National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for a1 a2 a9

  1. Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    human HepG2 hepatoma cell line Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human HepG2 hepatoma cell line Diterpenoid ...

  2. A9R72A2.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 9Li (24 KB) 9Be (44 KB) 9B (36 KB) 9C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 9Li (36 KB) 9Be (60 KB) 9B (48 KB) 9C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 9Li (1.7 MB) 9Be (1.7 MB) 9B (1.6 MB) 9C (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.8 MB) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic

  4. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  6. A=9He (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He is predicted to be particle unstable: its calculated mass excess > 40.17 MeV (1970WA1G, 1972WA07), = 43.54 MeV (1972TH13). Particle instability with respect to 8He + n, 7He + 2n and 6He + 3n implies atomic mass excesses greater than 39.7, 42.25 and 41.812 MeV, respectively. See also (1968CE1A). 9He has not been observed in a pion experiment [9Be(π-, π+)9He] (1965GI10) nor in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf (1967CO1K

  7. A=9Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See (GR64C). See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value for 7Li(t, p)9Li: Q = -2.397 ± 0.020 MeV, the mass excess of 9Li is 24.965 ± 0.020 MeV (MI64E, MA65A). 1. 9Li(β-)9Be Qm = 13.615 9Li decays to the ground state (25 ± 15 %) and to the 2.43 MeV, neutron-unstable state of 9Be (75 ± 15 %). The β-endpoints are 13.5 ± 0.3 MeV and 11.0 ± 0.4 MeV; log ft = 5.5 ± 0.2 and 4.7 ± 0.2,

  8. Proteomic analysis of trichloroethylene-induced alterations in expression, distribution, and interactions of SET/TAF-Iα and two SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins, eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, in hepatic L-02 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Yang, Liang; Chen, Moutong; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Fang, Shisong; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Peng, Chaoqiong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Xinfeng; Yang, Fan; Wu, Desheng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure causes severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms of TCE hepatotoxicity remain unclear. Recently, we reported that TCE exposure up-regulated the expression of the oncoprotein SET/TAF-Iα and SET knockdown attenuated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in hepatic L-02 cells. To decipher the function of SET/TAF-Iα and its contributions to TCE-induced hepatotoxicity, we employed a proteomic analysis of SET/TAF-Iα with tandem affinity purification to identify SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. We identified 42 novel Gene Ontology co-annotated SET/TAF-Iα-binding proteins. The identifications of two of these proteins (eEF1A1, elongation factor 1-alpha 1; eEF1A2, elongation factor 1-alpha 2) were confirmed by Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of TCE on the expression, distribution and interactions of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and SET in L-02 cells. Western blot analysis reveals a significant up-regulation of eEF1A1, eEF1A2 and two isoforms of SET, and immunocytochemical analysis reveals that eEF1A1 and SET is redistributed by TCE. SET is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while eFE1A1 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, we find by Co-IP that TCE exposure significantly increases the interaction of SET with eEF1A2. Our data not only provide insights into the physiological functions of SET/TAF-Iα and complement the SET interaction networks, but also demonstrate that TCE exposure induces alterations in the expression, distribution and interactions of SET and its binding partners. These alterations may constitute the mechanisms of TCE cytotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Identify 62 SET/TAF-Iα-associated proteins in human L-02 cells ► Trichloroethylene (TCE) alters the interaction of SET with eEF1A1 and eEF1A2. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of SET. ► TCE induces the translocation and up-regulation of eEF1A.

  9. Attachment A1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A1 CONTAINER STORAGE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 2013 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 2013 ...

  10. Appendix A-1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A-1 Table -1 This scale is created to provide a guide for the physician determination of ability to work for HRP certified persons with certain conditions and while taking certain ...

  11. Attachment A2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A2 GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October 2013 (This page intentionally blank) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Permit October ...

  12. Microsoft Word - table_A2.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    195 19 4 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2014 2014 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2014 (million cubic feet per ...

  13. Measurement of the proton A_1 and A_2 spin asymmetries: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Whitney

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function g_2 in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element d_2^p (an integral of g_2 weighted by x^2) is most sensitive. The data was taken from Q^2 equal to 2.5 GeV^2 up to 6.5 GeV^2. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, Apar and Aperp were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of d_2^p is is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  14. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  15. Th1A.2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Th1A.2.pdf OFC 2015 © OSA 2015 WAN Virtualization and Dynamic End-to-End Bandwidth Provisioning Using SDN Adrian Lara 1 , Byrav Ramamurthy 1 , Eric Pouyoul 2 and Inder Monga 2 1 University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln NE 68504 {alara,byrav}@cse.unl.edu 2 Energy Science Network, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 {lomax,imonga}@es.net Abstract: We evaluate a WAN-virtualization framework in terms of delay and scalability and demonstrate that adding a virtual layer between

  16. TU-A-9A-10: Verification of Photoacoustic Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Using DCE-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, A; Krutulis, M; Verleker, A; Stantz, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to verify quantifiable perfusion information generated by a Photoacoustic Computed Tomography (PCT) scanner using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT (DCE-CT), and to investigate physicsbased models of acoustic properties of tissue and photon transport to improve quantification. These corrections first necessitate a skin identifying algorithms to reduce speed-of-sound blurring and empirical photon correction methods. Methods: Xenograft mice (n=5) of breast cancer was imaged using DCE-CT which was followed by DCE-PCT. To obtain CT perfusion data, each mouse was i.v. injected (0.2mL Isovue @0.5mL/min) and subsequent radio-opaque time curves fit to a 2-compartmental model on a voxel-wise basis. For DCE-PCT, different concentrations of ICG (250, 125, and 62.5 micro-Molar) were injected at the same rate, but also acquired at different sampling rates (3, 6, and 12 seconds). The time intensity curves from PCT were fit to a 1-compartmental model on a voxel by voxel basis. The images were coregistered (Oncentra) based on the structural similarities of the tumor vasculature after which we compared both the contrastenhanced dynamics and the vascular physiology. Results: Moderate to high doses of ICG impact the washin phase of the PCT contrast due to photon losses as a function of depth. A semi-automatic algorithm has been developed to identify the skin margin, and subsequent MC and empirical models of photon transport and variations in speed-of-sound are being evaluated. Conclusion: From our results we find that there is a need to apply photon and speed-of-sound corrections to our PCT data to improve the quantifiable image data at depth in the tumor for PCT. The dose and injection rate may help in reducing large systematic effects. Our project is partially funded by a NIH SBIR grant.

  17. Appendix A-1 Contract Performance Reports ARRA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A-1 Contract Performance Reports ARRA December 2011 CHPRC-2011-12, Rev. 0 Contract DE-AC06-08RL14788 Deliverable C.3.1.3.1 - 1 Format 1 - Work Breakdown Structure Format 3 -...

  18. A 1-Joule laser for a 16-fiber injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, J

    2004-04-06

    A 1-J laser was designed to launch light down 16, multi-mode fibers (400-{micro}m-core dia.). A diffractive-optic splitter was designed in collaboration with Digital Optics Corporation (DOC), and was delivered by DOC. Using this splitter, the energy injected into each fiber varied <1%. The spatial profile out of each fiber was such that there were no ''hot spots,'' a flyer could successfully be launched and a PETN pellet could be initiated. Preliminary designs of the system were driven by system efficiency where a pristine TEM{sub 00} laser beam would be required. The laser is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a 4-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the stable, q-switched oscillator and a 9.5-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the double-passed amplifier. Using a TEM{sub 00} oscillator beam resulted in excellent transmission efficiencies through the fibers at lower energies but proved to be quite unreliable at higher energies, causing premature fiber damage, flyer plate rupture, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Upon further investigation, it was found that both temporal and spatial beam formatting of the laser were required to successfully initiate the PETN. Results from the single-mode experiments, including fiber damage, SRS and SBS losses, will be presented. In addition, results showing the improvement that can be obtained by proper laser beam formatting will also be presented.

  19. A9_ISO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2014 1 November 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell from $95/barrel (bbl) on October 1 to $84/bbl at the end of the month. The causes included weakening outlooks for global economic and oil demand growth, the return to the market of previously disrupted Libyan crude oil production, and continued growth in U.S. tight oil production. Brent crude oil spot prices averaged $87/bbl in October, the first month Brent prices have

  20. A=9 Nuclides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A short list of corrections to mistakes found after the evaluation was published Elsevier Electronic Online: Elsevier (Nuclear Physics A) has made available PDF versions of A...

  1. A = 9 General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The General Table for 9Li is subdivided into the following categories: Shell Model Cluster Model Theoretical Ground State Properties Special States Other Model Calculations...

  2. A2Wind Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Startup with strong capability in carbon fibre design targeting the wind turbine blade space. References: A2Wind Limited1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Microsoft Word - 7A1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Figure 1 Crystal structure of the 7A1 Fab' cocaine complex with the secondary structure of the antibody light (L) and heavy (H) chains colored in cyan. Substrate cocaine is also shown in spheres with yellow carbons, blue nitrogen, and red oxygens in the active site. High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu 1 , Tobin J. Dickerson 2,3 , Claude J. Rogers 2,3 , Gunnar F. Kaufmann 2,3 , Jenny M. Mee 2,3 , Kathleen M. McKenzie 2,3 , Kim D.

  4. Decommissioning Project of Bohunice A1 NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Moravek, J.; Spirko, M.

    2002-02-26

    The first (pilot) nuclear power plant A1 in the Slovak Republic, situated on Jaslovske Bohunice site (60 km from Bratislava) with the capacity of 143 MWel, was commissioned in 1972 and was running with interruptions till 1977. A KS 150 reactor (HWGCR) with natural uranium as fuel, D2O as moderator and gaseous CO2 as coolant was installed in the A1 plant. Outlet steam from primary reactor coolant system with the temperature of 410 C was led to 6 modules of steam generators and from there to turbine generators. Refueling was carried out on-line at plant full power. The first serious incident associated with refueling occurred in 1976 when a locking mechanism at a fuel assembly failed. The core was not damaged during that incident and following a reconstruction of the damaged technology channel, the plant continued in operation. However, serious problems were occurring with the integrity of steam generators (CO2 gas on primary side, water and steam on secondary side) when the plant had to be shut down frequently due to failures and subsequent repairs. The second serious accident occurred in 1977 when a fuel assembly was overheated with a subsequent release of D2O into gas cooling circuit due to a human failure in the course of replacement of a fuel assembly. Subsequent rapid increase in humidity of the primary system resulted in damages of fuel elements in the core and the primary system was contaminated by fission products. In-reactor structures had been damaged, too. Activity had penetrated also into certain parts of the secondary system via leaking steam generators. Radiation situation in the course of both events on the plant site and around it had been below the level of limits specified. Based on a technical and economical justification of the demanding character of equipment repairs for the restoration of plant operation, and also due to a decision made not to continue with further construction of gas cooled reactors in Czechoslovakia, a decision was made in

  5. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.; Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, 077125 Bucharest

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  6. Data:B0c510db-7e64-4d8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    d8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  7. OSU-A9 inhibits angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via disrupting AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, Hany A.; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; Salama, Samir A.; Arab, Hany H.; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenesis as a useful target for cancer therapy, few agents have been approved for clinical use due to the rapid development of resistance. This problem can be minimized by simultaneous targeting of multiple angiogenesis signaling pathways, a potential strategy in cancer management known as polypharmacology. The current study aimed at exploring the anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, an indole-3-carbinol-derived pleotropic agent that targets mainly Aktnuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling which regulates many key players of angiogenesis such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of OSU-A9 on several key steps of angiogenesis. Results showed that OSU-A9 effectively inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HUVECs. Besides, OSU-A9 inhibited angiogenesis as evidenced by abrogation of migration/invasion and Matrigel tube formation in HUVECs and attenuation of the in vivo neovascularization in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. Mechanistically, Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the ability of OSU-A9 to inhibit MMP-2 production and VEGF expression induced by hypoxia or phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate. Furthermore, dual inhibition of AktNF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the key regulators of angiogenesis, was observed. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-angiogenic activity of OSU-A9, at least in part through the inhibition of AktNF-?B and MAPK signaling and their consequent inhibition of VEGF and MMP-2. These findings support OSU-A9's clinical promise as a component of anticancer therapy. - Highlights: The antiangiogenic activity of OSU-A9 in HUVECs was explored. OSU-A9 inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. OSU-A9 targeted signaling

  8. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  9. File:FormA1.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FormA1.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:FormA1.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full resolution...

  10. A9R7296.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. A9R7298.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. A9_ISO.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. A9_iso.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. A2BE Carbon Capture LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Name: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Address: 2301 Panorama Ave Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80304 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  15. File:FormA2.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FormA2.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:FormA2.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full resolution...

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A2 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A2 Existing Regulations A2: Clarifying or administrative contract actions Contract interpretations, amendments, and modifications that are clarifying or administrative in nature. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 2, 2014 CX-012110: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cowlitz Falls Fish Facility Access Agreement Extension CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 04/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration October 1, 2012 CX-009195:

  17. Impaired osteoblast differentiation in Annexin A2- and -A5-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genetos, Damian C.; Wong, Alice; Weber, Thomas J.; Karin, Norman J.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2014-09-15

    Annexins are a class of calcium-binding proteins with diverse functions in the regulation of lipid rafts inflammation,fibrinolysis, transcriptional programming and ion transport. Within bone, they are well-characterized as components of mineralizing matrix vesicles, although little else is known as to their function during osteogenesis. We generated annexin A2 (AnxA2)- or annexin A5 (AnxA5)-knockdown pre-osteoblasts, and asked whether proliferation or osteogenic differentiation was altered in knockdown cells, compared to vector controls. We report that DNA content, a marker of proliferation, was significantly reduced in both AnxA2 and AnxA5 knockdown cells. Alkaline phosphatase expression and staining activity were also suppressed in AnxA2- or AnxA5-knockdown after 14 days of culture. The pattern of osteogenic gene expression was altered in knockdown cells, with Col1a1 expressed more rapidly in knock-down cells, compared to controls. In contrast, Runx2, Ibsp, and Bglap all revealed decreased expression after 14 days of culture. Using a murine fracture model, we demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 are rapidly expressed within the fracture callus. These data demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 can influence bone formation via regulation of osteoprogenitor proliferation and differentiation in addition to their well-studied function in matrix vesicles.

  18. Consumer Refrigerators-Freezers (Appendix A1) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerators-Freezers (Appendix A1) Consumer Refrigerators-Freezers (Appendix A1) The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. Consumer Refrigerators-Freezers Appendix

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A1 Existing Regulations A1: Routine DOE business actions Routine actions necessary to support the normal conduct of DOE business limited to administrative, financial, and personnel actions. Previous Regulations Categorical Exclusion Determinations dated before November 14th, 2011 were issued under previous DOE NEPA regulations. See the Notice of Final Rulemaking (76 FR 63763, 10/13/2011) for information changes to this categorical exclusion. DOCUMENTS

  20. Structure and function of lysosomal ;#8203;phospholipase A2 and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    function of lysosomal ;8203;phospholipase A2 and ;8203;lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and function of lysosomal...

  1. Hawaii Revised Statute 523A-2, Definition of Mineral Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Revised Statute 523A-2, Definition of Mineral Resources Citation...

  2. Evaluation of LLTR Series II tests A-1A and A-1B test results. [Large Leak Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoopak, B F; Amos, J C; Norvell, T J

    1980-03-01

    The standard methodology, with minor modifications provides conservative yet realistic predictions of leaksite and other sodium system pressures in the LLTR Series II vessel and piping. The good agreement between predicted and measured pressures indicates that the TRANSWRAP/RELAP modeling developed from the Series I tests is applicable to larger scale units prototypical of the Clinch River steam generator design. Calculated sodium system pressures are sensitive to several modeling parameters including rupture disc modeling, acoustic velocity in the test vessel, and flow rate from the rupture tube. The acoustic velocity which produced best agreement with leaksite pressures was calculated based on the shroud diameter and shroud wall thickness. The corresponding rupture tube discharge coefficient was that of the standard design methodology developed from Series I testing. As found in Series I testing, the Series II data suggests that the leading edge of the flow in the relief line is two phase for a single, doubled-ended guillotine tube rupture. The steam generator shroud acts as if it is relatively transparent to the transmission of radial pressures to the vessel wall. Slightly lower sodium system maximum pressures measured during Test A-1b compared to Test A-1a are attributed to premature failure (failure at a lower pressure) of the rupture disc in contact with the sodium for test A-1b. The delay in failure of the second disc in Test A-1b, which was successfully modeled with TRANSWRAP, is attributed to the limited energy in the nitrogen injection.

  3. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  4. A2E High Fidelity Modeling: Strategic Planning Meetings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew F.; Hammond, Steven; Sprague, Michael; Womble, David E.

    2015-10-01

    This report documents the combined work of the two meetings and serves as a key part of the foundation for the A2e/HFM effort for predictive modeling of whole wind plant physics.

  5. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. LARGE PARTICLES IN ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-02-10

    The previously unknown asteroid P/2010 A2 rose to prominence in 2010 by forming a transient, comet-like tail consisting of ejected dust. The observed dust production was interpreted as the result of either a hypervelocity impact with a smaller body or a rotational disruption. We have re-observed this object, finding that large particles remain a full orbital period after the initial outburst. In the intervening years, particles smaller than {approx}3 mm in radius have been dispersed by radiation pressure, leaving only larger particles in the trail. Since the total mass is dominated by the largest particles, the radiation pressure filtering allows us to obtain a more reliable estimate of the debris mass than was previously possible. We find that the mass contained in the debris is {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} kg (assumed density 3000 kg m{sup -3}), the ratio of the total debris mass to the nucleus mass is {approx}0.1, and that events like P/2010 A2 contribute <3% to the Zodiacal dust production rate. Physical properties of the nucleus and debris are also determined.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex (areas of contamination A4, A7, and A9), Middlesex County, MA, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The US Army Sudbury Annex (the Annex) is a National Priorities List (NPL) site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This Record of Decision addresses past releases of contaminants to all media at area of contamination (AOC) A4-Waste Dump, and past releases to groundwater at AOC A7-Old Gravel Pit Landfill and AOC A9-Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Burn Area.

  8. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A9R729A.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. A9R729C.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. A9R729E.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. A9R72A0.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. A9R72A4.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. A9R72A6.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. A9R72A8.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. A9R72AA.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. A9R72AC.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. A9R72AE.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. A9R72B0.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. A9RB1B5.tmp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Real Gross State Product (Billion $2009) New England ................ 858 869 863 867 869 874 878 883 888 892 896 901 864 876 894 Middle Atlantic .............. 2,399 2,435 2,450 2,455 2,459 2,473 2,487 2,499 2,507 2,519 2,531 2,542 2,435 2,479 2,525 E. N. Central ................. 2,236 2,250 2,269 2,277 2,278 2,288 2,298 2,309 2,322 2,333 2,344 2,353 2,258 2,293 2,338 W. N. Central ................ 1,048 1,055 1,057 1,058 1,060 1,066 1,072 1,078 1,084 1,090 1,096 1,102 1,054 1,069 1,093 S.

  1. SNOiioaroad A9U3N3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1997 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF 1997 Household Income Category Less than $5,000 ......................................... 3.8 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 16.2 $5,000 to $9,999 ......................................... 9.6 0.9 1.1 0.6 0.7 14.2 $10,000 to $14,999

  2. A=9Be (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978AR1H, 1979LA06, 1981BO1Y, 1982OR03). Cluster and -particle models: (1978AR1H, 1978RE1A, 1979CH1D, 1979FO16, 1979LU1A, 1979OK02,...

  3. A=9Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (1975KU27, 1975SC1K, 1977CA08, 1977JA14, 1978BO31). and cluster models: (1974CH19, 1974GR42, 1974PA1B, 1975AB1E, 1975CH28, 1975KR1D, 1975RO1B,...

  4. A=9Be (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excited state is 4 times less (HO61G: see also (JA57)). Angular distributions for both groups show maxima in the forward hemisphere. It is suggested that the large cross section...

  5. A=9B (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967ST1C, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967BA59, 1967ST1C, 1969HA1G, 1970TO1E, 1971CO28, 1971LI30, 1972BE1E). Astrophysical questions: (1970BA1M). Other topics: (1967CA17, 1967CH1H, 1970SA05, 1972AN05, 1972HA57, 1972CA37, 1972LE1L, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26,

  6. A=9B (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1977HO1F, 1977OK01, 1978HO1E). Special levels: (1974IR04, 1975WI1E, 1976IR1B, 1978HO1E). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D). Pion reactions: (1974KA07). Other topics: (1974HA1C, 1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31, 1977OK01). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm = -1.975 Eb = 16.603 (b) 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.7878 (c) 6Li(3He, d)7Be Qm = 0.113

  7. A=9B (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1978AR1H, 1979LA06, 1979MA1J, 1981KO1Q). Special states: (1981KO1Q). Reactions involving pions: (1978WA1B, 1979AL1J, 1982EL07, 1982HI02, 1983HU02). Hypernuclei: (1978PO1A, 1978SO1A, 1979MA1L, 1981WA1J, 1982KO11). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Ground state of 9B: (1982NG01). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, γ)9B Qm = 16.601 (b) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm =

  8. A=9B (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983SH38, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1983AU1B, 1983FE07, 1983GO28, 1984KO40, 1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1985SH24, 1986AN07, 1987BA54, 1987VOZU). Complex reactions involving 9B: (1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1987AR19, 1987PO03). Reactions involving pions: (1985PN01). Hypernuclei: (1982KA1D, 1983KO1D, 1983SH38, 1983SH1E, 1984ZH1B, 1985AH1A, 1985PN01, 1986DA1B,

  9. A=9B (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9B published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9B located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9b.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.13 preview 9.13 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). The low-lying levels of 9B have mainly [441] spatial symmetry and

  10. A=9B (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 9B) GENERAL: See also Table 9.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.786 Eb = 16.598 The excitation functions for protons leading to the ground and 2.9-MeV excited states of 8Be have been measured for E(3He) = 0.9 to 5.1 MeV (θ = 0° and 150°, lab.). Resonances are observed at E(3He) = 1.6 MeV (Γ = 0.25 MeV, 9B* = 17.6 MeV) and 3.0 MeV (Γ = 1.5 MeV, 9B* = 18.6 MeV) (SC56F). However, J.W. Butler (private communication)

  11. A=9B (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See (BA59N, PH60A, SP60, TA60L, BA62G, IN62, GR64C, RE64A, ST64). See also Table 9.10 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.787 Eb = 16.601 (b) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm = -1.975 The excitation functions for protons leading to the ground and 2.9 MeV states of 8Be (p0 and p1) have been measured for E(3He) = 0.9 to 17 MeV. Resonances are reported at E(3He) = 1.6 MeV (Γ = 0.25 MeV) and E(3He) = 3.0 MeV (Γ = 1.5 MeV)

  12. A=9Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965GR18, 1965VO1A, 1966AD06, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967ST1C, 1968GO01, 1969BO1V, 1969BO19, 1969BO33, 1969GU03, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971CO28, 1971GR02, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Aplha and cluster models: (1965NE1B, 1966HI1A, 1967TA1C, 1968KU1B, 1969BA1J, 1969NE1C, 1970BA1Q, 1971LE1N, 1971NO02,

  13. A=9Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1988AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983VA31, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985AN16, 1987KI1C, 1988OR1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982DZ1A, 1983JA09, 1983MI1E, 1983SH38, 1985HA1P, 1985KW02, 1986CR1B, 1987VOZU). Special states: (1981PL1A, 1983AU1B, 1983GO28, 1983MI08, 1983VA31, 1984BA49, 1984KO40, 1984VA06, 1984WO09, 1984ZW1A, 1985GO1A, 1985HA1J, 1985PO19, 1985SH24,

  14. A=9Be (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.2 preview 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ = -1.1778 ± 0.0009 μN: see (1978LEZA); Q = 52.88 ± 0.38 mb:

  15. A=9Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 9Be) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (DA55D, FR55H, BL56A, DE56, KU56, BA57, PA57A, KU58B). 1. (a) 6Li(t, d)7Li Qm = 0.994 Eb = 17.687 (b) 6Li(t, p)8Li Qm = 0.803 (c) 6Li(t, n)8Be Qm = 16.021 (d) 6Li(t, α)5He Qm = 15.158 (e) 6Li(t, n)4He + 4He Qm = 16.115 The differential cross section at 90° for reaction (a) rises steeply from 8.8 mb/sr at Et = 0.72 MeV to 19 mb at 0.90 MeV, and then more slowly to 21

  16. A=9C (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Other topics: (1966BA26, 1966MC1C, 1972AN05, 1972CA37, 1973LA19). Ground state properties, including theoretical mass predictions: (1965GO1D, 1966BA26, 1966GO1B, 1966KE16, 1969GA1P, 1969JA1M, 1972CE1A, 1973HA77). Mass of 9C: From the threshold energy of 7Be(3He, n)9C (1971MO01) the atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.908 ± 0.004 MeV. This value

  17. A=9C (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Pion reactions: (1974KA07, 1976HE1G, 1978SE1D). Other topics: (1974IR04, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B, 1977CE05). Ground state properties: (1975BE31). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28912 ± 3 keV (1975KA18) based on the Q-value of the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (1971TR03) and the threshold energy of the 7Be(3He, n)9C reaction

  18. A=9C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: (See also (1979AJ01) for other references in this category and for some reactions on which no new work has been done.) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1981MO20). Reactions involing pions: (1979AS01, 1979NA1E, 1980BU15, 1983HU02). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Mass of 9C: The recent Q0 value for the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (see reaction 3)

  19. A=9C (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1983AU1B). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1983FR1A, 1983OL1A, 1986HA1B, 1987SN01). Reactions involving pions: (1983AS1B, 1984BR22, 1985PN01). Other topics: (1982KA1D, 1985AN28, 1986AN07). Ground state of 9C: (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B, 1985AN28, 1987SA15). 1. 9C(β+)9B Qm = 16.498 The half-life of 9C is 126.5 ± 0.9 msec: see (1974AJ01). The decay is

  20. A=9C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9C) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9C published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9C located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9c.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.16 preview 9.16 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = -1.3914 ± 0.0005 μN (1996MA38). See

  1. A=9C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Comparison with the mass of 9Li leads to an estimated mass excess of 32.3 ± 2 MeV (55AJ61). Analysis of a single star attributed to β-decay of 9C and subsequent breakup into p + 2α yields Q > 15.4 MeV, mass excess > 30.2 MeV (SW56A). Stability against 8B + p requires a mass excess < 32.9 MeV. Two reactions leading to 9C which have not been reported are 7Be(3He, n)9C (Qm = -7) and 12C(γ, 3n)9C (Qm = -54

  2. A=9C (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See (55AJ61, SW56A, GR64C, WI64E, JA65C, WO65). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.99 ± 0.07 MeV: see 12C(3He, 6He)9C (CE65). 1. 9C(β+)9B → 8Be + p Qm = 16.76 Two groups of delayed protons are observed, indicating a component of the β+ decay to a level of 9B at 12.05 ± 0.2 MeV with Γ = 800 ± 100 keV which then decays to p + 8Be(0) and 8Be*(2.9). The half-life is 127 ± 3 msec. The allowed character of the decay suggests Jπ =

  3. A=9He (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He has not been observed: see (1974AJ01). It is predicted to be particle unstable. Particle instability with respect to 8He + n, 7He + 2n and 6He + 3n implies atomic mass excesses greater than 39.667, 42.253 and 41.808 MeV, respectively. The calculated mass excess of 9He is 43.49 MeV based on the modified form of the mass equation (1975JE02). See also (1974TH01) and (1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1976IR1B; theor.

  4. A=9He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 9He has been observed in the 9Be(π-, π+)9He reaction at Eπ- = 194 MeV; the atomic mass excess is 40.81 ± 0.12 MeV. 9He is then unstable with respect to decay into 8He + n by 1.14 MeV (1981SE1B, 1980NA1D, 1980SE1C, 1980SE1F). See also (1979AJ01) and (1982PO1C; hypernuclei) and (1982NG01; theor

  5. A=9He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9He) 9He has been observed in the 9Be(14C, 14O) reaction at E(14C) = 158 MeV (1987BEYI) and in the 9Be(π-, π+) reaction at Eπ- = 180 and 194 MeV (1987SE05): the atomic mass excesses are 41.5 ± 1.0 MeV and 40.80 ± 0.10 MeV, respectively. We adopt the latter value. 9He is then unstable with respect to decay into 8He + n by 1.13 MeV. (1987SE05) also report the population of excited states of 9He at 1.2, 3.8 and 7.0 MeV, while (1987BEYI) suggest an excited

  6. A=9He (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9he.shtml). Mass of 9He: Although the value adopted in the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation (2003AU02) for the 9He ground state is 40.939 ± 0.029 MeV based on the results

  7. A=9Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Special reactions: (1965DO13, 1966GA15, 1966KL1C, 1967AU1B, 1967CA1J, 1967HA10, 1968DO1C, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D, 1973MU12, 1973WI15). Other topics: (1972CA37, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26, , 1969JA1M). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value of 18O(7Li, 16O)9Li, the atomic mass excess of 9Li is 24.9654 ± 0.005 MeV (1969NE1E; prelim.

  8. A=9Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1977JA14). Special reactions: (1975AB1D, 1975ZE01, 1976AL1F, 1976BE67, 1976BU16, 1977YA1B). Pion and kaon reactions (See also reaction 3.): (1973CA1C, 1976TR1A, 1977BA1Q, 1977DO06, 1977SH1C). Other topics: (1970KA1A, 1973TO16, 1974IR04, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31). μ = 3.4359 ± 0.0010 nm (1976CO1L;

  9. A=9Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1978DU1B, 1979AL22, 1979BO22, 1979JA1C, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO1Y). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1980MU1B). Reactions involving pions and other mesons (See also reaction 3.): (1978FU09, 1979BO21, 1979PE1C, 1979WI1E, 1980NI03, 1980ST15, 1981YA1A). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A,

  10. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06). Special states: (1983KU17, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic interactions: (1983KU17). Astrophysical questions: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MO17, 1986CS1A, 1986HA1B, 1986SA30, 1986WE1C, 1987BA38, 1987CH26, 1987JA06, 1987KO1Z, 1987SH1K, 1987TAZU, 1987WA09,

  11. A=9Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.1 preview 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = 3.4391 ± 0.0006 μN (1983CO11). See

  12. A=9Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Mass of 9Li: From the threshold for 9Be(d, 2p)9Li, Ed = 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C), the mass excess of 9Li is determined as M - A = 28.1 ± 1 MeV. 1. 9Li(β-)9Be* --> 8Be + n Qm = 12.4 9Li decays to excited states of 9Be which decay by neutron emission. The mean of the reported half-lives is 0.169 ± 0.003 sec (GA51C, HO52B). See also (SH52, FR53A, BE55D, FL56, TA58B). 2. 9Be(d, 2p)9Li Qm = -15.5 The threshold is 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C). 3. 11B(γ, 2p)9Li Qm = -31.4 See (SH52,

  13. A=9N (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  14. A=9N (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). See also (1982NG01

  15. A=9N (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1984AJ01) and (1983ANZQ, 1986AN40

  16. A=9N (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1988AJ01). Mass excesses of 46.56 and 46.40 MeV have been estimated from two different mass formulae (2000PO32). 9N would then be proton unbound by ~ 4 MeV. However, mass formulae neither take into account the fact that the last occupied orbit(s) may change near the drip lines nor the fact that an extended low-l orbit leads to a lowered Coulomb energy. The suggested s-wave ground-state of 9He and a Coulomb energy estimated from the 11N ground state

  17. A=9n (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1977DE08

  18. A=9n (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01) and (1983BE55; theor.

  19. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 gene is related to circulating PCB118 levels in a population-based sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, Lars; Penell, Johanna; Syvänen, Anne-Christine; Axelsson, Tomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Morris, Andrew P.; Lindgren, Cecilia; Salihovic, Samira; Bavel, Bert van; Lind, P. Monica

    2014-08-15

    Several of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), i.e. the dioxin-like PCBs, are known to induce the P450 enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah)-receptor. We evaluated if circulating levels of PCBs in a population sample were related to genetic variation in the genes encoding these CYPs. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), 21 SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes were genotyped. Sixteen PCB congeners were analysed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ HRMS). Of the investigated relationships between SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 and six PCBs (congeners 118, 126, 156, 169, 170 and 206) that captures >80% of the variation of all PCBs measured, only the relationship between CYP1A1 rs2470893 was significantly related to PCB118 levels following strict adjustment for multiple testing (p=0.00011). However, there were several additional SNPs in the CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that showed nominally significant associations with PCB118 levels (p-values in the 0.003–0.05 range). Further, several SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were related to both PCB156 and PCB206 with p-values in the 0.005–0.05 range. Very few associations with p<0.05 were seen for PCB126, PCB169 or PCB170. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 was related to circulating PCB118 levels in the general elderly population. Genetic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 might also be associated with other PCBs. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between PCBs and the genetic variation in the CYP genes. • Cross sectional data from a cohort of elderly were analysed. • The PCB levels were evaluated versus 21 SNPs in three CYP genes. • PCB 118 was related to variation in the CYP1A1 gene.

  20. Wave-Energy/-Device Modeling: Developing A 1:17 Scaled Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Water PowerWave-Energy-Device Modeling: Developing A 1:17 Scaled Model Wave-Energy-Device Modeling: ...

  1. ,"Table 3A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ... February Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ...

  2. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  3. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 401 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  4. Extreme Climate Event Trends: The Data Mining and Evaluation of the A1FI Scenario for 2000???2100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson III, David J; Ganguly, Auroop R; Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K; Branstetter, Marcia L; Oglesby, Robert; Hoffman, Forrest M; Buja, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the implications and resulting alterations of the hydrologic cycle as Earth climate evolves from 2000-2100. Climate simulations based on the assumptions implicit in the A1F1 scenario for the period 2000-2100 using CCSM3 are analyzed. In particular, we will assess the changes in the surface latent and sensible heat energy budget, the Indian regional water budgets including trends in the timing and duration of the Indian monsoon and the resulting impacts on mean river flow and hydroelectric power generation potential. These analyses will also be examined within the context of heat index, droughts, floods and related estimates of societal robustness and resiliency. We will interpret these new A1F1 results within the context of the previous climate simulations based on the SRES A2 and B1 scenarios forced with land cover and atmospheric CO2. Analyses of historical records in the context of the Indian Monsoon Rainfall (IMR) have suggested an evolving relation of IMR with natural climate variability caused by El Nino events. We will report on the combined effects of natural climate variability and global warming on IMR and assess the trend of extreme rain and temperature events in a warming environment.

  5. Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid 21-Hydroxylase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid 21-Hydroxylase: Structure of the Enzyme ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human Cytochrome P450 21A2, the Major Steroid ...

  6. A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag ...

  7. A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 2D Radiation Transport Package with Mimetic Diffusion for ExaFlag...

  8. Axial resonances a$$_{1}$$(1260), b$$_{1}$$(1235) and their decays from the lattice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2014-04-28

    The light axial-vector resonancesmore » $a_1(1260)$ and $b_1(1235)$ are explored in Nf=2 lattice QCD by simulating the corresponding scattering channels $$\\rho\\pi$$ and $$\\omega\\pi$$. Interpolating fields $$\\bar{q} q$$ and $$\\rho\\pi$$ or $$\\omega\\pi$$ are used to extract the s-wave phase shifts for the first time. The $$\\rho$$ and $$\\omega$$ are treated as stable and we argue that this is justified in the considered energy range and for our parameters $$m_\\pi\\simeq 266~$$MeV and $$L\\simeq 2~$$fm. We neglect other channels that would be open when using physical masses in continuum. Assuming a resonance interpretation a Breit-Wigner fit to the phase shift gives the $a_1(1260)$ resonance mass $$m_{a1}^{res}=1.435(53)(^{+0}_{-109})$$ GeV compared to $$m_{a1}^{exp}=1.230(40)$$ GeV. The $a_1$ width $$\\Gamma_{a1}(s)=g^2 p/s$$ is parametrized in terms of the coupling and we obtain $$g_{a_1\\rho\\pi}=1.71(39)$$ GeV compared to $$g_{a_1\\rho\\pi}^{exp}=1.35(30)$$ GeV derived from $$\\Gamma_{a1}^{exp}=425(175)$$ MeV. In the $b_1$ channel, we find energy levels related to $$\\pi(0)\\omega(0)$$ and $b_1(1235)$, and the lowest level is found at $$E_1 \\gtrsim m_\\omega+m_\\pi$$ but is within uncertainty also compatible with an attractive interaction. Lastly, assuming the coupling $$g_{b_1\\omega\\pi}$$ extracted from the experimental width we estimate $$m_{b_1}^{res}=1.414(36)(^{+0}_{-83})$$.« less

  9. A 1.3-Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ion-binding Step Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 1.3- Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step Authors: ...

  10. File:FormA1-R.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link to this file. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFile:FormA1-R.pdf&oldid532769" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  11. Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May 2, 2011) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May 2, 2011) Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May 2, 2011) The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement

  12. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1999 421 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  13. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1995 467 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  14. Simulation and Experimental Studies of a 2.45GHz Magnetron Source...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Based on early Simulink simulation, experimental data and extension of the Adler equation ... Authors: Wang, Haipeng 1 ; Plawski, Tomasz E. 1 ; Rimmer, Robert A. 1 ; Dudas, A. ...

  15. Evolution of mitochondrial cell death pathway: Proapoptotic role of HtrA2/Omi in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igaki, Tatsushi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Tokushige, Naoko; Aonuma, Hiroka; Takahashi, Ryosuke . E-mail: ryosuket@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miura, Masayuki . E-mail: miura@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-05-18

    Despite the essential role of mitochondria in a variety of mammalian cell death processes, the involvement of mitochondrial pathway in Drosophila cell death has remained unclear. To address this, we cloned and characterized DmHtrA2, a Drosophila homolog of a mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi. We show that DmHtrA2 normally resides in mitochondria and is up-regulated by UV-irradiation. Upon receipt of apoptotic stimuli, DmHtrA2 is translocated to extramitochondrial compartment; however, unlike its mammalian counterpart, the extramitochondrial DmHtrA2 does not diffuse throughout the cytosol but stays near the mitochondria. RNAi-mediated knock-down of DmHtrA2 in larvae or adult flies results in a resistance to stress stimuli. DmHtrA2 specifically cleaves Drosophila inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein 1 (DIAP1), a cellular caspase inhibitor, and induces cell death both in vitro and in vivo as potent as other fly cell death proteins. Our observations suggest that DmHtrA2 promotes cell death through a cleavage of DIAP1 in the vicinity of mitochondria, which may represent a prototype of mitochondrial cell death pathway in evolution.

  16. External Merit Review for the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy held an External Merit Review in Washington, DC, on February 4-5, 2014. The External Review Panel reviewed the current program planning and provided suggestions on the formulation of A2e strategy, goals and implementation approaches.

  17. Microsoft Word - 2009-014655 - 2010 SGSR Appendix A 2 2 2012 print ready

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report Department of Energy | February 2012 Smart Grid System Report | Page A.iii Table of Contents Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... A.1 A.1 Metric #1: The Fraction of Customers and Total Load Served by Real-Time Pricing, Critical Peak Pricing, and Time-of-Use Pricing

  18. Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklow, T

    2003-12-18

    Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

  19. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    71.6 92.3 78.2 101.8 83.6 87.5 74.7 See footnotes at end of table. A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District, and State, 1984-Present 452 Energy Information...

  20. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - W 73.5 See footnotes at end of table. A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present Energy Information Administration ...

  1. Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept Experimental ...

  2. Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Small-Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in a 2D Electron System: The Effect of a Strong ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ...

  3. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-RELIABILITY & A2E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability and A2e March 24-27, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents Reliability and A2e CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) Database & Analysis Program-Valerie Hines, Sandia National Laboratories Blade Reliability Collaborative Targeted Effects of Manufacturing Defects Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics-Joshua Paquette, Sandia National Laboratories Gearbox Reliability Collaborative-Jonathan Keller, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Gearbox Failure Database,

  4. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  5. Predicting the future could win a $1,000 California or Illinois scholarship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting The Future Could Win California Or Illinois Scholarship Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Predicting the future could win a $1,000 California or Illinois scholarship To qualify, students need to post the answer to this question on their blog or website: "Where do you see the Internet in 10 years?" September 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives

  6. Wind Technology Testing Center Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing Wind Technology Testing Center Earns A2LA Accreditation for Blade Testing October 1, 2012 - 12:16pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The Massachusetts Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC), a joint effort by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was recently accredited

  7. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_depetrillo.pdf (184.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Sub-50 HP Engines with Low Exhaust Temperature

  8. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  9. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments CC lyase activity. ?5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17?-hydroxylation of ?4- and ?5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17?-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carboncarbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional Compound I rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17s physiological ?4- and ?5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing equivalents and protons

  10. Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M.; Michal, V.; Vargovcik, L.

    2012-07-01

    The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of

  11. Laser photodetachment diagnostics of a 1/3-size negative hydrogen ion source for NBI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.

    2015-04-08

    To investigate the flows of charged particles in front of the plasma grid (PG) in a negative hydrogen ion source, the information of the local densities of electrons and negative hydrogen ions (H-) are necessary. For this purpose, the laser photodetachment is applied for pure hydrogen plasmas and Cs-seeded plasma in a 1/3-size negative hydrogen ion source in NIFS-NBI test stand. The H- density obtained by photodetachment is calibrated by the results from cavity ring-down (CRD). The pressure dependence and PG bias dependence of the local H- density are presented and discussed. The results show that H- density increases significantly by seeding Cs into the plasma. In Cs-seeded plasma, relativity exists between the H- ion density and plasma potential.

  12. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; Witte, H.; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  13. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and the CYP1A1 restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, P.G.; Bowman, E.D.; Weston, A.; Harris, C.C.; Sugimura, H.; Caporaso, N.E.; Petruzzelli, S.F. ); Trump, B.F. )

    1992-11-01

    Human cancer risk assessment at a genetic level involves the investigation of carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Wide interindividual differences in metabolism result in different DNA adduct levels. For this and other reasons, many laboratories have considered DNA adducts to be a measure of the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Techniques for studying DNA adducts using chemically specific assays are becoming available. A modification of the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts described here provides potential improvements in quantification. DNA adducts, however, reflect only recent exposure to carcinogens; in contrast, genetic testing for metabolic capacity indicates the extent to which carcinogens can be activated and exert genotoxic effects. Such studies may reflect both separate and integrated risk factors together with DNA adduct levels. A recently described restriction fragment length polymorphism for the CYP1A1, which codes for the cytochrome P450 enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolic activation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk in a Japanese population. In a subset of individuals enrolled in a US lung cancer case-control study, no association with lung cancer was found. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E; Thornton, Michele M; Mayer, Benjamin W; Wilhelmi, Nate; Wei, Yaxing; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Cook, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a

  16. An early look of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring): Breathtaker or nightmare?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Hui, Man-To

    2014-06-01

    The dynamically new comet, C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring), is to make a close approach to Mars on 2014 October 19 at 18:30 UT at a distance of 40 1 Martian radii. Such an extremely rare event offers a precious opportunity for the spacecrafts on Mars to closely study a dynamically new comet itself as well as the planet-comet interaction. Meanwhile, the high-speed meteoroids released from C/Siding Spring also pose a threat to physically damage the spacecrafts. Here we present our observations and modeling results of C/Siding Spring to characterize the comet and assess the risk posed to the spacecrafts on Mars. We find that the optical tail of C/Siding Spring is dominated by larger particles at the time of the observation. Synchrone simulation suggests that the comet was already active in late 2012 when it was more than 7 AU from the Sun. By parameterizing the dust activity with a semi-analytic model, we find that the ejection speed of C/Siding Spring is comparable to comets such as the target of the Rosetta mission, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Under a nominal situation, the simulated dust cone will miss the planet by about 20 Martian radii. At the extreme ends of uncertainties, the simulated dust cone will engulf Mars, but the meteoric influx at Mars is still comparable to the nominal sporadic influx, seemly indicating that an intense and enduring meteoroid bombardment due to C/Siding Spring is unlikely. Further simulation also suggests that gravitational disruption of the dust tail may be significant enough to be observable at Earth.

  17. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  18. MNK1 expression increases during cellular senescence and modulates the subcellular localization of hnRNP A1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziaei, Samira; The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY ; Shimada, Naoko; Kucharavy, Herman; Hubbard, Karen; The Graduate School and University Center of CUNY, New York, NY

    2012-03-10

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is an RNA-binding protein that modulates splice site usage, polyadenylation, and cleavage efficiency. This protein has also been implicated in mRNA stability and transport from the nucleus. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 had diminished protein levels and showed cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Furthermore, we have shown that inhibition of p38 MAPK, a key regulator of cellular senescence, elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and inhibited hnRNP A1 cytoplasmic localization. In this study, we have explored the possible involvement of MNK1, one of the downstream effector of p38 MAPK, in the regulation of hnRNP A1. We have demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of MNK1 by CGP 57380 decreased the phosphorylation levels of hnRNP A1 in young and senescent fibroblast cells and blocked the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. In addition, MNK1 formed a complex with hnRNP A1 in vivo. The expression levels of MNK1, phospho-MNK1, and phospho-eIF4E proteins were found to be elevated in senescent cells. These data suggest that MNK1 regulates the phosphorylation and the subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 and that MNK1 may play a role in the induction of senescence. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 and not MAPKAPK2 phosphorylates hnRNP A1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 has elevated levels in senescent cells, this has not been reported previously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 activity induces cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP A1 may alter gene expression patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our studies may increase our understanding of RNA metabolism during cellular aging.

  19. Progress report on LLTR Series II Test A-2 (Part 1). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freede, W.J.; Neely, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This document contains a complete set of valid and final digital and analog data plots for LLTR Series II, Test A-2. Included is an Accuracy Statement regarding this data as required by Revision 0 of the GE Test Request, Specification No. 23A2062. The Series II, Sodium-Water Reaction Test A-2 was performed in the Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). This was the third of three planned double-edged guillotine (DEG) rupture tests of a single tube which will be followed by a number of small leak tests. The test article is the LLTI which is a full-size diameter internals, shortened in length and prototypic of the CRBR steam generator. It is installed in the Large Leak Test Vessel (LLTV). The overall test program was formulated by General Electric (GE) as Test Requester to establish steam generator design and to verify analytical models/codes to estimate the effect of large leak accidents in an LMFBR demonstration plant steam generator and system.

  20. Materials experience of the public domain portions of Tube Bank E' during Test Series A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The tube banks at the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized bed combustion facility are discussed. Tube Bank E'' was designed for operation as the in bed heat exchanger during Test Series A2 at the Grimethorpe PFBC Establishment between March and November 1987. The supply of the tube bank resulted from an agreement between Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC), the US Department of Energy, and the Operating Agent for the British Coal/CEGB Joint Programme on PFBC. The tube bank incorporated features, designed to produce acceptable and predictable wastage characteristics, suggested by both FWDC and BCC/CEGB interests. As part of the agreement between the various parties, it was agreed only data from 55% of the tube bank would enter the public domain. This report describes the tube bank, and describes and discusses the public domain wastage results following a total operating period approaching 1450 hours. It is concluded that although conditions varied throughout Test Series A2, there were no major differences in the aggressiveness of the bed. Armouring devices suggested by FWDC were not successful, but their chromised coatings offered promise. The results from UK proprietary parts of the tube bank indicated that the tube bank metal wastage need not be a life limiting problem for PFBC in-bed heat exchangers. 5 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. DYNAMICS OF LARGE FRAGMENTS IN THE TAIL OF ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2010 A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Jessica; Jewitt, David; Weaver, Harold

    2013-05-20

    We examine the motions of large fragments at the head of the dust tail of the active asteroid P/2010 A2. In previous work, we showed that these fragments were ejected from the primary nucleus in early 2009, either following a hypervelocity impact or by rotationally induced breakup. Here, we follow their positions through a series of Hubble Space Telescope images taken during the first half of 2010. The orbital evolution of each fragment allows us to constrain its velocity relative to the main nucleus after leaving its sphere of gravitational influence. We find that the fragments constituting a prominent X-shaped tail feature were emitted in a direction opposite to the motion of the asteroid and toward the south of its orbital plane. Derived emission velocities of these primary fragments range between 0.02 and 0.3 m s{sup -1}, comparable to the {approx}0.08 m s{sup -1} gravitational escape speed from the nucleus. Their sizes are on the order of decimeters or larger. We obtain the best fits to our data with ejection velocity vectors lying in a plane that includes the nucleus. This may suggest that the cause of the disruption of P/2010 A2 is rotational breakup.

  2. Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

  3. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solid velocity prediction in the column wall region.

  4. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  5. THE WHITE DWARF COMPANION OF A 2 M{sub sun} NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalerao, Varun B.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2011-08-10

    We report the optical discovery of the companion to the 2 M{sub sun} millisecond pulsar PSR J1614-2230. The optical colors show that the 0.5 M{sub sun} companion is a 2.2 Gyr old He-CO white dwarf. We infer that M-dot during the accretion phase is <10{sup -2} M-dot{sub edd}. We show that the pulsar was born with a spin close to its current value, well below the rebirth line. The spin-down parameters, the mass of the pulsar, and the age of the system challenge the simple recycling model for the formation of millisecond pulsars.

  6. Determination of chemical concentration with a 2 dimensional CCD array in the Echelle grating spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, D.K.; Stevens, C.G.

    1994-11-15

    The Echelle grating spectrometer (EGS) uses a stepped Echelle grating, prisms and a folded light path to miniaturize an infrared spectrometer. Light enters the system through a slit and is spread out along Y by a prism. This light then strikes the grating and is diffracted out along X. This spreading results in a superposition of spectral orders since the grating has a high spectral range. These orders are then separated by again passing through a prism. The end result of a measurement is a 2 dimensional image which contains the folded spectrum of the region under investigation. The data lies in bands from top to bottom, for example, with wavenumber increments as small as 0.1 lying from left to right such that the right end of band N is the same as the left end of band N+1. This is the image which must be analyzed.

  7. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solidmore » velocity prediction in the column wall region.« less

  8. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  9. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  10. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  11. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotila, L.D.; Constantinou, C.D.; Sereda, L.; Ganguly, A.; Prockop, D.J. ); Riggs, B.L. )

    1991-06-15

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here, the authors show that a 52-year-old post menopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the {alpha}2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the {alpha}2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the {alpha}2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen.

  12. DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer DOE Publishes CALiPER Report on Linear (T8) LED Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer May 2, 2014 - 4:48pm Addthis The U.S. Department ...

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... June 11, 2016 CX-100630 Categorical Exclusion Determination Interfacial Work Function ... May 26, 2016 CX-100621 Categorical Exclusion Determination Linear Fresnel Reflector Award ...

  14. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  15. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toole, Gasper L.

    2009-01-01

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  16. Modeling of leachate generation from MSW landfills by a 2-dimensional 2-domain approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann

    2010-11-15

    The flow of water through Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills is highly non-uniform and dominated by preferential pathways. Thus, concepts to simulate landfill behavior require that a heterogeneous flow regime is considered. Recent models are based on a 2-domain approach, differentiating between channel domain with high hydraulic conductivity, and matrix domain of slow water movement with high water retention capacity. These models focus on the mathematical description of rapid water flow in channel domain. The present paper highlights the importance of water exchange between the two domains, and expands the 1-dimensional, 2-domain flow model by taking into account water flows in two dimensions. A flow field consisting of a vertical path (channel domain) surrounded by the waste mass (matrix domain) is defined using the software HYDRUS-2D. When the new model is calibrated using data sets from a MSW-landfill site the predicted leachate generation corresponds well with the observed leachate discharge. An overall model efficiency in terms of r{sup 2} of 0.76 was determined for a simulation period of almost 4 years. The results confirm that water in landfills follows a preferential path way characterized by high permeability (K{sub s} = 300 m/d) and zero retention capacity, while the bulk of the landfill (matrix domain) is characterized by low permeability (K{sub s} = 0.1 m/d) and high retention capacity. The most sensitive parameters of the model are the hydraulic conductivities of the channel domain and the matrix domain, and the anisotropy of the matrix domain.

  17. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  18. Submit a Public Comment on The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) External Merit Review Meeting Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is a multi-year DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics of the wind resource and interaction with wind farms. DOE is now accepting public comments on the meeting summary for the A2e Initiative. DOE held an A2e External Merit Review in Washington, DC, on February 4-5, 2014. The External Review Panel reviewed the current program planning and provided suggestions on the formulation of A2e strategy, goals and implementation approaches.

  19. Submit a Public Comment on The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) External Merit Review Meeting Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative within the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is a multi-year DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy.

  20. Data:12a45141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  1. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodrguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  2. a1.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables October 2006 Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed...

  3. a1.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Principal Building Activity Education ...... 7.1 6.0 ... Principal Building Activity Education ...... 7.1 15.1 ...

  4. a1.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    See "Guide to the Tables" or "Glossary" for further explanations of the terms used in this table. Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site http:www.eia.doe.govemeucbecs. ...

  5. a1.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site http:www.eia.doe.govemeucbecs. Note: Due ... Both can be accessed from the CBECS web site http:www.eia.doe.govemeucbecs. QData ...

  6. Structural And Functional Analysis of the Ligand Specificity of the HtrA2/OmI PDZ Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Wiesmann, C.; Sidhu, S.S.

    2009-06-04

    The mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi helps to maintain mitochondrial function by handling misfolded proteins in the intermembrane space. In addition, HtrA2/Omi has been implicated as a proapoptotic factor upon release into the cytoplasm during the cell death cascade. The protein contains a C-terminal PDZ domain that packs against the protease active site and inhibits proteolytic activity. Engagement of the PDZ domain by peptide ligands has been shown to activate the protease and also has been proposed to mediate substrate recognition. We report a detailed structural and functional analysis of the human HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain using peptide libraries and affinity assays to define specificity, X-ray crystallography to view molecular details of PDZ-ligand interactions, and alanine-scanning mutagenesis to probe the peptide-binding groove. We show that the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain recognizes both C-terminal and internal stretches of extended, hydrophobic polypeptides. High-affinity ligand recognition requires contacts with up to five hydrophobic side chains by distinct sites on the PDZ domain. However, no particular residue type is absolutely required at any position, and thus, the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain appears to be a promiscuous module adapted to recognize unstructured, hydrophobic polypeptides. This type of specificity is consistent with the biological role of HtrA2/Omi in mitochondria, which requires the recognition of diverse, exposed stretches of hydrophobic sequences in misfolded proteins. The findings are less consistent with, but do not exclude, a role for the PDZ domain in targeting the protease to specific substrates during apoptosis.

  7. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  8. Microstructural examination of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-09-01

    Microstructural examination results are reported for four heats of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}200 and 300 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment or composition.

  9. Deficient expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 is consistent with increased sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome patients to radiation carcinogenesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, Aaron T.; Magnaldo, Thierry; Sontag, Ryan L.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Gache, Yannick; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-11-27

    Human phenotypes that are highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis have been identified. Sensitive phenotypes often display robust regulation of molecular features that modify biological response, which can facilitate identification of relevant pathways/networks. Here we interrogate primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Gorlin syndrome patients (GDFs), who display a pronounced tumorigenic response to radiation, in comparison to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Our approach exploits newly developed thiol-reactive probes with a flexible click chemistry functional group to define changes in protein thiol profiles in live cell studies, which minimizes artifacts associated with cell lysis. We observe qualitative differences in protein thiol profilesmore » by SDS-PAGE analysis when detection by iodoacetamide vs maleimide probe chemistries are compared, and pretreatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide eliminates detection of the majority of SDS-PAGE bands. Redox probes revealed deficient expression of an apparent 55 kDa protein thiol in GDFs from independent donors, compared with NHDFs. Proteomics tentatively identified this protein as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a key enzyme regulating retinoic acid synthesis, and this deficiency was confirmed by Western blot. Redox probes revealed additional protein thiol differences between GDFs and NHDFs, including radiation responsive annexin family members. Our results indicate a multifactorial basis for the unusual sensitivity of Gorlin syndrome to radiation carcinogenesis, and the pathways identified have plausible implications for radiation health effects.« less

  10. Measurements of the Neutron Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry A1n and Flavor Decomposition in the Valence Quark Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flay, David J.

    2014-08-01

    The current data for the nucleon-virtual photon longitudinal spin asymmetry A1 on the proton and neutron have shown that the ratio of the polarized-to-unpolarized down-quarkparton distribution functions,Dd=d, tends towards -1/2 at large x, in disagreement with the perturbative QCD prediction that Dd/d approaches 1 but more in line with constituent quark models. As a part of experiment E06-014 in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, double-spin asymmetries were measured in the scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of energies 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target in the deep inelastic scattering and resonance region, allowing for the extraction of the neutron asymmetry An1 and the ratios Dd/d and Du/u. We will discuss our analysis of the data and present results for A1 and g1/F1 on both 3He and the neutron, and the resulting quark ratios for the up and down quarks in the kinematic range of 0.2

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L.; Byers, P.H.

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A2e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & ...

  13. a2.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North east Mid- west South West All Buildings North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ...... 4,859 761 1,305 1,873 920 71,658 13,995 18,103 ...

  14. Quantum lattice fluctuations in a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave material: Luminescence and resonance Raman studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, F.H.; Love, S.P.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-12-31

    Luminescence spectra, both emission and excitation, and the excitation dependence of the resonance Raman (RR) spectra have been measured for a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave solid, [Pt(L)CI{sub 2}][Pt(L)](CIO{sub 4}){sub 4}; L=1,2-diaminoethane. The luminescence experiments support the existence of tail states in the band gap region, which indicate the presence of disorder. In contrast, the RR measurements conclusively demonstrate that the effects of static structural disorder on the vibrational spectroscopy can be neglected. This apparently paradoxical result can be explained by considering the zero-point motion of the lattice. The experimental results are compared to recent theoretical models.

  15. A 2-Stage Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Development of Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Departments of Pathology and Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York ; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson; Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York ; Buckstein, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Campbell, Christopher; Rath, Lynda; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Hixson, Rosetta; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of erectile dysfunction (ED) among prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A 2-stage genome-wide association study was performed. Patients were split randomly into a stage I discovery cohort (132 cases, 103 controls) and a stage II replication cohort (128 cases, 102 controls). The discovery cohort was genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 genome-wide arrays. The 940 top ranking SNPs selected from the discovery cohort were genotyped in the replication cohort using Illumina iSelect custom SNP arrays. Results: Twelve SNPs identified in the discovery cohort and validated in the replication cohort were associated with development of ED following radiation therapy (Fisher combined P values 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} to 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}). Notably, these 12 SNPs lie in or near genes involved in erectile function or other normal cellular functions (adhesion and signaling) rather than DNA damage repair. In a multivariable model including nongenetic risk factors, the odds ratios for these SNPs ranged from 1.6 to 5.6 in the pooled cohort. There was a striking relationship between the cumulative number of SNP risk alleles an individual possessed and ED status (Sommers' D P value = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -29}). A 1-allele increase in cumulative SNP score increased the odds for developing ED by a factor of 2.2 (P value = 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19}). The cumulative SNP score model had a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 75% for prediction of developing ED at the radiation therapy planning stage. Conclusions: This genome-wide association study identified a set of SNPs that are associated with development of ED following radiation therapy. These candidate genetic predictors warrant more definitive validation in an independent cohort.

  16. Wake of the MOD-0A1 wind turbine at two rotor diameters downwind on December 3, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    The wake of the MOD-0A1 wind turbine at Clayton, New Mexico has been measured using a vertical plane array of anemometers in a crosswind plane at a distance of two rotor diameters directly downwind of the turbine. Rotor blade vortices were well mixed into the wake turbulence and were not separately detectable. Wake swirl about the along-wind axis had a value not greater than 0.025 rad/s. Extra turbulence energy existed in the edge of the wake at a frequency of about n=0.025 Hz. The cross-wake plane analyses of wind speeds revealed a nearly circular inner portion and a strongly elliptical portion. The elliptical portion major axis was horizontal. An estimate of the average rate of reenergizing of the wake, using measurements of mean wind energy flow and turbine power, suggests that entrainment with ambient air may have been rapid. Some wake characteristics were compared with the corresponding ones for several simple wake models based upon concepts of mixing of ambient air into a wake or an equivalent coaxial jet. (LEW)

  17. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  18. Ultra-high tritium decontamination of simulated fusion fuel exhaust using a 2-stage palladium membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    A 2-stage cold (non-tritium) PMR system was tested with the ITER mix in61 days of continuous operation. No decrease in performance was observed over the duration of the test. Decontamination factor (DF) was found to increase with decreasing inlet rate. Decontamination factors in excess of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 5} were obtained, but the exact value of the highest DF could not be determined because of analysis limitations. Results of the 61-day test were used to design a 2-stage PMR system for use in tritium testing. The PMR system was scaled up by a factor of 6 and built into a glovebox in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is approximately 1/5th of the expected full ITER scale. The ITER mix was injected into the PMR system for 31 hours, during which 4.5 g of tritium were processed. The 1st stage had DF = 200 and the 2nd stage had DF = 2.9 {times} 10{sup 6}. The overall DF = 5.8 {times} 10{sup 8}, which is greater than ITER requirements.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetism of A2Co12As7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Ovidiu Garlea, V.; Chai, Ping; Geondzhian, Andrey Y.; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A.; Xin, Yan; Menushenkov, Alexey P.; Chernikov, Roman V.; Shatruk, Michael

    2015-08-28

    In this study, ternary intermetallics, A2Co12As7 (A=Ca, Y, Ce–Yb), have been synthesized by annealing mixtures of elements in molten Bi at 1223 K. The materials obtained crystallize in the P63/m variant of the Zr2Fe12P7 structure type. The unit cell volume shows a monotonic decrease with the increasing atomic number of the rare-earth metal, with the exception of Ce-, Eu-, and Yb-containing compounds. An examination of these outliers with X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) spectroscopy revealed mixed valence of Ce, Eu, and Yb, with the average oxidation states of +3.20(1), +2.47(5), and +2.91(1), respectively, at room temperature. Magnetic behavior ofmore » A2Co12As7 is generally characterized by ferromagnetic ordering of Co 3d moments at 100–140 K, followed by low-temperature ordering of rare-earth 4f moments. The 3d-4f magnetic coupling changes from antiferromagnetic for A=Pr–Sm to ferromagnetic for A=Ce and Eu–Yb. Finally, polarized neutron scattering experiments were performed to support the postulated ferro- and ferrimagnetic ground states for Ce2Co12As7 and Nd2Co12As7, respectively.« less

  20. A method distinguishing expressed vs. null mutations of the Col1A1 gene in osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redford-Badwal, D.A.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of bone characterized by increased susceptibility to fracture. Most of the causative mutations were identified in patients with the lethal form of the disease. Attention is now shifting to the milder forms of OI where glycine substitutions and null producing mutations have been found. Single amino acid substitutions can be identified by RT/PCR of total cellular RNA, but this approach does not work well for null mutations since the defective transcript does not accumulate in the cytoplasm. We have altered our RNA extraction method to separate RNA from the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cultured fibroblasts. Standard methods of mutation identification (RT/PCR followed by SSCP) is applied to each RNA fraction. DNA from an abnormal band on the SSCP gel is eluted and amplified by PCR for cloning and sequencing. Using this approach we have identified an Asp to Asn change in exon 50 (type II OI) and a Gly to Arg in exon 11 (type I OI) of the COL1A1 gene. These changes were found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. These putative mutations are currently being confirmed by protein studies. In contrast, three patients with mild OI associated with reduced {proportional_to}(I)mRNA, had distinguishing SSCP bands present in the nuclear but not the cytoplasmic compartment. In one case a frame shift mutation was observed, while the other two revealed polymorphisms. The compartmentalization of the mutant allele has directed us to look elsewhere in the transcript for the causative mutation. This approach to mutation identification is capable of distinguishing these fundamentally different types of mutations and allows for preferential cloning and sequencing of the abnormal allele.

  1. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  2. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4? sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  3. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  4. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  5. Data:00cdded9-47a1-49b6-a217-10941ffbefc6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cdded9-47a1-49b6-a217-10941ffbefc6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  6. Data:F9109623-5e77-4c82-a1f5-019fc4f4d029 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    c82-a1f5-019fc4f4d029 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  7. Data:Bddd4318-f08d-4223-a1c9-638b515268f9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bddd4318-f08d-4223-a1c9-638b515268f9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  8. Data:A125b2bf-bc5f-4315-a944-c784a51a1dac | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    c784a51a1dac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2....

  9. Data:80c4b163-4218-4bba-b1e5-536338a1d458 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bba-b1e5-536338a1d458 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  11. The R6A-1 peptide binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1} but is not a GDP-dissociation inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Francis S. . E-mail: fwillard@med.unc.edu; Siderovski, David P.

    2006-01-27

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that convert signals from membrane receptors into changes in intracellular physiology. Recently, several peptides that bind heterotrimeric G-protein {alpha} subunits have been isolated including the novel G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP binding peptides R6A and KB-752. The R6A peptide and its minimized derivative R6A-1 interact with G{alpha}{sub i1} . GDP. Based on spectroscopic analysis of BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S binding to G{alpha}{sub i1}, it has been reported that R6A-1 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity against G{alpha}{sub i1} [W.W. Ja, R.W. Roberts, Biochemistry 43 (28) (2004) 9265-9275]. Using radioligand binding, we show that R6A-1 is not a GDI for G{alpha}{sub i1} subunits. Furthermore, we demonstrate that R6A-1 reduces the fluorescence quantum yield of the G{alpha}{sub i1}-BODIPYFL-GTP{gamma}S complex, thus explaining the previously reported GDI activity as a fluorescence artifact. We further show that R6A-1 has significant sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor peptide KB-752 that binds to switch II of G{alpha}{sub i1}. We use competitive binding analysis to show that R6A-1 also binds to switch II of G{alpha} subunits.

  12. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Clitfon, Mathew C.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer withmore » a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide β-bulgein β2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the β-sheet.« less

  13. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Clitfon, Mathew C.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer with a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by H-?N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide ?-bulgein ?2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the ?-sheet.

  14. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  15. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  16. Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-29

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

  17. Development of a 2.0 eV AlGaInP Solar Cell Grown by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Dippo, Pat; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2015-06-14

    AlGaInP solar cells with a bandgap (Eg) of ~2.0 eV are developed for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This material system is of great interest for both space and concentrator photovoltaics due to its high bandgap, which enables the development of high-efficiency five-junction and six-junction devices and is also useful for solar cells operated at elevated temperatures. In this work, we explore the conditions for the Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. A ~2.0 eV AlGaInP solar cell is demonstrated with an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 1.59V, a bandgap-voltage offset (WOC) of 420mV, a fill factor (FF) of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. These AlGaInP cells have attained a similar FF, WOC and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) to the best upright GaInP cells grown in our lab to date.

  18. Application of a solar wind model driven by turbulence dissipation to a 2D magnetic field configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Miki?, Zoran; Velli, Marco E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com E-mail: mikic@predsci.com

    2014-12-01

    Although it is widely accepted that photospheric motions provide the energy source and that the magnetic field must play a key role in the process, the detailed mechanisms responsible for heating the Sun's corona and accelerating the solar wind are still not fully understood. Cranmer et al. developed a sophisticated, one-dimensional (1D), time-steady model of the solar wind with turbulence dissipation. By varying the coronal magnetic field, they obtain, for a single choice of wave properties, a realistic range of slow and fast wind conditions with a sharp latitudinal transition between the two streams. Using a 1D, time-dependent model of the solar wind of Lionello et al., which incorporates turbulent dissipation of Alfvn waves to provide heating and acceleration of the plasma, we have explored a similar configuration, obtaining qualitatively equivalent results. However, our calculations suggest that the rapid transition between slow and fast wind suggested by this 1D model may be disrupted in multidimensional MHD simulations by the requirement of transverse force balance.

  19. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Martins, L. Miguel; Kahle, Philipp J.; Krueger, Rejko

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. A 2.5D boundary element formulation for modeling damped waves in arbitrary cross-section waveguides and cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 ; Bartoli, I.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: Dispersive properties of viscoelastic waveguides and cavities are computed using a regularized 2.5D BEM. Linear viscoelasticity is introduced at the constitutive level by means of frequency dependent complex moduli. A contour integral algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is used to select the permissible Riemann sheets. Attenuation of surface waves in cavities approaches the attenuation of Rayleigh waves. -- Abstract: A regularized 2.5D boundary element method (BEM) is proposed to predict the dispersion properties of damped stress guided waves in waveguides and cavities of arbitrary cross-section. The wave attenuation, induced by material damping, is introduced using linear viscoelastic constitutive relations and described in a spatial manner by the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber. The discretized dispersive wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is solved obtaining complex axial wavenumbers for a fixed frequency using a contour integral algorithm. Due to the singular characteristics and the multivalued feature of the wave equation, the requirement of holomorphicity inside the contour region over the complex wavenumber plane is fulfilled by the introduction of the Sommerfeld branch cuts and by the choice of the permissible Riemann sheets. A post processing analysis is developed for the extraction of the energy velocity of propagative guided waves. The reliability of the method is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained for a rail and a bar with square cross-section with those obtained from a 2.5D Finite Element formulation also known in literature as Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method. Next, to show the potential of the proposed numerical framework, dispersion properties are predicted for surface waves propagating along cylindrical cavities of arbitrary cross-section. It is demonstrated that the attenuation of surface waves approaches

  1. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S; Mahdavi, S; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  2. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  3. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, Jackye; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  4. bnw32a1.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the ... 5.2 Preparation and Testing of Polymer ... evaporator to a damp solid, which was mixed with ...

  5. bnw32a1.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raw materials are shipped in by truck. or rail. A detailed analysis of the economic estimates for the baseline process is given in Appendix 4. The total capital investment for...

  6. uth93a1.tmp

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Worman, F. C. V., 1969. Archeological inveigations at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's ... Emory's bacchari; Iittleleafmountain mahogany rabbitbrush green rabbitbmsh blackbrush ...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of thermoalkaliphilic Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1 Reveals Molecular Adaptations to Extreme pH and Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalamorz, Falk; Keis, Stefanie; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brown, Steven D; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L; Han, Cliff; Martin, S L.; Morgan, Hugh; Cook, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The genes and molecular machines that allow for a thermoalkaliphilic lifestyle have not been defined. To address this goal, we report on the improved high-quality draft genome sequence of Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1, an obligately aerobic bacterium that grows optimally at pH 9.5 and 65 to 70 C on a wide variety of carbon and energy sources.

  8. A second mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) causing Stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy) is also a premature termination codon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, N.N.; Knowlton, R.G.; DiMascio, J.; Prockop, D.J. ); McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Zackai, E.H.; LaRossa, D. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at amino acid position [alpha]1-9 in exon 7 to a premature termination signal for translation. The second mutation found to cause AO was, therefore, similar to the first in that both created premature termination signals in the COL2A1 gene. Since mutations producing premature termination signals have not previously been detected in genes for fibrillar collagens, the results raise the possibility that such mutations in the COL2A1 gene are a common cause of AO. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Premature chain termination is a unifying mechanism for COL1A1 null alleles in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Roberts, E.J.

    1996-10-01

    Nonsense and frameshift mutations, which predict premature termination of translation, often cause a dramatic reduction in the amount of transcript from the mutant allele (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In some genes, these mutations also influence RNA splicing and induce skipping of the exon that contains the nonsense codon. To begin to dissect how premature termination alters the metabolism of RNA from the COL1A1 gene, we studied nonsense and frameshift mutations distributed over exons 11-49 of the gene. These mutations were originally identified in 10 unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. We observed marked reduction in steady-state amounts of mRNA from the mutant allele in both total cellular and nuclear RNA extracts of cells from affected individuals, suggesting that nonsense-mediated decay of COL1A1 RNA is a nuclear phenomenon. Position of the mutation within the gene did not influence this observation. None of the mutations induced skipping of either the exon containing the mutation or, for the frameshifts, the downstream exons with the new termination sites. Our data suggest that nonsense and frameshift mutations throughout most of the COL1A1 gene result in a null allele, which is associated with the predictable mild clinical phenotype, OI type I. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  11. Implementation of Division B, Title I, Section 1101(a)(2) of the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 2011-04 provides implementing instructions and guidance for Section 1101(a)(2) of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, Pub. L. 112-10 (hereinafter "Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011). Section 1101(a)(2) of the Act provides that, unless otherwise specified, the authority and conditions provided for projects or activities (including the costs of direct loans and loan guarantees) appropriated, authorized, or funded in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010, Pub. L. 111-85, still apply.

  12. Data:85f4a2f7-fc00-491f-9550-006c82a148f1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f4a2f7-fc00-491f-9550-006c82a148f1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  13. Assessment of Hard-to-Detect Radionuclide Levels in Decommissioning Waste From the Bohunice NPP-A1, Slovakia, for Clearance and Disposal Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slavik, O.; Moravek, J.; Stubna, M.

    2002-02-26

    For assessments of hard-to-detect radionuclides (HD-RN) contents in various type of radwastes at the NPP-A1, available empirical data referenced to 137Cs (actinides, 90Sr, 99Tc, 63Ni, 14C) and the theoretical assessment for the remaining HD-RN using calculated RN inventory and a simple model with effective relative (137Cs) spent fuel release fractions was applied. The analytical data of extended radiochemical analysis for the existing available operational radwaste forms have been reviewed for this purpose. 137Cs, 90Sr and 241Am were set up as release markers for partial spent fuel release groups of HD-RNs within which the total fractions of HD-RN released to the operational radwastes were assumed to be constant. It was shown by the assessment carried out that 137Cs and HD-RNs 129I, 99Tc, and partly 79Se and 14C are the main contributors to the disposal dose limit for the radioactive concentrate at NPP A-1. In the case of the radioactive sludge from the operational radwaste system the role of predominant dose contributors belongs to actinides 239,240Pu and 241Am. In the case of clearance of radioactive material from the NPP-A1 site, only the reference radionuclide, 137Cs was predicted to be the most dominant dose contributor. In all of these cases the estimated contributions of other hard-to-detect radionuclides to respective disposal or release dose limit are lower by 2 and more orders of magnitude. As a lesson learned, the most attention is proposed to focus on the control and measurement of the critical HD-RNs indicated by the assessment. For the control of less important HD-RNs, the developed release coefficient method is sufficient to be applied.

  14. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Severson, Paul L.; Kulak, Mikhail V.; Futscher, Bernard W.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  15. Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-04

    A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. szj91a2.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis of Thomsen Parameters for Finely Layered VTI Media James G. Berryman Patricia A. ... Analysis of Thomsen parameters for finely layered VTI media JamG. Berryman, Lawrence ...

  17. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Tv2a.2, a microsymbiont of Tachigali versicolor discovered in Barro Colorado Island of Panama

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; et al

    2015-05-17

    Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Tachigali versicolor collected in Barro Colorado Island of Panama. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2, together with high-quality permanent draft genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,496,279 bp high-quality draft genome is arranged in 87 scaffolds of 87 contigs, contains 8,109 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  18. The induction of reactive oxygen species and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 is associated with S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Qibing; Liu Lulu; Lu Yingmei; Tao Rongrong; Huang Jiyun; Shioda, Norifumi; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han Feng; Lou Yijia

    2010-05-01

    The pathophysiological relevance of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO)-induced endothelial cell injury remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GSNO-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells. Morphological evaluation through DAPI staining and propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. In cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells, exposure to GSNO led to a time- and dose-dependent apoptotic cascade. When intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured in GSNO-treated cells with the fluorescent probes 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, we observed elevated ROS levels and a concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that GSNO-induced death signaling is mediated through a ROS-mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, we found that peroxynitrite formation and Omi/HtrA2 release from mitochondria were involved in this phenomenon, whereas changes of death-receptor dependent signaling were not detected in the same context. The inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation and Omi/HtrA2 by a pharmacological approach provided significant protection against caspase-3 activation and GSNO-induced cell death, confirming that GSNO triggers the death cascade in endothelial cells in a mitochondria-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that ROS overproduction and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 play a pivotal role in reactive nitrogen species-induced cell death, and the modulation of these pathways can be of significant therapeutic benefit.

  19. Synthesis, selected coordination chemistry and extraction behavior of a (phosphinoylmethyl)pyridyl N-oxide-functionalized ligand based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ouizem, Sabrina; Rosario Amorin, Daniel; Dickie, Diane A.; Cramer, Roger E.; Campana, Charles F.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Paine, Robert T.

    2015-05-09

    For syntheses of new multidentate chelating ligands ((6,6'4(1,4-diazepane-1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(pyridine-6,2-diyl))bis(methylene))bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) (2) and 6,6'-((1,4-diazepane1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(2-((diphenylphosphoryl)methyl)pyridine 1-oxide) (3), based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform functionalized with 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine P-oxide and 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine NP-dioxide fragments, respectively, the results are reported. Our results from studies of the coordination chemistry of the ligands with selected lanthanide nitrates and Cu(BF4)(2) are outlined, and crystal structures for two complexes, [Cu(2)](BF4)2 and [Cu(3)](BF4)2, are described along with survey Eu(III) and Am(III) solvent extraction analysis, for 3.

  20. Synthesis, selected coordination chemistry and extraction behavior of a (phosphinoylmethyl)pyridyl N-oxide-functionalized ligand based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouizem, Sabrina; Rosario Amorin, Daniel; Dickie, Diane A.; Cramer, Roger E.; Campana, Charles F.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Paine, Robert T.

    2015-05-09

    For syntheses of new multidentate chelating ligands ((6,6'4(1,4-diazepane-1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(pyridine-6,2-diyl))bis(methylene))bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) (2) and 6,6'-((1,4-diazepane1,4-diyl)bis(methylene))bis(2-((diphenylphosphoryl)methyl)pyridine 1-oxide) (3), based upon a 1,4-diazepane platform functionalized with 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine P-oxide and 2-(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl)pyridine NP-dioxide fragments, respectively, the results are reported. Our results from studies of the coordination chemistry of the ligands with selected lanthanide nitrates and Cu(BF4)(2) are outlined, and crystal structures for two complexes, [Cu(2)](BF4)2 and [Cu(3)](BF4)2, are described along with survey Eu(III) and Am(III) solvent extraction analysis, for 3.

  1. Inhibitory effect of CT domain of CCN3/NOV on proliferation and differentiation of osteogenic mesenchymal stem cells, Kusa-A1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsuki, Yuko; Sakamoto, Kei; Minamizato, Tokutaro; Makino, Hatsune; Umezawa, Akihiro; Ikeda, Masa-aki; Perbal, Bernard; Amagasa, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Katsube, Ken-ichi

    2008-04-11

    CCN3/NOV activates the Notch signal through the carboxyl terminal cysteine-rich (CT) domain. CCN3 transfection to Kusa-A1 inhibited osteogenic differentiation and cell proliferation, which is accompanied by upregulation of Hes/Hey, Notch downstream targets, and p21, a CDK inhibitor. Upregulation of Hes/Hey and p21 was abrogated by the deletion of CT domain. Anti-proliferative activity of CCN3 was also abrogated by CT domain deletion whereas anti-osteogenic activity was not completely abrogated. We found that CT domain-deleted CCN3 still possesses antagonistic effect on BMP-2. These results suggest that CCN3 employs Notch and BMP pathways in anti-osteogenic activity while it inhibits cell proliferation uniquely by Notch/p21 pathway.

  2. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex.more » We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.« less

  3. TH-A-9A-06: Inverse Planning of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtained by solving a constrained integer-linear problem. (4) The shots are placed into ... Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; GEOMETRY; KERNELS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; ...

  4. Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhi; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.

    2012-06-12

    Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

  5. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD and satisfying dose limits to critical structures. This project is funded by MCubed and grant R01-CA132834.

  6. Light hadron spectra in the constituent quark model with the Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitrasinovic, V. . E-mail: dmitrasin@yahoo.com; Toki, H.

    2006-02-15

    We make a critical comparison of several versions of instanton-induced interactions present in the literature, all based on ITEP group's extension to three colours and flavours of 't Hooft's effective lagrangian, with the predictions of the phenomenological Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa (KKM) chiral quark lagrangian. We analyze the effects of all versions of the effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interactions on light hadron spectra in the non-relativistic constituent quark model. We show that the KKMT force, when used as a residual hyperfine interaction reproduces the correct ordering of pseudoscalar and vector mesons even without explicitly taking chiral symmetry into account. Moreover, the nucleon spectra are also correctly reproduced, only the Roper resonance remains too high, albeit lower than usual, at 1660 MeV. The latter's lower than expected mass is not due to a small excitation energy, as in the Glozman-Riska (GR) model, but to a combination of colour, flavour, and spatial wave function properties that enhance the relevant matrix elements. The KKMT interaction explicitly depends on flavour and spin of the quarks, but unlike the GR flavour-spin one it has a firm footing in QCD. In the process we provide several technical advances, in particular we show the first explicit derivation of the three-body Fierz transformation and apply it to the KKM interaction. We also discuss the ambiguities associated with the colour degree of freedom.

  7. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 GLOBAL INVENTORY FOR SO(X) AND NO(X) ON A 1(DEGREE) X 1(DEGREE) LATITUDE-LONGITUDE GRID.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN HEYST,B.J.

    1999-10-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen oxides emitted to the atmosphere have been linked to the acidification of water bodies and soils and perturbations in the earth's radiation balance. In order to model the global transport and transformation of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x}, detailed spatial and temporal emission inventories are required. Benkovitz et al. (1996) published the development of an inventory of 1985 global emissions of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from anthropogenic sources. The inventory was gridded to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} latitude-longitude grid and has served as input to several global modeling studies. There is now a need to provide modelers with an update of this inventory to a more recent year, with a split of the emissions into elevated and low level sources. This paper describes the development of a 1990 update of the SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} global inventories that also includes a breakdown of sources into 17 sector groups. The inventory development starts with a gridded global default EDGAR inventory (Olivier et al, 1996). In countries where more detailed national inventories are available, these are used to replace the emissions for those countries in the global default. The gridded emissions are distributed into two height levels (0-100m and >100m) based on the final plume heights that are estimated to be typical for the various sectors considered. The sources of data as well as some of the methodologies employed to compile and develop the 1990 global inventory for SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} are discussed. The results reported should be considered to be interim since the work is still in progress and additional data sets are expected to become available.

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2; a microsymbiont of Andira inermis discovered in Costa Rica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed; Baeshen, Nabih; et al

    2015-06-14

    Bradyrhizobium sp. Ai1a-2 is is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen fixing root nodule of Andira inermis collected from Tres Piedras in Costa Rica. In this report we describe, for the first time, the genome sequence information and annotation of this legume microsymbiont. The 9,029,266 bp genome has a GC content of 62.56% with 247 contigs arranged into 246 scaffolds. The assembled genome contains 8,482 protein-coding genes and 102 RNA-only encoding genes. Lastly, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Rootmore » Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  10. CX-003561: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ultra Efficient Combined Heat and Power Using High Temperature Fuel CellCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Danbury, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-005458: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida Energy Opportunity Fund ? Mustang Vacuum SystemsCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, B1.31, B5.1Date: 03/16/2011Location(s): Sarasota, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-002720: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Low Temperature Heat Recovery Absorption Chiller Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) ModuleCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9Date: 06/11/2010Location(s): Herndon, VirginiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-006555: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 08/17/2011Location(s): Lexington, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-005952: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina Offshore Wind Feasibility Study: Ocean Wind Energy Analysis - RevisedCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.1Date: 05/27/2011Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-006479: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fenestration System Energy Performance Rating Development and ResearchCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B1.2, B5.1Date: 08/12/2011Location(s): Greenbelt, MarylandOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-006556: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gallium Nitride Electronics for Grid ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 08/17/2011Location(s): Cambridge, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-004066: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Pilot Testing of a Membrane System for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide CaptureCX(s) Applied: A1, A2, A9, A11, B3.6Date: 10/01/2010Location(s): Menlo Park, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Preliminary Results On a 2D Dosimetry System Based On the Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Al2O3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, M; Eller, S; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Hanson, O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a precise 2D dose mapping technique based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning reader was developed using fast F{sup +}-center (lifetime of <7 ns) and slow F-center (lifetime of 35 ms) OSL emission from newly developed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films (Landauer Inc.). An algorithm was developed to correct images for both material and system properties. Since greater contribution of the F??-center emission in the recorded signal increases the readout efficiency and robustness of image corrections, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg film samples are being investigated in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C samples. Preliminary investigations include exposure of the films to a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in solid water phantom with an SSD of 100 cm, using a 10 cm × 10 cm flat field or a 4 cm × 4 cm field with a 60° wedge filter. Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and EBT2 Gafchromic film were also exposed for comparison. Results: The results indicate that the algorithm is able to correct images and calculate 2D dose. For the wedge field irradiation, the calculated dose at the center of the field was 0.9 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 0.87 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg, whereas, the delivered dose was 0.95 Gy. A good qualitative agreement of the dose profiles was obtained between the OSL films and EDR2 and EBT2 films. Laboratory tests using a beta source suggest that a large dynamic range (10{sup −2}−10{sup 2} Gy) can be achieved using this technique. Conclusion: A 2D dosimetry system and an in-house image correction algorithm were developed for 2D film dosimetry in medical applications. The system is in the preliminary stage of development, but the data demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. This work was supported by Landauer, Inc.

  19. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  20. Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Chevron USA Production Company, Wolfcamp A2 Sand, Pakenham Field, Val Verde Basin. Topical report, July 1995-March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, C.A.; Weijers, L.; Minner, W.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the results from Chevron`s Pakenham Field effort at fracture stimulation engineering which incorporated, to the greatest extent possible, the results of actual measured field data. Measurement of the sand-shale closure stress contrast around the Wolfcamp A2 sand and the relatively high net fracturing pressures (compared to the closure stress contrast) that were observed during real-data (net pressure) fracture treatment analysis revealed that fractures obtained in most of the treatments were much shorter and less confined than originally expected: the fracture half-length was about 200 to 300 ft (instead of about 600 ft), which is consistent with estimates from post-fracture pressure build-up tests. Based on these measurements, Chevron`s fracturing practices in the Pakenham Field could be carefully reviewed to enhance fracture economics. Supported by the real-data fracture treatment analysis, several changes in completion, fracture treatment design and data-collection procedures were made, such as: (1) using cheaper 20/40 Ottawa sand instead of pre-cured 20/40 resin coated sand; (2) reducing the pad fluid size, as fluid leakoff from the fracture into the formation was relatively low; and, (3) utilizing stepdown tests and proppant slugs to minimize near-wellbore screen-out potential (in the Wolfcamp D sand).

  1. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mega-Macas, A.; Vizcano-de-Julin, A.; Cortzar, O. D.

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  2. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-12-31

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness {sigma}{sub mns} as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage {sigma}{sub mns} of 1.3 {+-} 0.3 {micro}m for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of {sigma}{sub mns} on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered {sigma}{sub mns} to 1.0 {+-} 0.05 {micro}m.

  3. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    An integral part of the licensing procedure for the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, involves characterization of the in situ rheology for the design and construction of the facility and the emplacement of canisters containing radioactive waste. The data used to model the thermal and mechanical behavior of the repository and surrounding lithologies include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. In this study, a suite of experiments was performed on cores recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3 drilled in support of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The holes penetrated the Timber Mountain tuff and two thermal/mechanical units of the Paintbrush tuff. The thermal/mechanical stratigraphy was defined by Ortiz to group rock horizons of similar properties for the purpose of simplifying modeling efforts. The relationship between the geologic stratigraphy and the thermal/mechanical stratigraphy for each borehole is presented. The tuff samples in this study have a wide range of welding characteristics (usually reflected in sample porosity), and a smaller range of mineralogy and petrology characteristics. Generally, the samples are silicic, ash-fall tuffs that exhibit large variability in their elastic and strength properties.

  4. A 2.15 hr ORBITAL PERIOD FOR THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY XB 1832-330 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6652

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, M. C.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Elshamouty, K. G.; Edmonds, P. D. E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-03-10

    We present a candidate orbital period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XB 1832-330 in the globular cluster NGC 6652 using a 6.5 hr Gemini South observation of the optical counterpart of the system. Light curves in g' and r' for two LMXBs in the cluster, sources A and B in previous literature, were extracted and analyzed for periodicity using the ISIS image subtraction package. A clear sinusoidal modulation is evident in both of A's curves, of amplitude {approx}0.11 mag in g' and {approx}0.065 mag in r', while B's curves exhibit rapid flickering, of amplitude {approx}1 mag in g' and {approx}0.5 mag in r'. A Lomb-Scargle test revealed a 2.15 hr periodic variation in the magnitude of A with a false alarm probability less than 10{sup -11}, and no significant periodicity in the light curve for B. Though it is possible that saturated stars in the vicinity of our sources partially contaminated our signal, the identification of A's binary period is nonetheless robust.

  5. Temperature dependence of the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline pyrochlores A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, J.; Sun, C.; Dholabhai, P. P.; Xia, Y.; Tang, M.; Chen, D.; Yang, D. Y.; Li, Y. H.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2016-03-21

    A potentially enhanced radiation resistance of nanocrystalline materials, as a consequence of the high density of interfaces and surfaces, has attracted much attention both to understand the fundamental role of these defect sinks and to develop them for high-radiation environments. Here, irradiation response of nanocrystalline A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu) pyrochlore powders with grain sizes of 20–30 nm was investigated by 1-MeV Kr2+ ion bombardment. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the critical amorphization fluence for each nanocrystalline compound at room temperature was greater than that for their coarse-grained counterparts, indicating an enhanced amorphization resistance. Themore » effect of temperature on the irradiation response of one of these compounds, nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7, was further examined by performing ion irradiation at an elevated temperature range of 480–600 K. The critical amorphization temperature (Tc) was found to be noticeably higher in nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 (610 K) than its coarse-grained counterpart (480 K), revealing that nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 is less resistant to amorphization compared to its coarse-grained phase under high temperatures. We interpret these results with the aid of atomistic simulations. Molecular statics calculations find that cation antisite defects are less energetically costly to form near surfaces than in the bulk, suggesting that the nanocrystalline form of these materials is generally less susceptible to amorphization than coarse-grained counterparts at low temperatures where defect kinetics are negligible. In contrast, at high temperatures, the annealing efficiency of antisite defects by cation interstitials is significantly reduced due to the sink properties of the surfaces in the nanocrystalline pyrochlore, which contributes to the observed higher amorphization temperature in the nano-grained phase than in coarse-grained counterpart. Altogether, these results provide new

  6. Optical characterization of free electron concentration in heteroepitaxial InN layers using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 transfer-matrix algebra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsidis, C. C.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2013-02-21

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been implemented as a non-destructive, non-invasive, tool for the optical characterization of a set of c-plane InN single heteroepitaxial layers spanning a wide range of thicknesses (30-2000 nm). The c-plane (0001) InN epilayers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on GaN(0001) buffer layers which had been grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is shown that for arbitrary multilayers with homogeneous anisotropic layers having their principal axes coincident with the laboratory coordinates, a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 matrix algebra based on a general transfer-matrix method (GTMM) is adequate to interpret their optical response. Analysis of optical reflectance in the far and mid infrared spectral range has been found capable to discriminate between the bulk, the surface and interface contributions of free carriers in the InN epilayers revealing the existence of electron accumulation layers with carrier concentrations in mid 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at both the InN surface and the InN/GaN interface. The spectra could be fitted with a three-layer model, determining the different electron concentration and mobility values of the bulk and of the surface and the interface electron accumulation layers in the InN films. The variation of these values with increasing InN thickness could be also sensitively detected by the optical measurements. The comparison between the optically determined drift mobility and the Hall mobility of the thickest sample reveals a value of r{sub H} = 1.49 for the Hall factor of InN at a carrier concentration of 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 300 Degree-Sign {Kappa}.

  7. Data:D2e8eb8e-d151-44bc-8a2c-7e468f57f91f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a2c-7e468f57f91f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  8. The effects of clobazam treatment in rats on the expression of genes and proteins encoding glucronosyltransferase 1A/2B (UGT1A/2B) and multidrug resistance‐associated protein-2 (MRP2), and development of thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyawaki, Izuru Tamura, Akitoshi; Matsumoto, Izumi; Inada, Hiroshi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2012-12-15

    Clobazam (CLB) is known to increase hepatobiliary thyroxine (T4) clearance in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, which results in hypothyroidism followed by thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy. However, the mechanism of the acceleration of T4-clearance has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we tried to clarify the roles of hepatic UDP-glucronosyltransferase (UGT) isoenzymes (UGT1A and UGT2B) and efflux transporter (multidrug resistance–associated protein-2; MRP2) in the CLB-induced acceleration of T4-clearance using two mutant rat strains, UGT1A-deficient mutant (Gunn) and MRP2-deficient mutant (EHBR) rats, especially focusing on thyroid morphology, levels of circulating hormones (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3)) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and mRNA or protein expressions of UGTs (Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, and Ugt2b1/2) and MRP2 (Mrp). CLB induced thyroid morphological changes with increases in TSH in SD and Gunn rats, but not in EHBR rats. T4 was slightly decreased in SD and Gunn rats, and T3 was decreased in Gunn rats, whereas these hormones were maintained in EHBR rats. Hepatic Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt2b1/2, and Mrp2 mRNAs were upregulated in SD rats. In Gunn rats, UGT1A mRNAs (Ugt1a1/6) and protein levels were quite low, but UGT2B mRNAs (Ugt2b1/2) and protein were prominently upregulated. In SD and Gunn rats, MRP2 mRNA and protein were upregulated to the same degree. These results suggest that MRP2 is an important contributor in development of the thyroid cellular hypertrophy in CLB-treated rats, and that UGT1A and UGT2B work in concert with MRP2 in the presence of MRP2 function to enable the effective elimination of thyroid hormones. -- Highlights: ► Role of UGT and MRP2 in thyroid pathology was investigated in clobazam-treated rats. ► Clobazam induced thyroid cellular hypertrophy in SD and Gunn rats, but not EHBR rats. ► Hepatic Mrp2 gene and protein were upregulated in SD and Gunn rats, but not EHBR rats. ► Neither serum thyroid hormones (T3/T4

  9. Microsoft Word - table_A1.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of differences in company accounting systems in terms of scope and definition. A positive "unaccounted for" volume ...

  10. Diagnostics from a 1-D atmospheric column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flatley, J.M.; Mace, G.

    1996-04-01

    Various diagnostics were computed from an array of radiosondes during an intensive field operation arranged by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. The network data was centered around the site at Lamont, Oklahoma. The apparent heat source and apparent moisture sink were computed and compared to the kinematic vertical velocity for both real data and the mesoscale analysis and prediction system. Three different case studies of various weathe regimes were examined.

  11. A:\\1FRONT(REVISED).PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and traffic management, patents law, real and personal property management, ... Report (1995), and DOE's Contract Reform Team Report (1994) all have one thing in common. ...

  12. Residential Refrigerators-Freezers (Appendix A1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards.

  13. A1.5 Fusion Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amendt, P

    2011-03-31

    Analysis and radiation hydrodynamics simulations for expected high-gain fusion target performance on a demonstration 1-GWe Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant in the mid-2030s timeframe are presented. The required laser energy driver is 2.2 MJ at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength, and a fusion target gain greater than 60 at a repetition rate of 16 Hz is the design goal for economic and commercial attractiveness. A scaling-law analysis is developed to benchmark the design parameter space for hohlraum-driven central hot-spot ignition. A suite of integrated hohlraum simulations is presented to test the modeling assumptions and provide a basis for a near-term experimental resolution of the key physics uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF is poised to demonstrate ignition by 2012 based on the central hot spot (CHS) mode of ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn [1]. This immediate prospect underscores the imperative and timeliness of advancing inertial fusion as a carbon-free, virtually limitless source of energy by the mid-21st century to substantially offset fossil fuel technologies. To this end, an intensive effort is underway to leverage success at the NIF and to provide the foundations for a prototype 'LIFE.1' engineering test facility by {approx}2025, followed by a commercially viable 'LIFE.2' demonstration power plant operating at 1 GWe by {approx}2035. The current design goal for LIFE.2 is to accommodate {approx}2.2 MJ of laser energy (entering the high-Z radiation enclosure or 'hohlraum') at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength operating at a repetition rate of 16 Hz and to provide a fusion target yield of 132 MJ. To achieve this design goal first requires a '0-d' analytic gain model that allows convenient exploration of parameter space and target optimization. This step is then followed by 2- and 3-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations that incorporate laser beam transport, x-ray radiation transport, atomic physics, and thermonuclear burn [2]. These simulations form the basis for assessing the susceptibility to hydrodynamic instability growth, target performance margins, laser backscatter induced by plasma density fluctuations within the hohlraum, and the threat spectrum emerging from the igniting capsule, e.g., spectra, fluences and anisotropy of the x rays and ions, for input into the chamber survivability calculations. The simulations follow the guidelines of a 'point design' methodology, which formally designates a well-defined milestone in concept development that meets established criteria for experimental testing. In Section 2, the 0-d analytic gain model to survey gain versus laser energy parameter space is discussed. Section 3 looks at the status of integrated hohlraum simulations and the needed improvements in laser-hohlraum coupling efficiency to meet the LIFE.2 threshold (net) target gain of {approx}60. Section 4 considers advanced hohlraum designs to well exceed the LIFE.2 design goal for satisfactory performance margins. We summarize in Sec. 5.

  14. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  15. Recrystallization of a 2D Plasma Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapek, C. A.; Samsonov, D.; Zhdanov, S.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G. E.

    2007-01-05

    A monolayer plasma crystal consisting of micron-sized particles levitated in the sheath of a rf discharge was melted by applying a short electric pulse to two parallel wires located at the height of the particles. Structural properties and the particle temperature were examined during the stage of recrystallization. A liquidlike phase was followed by a transient state characterized by energy release and the restoring of long range translational order while the defect fraction was low. No long range orientational order was found, though highly ordered domains formed locally. Numerical simulations revealed the same regimes of recrystallization as those observed in the experiment.

  16. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mA cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.

  17. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A; Ge, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH/NCI under grant #R21CA161389 and a master research grant by Varian Medical System.

  18. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=d259a9

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    10: Energy Browse Previous | Browse Next PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION ... under section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act; (2) Activities conducted under the ...

  19. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mAmore » cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.« less

  20. NOI1VU1SININQV NOLLVINUOdNI A9H3N3 AO^HNH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study Release date: February 3, 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies

  1. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Programs W81XWH-13-1-0481 (LX), the National Institutes of Health 1R01 CA133474 and 1R21 A153587, and SRFDP (20124407120012) for funding.

  2. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucourt, Maximilian de Streitparth, Florian Collettini, Federico; Guettler, Felix; Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U. K.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  3. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By CX | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By CX A. - Categorical Exclusions Applicable to General Agency Actions A1 - Routine DOE business actions A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions A3 - Certain actions by Office of Hearings and Appeals A4 - Interpretations and rulings for existing regulations A5 - Interpretive rulemakings with no change in environmental effect A6 - Procedural rulemakings A7 - [Reserved] A8 - Awards of certain contracts A9 - Information gathering, analysis,

  4. WE-G-17A-07: Investigation of the Influence of the Electron Return Effect (ERE) On the Dose Distribution in Rectal Cancer Patients On a 1.5T MR-Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uilkema, S; Heide, U; Nijkamp, J; Sonke, J; Moreau, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this planning study is to investigate the influence of the ERE on the day-to-day dose distribution in rectal cancer patients, where changes in gas-pockets frequently occur. Methods: Daily CT scans of 5 patients treated neo-adjuvant with 5x5Gy for rectal cancer were used. We optimized two plans on the planning CT (Monaco, 1 mm3 dosegrid), a conventional 7-field 6MV IMRT plan (Dconv) and a plan in the presence of a 1.5T field (Dmrl). We recalculated the plans on all repeat-CT scans and evaluated under/over-dosage of the daily CTVs. Changes of more than 1% were considered significant. In the bowel area, we investigated the relative dose changes due to the ERE, where the contribution of the ERE was separated from other effects such as attenuation. Results: Both plans were comparable and compliant with ICRU 62 for all patients. For 2 fractions in one patient under-dosage in the CTV was significant, due to a disappearing gas-pocket. Here the V95 was 96.82 and 97.36% in in Dmrl compared to 98.85 and 98.66% in Dconv, respectively. For 3 fractions in another patient appearing gas-pockets resulted in significant over-dosage of the CTV. In these fractions the V107 was 1.882.68% in Dmrl compared to 0.331.27% in Dconv. In the bowel area the dose changes attributable to the ERE were approximately 5% in 1cc, at low dose levels. Conclusion: We were able to calculate acceptable treatment plans with and without a magnetic field. The ERE was present in the Dmrl, but the volumetric effect within the CTV was limited. Outside the CTV relative dose differences were similar, but on small volumes at lower, less relevant dose levels. This suggests that there is no clinical relevant ERE on dose distributions in rectal cancer patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac.

  5. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V. |

    1995-07-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a `backup,` self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  6. RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t9, S. nTCmI RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW OMA1ID9 V3 WMM I~UMMIM UU &!% W 2W WT AM 0? ?Ml U&O(1 LW pAM Mr MMW31 T!WOLVSD A GUS =-o &L MCMA I h MMK ON PLUPCMTtft GJ DR P -M~ CAM~ 07 W ULOW~ M *!Ti ~~mum 0sflOY iftJ A SLXQT OUT (Wi M I M ra IJJW MarB~ *~ W? $MOM.~ HMP~ IT V=h MMOTM RW1& 07W O RAttcMUU w~A0AO wAf~ K 43)AN wA BE tluywxwD (b(6 l~U %I S~)6 ASSA~ r 6 AM MWOim~~ SUM v~ DM 'VAT M OM1 IN * M S W IMIEf To MIK Row.

  7. Exhibit A-1. Labor Categories and Occupation Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Other 1 1 4 0.001 0.031 0.064 0.001 0.031 0.016 Thorium 15 5 27 0.067 0.052 0.096 0.004 ... 0.003 0.011 Plutonium 7 0.428 0.061 Thorium 10 0.128 0.013 Uranium 158 1.688 0.011 ...

  8. DOE/PPPO/03-0098&D1/A1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... from blades, jagged metal, or splintering woodsiding Flying particles from metal, wood, ... medium (sand, glass beads, grit, or CO 2 pellets) suspended in an air spray to loosen and ...

  9. A-1 APPENDIX A DEFINITION OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS Acronyms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FFTF Fast Flux Test Facility FFS Focused Feasibility Study FS Feasibility Study GIS Geographic Information System (used on page G-2) GPM Gallons Per Minute GPS Global ...

  10. Microsoft Word - Attachment A-1 Performance Work Statement Amended...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Perform andor coordinate maintenance activities and change combination-type safe locks, and maintain a supply of locksets, hardware, and spare parts and keys for immediate ...

  11. Search for B+ meson decay to a1+ K*0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260)K*{sup 0}(892). The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, represent 465 million B{anti B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the energy of the {Upsilon}(4S). We find no significant signal and set an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the product of branching fractions B(B{sup +} --> {alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260)K*{sup 0}(892)) x B({alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260) --> {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) of 1.8 x 10{sup -6}.

  12. Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Manufacturing Industries"," W ",613,0," W ",2," W ",0,0," W ",0,28.1 ,"Total",1947,98827,2220,2397,500,6887,13448,1627,728,48,8.2 ,,"West South Central Census Division" ...

  13. Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Manufacturing Industries"," W ",2,0," W ",2," W ",0,0," W ",0,28.1 ,"Total",1947,337,14,14,515,26,320,40,728,48,8.3 ,,"West South Central Census Division" ,"RSE Column ...

  14. Table A1: Tank Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    July 1, 1990) Lancaster Tanks and Steel Products Owens Corning (double ... wall since July 2005) Mid-South Steel Products, Inc. Xerxes (double wall ...

  15. Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers (Appendix A1 after May...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be ...

  16. A-1 APPENDIX A DEFINITION OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS Acronyms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of radioactive materials; each radionuclide has a characteristic constant half-life. Halogenated Hydrocarbons: Organic compounds containing atoms such as chlorine, fluorine,...

  17. Hanford Environmental Analytical Methods (methods as of March 1990). Volume 2, Appendix A1-O and appendix A1-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    Techniques in use at the Hanford Reservation as of March, 1990 for the analysis of liquids, organic wastes, soils, and sediments, are described. Limitations and applications of the techniques are included.

  18. SGR 0418+5729-HOW DOES A YOUNG NEUTRON STAR SPIN DOWN TO A 9 s PERIOD WITH A DIPOLE FIELD LESS THAN 10{sup 13} G?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alpar, M. A.; Ertan, Ue.; Caliskan, S.

    2011-05-01

    The period derivative bound for the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 0418+5729 establishes the magnetic dipole moment to be distinctly lower than the magnetar range, placing the source beyond the regime of isolated pulsar activity in the P-P-dot diagram and giving a characteristic age >2 x 10{sup 7} yr, much older than the 10{sup 5} yr age range of SGRs and anomalous X-ray pulsars. So the spin-down must be produced by a mechanism other than dipole radiation in vacuum. A fallback disk will spin down a neutron star with surface dipole magnetic field in the 10{sup 12} G range and initial rotation period P{sub 0} {approx} 100 ms to the 9.1 s period of SGR 0418+5729 in a few 10{sup 4} to {approx}10{sup 5} yr. The current upper limit to the period derivative gives a lower limit of {approx}10{sup 5} yr to the age that is not sensitive to the neutron star's initial conditions. The total magnetic field on the surface of SGR 0418+5729 could be significantly larger than its 10{sup 12} G dipole component.

  19. TU-A-9A-05: First Experimental Demonstration of the Anisotropic Detection Principle in X-Ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, M; Bazalova, M; Fahrig, R; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the sensitivity of X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) for in vivo molecular imaging. Is the maximum sensitivity achieved with an isotropic (4π) detector configuration? We prove that this is not necessarily true, and that a greater sensitivity is possible with anisotropic detector configuration. Methods: An XFCT imaging system was constructed consisting of 1) a collimated pencil beam x-ray source using a fluoroscopy grade x-ray tube; 2) a CdTe x-ray photon counting detector to detect fluorescent x-rays; and 3) a rotation/translation stage for tomographic imaging. We created a 6.5-cm diameter water phantom with 2-cm inserts of low gold concentration (0.25%–1%) to simulate tumors targeted by gold nano-particles. The placement of x-ray fluorescence detector were chosen to minimize scatter x-rays. XFCT imaging was performed at three different detector positions (60°, 90°, 145°) to determine the impact of forward-scatter, side-scatter, and back-scatter on imaging performance. The three data sets were also combined to estimate the imaging performance with an isotropic detector. Results: The highest imaging performance was achieved when the XF detector was in the backscatter 145° configuration. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was 5.5 for the 0.25% gold concentration compared to SNRs of 1.4, 0, and 2.4 for 60°, 90°, and combined (60°+90°+145°) datasets. Only the 145° detector arrangement alone could detect the 0.25% concentration. The imaging dose was 14 mGy for each detector arrangement experiment. Conclusion: This study experimentally proves, for the fist time, the Anisotropic Detection Principle in XF imaging, which holds that optimized anisotropic x-ray fluorescence detection provides greater sensitivity than isotropic detection. The optimized detection arrangement was used to improve the sensitivity of the XFCT experiment. The achieved XFCT sensitivity is the highest ever for a phantom at least this large using a benchtop x-ray source, which is an important step toward clinical XFCT molecular imaging. This work was supported by the NCI fellowship grant R25T-CA118681 and by the NIH (1R01-EB016777) and NIBIB (1K99-EB016059)

  20. Data:9f33a9f9-21ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ad-47b2-9b1f-4b3771f914ac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  1. Data:9a9d5422-780b-494c-9861-620f033009a8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  2. Protection of atherogenesis in thromboxane A2 receptor-deficient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan). E-mail: harai@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, ...

  3. A2Sea A S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DK-7000 Sector: Wind energy Product: Building and engineering contractor specialising in wind turbine transport and installation both onshore and offshore. Coordinates:...

  4. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  5. Oscillators in a (2+1)-dimensional noncommutative space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, F.

    2014-03-15

    We study the Harmonic and Dirac Oscillator problem extended to a three-dimensional noncommutative space where the noncommutativity is induced by the shift of the dynamical variables with generators of SL(2,R) in a unitary irreducible representation considered in Falomir et al. [Phys. Rev. D 86, 105035 (2012)]. This redefinition is interpreted in the framework of the Levi's decomposition of the deformed algebra satisfied by the noncommutative variables. The Hilbert space gets the structure of a direct product with the representation space as a factor, where there exist operators which realize the algebra of Lorentz transformations. The spectrum of these models are considered in perturbation theory, both for small and large noncommutativity parameters, finding no constraints between coordinates and momenta noncommutativity parameters. Since the representation space of the unitary irreducible representations SL(2,R) can be realized in terms of spaces of square-integrable functions, we conclude that these models are equivalent to quantum mechanical models of particles living in a space with an additional compact dimension.

  6. Microsoft Word - S08266_App_A-2.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tabernaemontani SOFT-STEMMED BULRUSH sedge 2 native OBL 5.912% Scirpus atrovirens GREEN BULRUSH sedge 1 native OBL 0.222% Sorghastrum nutans INDIAN GRASS grass 5 native UPL...

  7. Digital, remote control system for a 2-MW research reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, R.E.; Corbett, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A fault-tolerant programmable logic controller (PLC) and operator workstations have been programmed to replace the hard-wired relay control system in the 2-MW Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition to the PLC and remote and local operator workstations, auxiliary systems for remote operation include a video system, an intercom system, and a fiber optic communication system. The remote control station, located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2.5 km from the BSR, has the capability of rector startup and power control. The system was designed with reliability and fail-safe features as important considerations. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  8. A2 Processor User's Manual for Blue Gene/Q

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CEE change exception enable CI coprocessor instance CIA current instruction address CPU ... instruction itself (the current instruction address, or CIA) plus the signed displacement. ...

  9. Microsoft Word - LLNL Security Clearances Final 121108a _2_.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Clearances at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-California INS-O-09-01 December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 December 11, 2008 MEMORAliDUM FOR ADMINISTRATQR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CHIEF HEALTH: SAFETY AbD, SECURITY OFFICER FROM: Christopher R. Sharpley . Deputy hlspector General for

  10. Microscopic entropy of nondilatonic branes: A 2D approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Serra, Nicola

    2004-12-15

    We investigate nondilatonic p-branes in the near-extremal, near-horizon regime. A two-dimensional gravity model, obtained from dimensional reduction, gives an effective description of the brane. We show that the AdS{sub p+2}/CFT{sub p+1} correspondence at finite temperature admits an effective description in terms of a AdS{sub 2}/CFT{sub 1} duality endowed with a scalar field, which breaks the conformal symmetry and generates a nonvanishing central charge. The entropy of the CFT{sub 1} is computed using Cardy formula. Fixing in a natural way a free, dimensionless, parameter introduced in the model by a renormalization procedure, we find exact agreement between the CFT{sub 1} entropy and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the brane.

  11. An Analytical Study Of A 2-Layer Transient Thermal Conduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (e.g., where there is a shallow water table or a thin soil layer). Authors T. H. Larson and A. T. Hsui Published Journal Geophysics, 1992 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  12. CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    03: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maryland - Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative (CEEDI) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, ...

  13. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  14. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternatives 3A/5A/6A/6B/7A/9A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).

  15. Data:225b952f-75c8-44c8-9e4b-2e63f6a9a928 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  16. Probing the Quantum State of a 1D Bose Gas Using Off-Resonant Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykes, A. G.; Ballagh, R. J.

    2011-12-30

    We present a theoretical treatment of coherent light scattering from an interacting 1D Bose gas at finite temperatures. We show how this can provide a nondestructive measurement of the atomic system states. The equilibrium states are determined by the temperature and interaction strength, and are characterized by the spatial density-density correlation function. We show how this correlation function is encoded in the angular distribution of the fluctuations of the scattered light intensity, thus providing a sensitive, quantitative probe of the density-density correlation function and therefore the quantum state of the gas.

  17. Analytical study of the propagation of acoustic waves in a 1D weakly disordered lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richoux, O. Morand, E.; Simon, L.

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents an analytical approach of the propagation of an acoustic wave through a normally distributed disordered lattice made up of Helmholtz resonators connected to a cylindrical duct. This approach allows to determine analytically the exact transmission coefficient of a weakly disordered lattice. Analytical results are compared to a well-known numerical method based on a matrix product. Furthermore, this approach gives an analytical expression of the localization length apart from the Bragg stopband which depends only on the standard deviation of the normal distribution disorder. This expression permits to study on one hand the localization length as a function of both disorder strength and frequency, and on the other hand, the propagation characteristics on the edges of two sorts of stopbands (Bragg and Helmholtz stopbands). Lastly, the value of the localization length inside the Helmholtz stopband is compared to the localization length in the Bragg stopband.

  18. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    2015-05-01

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensors (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.

  19. Electron contamination modeling and reduction in a 1 T open bore inline MRI-linac system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Kolling, S.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Crozier, S.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: A potential side effect of inline MRI-linac systems is electron contamination focusing causing a high skin dose. In this work, the authors reexamine this prediction for an open bore 1 T MRI system being constructed for the Australian MRI-Linac Program. The efficiency of an electron contamination deflector (ECD) in purging electron contamination from the linac head is modeled, as well as the impact of a helium gas region between the deflector and phantom surface for lowering the amount of air-generated contamination. Methods: Magnetic modeling of the 1 T MRI was used to generate 3D magnetic field maps both with and without the presence of an ECD located immediately below the MLCs. Forty-seven different ECD designs were modeled and for each the magnetic field map was imported into Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations including the linac head, ECD, and a 30 30 30 cm{sup 3} water phantom located at isocenter. For the first generation system, the x-ray source to isocenter distance (SID) will be 160 cm, resulting in an 81.2 cm long air gap from the base of the ECD to the phantom surface. The first 71.2 cm was modeled as air or helium gas, with the latter encased between two windows of 50 ?m thick high density polyethlyene. 2D skin doses (at 70 ?m depth) were calculated across the phantom surface at 1 1 mm{sup 2} resolution for 6 MV beams of field size of 5 5, 10 10, and 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Results: The skin dose was predicted to be of similar magnitude as the generic systems modeled in previous work, 230% to 1400% ofD {sub max} for 5 5 to 20 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inclusion of the ECD introduced a nonuniformity to the MRI imaging field that ranged from ?20 to ?140 ppm while the net force acting on the ECD ranged from ?151 N to ?1773 N. Various ECD designs were 100% efficient at purging the electron contamination into the ECD magnet banks; however, a small percentage were scattered back into the beam and continued to the phantom surface. Replacing a large portion of the extended air-column between the ECD and phantom surface with helium gas is a key element as it significantly minimized the air-generated contamination. When using an optimal ECD and helium gas region, the 70 ?m skin dose is predicted to increase moderately inside a small hot spot over that of the case with no magnetic field present for the jaw defined square beams examined here. These increases include from 12% to 40% of D {sub max} for 5 5 cm{sup 2}, 18% to 55% of D {sub max} for 10 10 cm{sup 2}, and from 23% to 65% of D {sub max} for 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Conclusions: Coupling an efficient ECD and helium gas region below the MLCs in the 160 cm isocenter MRI-linac system is predicted to ameliorate the impact electron contamination focusing has on skin dose increases. An ECD is practical as its impact on the MRI imaging distortion is correctable, and the mechanical forces acting on it manageable from an engineering point of view.

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/12-CA-a (1) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (FERC) to consult with state agencies responsible for the oversight and protection of fish, wildlife, and botanical resources. The California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW)...

  1. Unexplained Excess of Electron-Like Events From a 1-GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, Stephen J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2008-12-01

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration observes unexplained electron-like events in the reconstructed neutrino energy range from 200 to 475 MeV. With 6.46 x 10{sup 20} protons on target, 544 electron-like events are observed in this energy range, compared to an expectation of 415.2 {+-} 43.4 events, corresponding to an excess of 128.8 {+-} 20.4 {+-} 38.3 events. The shape of the excess in several kinematic variables is consistent with being due to either {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} charged-current scattering or to {nu}{sub {mu}} neutral-current scattering with a photon in the final state. No significant excess of events is observed in the reconstructed neutrino energy range from 475 to 1250 MeV, where 408 events are observed compared to an expectation of 385.9 {+-} 35.7 events.

  2. Plasma and Electrode Emissions from a 1 kW Hydrogen-Nitrogen Arcjet Thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Heji; Pan Wenxia; Meng Xian; Wu Chengkang

    2010-05-21

    Arc root behavior affects the energy transfer and nozzle erosion in an arcjet thruster. To investigate the development of arc root attachment in 1 kW class N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} arcjet thrusters from the time of ignition to the stably working condition, a kinetic series of end-on view images of the nozzle obtained by a high-speed video camera was analyzed. The addition of hydrogen leads to higher arc voltage levels and the determining factor for the mode of arc root attachment was found to be the nozzle temperature. At lower nozzle temperatures, constricted type attachment with unstable motions of the arc root was observed, while a fully diffused and stable arc root was observed at elevated nozzle temperatures.

  3. National Geothermal Data System State Submissions by Date (Appendix A-1-a)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Diane

    2015-12-20

    This multipaged spreadsheet tracks submissions of all data records to the State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System by state and by type.

  4. Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","

  5. Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," ","

  6. Development of a 1 x N Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    A fiber sensor array for sub-surface CO2 concentrations measurements was developed for monitoring geologic carbon sequestration sites. The fiber sensor array uses a single temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating with a nominal wavelength of 2.004 μm. Light from this DFB laser is direct to one of the 4 probes via an in-line 1 x 4 fiber optic switch. Each of the 4 probes are buried and allow the sub-surface CO2 to enter the probe through Millipore filters that allow the soil gas to enter the probe but keeps out the soil and water. Light from the DFB laser interacts with the CO2 before it is directed back through the in-line fiber optic switch. The DFB laser is tuned across two CO2} absorption features where a transmission measurement is made allowing the CO2 concentration to be retrieved. The fiber optic switch then directs the light to the next probe where this process is repeated allowing sub-surface CO2 concentration measurements at each of the probes to be made as a function of time. The fiber sensor array was deployed for fifty-eight days beginning June 19, 2012 at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site where sub-surface CO2 concentrations were monitored. Background measurements indicate the fiber sensor array can monitor background levels as low as 1,000 parts per million (ppm). A thirty four day sub-surface release of 0.15 tones CO2/day began on July 10, 2012. The elevated subsurface CO2 concentration was easily detected by each of the four probes with values ranging to over 60,000 ppm, a factor of greater than 6 higher than background measurements. The fiber sensor array was also deploy at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) site in north-central Montana between July 9th and August 7th, 2013 where background measurements were made in a remote sequestration site with minimal infrastructure. The project provided opportunities for two graduate students to participate in research directly related to geologic carbon sequestration. Furthermore, commercialization of the technology developed is being pursued with five different companies via the Department of energy SBIR/STTR program

  7. Measurement of the Branching Fraction of B0 Meson Decay to a_1^+(1260) pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the B meson decay B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260){pi}{sup -}with a{sub 1}{sup +}(1260) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample corresponds to 218 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find the branching fraction (40.2 {+-} 3.9 {+-} 3.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. The fitted values of the a{sub 1}(1260) parameters are m{sub a{sub 1}} = 1.22 {+-} 0.02 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub a{sub 1}} = 0.423 {+-} 0.050 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. National Geothermal Data System State Contributions by Data Type (Appendix A1-b)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Diane

    2015-12-20

    Multipaged spreadsheet listing an inventory of data submissions to the State contributions to the National Geothermal Data System project by services, by state, by metadata compilations, metadata, and map count, including a summary of information.

  9. Comparison of beam simulations with measurements for a 1.25-MeV, CW RFQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Bolme, G.O.; Sherman, J.D.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Young, L.M.; Zaugg, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    The Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) injector is tested using the Chalk River Injector Test Stand (CRITS) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) as a diagnostic instrument. Fifty-keV, dc proton beams are injected into the 1.25-MeV, CW RFQ and transported to a beamstop. Computer-simulation-code predictions of the expected beam performance are compared with the measured beam currents and beam profiles. Good agreement is obtained between the measurements and the simulations at the 75-mA design RFQ output current.

  10. Redox shuttles having an aromatic ring fused to a 1,1,4,4-tetrasubstit...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inventors: Weng, Wei ; Zhang, Zhengcheng ; Amine, Khalil Issue Date: 2015-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1228404 Assignee: UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC CHO Patent Number(s): 9,203,112 Application ...

  11. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    2015-05-01

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensorsmore » (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.« less

  12. NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

  13. Microsoft Word - Attachment A-1 Performance Work Statement Amended 9-5-14.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Work Statement Site Security Services National Energy Technology Laboratory 1.0 SCOPE The Contractor shall furnish all the necessary personnel, materials, services, and otherwise do all things necessary to perform the work as set forth below. The Contractor shall furnish all contract oversight management, supervision and technically trained personnel to provide routine and emergency site security protection and support services for the United States Department of Energy (DOE),

  14. Characterization of a 1,4-{beta}-D-glucan synthase from Dictyostelium. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, R.L.

    1996-02-01

    The study of cellulose biosynthesis has a long history of frustrations, false leads, and setbacks. The authors have been able to proceed further than others who have studied eukaryotic cellulose synthesis because of the high level of enzyme activity in crude membrane preparations from developing Dictyostelium cells. This has made possible experiments to study factors that influence the activity, to determine cellular localization, and to study the development regulation of the enzyme activity. In higher plants, the challenge is still to obtain highly active membrane preparations. However, they have not been able to move beyond the level of crude membranes. The high starting activity of Dictyostelium membranes gave hope that cellulose synthase activity could be purified, allowing the identification of the polypeptides involved in cellulose synthesis. The first step in the purification of a membrane-associated activity is the solubilization of the activity; this they have not yet been able to do. They have applied some of their methods developed in the study of the Dictyostelium glucan synthase to preparation of plant membranes to see if they can obtain any in vitro activity. For instance, the disruption medium, disruption methods, and assay conditions used in Dictyostelium were used to prepare plant membranes, but without obtaining significant levels of enzyme activity.

  15. I DOE/RA/50354 FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A 1~--QfY FUEL ETHANOL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Material Balance 3.3 Energy Balance 3.4 Water Balance 4 PROCESS DESCRIPTION 4. 1 ... yeast formed per pound ethanol Pounds water- produced pei' pound yeast Pound carbon ...

  16. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G. )

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  17. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  18. A 1-V series-array Josephson voltage standard operated at 35 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, F.; Koehler, H.; Weber, P.; Bluethner, K.; Meyer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Josephson voltage standards utilize microwave-induced constant voltage steps in the dc characteristic of Josephson tunnel junctions. This paper describes the design and operation of array circuits with 108 and 2000 junctions connected in series. In contrast with similar realizations, simple {ital Q}-band equipment is used for the microwave supply. The microwave attenuation of 1000 junctions was about 1 dB. The version with 2000 junctions generated Josephson voltages up to 1.2 V when operated at 35 GHz. The stability times of the quantized levels were, under normal laboratory conditions (unshielded room), better than 10 min.

  19. Design of a 1 kW class gamma type Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raggi, L.; Katsuta, Masafumi; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The study for a design on a kinematic drive gamma type Stirling engine is reported. This unit enters in the 1kW class and it is conceived to move a portable electric generator. The peculiarity of this unit is basically to use components taken from the line production, and also for the parts designed specifically for this application all the efforts are directed to simplicity in terms of material and manufacture. At first the engine performance targets are defined in compatibility with the components taken from a large scale production compressor and then the new components like the heat exchangers and the crank mechanism are designed. Two pre-tests are effected: one to define the performances of the induction motor in the electric regenerative mode and another running the machine as a refrigerator.

  20. A 1 MEGAWATT POLYPHASE BOOST CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR KLYSTRON PULSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.A. REASS; J.D. DOSS; R.F. GRIBBLE

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes electrical design criteria and first operational results a 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter/modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2300 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. PWM (pulse width modulation) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt-peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. A review of these design parameters and the first results of the performance characteristics will be presented.

  1. RSC_CC_C1CC11440A 1..3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    359-7345 Chemical Communications www.rsc.orgchemcomm Volume 47 | Number 26 | 14 July 2011 ... can act as self-assembled sites for chemical interaction and structural transformation. ...

  2. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  3. CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Production Test (Phase III - Administrative/Planning/Modeling Tasks)CX(s) Applied: A2, A8, A9Date: 01/20/2011Location(s): Anchorage, AlaskaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-009285: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering... CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-000327: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology InvestmentsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/27/2009Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-000388: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sandia Technologies LLCCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-006948: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana-City-EvansvilleCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B5.1Date: 09/21/2011Location(s): Evansville, IndianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. CX-003745: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Microgrid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Education and Colonias Outreach ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-006121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University Energy Education Curriculum Project (UEECP)CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 06/29/2011Location(s): Richmond, KentuckyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-014428: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conference Support: Gordon Research Conference on Natural Gas Hydrates Systems CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/30/2015 Location(s): Rhode IslandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-009172: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-City-Buena Park CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/04/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. CX-011800: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.22 Date: 01/29/2014 Location(s): Tennessee, Georgia, Florida Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-011015: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-012154: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    System-Cost Optimized Smart EVSE for Residential Application (New Tasks 101 and 102) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 05/12/2014 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-011802: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Louisiana EOR/Sequestration Research and Development Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 01/28/2014 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-012427: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alaska Hydrate Production Testing: Test Site Selection and Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41879 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ZERT II: Investigating the Fundamental Issues of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 05/08/2014 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011014: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon Dioxide Flow.. CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-012262: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reconciling Unconventional Gas Emission Estimates (SUMMARY) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 07/02/2014 Location(s): Colorado, California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-014243: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rockville Centre SCADA, RTU & Relay Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7Date: 09/10/2015 Location(s): New YorkOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-004484: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Whitelist Antivirus ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7Date: 11/18/2010Location(s): Pullman, WashingtonOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-003739: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Electric Sector Cybersecurity OrganizationCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): Clackamas, OregonOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-012542: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geomechanical Framework for CO2 Storage in Fractured Reservoirs and Caprocks for Sedimentary Basins CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41834 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-008275: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Cities - Implementation Initiatives to Advance Alternative Fuel Markets CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 05/10/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-011434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III (Categorical Exclusion (CX)-A Tasks) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-007041: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Texas-City-Grand PrairieCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 03/30/2010Location(s): Grand Prairie, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. CX-006550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 08/18/2011Location(s): Branford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-006979: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 09/23/2011Location(s): Wilton, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-007029: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive Program - Reynerston ResidenceCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 09/21/2011Location(s): Darien, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-005644: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaic Program - Molodich FarmCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 04/22/2011Location(s): Sterling, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-007063: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Geothermal Incentive ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 10/19/2011Location(s): Windsor, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-013400: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composite Nozzles for 65% Efficiency - Phase I CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 02/13/2015 Location(s): New YorkOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-012286: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine Vibrator Prototype Demonstration Test CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, A9, A11, B3.11 Date: 06/12/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-004854: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri-City-St. PetersCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 01/04/2011Location(s): St. Peters, MissouriOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. CX-005277: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota-County-RamseyCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 02/17/2011Location(s): Ramsey County, MinnesotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. CX-002554: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    California-City-HemetCX(s) Applied: B1.32, A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 05/17/2010Location(s): Hemet, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. CX-012298: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin Biofuels Retail Availability Improvement Network (BRAIN) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 06/03/2014 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011060: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deep Controlled Source Electromagnetic Sensing: A Cost Effective, Long-Term Tool for Sequestration Monitoring CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011803: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Louisiana EOR/Sequestration Research and Development Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 01/28/2014 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011012: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Cell and Stack Technology CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-002603: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DeKalb County/Metro Atlanta Alternative Fuel ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-000340: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DeKalb County/Metro Atlanta Alternative Fuel ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Atlanta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_ROSE_MARTYN_UPDATED_NMMSS_2014_Foreign...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    88 JAPAN 35 89 PEOPLES' REPUBLIC OF CHINA 37 A8 SWITZERLAND 38 A1 ARGENTINA ... LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 76 B7 CHINAJAPAN LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 77 A9 ...

  6. Microsoft Word - Foreign Obligation Codes.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    34 88 Japan 35 89 Peoples' Republic of China 36 C1 Russia 37 A8 Switzerland 38 A1 ...JapanLes Centrifuge Enrichment 76 B7 ChinaJapanLes Centrifuge Enrichment 77 A9 ...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_Martyn_NMMSS_2013_Foreign Obligations...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    88 JAPAN 35 89 PEOPLES' REPUBLIC OF CHINA 37 A8 SWITZERLAND 38 A1 ARGENTINA ... LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 76 B7 CHINAJAPAN LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 77 A9 ...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Foreign Obligations_Julie Hawkins [Compatibilit...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    88 JAPAN 35 89 PEOPLES' REPUBLIC OF CHINA 37 A8 SWITZERLAND 38 A1 ARGENTINA ... LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 76 B7 CHINAJAPAN LES CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT 77 A9 ...

  9. CX-000461: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Training Graduate and Undergraduate Students in Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon SequestrationCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): Golden, ColoradoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-005519: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mississippi-City-JacksonCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 03/23/2011Location(s): Jackson, MississippiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. CX-009174: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri-County-Christian CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-014600: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the NETL's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 02/16/2016 Location(s): OtherOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-006100: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-City-Rancho CordovaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 02/16/2010Location(s): Rancho Cordova, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  14. CX-009474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Area 1 Systematic Assessment of Wellbore Integrity for Geologic Carbon Storage Projects CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 10/15/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-005252: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida-City-SarasotaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1Date: 02/09/2011Location(s): Sarasota, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology in Gas Turbines CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 07062011 Location(s): Jupiter, Florida Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 29,...

  17. CX-010702: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Financial Assistance to Universities and Institutions CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/17/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): NNSA-Headquarters

  18. CX-013846: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy - Newberry Volcano, OR (Phase One) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 06/24/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-009304: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Planning of a Marine Methane Hydrate Pressure Coring Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/31/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012026: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion - Phase II CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 04/28/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-005659: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Commercial Renewable Energy SystemsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Concord, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-001645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Infrastructure Upgrade ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 04/23/2010Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-012037: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Jordan School District and Utah Transit Authority Compressed Natural Gas Buses CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 04/15/2014 Location(s): Utah, Utah Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-014264: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Framework for Data Integration, Assimilation, and Learning CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 09/02/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-000410: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deepwater Riserless Intervention SystemCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/17/2009Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-008447: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shift for Good Community Program (Switch 4 Good) CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, A9, A11 Date: 06/21/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-004405: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ArmorBelt Single Point Gas Lift System for Stripper WellsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 11/08/2010Location(s): Hastings, MinnesotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-003335: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea CountyCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 07/29/2010Location(s): Lovington, New MexicoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010703: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Financial Assistance to Universities and Institutions CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): NNSA-Headquarters

  10. CX-005003: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-City-VancouverCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 01/10/2011Location(s): Vancouver, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. CX-007074: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-City-VancouverCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 01/10/2011Location(s): Vancouver, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-011026: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs in the Central Appalachian Basin… CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-002809: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Purchase of Dedicated Alternative Fuel VehiclesCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 06/22/2010Location(s): Diamond Bar, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-002487: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Powered Bus ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A7, A9, A11Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): Schaghticoke, New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-001315: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Truck DeploymentCX(s) Applied: A1, A7, A9, B5.1Date: 03/18/2010Location(s): San Antonio, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-003649: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California - City - RichmondCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/02/2010Location(s): Richmond, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire)CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 01/27/2010Location(s): Monona, WisconsinOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-000713: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire)CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 01/27/2010Location(s): Monona, WisconsinOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-000107: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Beavercreek's Energy Conservation Audit for City Hall and Police BuildingCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): Beavercreek, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. CX-006299: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado-County-MesaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B5.1Date: 03/09/2010Location(s): Mesa County, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. CX-010481: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 05/29/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-010705: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Laser Facility Program Funding Opportunity CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 02/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): NNSA-Headquarters

  3. CX-007622: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 01/04/2012 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-010704: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Financial Assistance to Historically black Colleges and Universities CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): NNSA-Headquarters

  5. CX-013862: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of Autoignition of High Pressure SCO2 Oxy-Combustion CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 06/15/2015 Location(s): GeorgiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-013867: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemical Kinetic Modeling Development and Validation Experiments CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 06/10/2015 Location(s): FloridaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-012438: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geomechanical Monitoring for CO2 Hub Storage: Production and Injection at Kevin Dome CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41878 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-006356: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon-City-CorvallisCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/12/2011Location(s): Corvallis, OregonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. CX-008955: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Smart Grid Data Access and Customer Engagement CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08/10/2012 Location(s): California, Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-006320: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Illinois-City-EvanstonCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 06/30/2011Location(s): Evanston, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-010792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gulf of Mexico Miocene Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Site Characterization Mega Transect - Task 8 CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08142013 ...

  12. CX-003256: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential and Commercial Buildings and AuditsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 07/26/2010Location(s): Cerro Gordo County, IowaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. CX-007607: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island Utility Scale Renewable Energy Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1 Date: 01/17/2012 Location(s): Rhode Island Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-000113: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mashantucket Pequot Tribe Energy Efficiency and Conservation StrategyCX(s) Applied: A9, A1, A11Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. CX-003504: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative Energy Training InstituteCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  16. CX-003401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative Energy Training InstituteCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 08/05/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-004417: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada-City-Carson CityCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 11/09/2010Location(s): Carson City, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. CX-002181: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Papillion Library Energy Study ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 04/29/2010Location(s): Papillion, NebraskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. CX-004629: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seneca Nation of New York Energy Efficiency and Conservation StrategiesCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 10/26/2009Location(s): New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. CX-013873: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Milford Site for Frontier Observatory for Geothermal Energy (FORGE) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 07/01/2015 Location(s): UtahOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-012274: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration and Trapping in Fractured Reservoirs with Validation CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): United Kingdom Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-013409: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alstom Grid Commercial Microgrid Design Development. and Testing for PIDC and PWD Systems CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 02/02/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-013408: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alstom Grid Commercial Microgrid Design Development. and Testing for PIDC and PWD Systems CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 02/02/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-014427: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Deployment of Microgrid Technologies in Alaska CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 12/02/2015 Location(s): AlaskaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-014235: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Resilient DC Microgrid Solution for REDI CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.7, B4.4Date: 09/14/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-008197: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Mexico TRIBE-JEMEZ PUEBLO CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 04/03/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  7. CX-008912: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Advanced Joint Inversion System for Carbon Dioxide Storage Modeling with Large Data Sets for Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-008938: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Advanced Joint Inversion System for Carbon Dioxide Storage Modeling with Large Data Sets for Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-001685: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sarasota County Energy and Sustainability - PlanningCX(s) Applied: A1, A7, A9Date: 04/22/2010Location(s): Sarasota County, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-007045: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small-Scale Field Test Demonstrating Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Arbuckle Saline AquiferCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 09/20/2011Location(s): Lawrence, KansasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-013849: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy - Fallon, NV (Phase One) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 06/23/2015 Location(s): New MexicoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-013874: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Snake River Plain Field Laboratory for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 07/01/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-013711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Penske Truck Leasing AFV Demonstration and Enhanced Driver Experience Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 05/19/2015 Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-004627: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seneca Nation of New York Energy AuditsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 10/26/2009Location(s): New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. CX-011056: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the NETL's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 09/04/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-012440: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Coal Syngas Combustor Development for High-Pressure, Oxy-Fuel SCO2 Cycles CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 41878 Location(s): North CarolinaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-000339: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chicago Area Alternative Fuel Deployment ProjectCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Des Plaines, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-003260: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Michigan-City-WarrenCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/19/2010Location(s): Warren, MichiganOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. CX-008188: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California City-Moreno Valley CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/12/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. CX-012421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Low-Leakage Shaft End Seals for Utility-Scale SCO2 Turbo Expanders CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 41880 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: NNSA-Headquarters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 8, 2013 CX-010705: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Laser Facility Program Funding Opportunity CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 02082013 Location(s): ...

  2. CX-000075: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tanana Chiefs Conference Residential and Commercial Building Energy AuditsCX(s) Applied: B5.1, A1, A11, A9Date: 11/12/2009Location(s): AlaskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  3. CX-008416: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado-County-Arapahoe CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/18/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  4. CX-013844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy - Coso, CA (Phase One) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 06/25/2015 Location(s): New MexicoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-003757: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Propane Vehicle ConversionCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1Date: 09/08/2010Location(s): Maricopa, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  6. CX-000390: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation Route Survey in CaliforniaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Contra Costa County, CA Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-000385: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Injection Site Survey Work in CaliforniaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Salano County, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-003512: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Resort Communities Retrofit ProgramCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1Date: 07/09/2010Location(s): Eagle, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. CX-014068: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southeast Offshore Storage Research Assessment CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 07/24/2015 Location(s): GeorgiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-014026: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nanoparticle Injection Technology for Remediating Leaks of Carbon Dioxide Storage Formation CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6Date: 08/17/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-000130: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sun'aq Tribe of Kodiak Energy Efficiency and Conservation StrategyCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 12/16/2009Location(s): AlaskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-012272: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration and Trapping in Fractured Reservoirs with Validation CX(s) Applied: A1, A8, A9 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-001767: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commerce's Energy Efficiency and Conservation ProgramsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.2, B5.1Date: 04/20/2010Location(s): Commerce, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  14. CX-008903: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Virginia-County-Albemarle CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. CX-004421: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arkansas-City-SpringdaleCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B5.1Date: 11/09/2010Location(s): Springdale, ArkansasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. CX-013870: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southeast Alternative Fuel Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 07/07/2015 Location(s): North CarolinaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-007462: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting Diode Street Light Retrofit CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1, B5.15 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-003528: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern OhioCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): Oberlin, OhioOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-008956: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demonstrating Innovation in Customer Empowerment through Open Data Access - Phase I CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 08/10/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011811: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Extension and dissemination of the Open Modeling Framework and GridLAB-D CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 01/22/2014 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-012537: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A Coupled Geomechanical, Acoustic, Transport and Sorption Study of Caprick Integrity in CO2 Seq. CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41836 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-003698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green EducationCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.2, B5.1Date: 09/08/2010Location(s): Maricopa, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  3. CX-004504: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beacon Power 20 Megawatt Flywheel Frequency Regulation PlantCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 11/19/2010Location(s): Tyngsboro, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-012273: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Migration and Trapping in Fractured Reservoirs with Validation CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-008896: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado-County-Douglas CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 07/31/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  6. CX-012125: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pressure Prediction and Hazard Avoidance Through Improved Seismic Imaging CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 05/29/2014 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-006111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-Tribe-Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/07/2011Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. CX-000291: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative and Clean Energy Technology Development and Commercialization InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/18/2009Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-005467: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquion - Control AlgorithmsCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 03/14/2011Location(s): Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-000288: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative and Clean Energy Technology Development and Commercialization InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/18/2009Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-000289: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative and Clean Energy Technology Development and Commercialization InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/18/2009Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000290: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternative and Clean Energy Technology Development and Commercialization InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/18/2009Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009313: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-003272: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-City-EverettCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1Date: 07/26/2010Location(s): Everett, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. CX-000386: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Alameda, CaliforniaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Berkley, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-000387: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Alameda, CaliforniaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Livermore, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-007679: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/23/2011 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

  18. CX-000384: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon Dioxide Capture Site Survey in CaliforniaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.1Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Contra Costa County, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012426: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Temperature CMC Nozzles for 65% Efficiency - Phase I CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41880 Location(s): New YorkOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011063: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SOFC Systems with Improved Reliability and Endurance CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011061: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SOFC Systems with Improved Reliability and Endurance CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Connecticut Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011062: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SOFC Systems with Improved Reliability and Endurance CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-005275: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Michigan-City-LansingCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 02/15/2011Location(s): Lansing, MichiganOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  4. CX-012124: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pressure Prediction and Hazard Avoidance Through Improved Seismic Imaging CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 05/29/2014 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-012161: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pressure Prediction and Hazard Avoidance Through Improved Seismic Imaging CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 05/29/2014 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-008958: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and Performance of Geologic Storage: Coupled Modeling CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 08/08/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-008429: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee-City-Chattanooga CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/18/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. CX-009352: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Navy Yard Network Operations Center (Energy Regional Innovation Cluster) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.2 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-009357: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building Energy Flow Model and Simulation CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-009324: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficient Buildings Hub (Energy Regional Innovation Cluster) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 10/02/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-013744: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ceramic Matrix Composite Advanced Transition for 65% Combined Cycle Efficiency CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 03/19/2015 Location(s): FloridaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-013468: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ceramic Matrix Composite Advanced Transition for 65% Combined Cycle Efficiency CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 03/19/2015 Location(s): FloridaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-014232: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coal Syngas Combustor Development for High-Pressure, Oxy-Fuel Supercritical… CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 09/15/2015 Location(s): North CarolinaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-005701: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado-City-GreeleyCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 04/11/2011Location(s): Greeley, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. CX-000336: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Durham, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-000337: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Columbia, South CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-000333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Charlotte, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-000334: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Raleigh, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-000335: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Asheville, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-002290: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery - Advanced Underground Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES)CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 05/19/2010Location(s): San Francisco, CaliforniaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory