Gasper L.

    2009-01-01

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  12. Data:12a45141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  13. Submit a Public Comment on The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) External Merit Review Meeting Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is a multi-year DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics of the wind resource and interaction with wind farms. DOE is now accepting public comments on the meeting summary for the A2e Initiative. DOE held an A2e External Merit Review in Washington, DC, on February 4-5, 2014. The External Review Panel reviewed the current program planning and provided suggestions on the formulation of A2e strategy, goals and implementation approaches.

  14. Submit a Public Comment on The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) External Merit Review Meeting Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is a multi-year DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy.

  15. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodrguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  16. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  17. Structural And Functional Analysis of the Ligand Specificity of the HtrA2/OmI PDZ Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Wiesmann, C.; Sidhu, S.S.

    2009-06-04

    The mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi helps to maintain mitochondrial function by handling misfolded proteins in the intermembrane space. In addition, HtrA2/Omi has been implicated as a proapoptotic factor upon release into the cytoplasm during the cell death cascade. The protein contains a C-terminal PDZ domain that packs against the protease active site and inhibits proteolytic activity. Engagement of the PDZ domain by peptide ligands has been shown to activate the protease and also has been proposed to mediate substrate recognition. We report a detailed structural and functional analysis of the human HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain using peptide libraries and affinity assays to define specificity, X-ray crystallography to view molecular details of PDZ-ligand interactions, and alanine-scanning mutagenesis to probe the peptide-binding groove. We show that the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain recognizes both C-terminal and internal stretches of extended, hydrophobic polypeptides. High-affinity ligand recognition requires contacts with up to five hydrophobic side chains by distinct sites on the PDZ domain. However, no particular residue type is absolutely required at any position, and thus, the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain appears to be a promiscuous module adapted to recognize unstructured, hydrophobic polypeptides. This type of specificity is consistent with the biological role of HtrA2/Omi in mitochondria, which requires the recognition of diverse, exposed stretches of hydrophobic sequences in misfolded proteins. The findings are less consistent with, but do not exclude, a role for the PDZ domain in targeting the protease to specific substrates during apoptosis.

  18. A2e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & ...

  19. a2.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North east Mid- west South West All Buildings North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ...... 4,859 761 1,305 1,873 920 71,658 13,995 18,103 ...

  20. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  1. Ultra-high tritium decontamination of simulated fusion fuel exhaust using a 2-stage palladium membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    A 2-stage cold (non-tritium) PMR system was tested with the ITER mix in61 days of continuous operation. No decrease in performance was observed over the duration of the test. Decontamination factor (DF) was found to increase with decreasing inlet rate. Decontamination factors in excess of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 5} were obtained, but the exact value of the highest DF could not be determined because of analysis limitations. Results of the 61-day test were used to design a 2-stage PMR system for use in tritium testing. The PMR system was scaled up by a factor of 6 and built into a glovebox in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is approximately 1/5th of the expected full ITER scale. The ITER mix was injected into the PMR system for 31 hours, during which 4.5 g of tritium were processed. The 1st stage had DF = 200 and the 2nd stage had DF = 2.9 {times} 10{sup 6}. The overall DF = 5.8 {times} 10{sup 8}, which is greater than ITER requirements.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetism of A2Co12As7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Ovidiu Garlea, V.; Chai, Ping; Geondzhian, Andrey Y.; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A.; Xin, Yan; Menushenkov, Alexey P.; Chernikov, Roman V.; Shatruk, Michael

    2015-08-28

    In this study, ternary intermetallics, A2Co12As7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb), have been synthesized by annealing mixtures of elements in molten Bi at 1223 K. The materials obtained crystallize in the P63/m variant of the Zr2Fe12P7 structure type. The unit cell volume shows a monotonic decrease with the increasing atomic number of the rare-earth metal, with the exception of Ce-, Eu-, and Yb-containing compounds. An examination of these outliers with X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) spectroscopy revealed mixed valence of Ce, Eu, and Yb, with the average oxidation states of +3.20(1), +2.47(5), and +2.91(1), respectively, at room temperature. Magnetic behavior ofmore » A2Co12As7 is generally characterized by ferromagnetic ordering of Co 3d moments at 100–140 K, followed by low-temperature ordering of rare-earth 4f moments. The 3d-4f magnetic coupling changes from antiferromagnetic for A=Pr–Sm to ferromagnetic for A=Ce and Eu–Yb. Finally, polarized neutron scattering experiments were performed to support the postulated ferro- and ferrimagnetic ground states for Ce2Co12As7 and Nd2Co12As7, respectively.« less

  3. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  4. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4? sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  5. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  6. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  7. Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-29

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

  8. Development of a 2.0 eV AlGaInP Solar Cell Grown by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Dippo, Pat; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2015-06-14

    AlGaInP solar cells with a bandgap (Eg) of ~2.0 eV are developed for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This material system is of great interest for both space and concentrator photovoltaics due to its high bandgap, which enables the development of high-efficiency five-junction and six-junction devices and is also useful for solar cells operated at elevated temperatures. In this work, we explore the conditions for the Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. A ~2.0 eV AlGaInP solar cell is demonstrated with an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 1.59V, a bandgap-voltage offset (WOC) of 420mV, a fill factor (FF) of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. These AlGaInP cells have attained a similar FF, WOC and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) to the best upright GaInP cells grown in our lab to date.

  9. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Martins, L. Miguel; Kahle, Philipp J.; Krueger, Rejko

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S; Mahdavi, S; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  11. A 2.5D boundary element formulation for modeling damped waves in arbitrary cross-section waveguides and cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 ; Bartoli, I.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: Dispersive properties of viscoelastic waveguides and cavities are computed using a regularized 2.5D BEM. Linear viscoelasticity is introduced at the constitutive level by means of frequency dependent complex moduli. A contour integral algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is used to select the permissible Riemann sheets. Attenuation of surface waves in cavities approaches the attenuation of Rayleigh waves. -- Abstract: A regularized 2.5D boundary element method (BEM) is proposed to predict the dispersion properties of damped stress guided waves in waveguides and cavities of arbitrary cross-section. The wave attenuation, induced by material damping, is introduced using linear viscoelastic constitutive relations and described in a spatial manner by the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber. The discretized dispersive wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is solved obtaining complex axial wavenumbers for a fixed frequency using a contour integral algorithm. Due to the singular characteristics and the multivalued feature of the wave equation, the requirement of holomorphicity inside the contour region over the complex wavenumber plane is fulfilled by the introduction of the Sommerfeld branch cuts and by the choice of the permissible Riemann sheets. A post processing analysis is developed for the extraction of the energy velocity of propagative guided waves. The reliability of the method is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained for a rail and a bar with square cross-section with those obtained from a 2.5D Finite Element formulation also known in literature as Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method. Next, to show the potential of the proposed numerical framework, dispersion properties are predicted for surface waves propagating along cylindrical cavities of arbitrary cross-section. It is demonstrated that the attenuation of surface waves approaches

  12. TH-C-19A-11: Toward An Optimized Multi-Point Scintillation Detector...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    41; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of...

  13. "Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and

  14. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion

  15. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  16. Implementation of Division B, Title I, Section 1101(a)(2) of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter "Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011). Section 1101(a)(2) of the Act provides that, unless otherwise specified, the authority and conditions provided for projects or activities (including the costs of direct loans and loan guarantees) appropriated, authorized, or funded in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Pub. L. 111-85, still apply.

  17. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  18. Data:85f4a2f7-fc00-491f-9550-006c82a148f1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f4a2f7-fc00-491f-9550-006c82a148f1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  19. CX-011416: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/19/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012472: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.11Date: 41873 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    03: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maryland - Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative (CEEDI) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, ...

  2. CX-009159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana Formaul State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/06/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-008989: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  4. CX-007853: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona Rooftop Challenge (ARC) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. CX-007864: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Broward County SOLAR Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  6. CX-010756: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Utility Network Deployment Acceleration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-008543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado State Energy Plan 2012 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-007866: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunShot Massachusetts CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-007880: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evergreen State Solar Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  10. CX-007858: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-007859: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing Solar Friendly Communities CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-007399: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offshore Wind Removing Market Barriers CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-009018: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program - Tennessee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-008984: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-008556: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haiti Renewable Resource Study CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Haiti Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-007882: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin Solar Market Transformation CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-007893: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SunShot Massachusetts CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02/10/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exclusion Determination CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.16 Date: 01272012...

  19. CX-007869: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Ready KC CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-008999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Year 2012 Formula Grants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-007414: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimized Ports Assessment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. szj91a2.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis of Thomsen Parameters for Finely Layered VTI Media James G. Berryman Patricia A. ... Analysis of Thomsen parameters for finely layered VTI media JamG. Berryman, Lawrence ...

  3. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Tv2a.2, a microsymbiont of Tachigali versicolor discovered in Barro Colorado Island of Panama

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; et al

    2015-05-17

    Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Tachigali versicolor collected in Barro Colorado Island of Panama. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2, together with high-quality permanent draft genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,496,279 bp high-quality draft genome is arranged in 87 scaffolds of 87 contigs, contains 8,109 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  4. The induction of reactive oxygen species and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 is associated with S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Qibing; Liu Lulu; Lu Yingmei; Tao Rongrong; Huang Jiyun; Shioda, Norifumi; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han Feng; Lou Yijia

    2010-05-01

    The pathophysiological relevance of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO)-induced endothelial cell injury remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GSNO-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells. Morphological evaluation through DAPI staining and propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. In cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells, exposure to GSNO led to a time- and dose-dependent apoptotic cascade. When intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured in GSNO-treated cells with the fluorescent probes 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, we observed elevated ROS levels and a concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that GSNO-induced death signaling is mediated through a ROS-mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, we found that peroxynitrite formation and Omi/HtrA2 release from mitochondria were involved in this phenomenon, whereas changes of death-receptor dependent signaling were not detected in the same context. The inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation and Omi/HtrA2 by a pharmacological approach provided significant protection against caspase-3 activation and GSNO-induced cell death, confirming that GSNO triggers the death cascade in endothelial cells in a mitochondria-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that ROS overproduction and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 play a pivotal role in reactive nitrogen species-induced cell death, and the modulation of these pathways can be of significant therapeutic benefit.

  5. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  6. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  7. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD and satisfying dose limits to critical structures. This project is funded by MCubed and grant R01-CA132834.

  8. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into ... Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; GEOMETRY; KERNELS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; ...

  9. Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhi; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.

    2012-06-12

    Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

  10. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotila, L.D.; Constantinou, C.D.; Sereda, L.; Ganguly, A.; Prockop, D.J. ); Riggs, B.L. )

    1991-06-15

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here, the authors show that a 52-year-old post menopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the {alpha}2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the {alpha}2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the {alpha}2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen.

  11. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  12. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2; a microsymbiont of Andira inermis discovered in Costa Rica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed; Baeshen, Nabih; et al

    2015-06-14

    Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2 is is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen fixing root nodule of Andira inermis collected from Tres Piedras in Costa Rica. In this report we describe, for the first time, the genome sequence information and annotation of this legume microsymbiont. The 9,029,266 bp genome has a GC content of 62.56% with 247 contigs arranged into 246 scaffolds. The assembled genome contains 8,482 protein-coding genes and 102 RNA-only encoding genes. Lastly, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Rootmore » Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  13. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Preliminary Results On a 2D Dosimetry System Based On the Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Al2O3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, M; Eller, S; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Hanson, O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a precise 2D dose mapping technique based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning reader was developed using fast F{sup +}-center (lifetime of <7 ns) and slow F-center (lifetime of 35 ms) OSL emission from newly developed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films (Landauer Inc.). An algorithm was developed to correct images for both material and system properties. Since greater contribution of the F??-center emission in the recorded signal increases the readout efficiency and robustness of image corrections, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg film samples are being investigated in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C samples. Preliminary investigations include exposure of the films to a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in solid water phantom with an SSD of 100 cm, using a 10 cm × 10 cm flat field or a 4 cm × 4 cm field with a 60° wedge filter. Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and EBT2 Gafchromic film were also exposed for comparison. Results: The results indicate that the algorithm is able to correct images and calculate 2D dose. For the wedge field irradiation, the calculated dose at the center of the field was 0.9 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 0.87 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg, whereas, the delivered dose was 0.95 Gy. A good qualitative agreement of the dose profiles was obtained between the OSL films and EDR2 and EBT2 films. Laboratory tests using a beta source suggest that a large dynamic range (10{sup −2}−10{sup 2} Gy) can be achieved using this technique. Conclusion: A 2D dosimetry system and an in-house image correction algorithm were developed for 2D film dosimetry in medical applications. The system is in the preliminary stage of development, but the data demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. This work was supported by Landauer, Inc.

  14. A 2.15 hr ORBITAL PERIOD FOR THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY XB 1832-330 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6652

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, M. C.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Elshamouty, K. G.; Edmonds, P. D. E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-03-10

    We present a candidate orbital period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XB 1832-330 in the globular cluster NGC 6652 using a 6.5 hr Gemini South observation of the optical counterpart of the system. Light curves in g' and r' for two LMXBs in the cluster, sources A and B in previous literature, were extracted and analyzed for periodicity using the ISIS image subtraction package. A clear sinusoidal modulation is evident in both of A's curves, of amplitude {approx}0.11 mag in g' and {approx}0.065 mag in r', while B's curves exhibit rapid flickering, of amplitude {approx}1 mag in g' and {approx}0.5 mag in r'. A Lomb-Scargle test revealed a 2.15 hr periodic variation in the magnitude of A with a false alarm probability less than 10{sup -11}, and no significant periodicity in the light curve for B. Though it is possible that saturated stars in the vicinity of our sources partially contaminated our signal, the identification of A's binary period is nonetheless robust.

  15. Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Chevron USA Production Company, Wolfcamp A2 Sand, Pakenham Field, Val Verde Basin. Topical report, July 1995-March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, C.A.; Weijers, L.; Minner, W.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the results from Chevron`s Pakenham Field effort at fracture stimulation engineering which incorporated, to the greatest extent possible, the results of actual measured field data. Measurement of the sand-shale closure stress contrast around the Wolfcamp A2 sand and the relatively high net fracturing pressures (compared to the closure stress contrast) that were observed during real-data (net pressure) fracture treatment analysis revealed that fractures obtained in most of the treatments were much shorter and less confined than originally expected: the fracture half-length was about 200 to 300 ft (instead of about 600 ft), which is consistent with estimates from post-fracture pressure build-up tests. Based on these measurements, Chevron`s fracturing practices in the Pakenham Field could be carefully reviewed to enhance fracture economics. Supported by the real-data fracture treatment analysis, several changes in completion, fracture treatment design and data-collection procedures were made, such as: (1) using cheaper 20/40 Ottawa sand instead of pre-cured 20/40 resin coated sand; (2) reducing the pad fluid size, as fluid leakoff from the fracture into the formation was relatively low; and, (3) utilizing stepdown tests and proppant slugs to minimize near-wellbore screen-out potential (in the Wolfcamp D sand).

  16. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mega-Macas, A.; Vizcano-de-Julin, A.; Cortzar, O. D.

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  17. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-12-31

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness {sigma}{sub mns} as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage {sigma}{sub mns} of 1.3 {+-} 0.3 {micro}m for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of {sigma}{sub mns} on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered {sigma}{sub mns} to 1.0 {+-} 0.05 {micro}m.

  18. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    An integral part of the licensing procedure for the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, involves characterization of the in situ rheology for the design and construction of the facility and the emplacement of canisters containing radioactive waste. The data used to model the thermal and mechanical behavior of the repository and surrounding lithologies include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. In this study, a suite of experiments was performed on cores recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3 drilled in support of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The holes penetrated the Timber Mountain tuff and two thermal/mechanical units of the Paintbrush tuff. The thermal/mechanical stratigraphy was defined by Ortiz to group rock horizons of similar properties for the purpose of simplifying modeling efforts. The relationship between the geologic stratigraphy and the thermal/mechanical stratigraphy for each borehole is presented. The tuff samples in this study have a wide range of welding characteristics (usually reflected in sample porosity), and a smaller range of mineralogy and petrology characteristics. Generally, the samples are silicic, ash-fall tuffs that exhibit large variability in their elastic and strength properties.

  19. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  20. Temperature dependence of the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline pyrochlores A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, J.; Sun, C.; Dholabhai, P. P.; Xia, Y.; Tang, M.; Chen, D.; Yang, D. Y.; Li, Y. H.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2016-03-21

    A potentially enhanced radiation resistance of nanocrystalline materials, as a consequence of the high density of interfaces and surfaces, has attracted much attention both to understand the fundamental role of these defect sinks and to develop them for high-radiation environments. Here, irradiation response of nanocrystalline A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu) pyrochlore powders with grain sizes of 20–30 nm was investigated by 1-MeV Kr2+ ion bombardment. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the critical amorphization fluence for each nanocrystalline compound at room temperature was greater than that for their coarse-grained counterparts, indicating an enhanced amorphization resistance. Themore » effect of temperature on the irradiation response of one of these compounds, nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7, was further examined by performing ion irradiation at an elevated temperature range of 480–600 K. The critical amorphization temperature (Tc) was found to be noticeably higher in nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 (610 K) than its coarse-grained counterpart (480 K), revealing that nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 is less resistant to amorphization compared to its coarse-grained phase under high temperatures. We interpret these results with the aid of atomistic simulations. Molecular statics calculations find that cation antisite defects are less energetically costly to form near surfaces than in the bulk, suggesting that the nanocrystalline form of these materials is generally less susceptible to amorphization than coarse-grained counterparts at low temperatures where defect kinetics are negligible. In contrast, at high temperatures, the annealing efficiency of antisite defects by cation interstitials is significantly reduced due to the sink properties of the surfaces in the nanocrystalline pyrochlore, which contributes to the observed higher amorphization temperature in the nano-grained phase than in coarse-grained counterpart. Altogether, these results provide new

  1. Optical characterization of free electron concentration in heteroepitaxial InN layers using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 transfer-matrix algebra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsidis, C. C.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2013-02-21

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been implemented as a non-destructive, non-invasive, tool for the optical characterization of a set of c-plane InN single heteroepitaxial layers spanning a wide range of thicknesses (30-2000 nm). The c-plane (0001) InN epilayers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on GaN(0001) buffer layers which had been grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is shown that for arbitrary multilayers with homogeneous anisotropic layers having their principal axes coincident with the laboratory coordinates, a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 matrix algebra based on a general transfer-matrix method (GTMM) is adequate to interpret their optical response. Analysis of optical reflectance in the far and mid infrared spectral range has been found capable to discriminate between the bulk, the surface and interface contributions of free carriers in the InN epilayers revealing the existence of electron accumulation layers with carrier concentrations in mid 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at both the InN surface and the InN/GaN interface. The spectra could be fitted with a three-layer model, determining the different electron concentration and mobility values of the bulk and of the surface and the interface electron accumulation layers in the InN films. The variation of these values with increasing InN thickness could be also sensitively detected by the optical measurements. The comparison between the optically determined drift mobility and the Hall mobility of the thickest sample reveals a value of r{sub H} = 1.49 for the Hall factor of InN at a carrier concentration of 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 300 Degree-Sign {Kappa}.

  2. A 2-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Departments of Pathology and Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York ; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson; Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York ; Buckstein, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Campbell, Christopher; Rath, Lynda; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Hixson, Rosetta; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) among prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A 2-stage genome-wide association study was performed. Patients were split randomly into a stage I discovery cohort (132 cases, 103 controls) and a stage II replication cohort (128 cases, 102 controls). The discovery cohort was genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 genome-wide arrays. The 940 top ranking SNPs selected from the discovery cohort were genotyped in the replication cohort using Illumina iSelect custom SNP arrays. Results: Twelve SNPs identified in the discovery cohort and validated in the replication cohort were associated with development of ED following radiation therapy (Fisher combined P values 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} to 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}). Notably, these 12 SNPs lie in or near genes involved in erectile function or other normal cellular functions (adhesion and signaling) rather than DNA damage repair. In a multivariable model including nongenetic risk factors, the odds ratios for these SNPs ranged from 1.6 to 5.6 in the pooled cohort. There was a striking relationship between the cumulative number of SNP risk alleles an individual possessed and ED status (Sommers' D P value = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}). A 1-allele increase in cumulative SNP score increased the odds for developing ED by a factor of 2.2 (P value = 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19}). The cumulative SNP score model had a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 75% for prediction of developing ED at the radiation therapy planning stage. Conclusions: This genome-wide association study identified a set of SNPs that are associated with development of ED following radiation therapy. These candidate genetic predictors warrant more definitive validation in an independent cohort.

  3. Data:D2e8eb8e-d151-44bc-8a2c-7e468f57f91f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a2c-7e468f57f91f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  4. Recrystallization of a 2D Plasma Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapek, C. A.; Samsonov, D.; Zhdanov, S.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G. E.

    2007-01-05

    A monolayer plasma crystal consisting of micron-sized particles levitated in the sheath of a rf discharge was melted by applying a short electric pulse to two parallel wires located at the height of the particles. Structural properties and the particle temperature were examined during the stage of recrystallization. A liquidlike phase was followed by a transient state characterized by energy release and the restoring of long range translational order while the defect fraction was low. No long range orientational order was found, though highly ordered domains formed locally. Numerical simulations revealed the same regimes of recrystallization as those observed in the experiment.

  5. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=d259a9

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    10: Energy Browse Previous | Browse Next PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION ... under section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act; (2) Activities conducted under the ...

  6. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mAmore » cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.« less

  7. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mA cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.

  8. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A; Ge, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH/NCI under grant #R21CA161389 and a master research grant by Varian Medical System.

  9. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Programs W81XWH-13-1-0481 (LX), the National Institutes of Health 1R01 CA133474 and 1R21 A153587, and SRFDP (20124407120012) for funding.

  10. NOI1VU1SININQV NOLLVINUOdNI A9H3N3 AO^HNH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study Release date: February 3, 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies