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1

Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) for the A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (U)  

SciTech Connect

The A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (ABRP) operable unit (OU) is located in the northwest portion of Savannah River Site (SRS), approximately 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) south of the A/M Area operations. Between 1951 and 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were used to burn paper, plastics, wood, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, and solvents. Combustible materials were burned monthly. After burning was discontinued in 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were also converted to rubble pits and used to dispose of concrete rubble, bricks, tile, asphalt, plastics, metal, wood products, and rubber until about 1978. When the pits were filled to capacity, there were covered with compacted clay-rich native soils and vegetation was established. Pit 731-2A was only used as a rubble pit until 1983 after which the area was backfilled and seeded. Two other potential source areas within the OU were investigated and found to be clean. The water table aquifer (M-Area aquifer) was also investigated.

Morgan, Randall

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Data Summary Report D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to verify that all analytical data collected at the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site for use in developing risk assessment and potential remediation procedures have been validated at the appropriate level. Any discrepancies or reasons why the data should be rejected for this purpose will be addressed. This report documents the data validation procedures used by Environmental Monitoring Section, Exploration Resources, and RUST Environment {ampersand} Infrastructure for Assigning qualifiers.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Central Shops burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G)  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit is listed as a solid waste management unit at the Savannah River Plant. This report describes the remedial action alternative for the pit.

Palmer, E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (431-D and 431-1D)  

SciTech Connect

The D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (DBRP) (431-D and 431-1D) Waste Unit is listed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(U) Solid Waste Management Unit/Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) unit in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS). This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the DBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Mason, J.T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final  

SciTech Connect

The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Statement of basis/proposed plan for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G). Revision 1, Final  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G (BRP6G) located at SRS, in northwestern Barnwell County, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process. Arsenic, beryllium, iron, and octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin isomers (OCDD) concentrations in the pit soil are at levels consistent with those found in the background. Therefore, the only contamination attributable to actions in BRP6G is PCB-1254. After the risk contributions of these chemicals are eliminated, the only remaining risk attributable to the pit soil is from PCB-1254 (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} via ingestion of vegetables grown on-site). The maximum concentration of PCB-1254 detected in the pit was 0.115 mg/kg, approximately 10% of the residential action level for PCBs of 1 mg/kg. Based on the results of the remedial investigation and the BRA, it is proposed that No Action be performed for the BRP6G. Considering the low levels of residual contamination present principally below 1.2 meters (4 feet) within the pit and the associated risks (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) within the lower level of EPA`s target risk range, action is not warranted for this unit.

Palmer, E.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

10

Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE RF. McKenna and S structlJre and unconsolidated ice ridges. The tests were conducted with a 0.32 m diameter structure in unconsolidated ridges are given in McKenna el al. (1995). The tests provide a means of correlating the forces

Bruneau, Steve

12

DOE/LX/07-0295 Secondary Document Rubble Area KY-19 Solid Waste...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Document Rubble Area KY-19 Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) Assessment Report SWMUAOC NUMBER: 565 DATE OF ORIGINAL SAR: 091309 DATE OF SAR REVISIONS: NA REGULATORY STATUS:...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - asteroids rubble piles Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

asteroids (28... of collisional events, and much of its interior may have an unconsolidated rubble-pile structure. The main... Radar Observations of Asteroid 216 Kleopatra...

14

Burns Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

15

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Operable Unit: Final Action (631-16G)  

SciTech Connect

The Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located within SRS and is approximately 305 meters west of South Carolina Highway 125.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as agricultural waste burning or prescribed burning infield agricultural waste burning [e.g. , Yevich and Logan,

Randerson, J. T; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R; Rogers, B. M; Morton, D. C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of the Burma Road Rubble Pit at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The Burma Road Rubble Pit (BRRP) is located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The BRRP unit consists of two unlined earthen pits dug into surficial soil and filled with various waste materials. It was used from 1973--1983 for the disposal of dry inert rubble such as metal, concrete, lumber, poles, light fixtures, and glass. No record of the disposal of hazardous substances at the BRRP has been found. In 1983, the BRRP was closed by covering it with soil. In September 1988, a Ground Penetrating Radar survey detected three disturbed areas of soil near the BRRP, and a detailed and combined RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation was conducted from November 1993 to February 1994 to determine whether hazardous substances were present in the subsurface, to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination, and to evaluate the risks posed to the SRS facility due to activities conducted at the BRRP site. Metals, semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides and one pesticide (Aldrin) were detected in soil and groundwater samples collected from seventeen BRRP locations. A baseline risk assessment (BRA) was performed quantitatively to evaluate whether chemical and radionuclide concentrations detected in soil and groundwater at the BRRP posed an unacceptable threat to human health and the environment. The exposure scenarios identifiable for the BRRP were for environmental researchers, future residential and occupational land use. The total site noncancer hazard indices were below unity, and cancer risk levels were below 1.0E-06 for the existing and future case environmental researcher scenario. The future case residential and occupational scenarios showed total hazard and risk levels which exceeded US EPA criterion values relative to groundwater scenarios. For the most part, the total carcinogenic risks were within the 1.0E-04 to 1.0E-06 risk range. Only the future adult residential scenario was associated with risks exceeding 1.0E-04.

Ward, K.G.; Frazier, W.L.; McAdams, T.D.; McFalls, S.L.; Rabin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Voss, L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[Neptune and Co., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996  

SciTech Connect

Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

20

System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a cutter for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head (72) has a hollow body (76) with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft (74) extends from the hollow body (76). Cutter teeth (78) are mounted on the upper surface of the body (76) and relatively small holes (77) are formed in the body (76) between the cutter teeth (78). Relatively large peripheral flutes (80) around the body (76) allow material to drop below the drill head (72). A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale.

Galloway, Terry R. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a cutter are disclosed for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head has a hollow body with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft extends from the hollow body. Cutter teeth are mounted on the upper surface of the body and relatively small holes are formed in the body between the cutter teeth. Relatively large peripheral flutes around the body allow material to drop below the drill head. A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale. 4 figs.

Galloway, T.R.

1983-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Preparing limestone for burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classification of limestone before burning can be done by the screening method ... enables us to use the heat of the waste gases from the calcination units.

V. I. Goncharov; T. P. Kirichenko

23

Burn Wound Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...described, noting areas of circumferential...of body surface area burned (252...protein-rich plasma into terminal...clinical effects of thermal inhalation injury...312). High-frequency ventilation may...standard of care for large thermal injuries...of the burned area is excised during...

Deirdre Church; Sameer Elsayed; Owen Reid; Brent Winston; Robert Lindsay

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sun tanning/burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

25

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the F-area burning/rubble pits (231-F, 231-1F, and 231-2F)  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the FBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina. The selected alternative was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

Palmer, E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (231-F, 231-1F, {ampersand} 231-2F) Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to evaluate various technologies that can be used to remediate the soil contamination attributed to the FBRP source unit.Section 1 of this report gives the background of this facility. Section 2 discusses the remedial action objectives and the general response actions for each medium of interest. The technology types and process options are identified and evaluated for each medium of interest. A selection and evaluation of representative technologies is included. Section 3 describes the rationale for combining technologies into alternatives. Section 4 gives a detailed analysis of each alternative as well as a comparative analysis of these alternatives.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Prescribed Range Burning in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and implement a prescribed burn, including predicting fire and weather behavior, topography, fuel, firing techniques, fire containment, safety precautions and costs. A graph illustrates factors that influence prescribed burning and a table shows the relationship...

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

Dong, Xiquan

29

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Planning a Prescribed Burn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drinks are best used when it?s over) Water or fire retardant in the ? pumpers Gasoline for the pumpers ? Diesel fuel and gas for the drip ? torches Lunch for the crew (a cooler with ? sandwich makings is handy) First aid kit ? Keys or combinations... in April with picloram to knock out my prickly pear.? Now you are heading in the right direction. Other reading Prescribed Range Burning in Texas. Texas AgriLife Extension Service. E-37. Acknowledgment The original manuscript on which...

Hanselka, C. Wayne

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biomass burning and global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The burning of living and dead biomass including forests savanna grasslands and agricultural wastes is much more widespread and extensive than previously believed and may consume as much as 8700 teragrams of dry biomass matter per year. The burning of this much biomass releases about 3940 teragrams of total carbon or about 3550 teragrams of carbon in the form of CO2 which is about 40% of the total global annual production of CO2. Biomass burning may also produce about 32% of the worlds annual production of CO 24% of the nonmethane hydrocarbons 20% of the oxides of nitrogen and biomass burn combustion products may be responsible for producing about 38% of the ozone in the troposphere. Biomass burning has increased with time and today is overwhelmingly human?initiated.

Joel S. Levine; Wesley R. Cofer III; Donald R. Cahoon Jr.; Edward L. Winsted; Brian J. Stocks

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ARM - Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 2013 BNL BBOP Website Contacts Larry Kleinman, Lead Scientist Arthur Sedlacek Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burning Plants, trees, grass, brush, and...

33

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

34

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

35

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

36

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

37

Mercury Emissions from Biomass Burning in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because the burned area products from remote sensors with medium resolution often miss the crop burning in fields due to its small size, we used the official statistics data at the provincial level to estimate the mercury emissions from crop residues burning in fields and biofuel combustion in homes. ... Although the amount of crop residues burnt in fields in China could not be reflected accurately in burned area products (MCD45A1) because of their small size, they could be located by MODIS fire counts data. ... Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the Hg budget. ...

Xin Huang; Mengmeng Li; Hans R. Friedli; Yu Song; Di Chang; Lei Zhu

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wood would burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absract In view of the world-wide problem of energy sustainability and greenhouse gas production (carbon dioxide), it is timely to review the issues involved in generating heat and power from all fuels and especially new (to the UK) solid fuels, including high moisture fuels such as wood, SRF, oil shale, tar sands and brown coal, which will become major international fuels as oil and gas become depleted. The combustion properties of some of these materials are significantly different from traditional coal, oil and gas fuels, however the technology proposed herein is also applicable to these conventional fuels. This paper presents some innovative combustion system options and the associated technical factors that must be considered for their implementation. For clarity of understanding, the novel concepts will be largely presented in terms of a currently developing solid fuel market; biomass wood chips. One of the most important characteristics of many solid fuels to be used in the future (including oil shale and brown coal) is their high moisture content of up to 60%. This could be removed by utilising low grade waste heat that is widely available in industry to dry the fuel and thus reduce transport costs. Burning such dried wood for power generation also increases the energy available from combustion and thus acts as a thermal transformer by upgrading the low grade heat to heat available at combustion temperatures. The alternative approach presented here is to recover the latent heat by condensing the extrinsic moisture and the water formed during combustion. For atmospheric combustion, the temperature of the condensed combustion products is below the dew point at about 5565C and is only suitable for recovery in an efficient district heating system. However, in order to generate power from the latent heat, the condensation temperature must be increased to the level where the heat can be used in the thermodynamic power cycle. This can be achieved by increasing the combustion pressure to above 80bar, resulting in the recovered latent heat being available at more than 200C. It can then be used to increase the cycle efficiency by about 15% by pre-heating the boiler water and/or combustion air etc. A further advantage is that the high pressure of the combustion gases also reduces the superheater tube stress since it can balance the steam pressure. The key advantage of this high pressure flue gas is that it is above the pressure at which carbon dioxide condenses to a liquid or supercritical gas at atmospheric temperature. Thus when used with oxy-fuel combustion, the carbon dioxide flue gas from which the moisture has been condensed can be cooled to atmospheric temperature and the supercritical CO2 can be fed directly into the pipes leading to the sequestration site. An important consideration of these strategies is to ensure that non-condensable gases in the exhaust, including oxygen and nitrogen, do not adversely affect the condensation processes. When oxy-fuel combustion is used, the flame temperature must be moderated by a cool diluent. Recycled carbon dioxide is often proposed for this duty. However, since the latent heat is recovered, the moisture or even additional water can fulfil this role. This latter option may be advantageous since it is more efficient to pump wood chip fuel in water into the high pressure zone rather than feed solid wood particles. Surplus water can be simply drained and the wet wood chips are a good fuel when the latent heat of the moisture in the fuel gases is recovered into the power cycle. Bearing in mind that it is much more efficient to pump a liquid to high pressure than to compress the same material as a gas, indicates that cryogenic oxygen is a suitable material to use for an efficient power station that generates energy from biomass (or other fuels such as coal etc). Finally, combustion of the hydrogen from the watergas reaction with oxygen allows the steam temperature in the turbine to be increased to the gas-turbine engine range of 10001400C an

Jim Swithenbank; Qun Chen; Xiaohui Zhang; Vida Sharifi; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Raymond Burns > Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raymond Burns Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile raymond.burns@gmail.com Formerly a member of the DiSalvo Group, Ray earned his PhD in August 2013...

40

The burn bactericidal index: A bactericidal index specific for burn patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The percentage of the body surface area burned together with the bactericidal capacity of polymorphs were found to have an influence on burned patients' resistance to infection. This new indicator of resistance to infection in burns, the Burn Bactericidal Index (BBI), was high in patients not susceptible to infection especially in patients vaccinated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but low in patients with extensive burns and in patients with septicaemia and other acute clinical infections.

E.A. Roe

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

Burn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stream that meanders through the cavern. My guide tells me the brook was once a roaring river, two hundred million years ago this site was covered by an inland sea. He points out salamander and raccoon tracks in the mud as we hike past Mirror... While Painting a Red Canna: A Rhapsody 52 IV. New Poems Halloween 54 Alabaster Caverns 55 Subterranean Red 57 Ten Seconds After the Gun 58 Rock Wall 59 Following the Red Hills home 60...

Johnson, Vivian Kathleen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Excision and Skin Grafting of Thermal Burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as loss of hand function or facial deformity. There are often psychological sequelae in burned patients, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Pathophysiology and the Effect of Therapy. The pathophysiology of thermal injury is related to the initial distribution of heat within... A 45-year-old man presents with extensive burns after a house fire. Excision and grafting are recommended for management of his burns. Depending on the depth and extent of the burn, early excision and grafting promote wound healing, reduce the risk of infection, and shorten hospitalization but increase the need for blood transfusion, as compared with conservative management.

Orgill D.P.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pollution by cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the amount of cereal waste burned in Spain, which represents the most important source of biomass burning in this country, is estimated. During the period between 1980 and 1998, an average mass of 8 Tg of cereal waste was burned annually, with remaining 1 Tg of ash on the cereal fields after combustion. By using emission factors previously calculated by Ortiz de Zrate et al. [Ortiz de Zrate, I., Ezcurra, A., Lacaux, J.P., Van Dihn, P., 2000. Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain. Atmos. Environ. 34, 31833193.], it is deduced that pollutant emissions linked to cereal waste-burning process reach values of 11 Tg CO2, 80 Gg of TPM and 23 Gg of \\{NOx\\} year?1 during the cereal-burning period. These emissions represent 46% of total CO2 and 23% \\{NOx\\} emitted in Spain during the burning period that lasts 1 month after harvesting. Therefore, the relative importance of cereal waste burning as pollutant source in Spain almost during fire period becomes evident. Finally, our study allows to deduce that the production of 1 kg of cereal crop implies that 410 g of carbon and 3.3 g of nitrogen are going to be introduced into the atmosphere by this pollutant process. We estimate a total gaseous emission of 3.3 Tg of C and 25 Gg N as different pollutants by cereal waste burning.

I. Ortiz de Zrate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; P. Van Dinh; J. Daz de Argandoa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICS OF BURNING PLASMAS: PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES FIRE Physics Workshop May 2000 F. Perkins and N. Sauthoff Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FIRE Workshop 1 May 2000 #12;OUTLINE · Introduction · Three Classes of Burning Plasma Physics inaccessable to contemporary tokamak

48

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion in a Cummins ISB 5.9L MY2000 turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality issues and blending level question: B2The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean: Advancing Engines for Renewable Fuels Live Green, Burn

Lee, Dongwon

50

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Thinnings to Energy Using BioMax in Southern Oregon E a small-scale (100-kW) BioMax without a subsidy or tax credit, even if fuel were delivered to the plant; Christensen, Glenn. 2005. Fuel to burn: Economics of converting forest thinnings to energy using Bio

Fried, Jeremy S.

51

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal...

52

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

53

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms ... Under baseline, the weapon is disassembled into four componentsthe chemical agent, energetic materials, metal parts, and dunnage (waste)with each incinerated separately. ...

1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

55

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

56

Treatment of a severe alkali burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The case history of a 20-year-old male patient who sustained an 85 per cent total body surface area alkali burn to his skin, after falling into a caustic lime pit, is reported. Considerable problems regarding the correct estimate of burn wound depth, predominant location of the deepest burn on the posterior half of the body, appropriate wound coverage, and lack of sufficient skin graft donor sites required a complex treatment plan. Excisions to fascia and intradermal debridement were required to achieve an appropriate bed for wound closure. Five per cent mafenide acetate solution (Sulfamylon) was applied to prevent burn wound sepsis. Human allografts and Biobrane were used extensively to achieve temporary wound closure, to provide mechanical protection of freshly autografted wounds, and to prevent desiccation following application of cultured epidermal autografts on to debrided wounds and split thickness skin grafted donor sites. The case illustrates a number of problems associated with the evaluation and treatment of patients suffering severe alkali burns, and demonstrates the implementation of both established and evolving technologies in the management of these injuries.

D. Erdmann; J. Hussmann; J.O. Kucan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

58

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulation of agricultural waste burning occurs at multipleexample, agricultural waste burning is managed by individualalso take agricultural waste- burning emissions into

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Nio?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. D. Crounse et al. : Biomass burning pollution overChemistry and Physics Biomass burning and urban airprimary anthropogenic and biomass burning organic aerosols

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

63

First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-T fusion power density is approximated by: Plasma pressure in atmospheres We need >1MWm-3 for an economic system -- need a few Atmospheres of plasma pressure. Can we hold it with a magnetic field? MagneticITER JET (to scale) JET (to scale) First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019. BASIC PARAMETERS

64

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR TRUCKS OF BIOMASS/ DAY (Currently 82) #12;BAD FOR THE ECONOMY · Taxpayers will pay 50% - tax credits, etc · Not a cogen project so only 25% efficient · Biomass better for biofuels, not electricity · MILL JOBS

65

U S Burning Plasma Organization:U.S. Burning Plasma Organization: Supporting US Scientific Contributions to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community (TTF,...) US Technology Community · USBPO mission is to coordinate US Burning Plasma related research to advance science USBPO Director, Jim Van Dam, also serves as US IPO Chief Scientist, assuring

66

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea ... An Environmental Protection Agency official has cautioned that a proposal by Chemical Waste Management (CWM) to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea should be permitted only if stringent conditions are met. ... During 19 days of burns, EPA would conduct research to determine the incinerator emissions' composition, transport, and effect on marine life. ...

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments M. Ulrickson Presented · Introduction to Burning Plasmas · Plasma Materials Interaction Phenomena · Materials Issues · Summary #12;MAU 4 ­ Resistance to neutron damage #12;MAU 5 11/15/2001 The FIRE Burning Plasma Device · A compact high field

68

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

69

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the pile as waste. Waste burning is not permitted in manyagricultural residue/waste burning, residential wood

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Impact of Trash Burning on Air Quality in Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ... Four test burns were made in which the amt. of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amt. ... The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). ...

A. Hodzic; C. Wiedinmyer; D. Salcedo; J. L. Jimenez

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Emissions of Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins and Dibenzofurans and Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Uncontrolled Burning of Garden and Domestic Waste (Backyard Burning)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Straw and plastic (polyethylene) film used for wrapping silage were included, since burnings of these wastes on agricultural fields is considered to be one of the most common types of uncontrolled waste combustions in Sweden. ... To obtain fundamental information on dioxin emissions from an open burning 8 wastes which were likely amenable to be burnt wildly or suspected to generate high levels of dioxins were subjected to an open burning simulation in a special adapted furnace. ... designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ...

Bjrn Hedman; Morgan Nslund; Calle Nilsson; Stellan Marklund

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in burning and non-burning coal waste piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal waste material that results from Douro Coalfield exploitation was analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GCMS) for the identification and quantification of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), defined as priority pollutants. It is expected that the organic fraction of the coal waste material contains \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic origin, and also from pyrolytic origin in burning coal waste piles. The results demonstrate some similarity in the studied samples, being phenanthrene the most abundant PAH followed by fluoranthene and pyrene. A petrogenic contribution of \\{PAHs\\} in unburned samples and a mixture of \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic and pyrolytic sources in the burning/burnt samples were identified. The lowest values of the sum of the 16 priority \\{PAHs\\} found in burning/burnt samples and the depletion LMW \\{PAHs\\} and greater abundance of HMW \\{PAHs\\} from the unburned coal waste material relatively to the burning/burnt material demonstrate the thermal transformation attributed to the burning process. The potential environmental impact associated with the coal waste piles are related with the release of petrogenic and pyrolytic \\{PAHs\\} in particulate and gaseous forms to soils, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and biodiversity.

Joana Ribeiro; Tais Silva; Joao Graciano Mendonca Filho; Deolinda Flores

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Initial Estimates of Mercury Emissions to the Atmosphere from Global Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the mercury budget. ... Savannas burn frequently (intentionally or by accident), typically annually or biannually, while boreal forest burns at 50?200 year time scales, and wet tropical forests rarely burn at all. ... Total C emissions tracked burning in forested areas (including deforestation fires in the tropics), whereas burned area was largely controlled by savanna fires which responded to different environmental and human factors. ...

H.R. Friedli; A.F. Arellano; S. Cinnirella; N. Pirrone

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

75

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

76

Life Satisfaction Over the First Five Years Following Burn Injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................... 88 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In the United States, approximately 500,000 individuals present annually for treatment of burns; about 40,000 of whom require hospitalization (Esselman, 2007). These individuals are typically men, ages 20... year after hospitalization is almost universally a time of high distress for individuals with burn injuries (Patterson & Ford, 2000). The psychological distress following burn injury is said to be the most disabling of secondary complications...

Hoskins, Jessica Lynne

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Alkyl Amides and Nitriles as Novel Tracers for Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonia emissions into the atmosphere have been reported for numerous sources, as for example natural decay in soils, sewage treatment plants, livestock waste, and ammonia-based fertilizers (42, 43). ... Anal. of emissions from the burning of dried tropical grasses and agricultural wastes in a small-scale app. ... under the smoldering conditions of residential wood combustion, as compared to the active burning of forest fires and slash burns, incomplete combustion resulted in the preservation of high levels of the natural products. ...

Bernd R. T. Simoneit; A. I. Rushdi; M. R. bin Abas; B. M. Didyk

2002-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awards news release _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy announced it has selected teams led by Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to advance the technology of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn," in...

80

Geopolymeric Agent for Immobilization of Radioactive Ashes after Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes obtained after biomass burning was studied. Two solidification modes using Portland...- 6 g cm- 2 day- 1.... Thus, su...

A. D. Chervonnyi; N. A. Chervonnaya

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the brand area is also visualized in the THz images of thebrand shape is discernible as early as the post burn THz image.

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from two different burning scenarios, so-called burn piles/pits and an air curtain burner/burn box, were compared using simulated FOB waste from municipal and commercial sources. ... Aerial- and ground-sampled emissions from three prescribed forest burns in the southeastern U.S. were compared to emissions from laboratory open burn tests using biomass from the same locations. ...

Johanna Aurell; Brian K. Gullett; Dirk Yamamoto

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001??2009 MISR imagery of Borneo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. S. Zender et al. : Tropical biomass burning smoke plumeslaboratory measurements of biomass-burning emis- sions: 1.aerosol optical depth biomass burning events: a comparison

Zender, C. S; Krolewski, A. G; Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

become a method to manage forest health, while preventing uncontrolled wild land fire. Low intensity, prescribed burns release less carbon dioxide than wildfires of the same size and may be used as a strategy. The ultimate goal of the project is to use the data from the burn, along with modeling techniques to improve

Collins, Gary S.

85

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St., Washington, DC 20036, USA 7 c Energy as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

86

Prioritizing Burn-Injured Patients During a Disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. government has mandated that, in a catastrophic event, metropolitan areas need to be capable of caring for 50 burn-injured patients per million population. In New York City, this corresponds to 400 patients. There are currently 140 burn beds ... Keywords: disaster planning, healthcare, triage

Carri W. Chan; Linda V. Green; Yina Lu; Nicole Leahy; Roger Yurt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. In these objects, a thermonuclear runaway of the helium shell on top of an electron-degenerate core (a young White implications for the production of neutron- rich elements. log Tlog Teffeff Figure 1-- A thermonuclear runaway stellar conditions. We will include a stellar equation of state as well as thermonuclear burning (TN burn

Herwig, Falk

88

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

89

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles ... The process uses a heavy liquid to separate marketable high-ash coal from nonburnable waste rock. ... Nearly 500 mountains of coal refuse, waste material from coal cleaning operations, are burning uncontrollably in 15 states in the U.S., according to a Bureau of Mines survey. ...

1965-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of premixed burners capable of stably burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners couldAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different

Pascucci, Valerio

91

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- bly burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners could, for example, be used as oneAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen

92

Microsoft PowerPoint - burns.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Low Evaluation of Low Tank Level Mixing Technologies for DOE High Level Waste Tank Retrieval (10516) Heather Burns Andrew Fellinger and Richard Minichan Savannah River National Laboratory March 7 - 11, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona Waste Management Symposia 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00139 2 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Agenda Overview Background Why a retrieval knowledge center Initial objectives / goals Low Level Mixing Addressing a challenge through technology demonstration Evaluation criteria Instrumentation Test matrix HOW DID WE GET THERE? WHERE DID WE GO? "Building a Foundation" The challenges that lead to gaps in retrieval Development and mock-up of retrieval technologies 3 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Background -

93

High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

SciTech Connect

High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Lean-burn SIDI...

96

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

97

Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and isomer ratios as tracers of biomass burning emissions in Northern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission from large-scale post-harvest agricultural-waste burning (paddy-residue burning during OctoberNovember and wheat-residue burning in AprilMay) is a conspicuous feature ... in northern India. The poor an...

Prashant Rajput; M. M. Sarin; Deepti Sharma

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - american biomass burning Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biomass burning Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american biomass burning Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recent biomass burning in the...

99

Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel (FF) combustion and biomass burning (BB), respectively. The enhancements of BC and LSP in BBEmission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over. (2012), Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute burn patients Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and Paediatrics 12;Studying Nursing & Health Care at Glasgow... Certificate in Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

SciTech Connect

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Spectral hole burning for stopping light  

SciTech Connect

We propose a protocol for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in a {lambda}-type atomic medium. This protocol derives from spectral hole burning and takes advantages of the specific properties of solid-state systems at low temperature, such as rare-earth ion-doped crystals. The signal pulse is tuned to the center of the hole that has been burnt previously within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption band. The group velocity is strongly reduced, being proportional to the hole width. This way the optically carried information and energy are carried over to the off-resonance optical dipoles. Storage and retrieval are performed by conversion to and from ground-state Raman coherence by using brief {pi} pulses. The protocol exhibits some resemblance with the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency process. It also presents distinctive features such as the absence of coupling beam. In this paper we detail the various steps of the protocol, summarize the critical parameters, and theoretically examine the recovery efficiency.

Lauro, R.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J.-L. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR3321, Universite Paris Sud, Batiment 505, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

106

ARM - News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project (BBOP)News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project Related Links BBOP Home Outreach News & Press Backgrounder (PDF, 2.1MB) Images ARM flickr site ARM Data Discovery...

107

Reversal of Catabolism by Beta-Blockade after Severe Burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...-isotope methods and serial body-composition scanning to determine that beta-blockade with propranolol diminishes wasting of skeletal-muscle protein after severe burns. Thirteen severely burned children were given propranolol for up to four weeks and had a decrease in resting energy expenditure, without... Patients with severe burns have catecholamine-mediated hypermetabolism, including pronounced muscle-protein catabolism, that adversely affects recovery. In a prospective, randomized study, 13 children with severe burns were given oral propranolol for up to four weeks in an attempt to interrupt this process, and 12 served as controls. Beta-blockade decreased resting energy expenditure and increased net muscle-protein balance by 82 percent, as compared with a 27 percent decrease in net muscle-protein balance in the control group.

Herndon D.N.Hart D.W.Wolf S.E.Chinkes D.L.Wolfe R.R.

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Purifying rotary kiln waste gases in chamotte burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the operation of electric filters connected to rotary kilns for burning clay into chamotte showed that to increase the dust extraction efficiency it is necessary: with dust concentrations in the gas...

Yu. I. Chander; S. Z. Belinskii; L. G. Borisovskii

109

Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Results of an extensive study, covering burn intensities in the nW to {dollar}?{dollar}W/cm{dollar}2{dollar} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in (more)

Kenney, Michael Joseph

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Issues to be Addressed Next Step MFE Burning Plasma Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of risk into burning plasma initiatives. The level of acceptable risk is clearly a matter of personal with Acceptably Small Elms ALL of these Issues are the subject of active research at ALL major experimental

111

Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment Scientific readiness to proceed with such an experiment Is the FIRE mission scientifically appropriate

112

Actinide burning in the integral fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid-metal reactor concept. In the IFR, the inherent properties of liquid-metal cooling are combined with a new metallic fuel and a radically different refining process to allow breakthroughs in passive safety, fuel cycle economics, and waste management. A key feature of the IFR concept is its unique pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing has the potential to radically improve long-term waste management strategies by exploiting the following attributes: 1. Minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream; therefore, actinide recycling occurs naturally. Actinides, the primary source of long-term radiological toxicity, are removed from the waste stream and returned to the reactor for in situ burning, generating useful energy. 2. High-level waste volume from pyroprocessing call be reduced substantially as compared with direct disposal of spent fuel. 3. Decay heat loading in the repository can be reduced by a large factor, especially for the long-term burden. 4. Low-level waste generation is minimal. 5. Troublesome fission products, such as [sup 99]Tc, [sup 129]I, and [sup 14]C, are contained and immobilized. Singly or in combination, the foregoing attributes provide important improvements in long-term waste management in terms of the ease in meeting technical performance requirements (perhaps even the feasibility of demonstrating that technical performance requirements can be met) and perhaps also in ultimate public acceptance. Actinide recycling, if successfully developed, could well help the current repository program by providing an opportunity to enhance capacity utilization and by deferring the need for future repositories. It also represents a viable technical backup option in the event unforeseen difficulties arise in the repository licensing process.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning

Yong-Le Pan; Joshua D. T. Houck; Pamela A. Clark; Ronald G. Pinnick

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Program Info Start Date 09/07/2012 State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Stick Burning Stove: $500 Pellet Burning Stove: $700 The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program offers a flat grant award of $500 for stick burning wood stoves and $700 for pellet burning wood stoves that meet program eligibility requirements. Basic requirements for grant funding include: *The property must serve as primary residence *Clean burning wood stove must replace existing electric or non-natural gas

115

Potential health impacts of burning coal beds and waste banks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncontrolled release of pollutants from burning coal beds and waste banks presents potential environmental and human health hazards. On a global scale, the emissions of large volumes of greenhouse gases from burning coal beds may contribute to climate change that alters ecosystems and patterns of disease occurrence. On regional and local scales, the emissions from burning coal beds and waste banks of acidic gases, particulates, organic compounds, and trace elements can contribute to a range of respiratory and other human health problems. Although there are few published reports of health problems caused by these emissions, the potential for problems can be significant. In India, large numbers of people have been displaced from their homes because of health problems caused by emissions from burning coal beds. Volatile elements such as arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are commonly enriched in coal deposits. Burning coal beds can volatilize these elements, which then can be inhaled, or adsorbed on crops and foods, taken up by livestock or bioaccumulated in birds and fish. Some of these elements can condense on dust particles that can be inhaled or ingested. In addition, selenium, arsenic, lead, tin, bismuth, fluorine, and other elements condense where the hot gaseous emissions come in contact with ambient air, forming mats of concentrated efflorescent minerals on the surface of the ground. These mats can be leached by rainwater and washed into local water bodies providing other potential routes of exposure. Although there are little data linking burning coal beds and waste banks to known health problems, a possibly analogous situation exists in rural China where mineralized coal burned in a residential environment has caused widespread and severe health problems such as fluorosis and arseniasis.

Robert B Finkelman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids  

SciTech Connect

Results covering burn intensities in the nW to {mu}W/cm{sup 2} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in glycerol glasses and polyvinyl alcohol polymer films and their deuterated analogues. A theoretical model which employs a distribution function for the hole burning rate constant based upon a Gaussian distribution for the tunnel parameter is shown to accurately describe the kinetic data. This model incorporates the linear electron-phonon coupling. A method for calculating the nonphotochemical quantum yield is presented which utilizes the Gaussian distribution of tunnel parameters. The quantum yield calculation can be extended to determine a quantum yield as a function of hole depth. The effect of spontaneous hole filling is shown to be insignificant over the burn intensity range studied. Average relaxation rates for hole burning are {approximately}8 orders of magnitude greater than for hole filling. The dispersive kinetics of hole burning are observed to be independent over the temperature range of these experiments, 1.6 to 7.0 K. 6 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

Kenney, M.J.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Experiments related to the resuspension of aerosols during hydrogen burns  

SciTech Connect

We have performed seven ''add-on'' experiments in two large combustion facilities to investigate the capability of hydrogen burns to remove simulated structural and fission product aerosols previously deposited on small metal discs that have surfaces prototypical of those found in nuclear reactor containments. Our results suggest that hydrogen combustion provides an especially effective mechanism for removal (and, presumably, resuspension) of sedimented aerosols produced in a hypothetical nuclear reactor core-degradation or core-melting accident. The presence of condensing steam does not seem to assure adhesion of sedimented aerosols during hydrogen burns. Differences are exhibited between different surfaces as well as between types of aerosol. In-depth studies will be required to assess the impact exposure of sedimented aerosols to hydrogen burns might have on the radiological source term.

Nelson, L.S.; Guay, K.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

Branter, Curtis Keith; Conley, Dennis Allen; Corrigan, Shannon James; Moser, David Roy

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Completion of the INEEL's WERF Incinerator Trial Burn  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successes and challenges associated with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) hazardous and mixed waste incinerator. Topics to be discussed include facility modifications and problems, trial burn results and lessons learned in each of these areas. In addition, a number of challenges remain including completion and final issue of the RCRA Permit and implementation of all the permit requirements. Results from the trial burn demonstrated that the operating conditions and procedures will result in emissions that are satisfactorily protective of human health, the environment, and are in compliance with Federal and State regulations.

C. K. Branter; D. A. Conley; D. R. Moser; S. J. Corrigan

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Burning for Improvement of Macartney Rose-Infested Coastal Prairie.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ~u:nd,mt white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus lIO~lUlatlO?n. The pasture in which the experimental are located is usually grazed by cattle from late to late fall . Experimental Burns were installed as headfires at 2- to 3-month in February... for ~u:nd,mt white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus lIO~lUlatlO?n. The pasture in which the experimental are located is usually grazed by cattle from late to late fall . Experimental Burns were installed as headfires at 2- to 3-month in February...

Gordon, R.A.; Scifres, C.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ignition and Burn in a Small Magnetized Fuel Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LASNEX calculations of a small magnetized target show high gain at a velocity significantly lower than needed for unmagnetized targets. Its cryogenic fuel layer appears to be raised to an equilibrium ignition temperature of about 2 keV by the radiation from the burning magnetized fuel.

Kirkpatrick, Ronald C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

Dukes, Jeffrey

125

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBERTY TOLERANT COTTON: WEED CONTROL AND CROP TOLERANCE Brent Burns Texas Tech University Lubbock Acres planted with herbicide-tolerant cotton varieties have steadily increased since their introduction in 1995. Recently, the bar gene was introduced into Coker 312 cotton plants for tolerance to Liberty

Mukhtar, Saqib

126

More than words : a biography of Daniel Francis Burns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daniel Francis Burns was born in Ireland in 1888 and immigrated to the United States in 1912. He married Mary O'Neill in 1923 and had a family of seven children. He worked as a police officer in the Boston Police Department ...

Burns, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN PRESIDENT FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES REACTORS ! FISSION PRODUCT DEACTIVATION ! HAZARDOUS WASTE PROCESSING ! RECYCLING OF MATERIALS ! FUSION ! UNRESOLVED WASTE DISPOSAL ISSUE EPRI DID PREPARE TWO REPORTS ON FUSION, IN 1992 AND 1994 ! Report of the 1992

128

Firm sues to hasten burning of waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to force a decision on its bid to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea, Chemical Waste Management is suing both the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. The company wants the U.S. ...

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

A New Type Heat Exchanger for Coal Burning Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To make the best of heat energy in the flue gas exhausted from a coal burning boiler, the design proposal for a new type of heat exchanger was put forward in the paper. Via the new type of heat exchanger, temperature of the flue gas can be decreased ... Keywords: waste heat utilization, energy conservation, special heat exchanger, economizer

Bingwen Zhang; Yingjin Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Paediatric medical trauma: The impact on parents of burn survivors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to identify parents at risk of developing ongoing psychological distress after their child has sustained a burn a greater understanding of paediatric medical trauma is required. Aim To investigate the impact of exposure to paediatric trauma on parents of children with a burn and to identify risk factors and relationships between psychological distress and resilience. Methods Sixty-three parents were recruited. Parents completed standardised assessments measuring symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, stress, and resilience within one week of the burn occurring. Statistical analysis included t-tests, KruskalWallis one way ANOVA and Spearman's Roe. Results Parents experienced significantly more symptoms of PTSD (p=0.001) than a comparative community population. Factors including having a daughter, witnessing the event, feeling helpless or having past traumatic experiences significantly influenced symptoms of psychological distress and resilience (p=0.05). Conclusion Parents of burn survivors experience significant psychological distress with low levels of resilience. As part of standard routine care health professionals should screen parents to identify those at greatest risk and provide effective evidence based interventions aimed at improving resilience and reducing stress.

Sarah McGarry; Sonya Girdler; Ann McDonald; Jane Valentine; Fiona Wood; Catherine Elliott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The impact of infield biomass burning on PM levels and its chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the South of Italy, it is common for farmers to burn pruning waste from olive trees in spring. In order to evaluate the impact of the biomass burning source on the physical and chemical characteristics ... ope...

P. Dambruoso; G. de Gennaro; A. Di Gilio

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Burning of Hydrocarbon Fuels Directly in a Water-Based Heat Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principal possibility of burning hydrocarbon fuels directly in a water-based heat carrier is demonstrated. The first experimental results are presented by an example of burning acetylene in water with initia...

V. S. Teslenko; V. I. Manzhalei; R. N. Medvedev

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.J. R. , and Veres, P. : Biomass burning in Siberia andOpen burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Recovery Boiler Modeling: An Improved Char Burning Model Including Sulfate Reduction and Carbon Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasification, reactions between oxygen and combustibles in the boundary layer, and integration of sulfate reduction and sulfide reoxidation into the char burning process. Simulations using the model show that for typical recovery boiler conditions, char burning...

Grace, T. M.; Wag, K. J.; Horton, R. R.; Frederick, W. J.

135

US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory US Contributions to ITER Project (US ITER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory US Contributions to ITER Project (US ITER Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge, TN December 7, 2005 #12;US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National '06 Expectations · Summary #12;US Burning Plasma Workshop Oak Ridge National Laboratory Highlights

136

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

137

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

138

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations of Asian outflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations for biomass burning using AVHRR satellite observations of fire activity corrected for data gaps and scan angle biomass burning in SE Asia was a major contributor to the outflow of Asian pollution observed in TRACE

Palmer, Paul

139

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern Africa Steven Met Office C-130 within a distinct biomass burning plume during the Southern AFricAn Regional science, and P. R. Buseck, Evolution of biomass burning aerosol properties from an agricultural fire in southern

Highwood, Ellie

140

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of candida precipitin and agglutinin tests for the diagnosis of systemic candidiasis in burn patients.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hospitals and did not include any burn patients. However, in a study on burn patients, the germ tube dispersion...disease entities are apparent pit- falls for this test. This...of systemic candidiasis in the burn patient. Our goal was to determine...

I A Holder; P J Kozinn; E J Law

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel/biofuel combustion (FFBF), biomass burning (BIOM) andsource from fuel combustion as well as biomass burning of

Arellano, Avelino F; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Giglio, Louis; van der Werf, Guido R; Randerson, James T; Collatz, G. James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Kleinman 2013 Biomass Burn Plan B.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if There are Few Fires? if There are Few Fires? Fire Plan Major focus is to sample fires in near-field where there are rapid changes, with a particular emphasis on soot, brown carbon, and SOA This includes sampling other sources for contrast Urban, Long range transport Plan B Same instruments can be used for multiple purposes Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Areas are ~ 1000 km by 1000 km centered on Pasco, WA and Little Rock, AK Year to year variability in Monthly Fire Emissions ~ factor of 10. Year to Year Burn Variability Fire Data from FINN version 1.0, courtesy of Christine Wiedinmyer Large year to year variability in Fire Counts Sometimes, 2 week periods between fire activity Other Soot/Brown Carbon Sources

144

NETL: News Release - Combustion Optimization Systems - Cleaner Coal Burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs "Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs DOE Joins with Sunflower Electric to Outfit Kansas Coal Plant with Lower Cost System to Cut Air Emissions FINNEY COUNTY, KS - A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems will be tested on a Kansas coal-fired power plant as part of the federal government's efforts to show how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station will be outfitted with a combination of innovative hardware and software to further reduce air emissions. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Sunflower Electric Power Corporation have signed an agreement to use the utility's Holcomb Station power plant in

145

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Combustion, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The Polk Power Station near Mulberry, Florida, is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle gasification plant. It is capable of generating 313 megawatts of electricity - 250 megawatts of which are supplied to the electric grid. The plant's gas cleaning technology removes more than 98 percent of the sulfur in coal, converting it to a commercial product. Nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by more than 90 percent. (Photo courtesy of DOE-NETL) Approximately half of all electricity used in the United States comes from

146

Type Ia Supernova: Burning and Detonation in the Distributed Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple, semi-analytic representation is developed for nuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae in the special case where turbulent eddies completely disrupt the flame. The speed and width of the ``distributed'' flame front are derived. For the conditions considered, the burning front can be considered as a turbulent flame brush composed of corrugated sheets of well-mixed flames. These flames are assumed to have a quasi-steady-state structure similar to the laminar flame structure, but controlled by turbulent diffusion. Detonations cannot appear in the system as long as distributed flames are still quasi-steady-state, but this condition is violated when the distributed flame width becomes comparable to the size of largest turbulent eddies. When this happens, a transition to detonation may occur. For current best estimates of the turbulent energy, the most likely density for the transition to detonation is in the range 0.5 - 1.5 x 10^7 g cm^{-3}.

S. E. Woosley

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Delineation of a coal burn edge with seismic refraction  

SciTech Connect

Coal seams in many areas of western United States have ignited and burned for considerable distances underground. The boundary between the coal and clinker needs to be defined for determination of reserves. Field tests of a seismic refraction method were conducted at Kerr-McGee Coal Corp's open pit Clovis Point mine near Gillette, Wyoming. Explosive sources were detonated in shot holes in the pit floor. Geophone lines, laid on the surface beyond the edge of the pit, crossed from an area of known coal to an area of clinker. Delays in arrival times correlated with the expected beginning of the clinker zone. Waves passing through the clinker also exhibit a significant attenuation. A magnetic survey concluded along the seismic lines showed anomalies in the regions where seismic data indicated the burn edge.

Sontag, K.D.; Wolfe, P.J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year more than 5 million ha of cereal fields are affected by fires in order to eliminate cereal waste in Spain. The characteristics of this type of fire with intense flames are similar to those of the African dry savanna heading fires. This paper surveys the atmospheric emission caused by this process by combining results of field and combustion chamber experiments. Combustion chamber experiments show that during the flaming phase 88% of the fire exposed carbon is converted into CO2 and during the smoldering phase this percentage changes to 74%. These combustion chamber experiments also show that the soluble part of the aerosols emitted during the course of fires only represent 3% of the total particulate matter (TPM) produced, being the ions K+ and CI? the predominant ones. The cereal waste fire process can be represented by an arithmetic combination that takes into account the amounts of mass burned during the two phases of the fire: 0.90 flaming +0.10 smoldering. Emission factor estimates from field burning experiment are 137g TPMkg?1(dm) and 2.80.2g NOxkg?1 (dm). Finally, we obtain average emissions of 80130Gg TPM, 1728Gg NOx, 210350Gg CO and 814Tg CO2 in Spain. These emissions represent nearly 25% of the total \\{NOx\\} and 50% of the total CO2 emissions by other pollution sources during the burning period in Spain.

I. Ortiz de Zrate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; Pham Van Dinh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL AND SURFACE PROPERTIES FROM THE ORAC-AATSR RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL, OX1 3PU, UK 2: Science and Technology Facilities Council Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell://www.iup.uni-bremen.de/sciamachy/ · ESA (A)ATSR World Fire Atlas: http://dup.esrin.esa.it/ionia/wfa/index.asp · MODIS Fire and Thermal

Oxford, University of

150

Particulate matter characteristics during agricultural waste burning in Taichung City, Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural waste burning is performed after harvest periods in June and November in Taiwan. Typically, farmers use open burning to dispose of excess rice straw. PM2.5 and PM2.510 measurements were conducted at National Chung Hsing University in Taichung City using a dichotomous sampler. The sampling times were during straw burning periods after rice harvest during 20022005. Ionic species including SO42?, NO3?, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Cl? and Na+ and carbonaceous species (EC and OC) in PM2.5 and PM2.510 were analyzed. The results showed that the average PM2.5 and PM2.510 concentrations were 123.6 and 31.5?gm?3 during agricultural waste burning periods and 32.6 and 21.4?gm?3 during non-waste burning periods, respectively. The fine aerosol ionic species including Cl?, K+ and NO3? increased 11.0, 6.7 and 5.5 times during agricultural burning periods compared with periods when agricultural waste burning is not performed. K+ was found mainly in the fine mode during agricultural burning. High nitrogen oxidation ratio was found during agricultural waste burning periods which might be caused by the conversion of Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to NO3?. It is concluded that agricultural waste burning with low dispersion often causes high PM2.5 and gases pollutant events.

Man-Ting Cheng; Chuen-Liang Horng; Yi-Ru Su; Li-Kai Lin; Yu-Chi Lin; Charles C.-K. Chou

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awardee team members _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEEP-BURN AWARDEES RECIPIENTS RECIPIENT TEAM MEMBERS Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capability R&D for $1 million University of Chicago Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Lab University of Michigan Transuranic Management Capabilities R&D for $6.3 million Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Idaho National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley University of Wisconsin University of Tennessee University of Nevada Las Vegas North Carolina State University Georgia Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Idaho State University Texas A&M University Logos Technologies

152

Height Replacement of Selected Woody Plants Following Burning or Shredding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for effectively suppressing w e y plants to levels which allow im- proved forage responses from pastures. Although few woody plants are killed by cool-season burns, the live topgrowth is usu- ally r e d u d to near ground level and forage production... descriptions by site. The Claypan Prairie range site is typified by. kparita soils on nemly levd to gerrtlp&loping up- lands in claw p x b i t y to small d r d n a ~ e s . ' Slopes p ubally less than f krceiitt but -On- ally inmeam to-3 m e h t . Wfls...

Hamilton, W.T.; Kitchen, L.M.; Scifres, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee`s Sun Oven  

SciTech Connect

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160{degrees}C (320{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperatures to 80{degrees}C, (175{degrees}F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs. (WRF)

Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Doggett, J.N.; Johnson, B.M.; Lee, J.D.; Hoard, R.W.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Emissions from Small-Scale Burns of Simulated Deployed U.S. Military Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piles of simulated military waste were constructed, burned, and emissions sampled at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Open Burn Testing Facility (OBTF), Research Triangle Park, NC. ... The lack of sufficient and safe off-base waste treatment methods in the deployed environment, combined with limited numbers of waste management devices such as incinerators, have forced continued reliance on open burning in burn pits as an expedient method of volume reduction and treatment for solid waste during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. ... (4) In response, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has published guidance regulating burn pit operations, including limiting their use and prohibiting the burning of recyclable plastics. ...

Brian D. Woodall; Dirk P. Yamamoto; Brian K. Gullett; Abderrahmane Touati

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Facile Catalytic Combustion of Rice Husk and Burning Temperature Dependence of the Ashes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Facile Catalytic Combustion of Rice Husk and Burning Temperature Dependence of the Ashes ... However, these traditional applications are of low profits, and in many cases, RH is discarded as agricultural waste, which is mostly burned in open heaps (8). ... The utilization of a vibrofluidized bed of catalysts makes it possible to burn RH at decreased temperatures (10), but the millimetric catalyst particles are ill dispersed over the RH pieces, limiting the catalytic effect. ...

Liangming Xiong; Edson H. Sekiya; Shigetaka Wada; Kazuya Saito

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Climate Impacts of Biomass Burning Aerosols: Constraining the Chemicophysical Properties of Fresh and Aged Particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning is one of the largest contributors of particles and trace gases to the atmosphere. This work focuses on constraining the impacts that biomass (more)

Giordano, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Experimental restoration treatments for burn pile fire scars in conifer forests of the Front Range, Colorado.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Drastic changes in soil physical, chemical, and biotic properties following slash pile burning and their lasting effects on vegetation cover have been well documented in (more)

Shanklin, Amber

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Burning Behaviour of Heavy Gas Oil from the Canadian Oil Sands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents the first systematic investigation and characterisation of the burning behaviour of untreated heavy gas oil from the Canadian oil sands, an intermediate (more)

Mulherin, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Indoor Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Homes with or without Wood Burning for Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Homes with or without Wood Burning for Heating ... One wood-burning home had a boiler located in a shelter outside the house and was excluded from the study. ... The concentrations of BaP in the wood-burning homes (0.52 ng/m3) were within the range reported for an American home during operation of different airtight wood stoves (20) and for seven homes during wood burning in airtight wood stoves (21). ...

Pernilla Gustafson; Conny stman; Gerd Sllsten

2008-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial and subsistence groups in western Uganda's forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial and subsistence groups in western Uganda biomass energy from natural forests in western Uganda. While domestic consumers use the most species

Kammen, Daniel M.

162

Application of the microwave technique for burning-rate measurement in high-energy composite materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A facility designed to determine the current burning rate of high-energy composite materials is described. Methodical aspects of processing the...

A. S. Zharkov; M. G. Potapov; V. P. Lushev

163

Interannual variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 to 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. : Retrieval of biomass combustion rates and totals fromM. C. : Fuel biomass and combustion factors associated within global biomass burning emissions combustion factor.

van der Werf, G. R; Randerson, J. T; Giglio, L.; Collatz, G. J; Kasibhatla, P. S; Arellano, A. F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from smoldering combustion of biomass measured by open-pathorganic species from biomass combustion, J. Geophys. Res. ,Biomass Burning Plume Origin Plume Age, Days a Modified Combustion

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Research on methanol-burning, two-stroke engines  

SciTech Connect

In looking for the possibility of burning methanol in the two-stroke marine diesel engine, Mitsubishi decided that its investigations would be for a pure methanol-burning engine. Since ignition of methanol by the straight forward diesel cycle is not attainable, Mitsubishi decided to use glow plugs for ignition. The result has been the adaptation of the 450 mm bore test engine, at Nagasaki, with a special cylinder head carrying two methanol precombustion chambers and two main methanol injectors. Results from the tests at Nagasaki showed that NO[sub x] formation was no more than 500 ppm at full load, while thermal efficiency was at least equal to that of a straight diesel engine. A base model ship for Japanese coastal waters operation is being studied. Plans of the ship have been sent to the Japanese classification society, NK, and they include a separate methanol treatment room and storage tanks. The committee concluded that a methanol-engined ship of about 1000 dwt can be operated economically with a relatively small increase in freight rate. Lower crew costs are part of that equation, because of an expected decrease in machinery maintenance. Conceptual approval for the project is now being sought with NK. 2 figs.

Wilson, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Assessment of Rich-Burn, Quick-Mix, Lean-Burn Trapped Vortex Combustor for Stationary Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the evaluation of an alternative combustion approach to achieve low emissions for a wide range of fuel types. This approach combines the potential advantages of a staged rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor with the revolutionary trapped vortex combustor (TVC) concept. Although RQL combustors have been proposed for low-Btu fuels, this paper considers the application of an RQL combustor for high-Btu natural gas applications. This paper will describe the RQL/TVC concept and experimental results conducted at 10 atm (1013 kPa or 147 psia) and an inlet-air temperature of 644 K (700F). The results from a simple network reactor model using detailed kinetics are compared to the experimental observations. Neglecting mixing limitations, the simplified model suggests that NOx and CO performance below 10 parts per million could be achieved in an RQL approach. The CO levels predicted by the model are reasonably close to the experimental results over a wide range of operating conditions. The predicted NOx levels are reasonably close for some operating conditions; however, as the rich-stage equivalence ratio increases, the discrepancy between the experiment and the model increases. Mixing limitations are critical in any RQL combustor, and the mixing limitations for this RQL/TVC design are discussed.

Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Robie E. Lewis; Todd G. Sidwell; Daniel J. Maloney; George A. Richards

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation. Subject headings: supernovae: general a late time transition of the thermonuclear burning to a detonation wave (e.g., Hoflich et al. 1995

168

Annual Broomweed [Gutierrezia dracuncu-Zoides(DC.) Blake] Response to Burning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENE TOWNE AND CLENTON OWENSBY The influence of artfficial mulch additions and mulch removal with fall mulch additions, and to mulch removal with fall, winter, and spring burning. Study Area and MethodsAnnual Broomweed [Gutierrezia dracuncu- Zoides(DC.) Blake] Response to Burning and Mulch Addition

Owensby, Clenton E.

169

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels analyzed the impacts of soot from fossil fuels -- diesel, coal, gasoline, jet fuel -- and from solid

170

Exploring the Frontiers of Burning Science Dale Meade and the FIRE Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Frontiers of Burning Science Dale Meade and the FIRE Team ITC-12 / APFA '01 Meeting, and it produces negligible nuclear waste or pollutants." What should we do to be ready? By end of January conduct the base fusion sciences program 2. Directs DOE to submit a plan for construction of a U.S. Burning Plasma

171

Biomass Burning in the Tropics: Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry and Biogeochemical Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that the prompt release of CO2 to the...as the net CO2 release from deforestation...somewhat, as a fraction of the burned...formation in fires. Fearnside and...burning also releases another greenhouse...for a greater fraction of the increase...mid-latitude forest fires. Considering...

Paul J. Crutzen; Meinrat O. Andreae

1990-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen flames and lifted turbulent V-flames for various preheating temperatures, equivalence ratios and steam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Design and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aircraft R1 Maximum payload at maximum range SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference area STADesign and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial Francisco, CA 94104, U.S.A. Accurately predicting the fuel burn performance and CO2 emissions of future

Alonso, Juan J.

174

Interannual and seasonal variability of biomass burning emissions constrained by satellite observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--composition and chemistry; KEYWORDS: Biomass burning, interannual seasonal variation Citation: Duncan, B. N., R. V. Martin, A. C. Staudt, R. Yevich, and J. A. Logan, Interannual and seasonal variability of biomass burning [Malingreau, 1990; Stricker et al., 1995; Hsu et al., 1996; Cooke et al., 1996; Justice et al., 1996; Herman

Jacob, Daniel J.

175

Formation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics and Chemistry Abstract The combustion of biomass is a major source of atmospheric trace gasesFormation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning by Matthew and Planetary Sciences #12;Formation of Ozone and Growth of Aerosols in Young Smoke Plumes from Biomass Burning

176

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world Rosemarie Yevich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and population densities influence these types of biomass burning, simple glo- bal characterizations was used in the developing world in 1985; of this 66% was burned in Asia, and 21% and 13% in Africa%, 29%, and 13% of biofuel use in Asia, Latin America, and Africa, and 41% and 51% of the biofuel use

Jacob, Daniel J.

177

TAILORING THE PLATEAU BURNING RATES OF COMPOSITE PROPELLANTS BY THE USE OF NANOSCALE ADDITIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis...

Stephens, Matthew

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tailoring the plateau burning rates of composite propellants by the use of nanoscale additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis...

Stephens, Matthew Aaron

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Lignite Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control technologies for Mercury control technologies for electric utilities Burning lignite coal Background In partnership with a number of key stakeholders, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been carrying out a comprehensive research program since the mid-1990s focused on the development of advanced, cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Mercury is a poisonous metal found in coal, which can be harmful and even toxic when absorbed from the environment and concentrated in animal tissues. Mercury is present as an unwanted by-product of combustion in power plant flue gases, and is found in varying percentages in three basic chemical forms(known as speciation): particulate-bound mercury, oxidized

180

Advanced atomization concept for CWF burning in small combustors  

SciTech Connect

The present project involves the second phase of research on a new concept in coal-water fuel (CWF) atomization that is applicable to burning in small combustors. It is intended to address the most important problem associated with CWF combustion; i.e., production of small spray droplets in an efficient manner by an atomization device. Phase 1 of this work was successfully completed with the development of an opposed-jet atomizer that met the goals of the first contract. Performance as a function of operating conditions was measured, and the technical feasibility of the device established in the Atlantic Research Atomization Test Facility employing a Malvern Particle Size Analyzer. Testing then proceeded to a combustion stage in a test furnace at a firing rate of 0.5 to 1.5 MMBtu/H.

Heaton, H.; McHale, E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Explosive hydrogen burning during type I X-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

Explosive hydrogen burning in type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) is driven by charged particle reactions creating isotopes with masses up to A {approx} 100. Since charged particle reactions in a stellar environment are very temperature sensitive, we use a realistic time-dependent general relativistic and self-consistent model of type I X-ray bursts to provide accurate values of the burst temperatures and densities. This allows a detailed and accurate time-dependent identification of the reaction flow from the surface layers through the convective region and the ignition region to the neutron star ocean. Using this, we determine the relative importance of specific nuclear reactions in the X-ray burst.

Fisker, J L; Schatz, H; Thielemann, F

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pellet fuelling requirements to allow self-burning on a helical-type fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pellet refuelling conditions to sustain a self-burning plasma have been investigated by extrapolating the confinement property of the LHD plasma, which appears to be governed by a gyro-Bohm-type confinement property. The power balance of the burning plasma is calculated taking into account the profile change with pellet deposition and subsequent density relaxation. A self-burning plasma is achieved within the scope of conventional pellet injection technology. However, a very small burn-up rate of 0.18% is predicted. Higher velocity pellet injection is effective in improving the burn-up rate by deepening particle deposition, whereas deep fuelling leads to undesirable fluctuation of the fusion output.

R. Sakamoto; J. Miyazawa; H. Yamada; S. Masuzaki; A. Sagara; the FFHR Design Group

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pollution Caused by Agricultural Waste Burning and Possible Alternate Uses of Crop Stubble: A Case Study of Punjab  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue burning is one among the many sources of air pollution. Burning of farm waste causes severe pollution of land and water ... Straw carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are completely burnt and lost to the atm...

Parmod Kumar; Laxmi Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Requirements: Date of Event: ___________ You must obtain a signed burn permit from Campus Fire Safety or Public Safety.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obtain a permit. Open burning must be 50 feet away from nearest field, brush, or structure. The fire pit: Open burning - bonfires, camp fires, open pits, etc. Only an approved enclosed fire pit structure canRequirements: Date of Event: ___________ You must obtain a signed burn permit from Campus Fire

Royer, Dana

185

Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California Lightning Series fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ketone, Biomass burning, Fossil fuel combustion 1. Introduction Globally the two largest sources of primary organic aerosol are fossil fuel combustion (2-28 Tg C yr-1 ) and biomass burning (31-45 Tg C yr-1Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California

Russell, Lynn

186

Characterizing the Aging of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol by Use of Mixing Ratios: A Meta-analysis of Four Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and combustion conditions in determining OA loadings from biomass burning. 1. INTRODUCTION Biomass burningCharacterizing the Aging of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol by Use of Mixing Ratios: A Meta: Characteristic organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ERs) and normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs) for biomass

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

187

Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California Lightning Series fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 2000), making SOA from fossil fuel combustion, biogenic, and biomass burning emissions a potentiallyOxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California in revised form 20 July 2010 Accepted 21 July 2010 Keywords: Organic carbon particles Ketone Biomass burning

Russell, Lynn

188

Influence of local waste burning on atmospheric aerosol properties in urban environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosols affect the radiative energy budget on both the regional and global scales. The wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a fundamental determinant of the amount by which extra-terrestrial incoming sunlight and outgoing terrestrial radiation are being attenuated in the atmosphere. The present study addresses the influence of local waste burning on aerosol characteristics, black carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration and spectral solar irradiance using ground-based measurements over the tropical urban environment of Hyderabad, India. AOD has been observed to be maximum during burning days compared to normal days. Aerosol size spectra suggest bimodal distributions during pre-and post-burning periods and trimodal distributions during burning periods. Angstrom wavelength exponent estimated from spectral variation of AOD suggested dominance of accumulation mode particle loading during burning days compared to normal days. Diurnal variation of BC on normal days showed a broad nocturnal peak during ?20:00 to ?24:00h with a maximum value of BC aerosol concentration of ?14,000ngm?3 whereas on local waste burning days enormous increases in BC concentrations have been observed with a peak at ?60,000ngm?3. Relative attenuation of global solar irradiance during burning days has been found to be of the order of 30% in the visible and 28% in the near-infrared regions. The results are discussed in detail in this paper.

K. Madhavi Latha; K.V.S. Badarinath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cereal waste burning pollution observed in the town of Vitoria (northern Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural waste burning is a widespread practice throughout the world but there is little information about its pollutant impact. This paper deals with a preliminary study of the pollution observed in Vitoria (Northern Spain) caused by cereal waste burning. The mean hourly flux of pollutants produced by cereal waste burning fires can reach values of 1.4kt of CO2, 13t of TPM and 3t of \\{NOx\\} in the area around Vitoria. Measurements obtained in the area of emission and inside fire plumes show high ratios (NO2/NOx) indicating that nitrogen oxides emitted by the source undergo a rapid transformation in the same area of emission. Results relating to aerosol composition collected in Vitoria during burning periods show an increase in the concentration of K+, NO3? and Cl? ions, that are inter-correlated. The modification of the ionic composition of aerosols also affects the chemistry of the rain collected in Vitoria. During the burning period, it is particularly noticeable that anthropogenic pollution (usually identifiable by the correlation between SO42? and NO3? concentrations) disappears, indicating the existence of an independent source of NO3? not linked to the SO42? source. Similar results were deduced studying BAPMON data collected in Spain during cereal waste burning. Finally, we note that ozone concentration measured at Vitoria is not affected by the pollution generated by the burning fires.

A. Ezcurra; I. Ortiz de Zrate; Pham Vhan Dhin; J.P. Lacaux

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Emission and transport of cesium-137 from boreal biomass burning in the summer of 2010  

SciTech Connect

While atmospheric concentrations of cesium-137 have decreased since the nuclear testing era, resuspension of Cs-137 during biomass burning provides an ongoing emission source. The summer of 2010 was an intense biomass burning season in western Russia, with high levels of particulate matter impacting air quality and visibility. A radionuclide monitoring station in western Russia shows enhanced airborne Cs-137 concentrations during the wildfire period. Since Cs-137 binds to aerosols, satellite observations of aerosols and fire occurrences can provide a global-scale context for Cs-137 emissions and transport during biomass burning events.

Strode, S.; Ott, Lesley E.; Pawson, Steven; Bowyer, Ted W.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition  

SciTech Connect

An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

Li, H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition  

SciTech Connect

An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

Li, H.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Dispersion model development for open burn/open detonation sources  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of obsolete munitions, propellants, and manufacturing wastes is conducted at Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The most common disposal method is open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD) of the material, which occurs in an earthen pit or bermed area. OB/OD operations generate air pollutants and require predictions of pollutant concentrations. The pollutants include SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates, volatile organic compounds and toxic materials such as metals, semivolatile organics, etc. Dispersion models are used to estimate pollutant concentrations given the source and meteorological conditions. However, there is currently no recommended EPA dispersion model to address OB/OD sources. Due to the constraints of existing models, a model development program was initiated under the DOD/DOE Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. In Section 2, the authors give an overview of the model design which is divided into simple and research components. Sections 3 and 4 describe the simple component which includes Gaussian puff and analytic plume models.

Weil, J.C.; Templeman, B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.; Weber, R. [NOAA-ETL, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Research Labs.; Mitchell, W. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Interaction of fast particles and Alfven modes in burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study the interaction of fast particles with Alfvenic instabilities in Tokamak plasmas, with reference to present-day experiments that exploit strong energetic particle heating (namely, JT-60U) and the consistency of proposed ITER burning plasma scenarios. Concerning JT-60U, two different types of bursting modes have been observed by MHD spectrography in auxiliary heated (NNB) discharges. One of these modes has been dubbed fast frequency sweeping (fast FS) mode. It is characterized by a timescale of the order of few milliseconds and frequencies branching upwards and downwards. The other mode, called the abrupt large-amplitude event (ALE), has shorter timescale (order of hundred microseconds) and larger amplitude. On the occurrence of ALEs, a significant reduction of the neutron emission rate in the central plasma region is observed. Such a change has been attributed to a redistribution of the energetic ions, with a marked reduction of their on-axis density. We present an interpretation of these experimental observations, based on the results of nonlinear particle simulations performed by the Hybrid MHD-Gyrokinetic Code HMGC.Concerning ITER, monotonic-q (scenario 2) and reversed-shear (scenario 4) equilibria are considered. Also an ITER hybrid scenario is examined and quantitatively compared with the previous ones. The transition from the low-amplitude Alfvenic instability saturation to the secondary excitation of a stronger mode is addressed, and its effect on the energetic particle transport analyzed.

Vlad, G.; Briguglio, S.; Fogaccia, G.; Zonca, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, CR ENEA-Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the affect of the MAs on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the affect of the MAs on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Emissions of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans from the Open Burning of Household Waste in Barrels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), from burning mixtures designed to simulate waste generated by a recycling and a nonrecycling family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ... Four test burns were made in which the amount of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amount actually burned varied from 46.6% to 68.1%. ... This study included a survey of 187 residents in rural counties of Illinois to determine the quantity and type of wastes burned, the management of the ash, and the motivation for burning. ...

Paul M. Lemieux; Christopher C. Lutes; Judith A. Abbott; Kenneth M. Aldous

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

202

Water quality as affected by season and prescribed burning, Post Oak Savannah, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variation in nutrient and sediment loss via runoff is responsive to precipitation patterns, site characteristics, and disturbance. Fire is necessary for natural maintenance of most grasslands and savannahs. Prescribed burning is an effective...

Landry, Mark S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Chang H. Kim, Kevin Perry, Wei Li, Kushal Narayanaswamy, and Michael Viola Global Research &...

204

Modeling the impacts of biomass burning on air quality in and around Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The local and regional impacts of open fires and trash burning on ground-level ozone (O[subscript 3]) and fine carbonaceous aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and surrounding region during two high fire ...

Lei, W.

205

Investigation of the optical and cloud forming properties of pollution, biomass burning, and mineral dust aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of a biomass burning aerosol generated from fires on the Yucatan Peninsula. Measured aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity and volatility were used to infer critical supersaturation distributions of the distinct particle types...

Lee, Yong Seob

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

Jeong, Gill-Ran

207

Practical delay modeling of externally recirculated burned gas fraction for Spark-Ignited Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION AND COMPARISON WITH DIESEL EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION To prevent the malicious knock phenomenon. Scheme of the intake burned gas fraction dynamics. In the seemingly similar context of automotive Diesel

208

Using Coupled Mesoscale Experiments and Simulations to Investigate High Burn-Up Oxide Fuel Thermal Conductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is a mature technology with a small carbon footprint. However, work is needed to make current reactor technology more accident tolerant and to allow reactor fuel to be burned in a reactor for longe...

Melissa C. Teague; Bradley S. Fromm; Michael R. Tonks; David P. Field

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

CostPerformance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost ... The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the ...

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Methods of reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides at thermal power plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Essentially all the major methods of reducing the emissions of nitrogen oxides from flue gases employed in power generation have been tested on plants in Moscow which burn solid domestic waste for production of h...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Combustion aerosols formed during burning of radioactively contaminated materials: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Radioactive aerosols generated by fires were investigated in experiments in which combustible solids and liquids were contaminated with radioactive materials and burned. Uranium in powder and liquid form was used to contaminate five fuel types: polychloroprene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, and a mixture of 30% tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. Heat flux, oxygen concentration, air flow, contaminant concentration, and type of ignition were varied in the experiments. The highest release (7.1 wt %) came from burning TBP/kerosene over contaminated nitric acid. Burning cellulose contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate liquid gave the lowest release (0.01 wt %). Rate of release and particle size distribution of airborne radioactive particles were highly dependent on the type of fuel burned.

Halverson, M.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Dennis, G.W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characterization of tree macroremains production in a recently burned conifer forest in northern Qubec, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of plant macroremains was studied in a conifer forest twomonths after it burned in 1996 in...Piceamariana) and jack pine (Pinusbanksiana) were determined by sampling around individual trees.Both sp...

Yves Bgin; Dominique Marguerie

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Lateral Current Density Distribution and Spatial Hole Burning in Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated non-uniformity of the lateral current density and lateral hole burning in Quantum Cascaded lasers, e.g., the current density in the mode center is 1.8 times that...

Huang, Xue; Dikmelik, Yamac; Gmachl, Claire F

215

Linking Burn Severity to Soil Infiltartion and Runoff in a Montane Watershed: Boulder, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest fires have an enormous impact on biotic and abiotic variables that control runoff and soil properties in watersheds. Because wildfires do not have a uniform effect on the burned area, significant variability occurs between areas of different...

Ahlstrom, Anna 1988-

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

217

Nuclear-quadrupole optical hole burning in the stoichiometric material EuP5O14  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hole burning, which is attributed to optical pumping of nuclear-quadrupole levels, has been observed in the stoichiometric rare-earth compound, EuP5O14. The long...

Macfarlane, R M; Genack, A Z; Weitz, D A; Shelby, R M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Laboratory-Scale Burning and Characterizing of Composite Solid Propellant for Studying Novel Nanoparticle Synthesis Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the effects of nanoparticle, metal-oxide additives on the burning rate of composite solid propellants. Recent advancements in chemical synthesis techniques have allowed for the production of improved solid rocket propellant nano...

Allen, Tyler Winston

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Theoretical study of the recording density limit of photochemical hole-burning memory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To clarify the potential of photochemical hole-burning memory systems, we study the theoretical recording-density limit of such systems. Shot noise and material noise are considered...

Murase, Norio; Horie, Kazuyuki; Terao, Motoyasu; Ojima, Masahiro

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Source of Steam for A Area at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1568 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..............................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action.....................................................1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

Ultraslow Wave Nuclear Burning of Uranium-Plutonium Fissile Medium on Epithermal Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238, the investigation of fulfillment of the wave burning criterion in a wide range of neutron energies is conducted for the first time, and a possibility of wave nuclear burning not only in the region of fast neutrons, but also for cold, epithermal and resonance ones is discovered for the first time. For the first time the results of the investigation of the Feoktistov criterion fulfillment for a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238 dioxide with enrichments 4.38%, 2.00%, 1.00%, 0.71% and 0.50% with respect to uranium-235, in the region of neutron energies 0.015-10.0eV are presented. These results indicate a possibility of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning mode realization in the uranium-plutonium media, originally (before the wave initiation by external neutron source) having enrichments with respect to uranium-235, corresponding to the subcritical state, in the regions of cold, thermal, epithermal and resonance neutrons. In order to validate the conclusions, based on the slow wave neutron-nuclear burning criterion fulfillment depending on the neutron energy, the numerical modeling of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning of a natural uranium in the epithermal region of neutron energies (0.1-7.0eV) was conducted for the first time. The presented simulated results indicate the realization of the ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning of the natural uranium for the epithermal neutrons.

V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; M. V. Eingorn; S. A. Chernezhenko; A. A. Kakaev; V. M. Vashchenko; M. E. Beglaryan

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn in ICF Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn of ICF targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and burn of the thermonuclear fuel in inertial confinement fusion pellets at the ion kinetic level to treat fusion products (suprathermal -particles) in a self-consistent manner with the thermal bulk enhancement of fusion products leads to a significant reduction of the fusion yield. I. MOTIVATION AND CONTEXT

223

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Title Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Margaret S. Torn, David P. Billesbach, Geoffrey Doyle, Brian Northup, and Sebastien C. Biraud Journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Volume 166-167 Pagination 169-174 Keywords Carbon exchange, eddy covariance, Fire, Grassland, Prairie, Water stress Abstract Drought and fire are common disturbances to grassland ecosystems. We report two years of eddy covariance ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes and biometric variables measured in nearby burned and unburned pastures in the US Southern Great Plains. Over the course of the experiment, annual precipitation (∼600 mm yr-1) was lower than the long term mean (∼860 mm yr-1). Soil moisture decreased from productive conditions in March 2005 dry, unproductive conditions during the growing season starting in March 2006. Just prior to the burn in early March 2005, burned and unburned pastures contained 520 ± 60 and 360 ± 40 g C m-2 of total above ground biomass (AGB) and litter, respectively. The fire removed approximately 200 g C m-2 of litter and biomass. In the 2005 growing season following the burn, maximum green AGB was 450 ± 60 and 270 ± 40 g C m-2, with corresponding cumulative annual net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of -330 and -150 g C m-2 for the burned and unburned pastures, respectively. In contrast to NEE, cumulative mean sensible heat and water fluxes were approximately equal in both pastures during the growing season, suggesting either an increase in water use efficiency or a decrease in evaporation in the burned relative to the unburned pasture. In the 2006 growing season, dry conditions decreased carbon uptake and latent heat, and increased sensible heat fluxes. Peak AGB was reduced to 210 ± 30 g C m-2 and 140 ± 30 g C m-2 in the burned and unburned pastures, respectively, while NEE was near zero. These results suggest that the lack of precipitation was responsible for most of the interannual variation in carbon exchange for these un-irrigated prairie pastures.

224

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during cold weather. 2.3 Domestic waste burning at a private residence when collection is not providedTexas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning Approved: October 5 Review: August 27, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning

225

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during cold weather. 2.3 Domestic waste burning at a private residence when collection is not providedTexas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Approved: October 5, 2000: August 27, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedure 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Page 1 of 2

226

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Laminar burning velocity with oxygen-enriched air of syngas produced from biomass gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several studies on the laminar burning velocity of syngas mixtures have been conducted by various researchers. However, in most of these studies, dry air was used as the oxidizer, whereas very few studies have been conducted on syngas combustion in oxygen enriched air. In this work, a numerical and experimental study on the laminar burning velocity of a mixture of H2, CO and N2 (20:20:60vol%) was performed using air enriched with oxygen as the oxidizer, varying the oxygen content from 21% up to 35% for different equivalence ratios. Numerical calculations were conducted using three detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties. Flames were generated using contoured slot-type nozzle burners, and Schlieren images were used to determine the laminar burning velocity with the angle method. The experiments were performed under the conditions of Medellin (1550m.a.s.l.), 0.838atm and 298K. The laminar burning velocity increases with the concentration of the oxygen in the mixture due to the increase of the reaction rate; for a stoichiometric mixture, the laminar burning velocity increases by almost 25% with an increment of 4% of oxygen in the oxidant. However, the flammability limits also increase, allowing stable flames to exist in a wider range of equivalence ratios.

Hernando A. Yepes; Andres A. Amell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Study of the burning capability of the los alamos ATW system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of calculations is to evaluate the evolution of the infinite multiplication factor (k inf) during the irradiation of minor actinides High Level Waste (HLW) and Plutonium. The most important results are independently verified with Monte Carlo calculations. The relative importance of the main parameters affecting the k inf was investigated by performing calculations with several minor actinide and plutonium concentrations as well as different 238U decontamination factors for HLW. The merit figure value for minor actinide alone considering a constant neutron flux indicates that the best results are reached for minor actinide concentration equal to PWR spent fuel. The best plutonium burning results are obtained for a concentration (50.23 g/l) equal to the half of PWR spent fuel one. The simulations lead to two different reactor concepts: one for HLW burning and the other for plutonium burning purposes. To burn the HLW the most suitable reactor is an homogeneous one. This kind of reactor can effectively be utilised to burn minor actinide in low concentration (namely the PWR spent fuel). On the other hand an heterogeneous reactor with channels filled by all actinides present in PWR spent fuel with the exclusion of U isotopes with a concentration of 50 g/l can be studied.

P. A. Landeyro; A. Buccafurni; A. Orazi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ambient measurements of light-absorption by agricultural waste burning organic aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absorption properties (absorption ngstrom exponent and mass absorption efficiency) of agricultural waste burning organic aerosols (AWB-OA) and their impact on total absorption were investigated in Cairo (Egypt) during the post-harvest rice straw burning autumn season. At 370nm, AWB-OA were found to account for more than 25% of total absorption on average for the period of study (and for ?50% during intense biomass burning events), pointing out the major role potentially played by such particles on light absorption at short wavelengths. The absorption exponent obtained for AWB-OA (?3.5) is consistent with values previously reported for biomass burning brown carbon. In addition, AWB-OA were found to exhibit high mass absorption efficiencies at the near ultraviolet/mid-visible regions (e.g. 3.21.6m2g?1 at 370nm and 0.80.4m2g?1 at 520nm). Such findings clearly illustrate the need to take light absorption by organic aerosols into account for a better estimate of the radiative impact of biomass burning aerosols.

Olivier Favez; Stphane C. Alfaro; Jean Sciare; Hlne Cachier; Magdy M. Abdelwahab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effects of surface voids on burning rate measurements of pulverized coal at diffusion-limited conditions  

SciTech Connect

This research explores the effects of voids (pores on the particle surface that are deeper than their surface radius) on burning area at diffusion-limited combustion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and digital processing of images of quenched particles were used to quantify surface void area, perimeter, and reacting void wall area for voids with diameters larger than 1 {micro}m. After careful analysis, the most accurate determination of particle burning area at diffusion-limited conditions was achieved by measuring particle surface area using the technique of discrete revolution, subtracting surface void area, and adding reacting void wall area. In situ measurements of reacting coal particle temperatures and images were taken for three coals and spherocarb particles at conditions that limit the formation of CO{sub 2} from reacting carbon under various oxygen concentrations and heating rates. The results of these experiments indicate that correcting the measured surface area for void area and reacting void wall area produces calculated burning rates closely matching diffusion-limited burning rates for all conditions and all coals investigated. These results suggest that void area effects should be included for accurate determination of burning area at diffusion-limited conditions.

Bayless, D.J.; Schroeder, A.R.; Peters, J.E.; Buckius, R.O. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Combustion Products of Plastics as Indicators for Refuse Burning in the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Major compounds in smoke from burning plastics include the non-source-specific n-alkanes (mainly even predominance), terephthalic acid, phthalates, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, with minor amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (including triphenylbenzenes) and tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphate. 1,3,5-Triphenylbenzene and tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphate were found in detectable amounts in atmospheric samples where plastics and refuse were burned in open fires, and thus we propose these two compounds as specific tracers for the open-burning of plastics. ... Bioplastics from Waste Materials and Low-Value Byproducts ... Application of Electrostatic Separation to the Recycling of Plastic Wastes: Separation of PVC, PET, and ABS ...

Bernd R. T. Simoneit; Patricia M. Medeiros; Borys M. Didyk

2005-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

An index for estimating resistance to infection in patients with burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bactericidal index (BI), which measures the bactericidal capacity of polymorphs against bacteria isolated from burns, has been used to monitor susceptibility to infection in patients with burns. On admission, patients had different BI values against different bacteria but were only susceptible to infection when the \\{BIs\\} to bacteria on their burns was low. In patients where the BI was measured against the infecting strains of Staphylococcus aureus, BI values lower than those found in healthy volunteers occurred at the onset of septicaemia and abscesses. A low BI in patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa coincided with high levels of endotoxin in their peripheral blood. Patients inoculated with a new polyvalent pseudomonas vaccine had a raised BI against all strains of P. aeruginosa tested.

E.A. Roe; R.J. Jones

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effective Helium Burning Rates and the Production of the Neutrino Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective values for the key helium burning reaction rates, triple-alpha and 12C(alpha,gamma)16O, are obtained by adjusting their strengths so as to obtain the best match with the solar abundance pattern of isotopes uniquely or predominately made in core collapse supernovae. These effective rates are then used to determine the production of the neutrino isotopes. The use of effective rates considerably reduces the uncertainties in the production factors arising from uncertainties in the helium burning rates, and improves our ability to use the production of 11B to constrain the neutrino emission from supernovae.

Sam M. Austin; Christopher West; Alexander Heger

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Effective Helium Burning Rates and the Production of the Neutrino Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective values for the key helium burning reaction rates, triple-alpha and 12C(alpha,gamma)16O, are obtained by adjusting their strengths so as to obtain the best match with the solar abundance pattern of isotopes uniquely or predominately made in core collapse supernovae. These effective rates are then used to determine the production of the neutrino isotopes. The use of effective rates considerably reduces the uncertainties in the production factors arising from uncertainties in the helium burning rates, and improves our ability to use the production of 11B to constrain the neutrino emission from supernovae.

Austin, Sam M; Heger, Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Conceptual development of a continuous burning system for oil spill remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or ocean environment. During the period from 1974 to 1977, an average of four mil- lion gallons of crude oil per year were discharged into open waters and this trend is expected to increase (Buist 1987). The situation where combustion of oil employed... requirement of initiating the burning safely. This is done with a automatic valve which regulates the fuel supply. The valve is operated by a radio signal sway from the zone of burning. 45 C. CHEMISTRY OF LIQUID PETROLEUM GASES In a Liquefied Hydrocarbon...

Venkataramaiah, Ramesh H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Burning Bubbles in Electroweak Theory and in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuming that the electroweak and QCD phase transitions are first order, upon supercooling, bubbles of the new phase appear. These bubbles grow to macroscopic sizes compared to the natural scales associated with the Compton wavelengths of particle excitations. They propagate by burning the old phase into the new phase at the surface of the bubble. We study the hydrodynamic stability of the burning and find that for the velocities of interest for cosmology in the electroweak phase transition, the shape of the bubble wall is stable under hydrodynamic perturbations. Bubbles formed in the cosmological QCD phase transition are found to be a borderline case between stability and instability.

P. Huet; K. Kajantie; R. G. Leigh; B. -H. Liu; L. McLerran

1992-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effects of prescribed seasonal burning on a Combretum-Commiphora plant community in South Central Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/2500sr OEAO STEMS/2500m' 0 Zs el M 00 roe 0 lo 20 50 PLANT HEIGHT fm) 0 I CAHOPT UITEACEPT Iml 0 5 10 C' HOV JAH isa MAA ~ Pre-bum value ~ Post-burn velum LaVel Of Slsnlfleanue r * 5'/ 0 IO'0 Duosperma kilimandsctzaricum Fig . PLAHIS/2500m.../2500sr OEAO STEMS/2500m' 0 Zs el M 00 roe 0 lo 20 50 PLANT HEIGHT fm) 0 I CAHOPT UITEACEPT Iml 0 5 10 C' HOV JAH isa MAA ~ Pre-bum value ~ Post-burn velum LaVel Of Slsnlfleanue r * 5'/ 0 IO'0 Duosperma kilimandsctzaricum Fig . PLAHIS/2500m...

Kinyamario, Jenesio Ikindu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

RUBBLE-PILE RESHAPING REPRODUCES OVERALL ASTEROID SHAPES  

SciTech Connect

There have been attempts in the past to fit the observed bulk shapes (axial ratios) of asteroids to theoretical equilibrium figures for fluids, but these attempts have not been successful in many cases, evidently because asteroids are not fluid bodies. So far, however, the observed distribution of asteroid macroscopic shapes has never been attributed to a common cause. Here, we show that a general mechanism exists, capable of producing the observed shape distribution. We base our approach on the idea that aggregates of coherent blocks held together mostly by gravity (gravitational aggregates) can change their shape under the action of external factors, such as minor collisions, that break the interlocking of the constituent blocks, thus allowing them to asymptotically evolve toward fluid equilibrium. We show by numerical simulations that this behavior can produce a shape distribution compatible with the observations. Our results are shown to be consistent with a simple interpretation based on the topology of the potential energy field for rotating bodies. Also, they suggest that most asteroids have an internal structure that is at least partially fragmented, consistent with constraints derived from large asteroids (diameters >100 km) with satellites.

Tanga, P.; Comito, C.; Walsh, K. J.; Delbo, M. [UMR 6202 Cassiopee, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Paolicchi, P. [Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Hestroffer, D. [Institut de Mecanique Celeste et de Calcul des Ephemerides (IMCCE), CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 75014 Paris (France); Cellino, A.; Dell'Oro, A. [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10122 Pino Torinese (Italy); Richardson, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

ESTIMATE OF RADIUM-226 CONCENTRATIONS IN RUBBLED PCB WAREHOUSE...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE MAY 1987 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 By Bechtel National, Inc....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CX-010313: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010313: Categorical Exclusion Determination Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. CX-010313.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009066: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010140: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009110

242

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/ MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. The monitoring wells will be screened in the Upper or Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone (ULLAZ or LLLAZ). B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

243

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/ MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. The monitoring wells will be screened in the Upper or Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone (ULLAZ or LLLAZ). B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

244

Reconstructing long time series of burned areas in arid grasslands of southern Russia by satellite remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconstructing long time series of burned areas in arid grasslands of southern Russia by satellite of Sciences, 33 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow, 119071 Russia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: AVHRR MODIS RESURS Landsat Burned area mapping Southern Russia Arid grasslands Grazing Fire

Radeloff, Volker C.

245

The spherically symmetric droplet burning characteristics of Jet-A and biofuels derived from camelina and tallow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spherically symmetric droplet burning characteristics of Jet-A and biofuels derived from the biofuels due to its higher aromatic content. " Droplet burning rates of camelina and tallow HRJ fuel Available online 1 March 2013 Keywords: Alternative jet fuel Hydroprocessed biofuel Spherically symmetric

Walter, M.Todd

246

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME the resulting time series, we use tropospheric NO2 data as a reference in the regions dominated by biomass sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

247

Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions Lyatt Jaegle´ ,a Linda Steinberger,a Randall V. Martinbc anthropogenic emissions, mostly resulting from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are superimposed-CHEM chemical transport model. Top-down NOx sources are partitioned among fuel combustion (fossil fuel

Lyatt Jaeglé

248

Global Emissions of Trace Gases, Particulate Matter, and Hazardous Air Pollutants from Open Burning of Domestic Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For each country, the amount of waste burned (WB) is estimated using the general guidelines from section 5.3.2 in the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National GHG Inventories:(4)(2)where P is the national population, Pfrac is the fraction of the population assumed to burn some of their waste, MSWP is the mass of annual per capita waste production, and Bfrac is the fraction of waste available to be burned that is actually burned. ... In urban areas, waste that is not collected is assumed to be burnable. ... Among the most important sources, open fires in agriculture/forests as well as open burning of wastes have been identified as the major sources of PCDD/PCDF. ...

Christine Wiedinmyer; Robert J. Yokelson; Brian K. Gullett

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Open burning of household waste: Effect of experimental condition on combustion quality and emission of PCDD, PCDF and PCB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open burning for waste disposal is, in many countries, the dominant source of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls (PCDD/PCDF/PCB) release to the environment. To generate emission factors for open burning, experimental pile burns of about 100kg of household waste were conducted with emissions sampling. From these experiments and others conducted by the same authors it is found that less compaction of waste or active mixing during the fire stirring promotes better combustion (as evidenced by lower CO/CO2 ratio) and reduces emissions of PCDD/PCDF/PCB; an intuitive but previously undemonstrated result. These experiments also support previous results suggesting PCDD/PCDF/PCB generation in open burning while still highly variable tends to be greater in the later (smoldering) phases of burning when the CO/CO2 ratio increases.

Gustavo Solorzano-Ochoa; David A. de la Rosa; Pablo Maiz-Larralde; Brian K. Gullett; Dennis G. Tabor; Abderrahmane Touati; Barbara Wyrzykowska-Ceradini; Heidelore Fiedler; Todd Abel; William F. Carroll Jr.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Exergy Analysis of Exhaust-Gas of Burning Liquefied-Gas in a Chinese Kitchen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research analyzes distribution laws of exhaust-gas of burning liquefied-gas in closed kitchen without any kitchen hood or fan with the exergy indicator; and compares the distribution results from the exergy analysis with those from the concentration ... Keywords: Exhaust-gas, exergy distribution, CFD simulation, tecplot fitting

Ao Yong-an; Gao Xing-quan; Shen Lin; Wang Yue-ren; Feng Guo-hui

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Niche construction and Dreaming logic: aboriginal patch mosaic burning and varanid lizards (Varanus gouldii) in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between invasive species and mid-century removal of Aboriginal niche...water, and moving on to new camps when hunting returns declined...began to burn small fires near camps and along tracks, paths and...from communities and hunting camps and tracks, lightening is still...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Outcrop-scale physical properties of Burns Formation at Meridiani Planum, Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 2007. [1] A rock mass rating (RMR) analysis was performed on an outcrop of Burns Formation pressure (P*) for dry conditions is 19.5 GPa, with an uncertainty of about an order of magnitude. Analysis, location, or composition. Analysis of Martian outcrops using rock mass classification schemes is important

253

Page 1 of 3 National Research Council Burning Plasma Assessment Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 of 3 National Research Council Burning Plasma Assessment Committee November 18, 2002 Remarks of the concept of electrical power generation from nuclear fusion. Determining a national strategy for this concept raises two kinds of issues: technical and economic. The closer we are to a transition from

254

Production of potentially hazardous respirable silica airborne particulate from the burning of sugarcane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In some areas of the world where agricultural burning is practised, the airborne particles produced have been linked to respiratory disease in humans. Here, we investigate the abundance and form of silica (SiO2) minerals found within ash and aerosol produced by the experimental burning of sugarcane. Samples of sugarcane leaf were incinerated over a range of temperatures, time scales and airflow conditions, the latter to investigate the effects of wind and updrafts during natural fires. The silica content of the residual ash (from still air simulations) was measured using an improved wet chemical methodology, described here. This indicated that the release of silica from the plant material into the atmosphere increases with increasing temperature of combustion. Airborne particulate, sampled using air-pump-filter apparatus, was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with automated image and elemental analysis. For airborne particulate formed at 1100C (with airflow), 17% of the particles are in the respirable size fraction (release of cristobalite to the atmosphere (as sampled on filters). This pilot study shows that potentially toxic particles could be released during sugarcane burning and reinforces the need for further study into the emissions and re-suspension of ash from the burning of biomass.

Jennifer S. Le Blond; Ben J. Williamson; Claire J. Horwell; Alex K. Monro; Caroline A. Kirk; Clive Oppenheimer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The problem of the burning of an electric arc in a stream of gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A one-dimensional heat-conduction equation is analyzed for the positive column of an arc discharge in a lateral gas flow (V?J). Two discharge burning regimes are found for the same parameters (E and V). The cr...

V. L. Goryachev; A. D. Lebedev

1967-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Soil respiration response to prescribed burning and thinning in mixed-conifer and hardwood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil respiration response to prescribed burning and thinning in mixed-conifer and hardwood forests (SRR) in a mixed-conifer and hardwood forest that had undergone various treatments from June to August 2003. The mixed-conifer forest, located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, had been treated

North, Malcolm

257

Fuel-Burn Impact of Re-Designing Future Aircraft with Changes in Mission Specifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., with permission. AIAA SciTech #12;SA Single aisle aircraft SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference.S.A. Over the past few years, pressure to reduce the overall fuel consumption of the commer- cial aircraftFuel-Burn Impact of Re-Designing Future Aircraft with Changes in Mission Specifications Anil

Alonso, Juan J.

258

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of burners, particularly for alternative fuels, depends on improving our understanding of basic flame. Beckner1, M. J. Lijewski1 1 Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification

259

REVIEW PAPER Burning Water: A Comparative Analysis of the Energy Return  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the availability of fresh water. Keywords Biofuels Á EROEI Á Water Á Energy production Á Ethanol Á Energy cropsREVIEW PAPER Burning Water: A Comparative Analysis of the Energy Return on Water Invested Kenneth online: 2 March 2010 ? Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2010 Abstract While various energy

Vermont, University of

260

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil ... 3. General Characteristics ... Now we are considering using LCO as well as its blend with LO in gas turbine (GT) or partially in the combined cycling gas turbine (CCGT),10 as to avoid the tight standards on oil compositions. ...

Guangwen Xu; Masiki Ikegami; Senji Honma; Khoji Ikeda; Hiroshi Nagaishi; Daniel L. Dietrich; Yasuhiro Takeshita

2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

1 BPP II Workshop May 1-3 2001 Ion Cyclotron Systems for Burning Plasma Experiments*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle. #12;2 BPP II Workshop May 1-3 2001 Introduction Ion cyclotron heating Information in this section is from the ITER Design Description Document for the Ion Cyclotron Heating1 BPP II Workshop May 1-3 2001 Ion Cyclotron Systems for Burning Plasma Experiments* D. A

262

Lean burn limit and time to light characteristics of laser ignition in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work details a study of laser ignition in a low pressure combustion test rig, representative of an industrial gas turbine (SGT-400, Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd.) and for the first time investigates the effect of air mass flow rate on combustion characteristics at air/fuel ratios at the lean burn limit. Both the lean burn limit and time taken to light are essential in determining the suitability of a specified air/fuel ratio, especially in multi-chamber ignition applications. Through extension of the lean burn limit and reduction of the time taken to light, the operating window for ignition with regards to the air/fuel ratio can be increased, leading to greater reliability and repeatability of ignition. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using both a standard high energy igniter and a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 1064nm wavelength. A detailed comparison of the lean burn limit and time taken to light for standard ignition and laser ignition is presented.

J. Griffiths; M. Riley; A. Kirk; A. Borman; J. Lawrence; C. Dowding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reaction Rate and Composition Dependence of the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning on Accreting Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a ten times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of triple alpha and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15O(a,g)19Ne and 18Ne(a,p)21Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor ten decrease of the 15O(a,g)19Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depend...

Keek, L; Heger, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Persistent spectral-hole-burning spectroscopy of CuCl quantum cubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A persistent spectral-hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon was successfully applied to the precise site-selective spectroscopy of CuCl quantum dots embedded in NaCl crystals. In the PSHB spectra of CuCl quantum dots, a resonantly burned hole and lower-energy satellite holes were observed. These satellite holes are supposed to originate from hole burning of the ground states, which results from site-selective excitation of the corresponding excited states of excitons confined in CuCl quantum dots. Energy relation between the resonantly burned hole and each satellite hole is well explained by the simple concept of a particle in a quantum cube with an infinitely high potential barrier. However, actual quantum dots are considered to be a little deviated from cubes, resulting in the violation of the optical selection rule in quantum cubes. A cubic-shaped quantum-dot model is almost consistent with oscillatory fine structures observed in the Z3 exciton absorption band. Its spectral decomposition into the ground state and the first excited state of excitons was made, and showed that the first excited state is in majority at the higher-energy region of the Z3 exciton absorption band. This result was supported by the photoluminescence spectrum of the Z3 exciton.

Naru Sakakura and Yasuaki Masumoto

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United Wildland fires can be an important source of greenhouse gases as well as black carbon emissions that have of climate response to fire emissions compared to other emission sources of GHG, aerosols, and black carbon

266

Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (17951994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejo). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as FeAl spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some chemical variations are responsible for this separation. Elemental sulphur and salammoniac (ammonium salt) are the coal fire gas minerals neoformed on the surface of piles, near the burning zones. They were identified by different techniques, mainly SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR. Relatively high concentrations of several aromatic compounds were detected in the gas collected at the studied areas, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbons. The highest concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in gas samples from S. Pedro da Cova waste pile. The exposure to hazardous compounds present in the gas is a serious risk to human health and the environment.

J. Ribeiro; E. Ferreira da Silva; D. Flores

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Recent Mid-Scale Research on Using Oil Herding Surfactants to Thicken Oil Slicks in Pack Ice for In-Situ Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of burn tests at the scale of 50 m2 with herders and crude oil in a pit containing broken sea ice is planned for ... be presented and the plans for the November burn tests will be discussed.

I. Buist; S. Potter; L. Zabilansky; A. Guarino

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 3, Appendix A: Mass burn technologies  

SciTech Connect

This appendix on Mass Burn Technologies is the first in a series designed to identify, describe and assess the suitability of several currently or potentially available generic technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). These appendices, which cover eight core thermoconversion, bioconversion and recycling technologies, reflect public domain information gathered from many sources. Representative sources include: professional journal articles, conference proceedings, selected municipality solid waste management plans and subscription technology data bases. The information presented is intended to serve as background information that will facilitate the preparation of the technoeconomic and life cycle mass, energy and environmental analyses that are being developed for each of the technologies. Mass burn has been and continues to be the predominant technology in Europe for the management of MSW. In the United States, the majority of the existing waste-to-energy projects utilize this technology and nearly 90 percent of all currently planned facilities have selected mass burn systems. Mass burning generally refers to the direct feeding and combustion of municipal solid waste in a furnace without any significant waste preprocessing. The only materials typically removed from the waste stream prior to combustion are large bulky objects and potentially hazardous or undesirable wastes. The technology has evolved over the last 100 or so years from simple incineration to the most highly developed and commercially proven process available for both reducing the volume of MSW and for recovering energy in the forms of steam and electricity. In general, mass burn plants are considered to operate reliably with high availability.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The relationships between biomass burning, land-cover/use change, and the distribution of carbonaceous aerosols in mainland Southeast Asia: A review and synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The relationships between biomass burning, land-cover/use change, and the distribution. 793, The Ohio State University March 3, 2007 Biomass burning is a major source of black carbon directly and indirectly. Uncertainty regarding the contribution of biomass burning to the concentration

Shi, Tao

270

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

271

Analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 hydrogen burn. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

As a basis for the analysis of the hydrogen burn which occurred in the Three Mile Island Containment on March 28, 1979, a study of recorded temperatures and pressures was made. Long-term temperature information was obtained from the multipoint temperature recorder which shows 12 containment atmosphere temperatures plotted every 6 min. The containment atmosphere pressure recorder provided excellent long- and short-term pressure information. Short-term information was obtained from the multiplex record of 24 channels of data, recorded every 3 sec, and the alarm printer record which shows status change events and prints out temperatures, pressures, and the time of the events. The timing of these four data recording systems was correlated and pertinent data were tabulated, analyzed, and plotted to show average containment temperature and pressure versus time. Photographs and videotapes of the containment entries provided qualitative burn information.

Henrie, J.O.; Postma, A.K.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermonuclear Burning Regimes and the Use of SNe Ia in Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The calculations of the light curves of thermonuclear supernovae are carried out by a method of multi-group radiation hydrodynamics. The effects of spectral lines and expansion opacity are taken into account. The predictions for UBVI fluxes are given. The values of rise time for B and V bands found in our calculations are in good agreement with the observed values. We explain why our results for the rise time have more solid physical justification than those obtained by other authors. It is shown that small variations in the chemical composition of the ejecta, produced in the explosions with different regimes of nuclear burning, can influence drastically the light curve decline in the B band and, to a lesser extent, in the V band. We argue that recent results on positive cosmological constant Lambda, found from the high redshift supernova observations, could be wrong in the case of possible variations of the preferred mode of nuclear burning in the earlier Universe.

E. I. Sorokina; S. I. Blinnikov; O. S. Bartunov

1999-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. (Natural and Applied Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Ursula Burns, Xerox Corporation)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Ursula Burns, Chairman and CEO of the Xerox Corporation, gave the second keynote address of the third day's sessions on February 29.

Burns, Ursula (Xerox Corporation, Chairman and CEO)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Short-Term Cooling but Long-Term Global Warming Due to Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass burning releases gases (e.g., CO2, CO, CH4, NOx, SO2, C2H6, C2H4, C3H8, C3H6) and aerosol particle components (e.g., black carbon, organic matter, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, H+, Cl?, H2SO4, HSO4?, SO42?, NO3?). To date, the global-scale climate response of ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

An assessment of waste fuel burning in operating circulating fluidized bed boilers  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC), today's fastest growing boiler technology, has the flexibility to burn a wide range of fuels, including many waste fuels, while satisfying all present and anticipated environmental regulations. The first generation of FBC--atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC)--concentrated on ''bubbling'' fluidized bed designs. These systems have inherent limitations and experienced several problems. In response to these problems, circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology was developed.

Gendreau, R.J.; Raymond, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

ADVANCED BURNING STAGES AND FATE OF 8-10 M{sub Sun} STARS  

SciTech Connect

The stellar mass range 8 {approx}< M/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 12 corresponds to the most massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and the most numerous massive stars. It is host to a variety of supernova (SN) progenitors and is therefore very important for galactic chemical evolution and stellar population studies. In this paper, we study the transition from super-AGB (SAGB) star to massive star and find that a propagating neon-oxygen-burning shell is common to both the most massive electron capture supernova (EC-SN) progenitors and the lowest mass iron-core-collapse supernova (FeCCSN) progenitors. Of the models that ignite neon-burning off-center, the 9.5 M{sub Sun} star would evolve to an FeCCSN after the neon-burning shell propagates to the center, as in previous studies. The neon-burning shell in the 8.8 M{sub Sun} model, however, fails to reach the center as the URCA process and an extended (0.6 M{sub Sun }) region of low Y{sub e} (0.48) in the outer part of the core begin to dominate the late evolution; the model evolves to an EC-SN. This is the first study to follow the most massive EC-SN progenitors to collapse, representing an evolutionary path to EC-SN in addition to that from SAGB stars undergoing thermal pulses (TPs). We also present models of an 8.75 M{sub Sun} SAGB star through its entire TP phase until electron captures on {sup 20}Ne begin at its center and of a 12 M{sub Sun} star up to the iron core collapse. We discuss key uncertainties and how the different pathways to collapse affect the pre-SN structure. Finally, we compare our results to the observed neutron star mass distribution.

Jones, S.; Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard Jones Building, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Nomoto, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Fischer, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, University of Arizona, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Herwig, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paxton, B. [KITP and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Toki, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Lam, Y. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bertolli, M. G., E-mail: s.w.jones@keele.ac.uk [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The effect of developing nations' municipal waste composition on PCDD/PCDF emissions from open burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Open burning tests of municipal waste from two countries, Mexico and China, showed composition-related differences in emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs). Twenty-six burn tests were conducted, comparing results from two laboratory combustion facilities. Waste was shredded to isolate composition-specific effects from those due to random waste orientation. Emissions ranged from 5 to 780ng toxic equivalent/kg carbon burned (ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1) with an average of 140ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1 (stdev=170). The waste from Mexico (17ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1) had a statistically lower average emission factor than waste from China (240ng TEQ (kg Cb)?1. This difference was attributed primarily to waste composition differences, although one time-integrated combustion quality measure, ?CO/?CO2, showed statistical significance between laboratories. However, waste composition differences were far more determinant than which laboratory conducted the tests, illustrated using both statistical techniques and comparison of cross-over samples (wastes tested at both facilities). Comparison of emissions from previous waste combustion tests in Sweden and the U.S.A, showed emission factors within the range of those determined for Mexico and China waste. For laboratory-scale combustion, existing emission factors and test methodologies are generally applicable to both developed and developing countries.

Lisa Lundin; Brian Gullett; William F. Carroll Jr.; Abderrahmane Touati; Stellan Marklund; Heidelore Fiedler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact of different covariance data is studied by comparing two of the presently most complete nuclear data covariance libraries (ENDF/B-VII.1 and SCALE 6.0), which reveals a high dependency of the uncertainty estimates on the source of covariance data. The burn-up benchmark Exercise I-1b proposed by the OECD expert group "Benchmarks for Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) for the Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs" is studied as an example application. The burn-up simulations are performed with the SCALE 6.0 tool suite.

Carlos Javier Diez; Oliver Buss; Axel Hoefer; Dieter Porsch; Oscar Cabellos

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

Natural and prescribed biomass fires are a major source of atmospheric aerosols that can persist in the atmosphere for long periods of time. Biomass burning aerosols (BBA) can be associated with long range transport of water soluble N?, S?, P?, and metal?containing species. In this study, BBA samples were collected using a particle?into?liquid sampler (PILS) from laboratory burns of vegetation collected on military bases in the southeastern and southwestern United States. The samples were then analyzed using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/HR?MS) that enabled accurate mass measurements for hundreds of species with m/z values between 70 and 1000 and assignment of probable elemental formulae. Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ba?containing organometallic species were identified. The results suggest that the biomass may have accumulated metal?containing species that were reemitted during biomass burning. Further research into the sources, persistence, and dispersion of metal?containing aerosols as well as their environmental effects is needed.

Chang-Graham, Alexandra L.; Profeta, Luisa Tm; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes  

SciTech Connect

Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry ...

Alvarado, Matthew James

284

Methods for reducing emissions of dioxins and furans in flue gases at plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods are discussed for reducing emissions of toxic chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and dibenzo-furans in flue gases at plants which burn solid domestic waste. Results are presented from a study of ... number of th...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev; L. G. Fedorov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Results of familiarization of and prospects for a procedure for the burning of wastes in a vortical fluidized bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems that have arisen during tune-up of the production line for the thermal processing of solid household waste by the method of burning in a vortical fluidized bed (principally,...

A. N. Tugov; G. A. Ryabov; V. I. Rodionov

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

PHOTOCHEMICAL AND NON-PHOTOCHEMICAL HOLE BURNING IN DIMETHYL-S-TETRAZINE IN A POLYVINYL CARBAZOLE FILM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING IN DIMETHYL-S-TETRAZINE IN A POLYVINYL CARBAZOLEon the system dimethyl-s-tetrazine in polyvinyl carbazolehere studies on dimethyl-s-tetrazine (DMST) in a polyvinyl

Cuellar, E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Spatio-temporal distribution of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) relative to prescribed burns on rangeland in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) spatial and temporal distribution, in the presence of cattle grazing. Three 40 ha patches, constituting 10% and 6% of the land area in the lesser and greater Yellow Bluff pasture, respectively, were burned in September...

Meek, Michael Glenn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Water relations strategies of two grass and shrub species as influenced by prescribed burning in a semiarid ecosystem in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER RELATIONS STRATEGIES OF TWO GRASS AND SHRUB SPECIES AS INFLUENCED BY PRESCRIBED BURNING IN A SEMIARID ECOSYSTEM IN KENYA A Thesis by ALI RAMADHAN ALI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Range Science WATER RELATIONS STRATEGIES OF TWO GRASS AND SHRUB SPECIES AS INFLUENCED BY PRESCRIBED BURNING IN A SEMIARID ECOSYSTEM IN KENYA A Thesis by ALI RAMADHAN ALI...

Ali, Ali Ramadhan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

PCDD/F, PBDD/F, and PBDE Emissions from Open Burning of a Residential Waste Dump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PCDD/F, PBDD/F, and PBDE Emissions from Open Burning of a Residential Waste Dump ... PCDD/F emission factors averaged 823 ng toxic equivalency (TEQ)/kg Cburned (N = 8, 68% relative standard deviation, RSD), a value at least five times higher than those from previous tests with domestic waste burned in barrels and approximately 2000 times higher than those from stacks of modern municipal waste combustors. ...

Brian K. Gullett; Barbara Wyrzykowska; Emanuela Grandesso; Abderrahmane Touati; Dennis G. Tabor; Gustavo Solrzano Ochoa

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): H and H Burn Pit Superfund Site, Hanover County, VA, June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the final remedial action selected for the HH Burn Pit Superfund Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia (Site). This remedy addresses contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water at the Site. The Site has been identified using different names in many of the documents in the Administrative Record and on the National Priorities List. This Record of Decision will refer to the Site as the `HH Burn Pit Superfund Site.`

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Organic Rankine Cycle System Preliminary Design with Corn Cob Biomass Waste Burning as Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy source potencies in Indonesia are needed to be utilized to fulfill the electricity requirement in rural or remote area that not yet get electricity. One of the potency is biomass waste. Therefore, this paper discusses about the electricity generation preliminary design of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system with corn cob biomass waste burning as heat source, so it can be obtained the theoretic corn farm area requirement, electricity power, and thermal efficiency at heat source temperature and flow rate variations. Corn cob burning temperature can heat up the heating fluid that is heated by boiler with corn cob as the biomass fuel. Furthermore, that heating fluid is used as ORC electricity generation heat source. The independent variables in this study are the heating fluid temperature which varied between 110, 120, and 130oC, and the heating fluid flow rate that varied between 100, 150, and 200 liter/minute. \\{R141b\\} is selected to be the working fluid, palm oil is used for heating fluid and water as cooling fluid. The calculation results that the theoretic electricity power, thermal efficiency, and corn farm area requirement, respectively, are in the range of 3.5-8.5kW, 9.2-10.3%, and 49.5-101.1hectare/year. All of the highest range values are resulted at the highest temperature and flow rate, 130oC and 200 liter/minute. This result shows that corn cob burning heat is potential to be utilized as electricity generation heat source for rural society, particularly for some areas that have been studied.

Nur Rohmah; Ghalya Pikra; Agus Salim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oxidation of volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. Final technical report, September 1980-February 1984  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to measure, through the use of laboratory combustors, those conditions which promote complete combustion of wood volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. The conditions of interest are combustion temperature, residence time, stoichiometry, and air mixing. The project objectives are met through two laboratory approaches: (1) model compound studies: in order to measure the overall rates of oxidative pyrolysis of biomass volatiles, and to determine the types of intermediate organic species which are likely to form as part of this process, model compounds have been reacted in a specialized jet-stirred reactor, which has been developed as part of this research. (2) high-intensity wood combustion: in order to study the clean combustion of wood, that is, to investigate the conceptual design features required for clean burning, and to ascertain the levels and types of pollutant and condensible species which are most difficult to oxidize, a high-intensity, research wood combustor has been developed and examined for the different phases of the wood burning cycle. Although the objectives of the project have been met, it has not been possible, because of support limitations, to thoroughly explore several interesting aspects which have arisen because of this research. For example, a third laboratory system in which wood pyrolysis gas is injected directly into the a well characterized reactor, so that the kinetics and mechanisms of the gas-phase reaction of the actual biomass volatiles can be studied, could not be thoroughly developed. Refinements in the high-intensity wood combustor, which would bring its design features closer to practicality for the industry, could not be considered. 32 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

Malte, P.C.; Thornton, M.M.; Kamber, P.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The wrong kind of general: the resignation of union brigadier general William W. Burns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a teenager and became a prominent local politician, serving in the state legislature from 1838 to 1840 and winning a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1857. The elder Burns also had a strong interest in military affairs... and in field inflicts upon an universal soldier, passes through the chrysalis state of manhood into the veteran defender of his country and her rights. When this soldier perseveres with a single eye to duty, resisting alike the disloyalty and weakness...

Ward, David Earl

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-negative voltage at the cathode initiates a dark discharge resulting in a reduction of the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. An experiment indicated that nearly 44% of the carbon dioxide in exhaust gas disappears after a high-voltage application to the cathode. The energy needed for the endothermic reaction of the carbon dioxidedissociation corresponding to this concentration reduction is provided mainly by the internal energy reduction of the discharge gas which is nearly 20 times the electrical energy for electron emission.

Han S. Uhm; Chul H. Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transuranic Waste Burning Potential of Thorium Fuel in a Fast Reactor - 12423  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Electric Company (referred to as 'Westinghouse' in the rest of this paper) is proposing a 'back-to-front' approach to overcome the stalemate on nuclear waste management in the US. In this approach, requirements to further the societal acceptance of nuclear waste are such that the ultimate health hazard resulting from the waste package is 'as low as reasonably achievable'. Societal acceptability of nuclear waste can be enhanced by reducing the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste, which is currently driven primarily by the protracted radiotoxicity of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes. Therefore, a transition to a more benign radioactive waste can be accomplished by a fuel cycle capable of consuming the stockpile of TRU 'legacy' waste contained in the LWR Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) while generating waste which is significantly less radio-toxic than that produced by the current open U-based fuel cycle (once through and variations thereof). Investigation of a fast reactor (FR) operating on a thorium-based fuel cycle, as opposed to the traditional uranium-based is performed. Due to a combination between its neutronic properties and its low position in the actinide chain, thorium not only burns the legacy TRU waste, but it does so with a minimal production of 'new' TRUs. The effectiveness of a thorium-based fast reactor to burn legacy TRU and its flexibility to incorporate various fuels and recycle schemes according to the evolving needs of the transmutation scenario have been investigated. Specifically, the potential for a high TRU burning rate, high U-233 generation rate if so desired and low concurrent production of TRU have been used as metrics for the examined cycles. Core physics simulations of a fast reactor core running on thorium-based fuels and burning an external TRU feed supply have been carried out over multiple cycles of irradiation, separation and reprocessing. The TRU burning capability as well as the core isotopic content have been characterized. Results will be presented showing the potential for thorium to reach a high TRU transmutation rate over a wide variety of fuel types (oxide, metal, nitride and carbide) and transmutation schemes (recycle or partition of in-bred U-233). In addition, a sustainable scheme has been devised to burn the TRU accumulated in the core inventory once the legacy TRU supply has been exhausted, thereby achieving long-term virtually TRU-free. A comprehensive 'back-to-front' approach to the fuel cycle has recently been proposed by Westinghouse which emphasizes achieving 'acceptable', low-radiotoxicity, high-level waste, with the intent not only to satisfy all technical constraints but also to improve public acceptance of nuclear energy. Following this approach, the thorium fuel cycle, due to its low radiotoxicity and high potential for TRU transmutation has been selected as a promising solution. Additional studies not shown here have shown significant reduction of decay heat. The TRU burning potential of the Th-based fuel cycle has been illustrated with a variety of fuel types, using the Toshiba ARR to perform the analysis, including scenarios with continued LWR operation of either uranium fueled or thorium fueled LWRs. These scenarios will afford overall reduction in actinide radiotoxicity, however when the TRU supply is exhausted, a continued U- 235 LWR operation must be assumed to provide TRU makeup feed. This scenario will never reach the characteristically low TRU content of a closed thorium fuel cycle with its associated potential benefits on waste radiotoxicity, as exemplified by the transition scenario studied. At present, the cases studied indicate ThC as a potential fuel for maximizing TRU burning, while ThN with nitrogen enriched to 95% N-15 shows the highest breeding potential. As a result, a transition scenario with ThN was developed to show that a sustainable, closed Th-cycle can be achieved starting from burning the legacy TRU stock and completing the transmutation of the residual TRU remaining in the core inventory after the legacy TRU external supply has been

Wenner, Michael; Franceschini, Fausto; Ferroni, Paolo [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC,Cranberry Township, PA, 16066 (United States); Sartori, Alberto; Ricotti, Marco [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization - which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism - is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

Spectral hole burnings at high energy tails in spontaneous emission and hot carrier relaxation in InGaAsP lasers  

SciTech Connect

Spectral hole burnings in spontaneous emission spectra from 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP lasers were found. The results are understood on the basis of population burnings of holes associated with the saturation of intervalence-band absorption. Theoretical results on hot carrier relaxation are shown to explain the population burnings, pointing out an importance of nonequilibrium optical phonon populations in the active layers of long wavelength InGaAsP lasers and light emitting diodes (LED's).

Yamanishi, M.; Mikoshiba, N.; Nonomura, K.; Suemune, I.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Numerical and experimental study on laminar burning velocity of syngas produced from biomass gasification in sub-atmospheric pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The laminar burning velocity of syngas mixtures has been studied by various researches. However, most of these studies have been conducted in atmospheric conditions at sea level. In the present study, the effect of sub atmospheric pressure was evaluated on the laminar burning velocity for a mixture of H2, CO and N2 (20:20:60vol%) in real sub atmospheric condition. The measurements was conducted in an altitude of 2130m.a.s.l (0.766atm) and 21m.a.s.l (0.994atm) to evaluate the effect of pressure, the temperature and relative humidity were controlled using an air conditioning unit and was maintained in 2951K and 62.62.7% respectively. The Flames were generated using contoured slot-type nozzle burner, and an ICCD camera was used to capture chemiluminescence emitted by OH?-CH? radicals present in the flame and thus obtain the flame front and determinate the laminar burning velocity using the angle method. The experimental results were compared with numerical calculations, conducted using the detailed mechanisms of Li etal. and the GRI-Mech 3.0. It was found that the laminar burning velocity increases at lower pressure, for an equivalence ratio of 1.1, the laminar burning velocity increases by almost 23% respect to the sea level conditions.

Andres A. Amell; Hernando A. Yepes; Francisco J. Cadavid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Deep sole burns in several participants in a traditional festival of the firewalking ceremony in Kee-lung, TaiwanClinical experiences and prevention strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose Firewalking is a common Taoist cleansing ceremony in Taiwan, but burns associated with the practice have rarely been reported. We analyzed the patients with plantar burns from one firewalking ceremony. Materials and methods In one firewalking ceremony, 12 Taoist disciples suffered from contact burns to the soles of their feet while walking over burning coals. Eight of them had at least second-degree burns over areas larger than 1% of their total body surface areas (TBSAs). The age, sex, medical history, date of injury, time taken to traverse the fire pit, depth and TBSA of the burns, treatment, length of stay, and outcome were recorded and analyzed. Results Deep, disseminated second- to third-degree burns were noted and healing took as long as three weeks in some patients. Because disseminated hypertrophic scars form after burns, the soles involved regain much of their tensile strength while walking. The patients experienced only a few difficulties in their daily lives three months after injury. Conclusion From our experience treating patients with deep disseminated second- to third-degree plantar burns caused by firewalking, we conclude that they should be treated conservatively, with secondary healing rather than a skin graft.

Shun-Cheng Chang; Chih-Kang Hsu; Yuan-Sheng Tzeng; Shou-Cheng Teng; Ju-Peng Fu; Niann-Tzyy Dai; Shyi-Gen Chen; Tim-Mo Chen; Chun-che Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Smoldering Biomass Combustion. Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 10,aerosols emitted during biomass combustion [Robinson et al.burning samples. Combustion of biomass produces EC a and

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Type B Accident Investigation Report of the October 28, 2004, Burn Injuries Sustained During an Office of Secure Transportation Joint Training Exercise at Fort Hunter-Liggett, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TYPE B Accident Investigation Report of the October 28, 2004 Burn Injuries Sustained During an Office of Secure Transportation Joint Training Exercise at Fort Hunter-Liggett, CA

304

Carbon nanotube (CNT) gas sensors for emissions from fossil fuel burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fossil fuels endow wide applications in industrial, transportation, and power generation sectors. However, smoke released by burning fossil fuels contains toxic gases, which pollutes the environment and severely affects human health. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potential material for gas sensors due to their high structural porosity and high specific surface area. Defects present on the CNT sidewalls and end caps facilitate adsorption of gas molecules. The chemical procedures adopted to purify and disperse carbon nanotubes create various chemical groups on their surface, which further enhance the adsorption of gas molecules and thus improve the sensitivity of CNTs. Present review focuses on CNT chemiresistive gas sensing mechanisms, which make them suitable for the development of next generation sensor technology. The resistance of carbon nanotubes decreases when oxidizing gas molecules adsorb on their surface, whereas, adsorption of reducing gas molecules results in increasing the resistance of CNTs. Sensing ability of carbon nanotubes for the gases namely, NO, NO2, CO, CO2 and SO2, released on burning of fossil fuels is reviewed. This review provides basic understanding of sensing mechanisms, creation of adsorption sites by chemical processes and charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and surface of CNTs. In addition, useful current update on research and development of CNT gas sensors is provided.

M. Mittal; A. Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Emissions of unintentional persistent organic pollutants from open burning of municipal solid waste from developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Open burning of waste is the most significant source of polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) in many national inventories prepared pursuant to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. This is particularly true for developing countries. Emission factors for \\{POPs\\} such as PCDD/PCDF, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCB) and penta- and hexachlorobenzenes (PeCBz/HCB) from open burning of municipal solid waste in China and Mexico are reported herein. Six different waste sources were studied varying from urban-industrial to semi-urban to rural. For PCDD/PCDF, the emission factors to air ranged from 3.0 to 650ngTEQkg?1waste and for dl-PCB from 0.092 to 54ngTEQkg?1waste. Emission factors for PeCBz (171200ngkg?1waste) and HCB (241300ngkg?1waste) spanned a wide but similar range. Within the datasets there is no indication of significant waste composition effect on emission factor with the exception of significantly higher Mexico rural samples.

Tingting Zhang; Heidelore Fiedler; Gang Yu; Gustavo Solorzano Ochoa; William F. Carroll Jr.; Brian K. Gullett; Stellan Marklund; Abderrahmane Touati

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geophysical investigation of burn pit, 128-H-1, 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

The 128-H-1 burn pit is located in the northeast corner of 100-H Area. The objective of the survey was to delineate subsurface features in the 128-H-1 burn pit that may affect the emplacement of soil-gas probes. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other geophysical investigations on the Hanford Site. The GPR system used for this work utilized a 300-MHz antenna to transmit the Em energy into the ground. The transmitted energy is reflected back to a receiving antenna where variations in the return signal are recorded. Common reflectors include natural geologic conditions such as bedding, cementation, moisture, and clay, or man-made objects such as pipes, barrels, foundations, and buried wires. The studied depth, which varies from site to site, was 0--11 ft for this survey. The method is limited in depth by transmit power, receiver sensitivity, and attenuation of the transmitted energy. Depth of investigation is influenced by highly conductive material, such as metal drums, which reflect all the energy back to the receiver. Therefore, the method cannot ``see`` below such objects.

Szwartz, G.J.

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

Stress Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel in the Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor Design  

SciTech Connect

High fuel temperatures and resulting fuel particle coating stresses can be expected in a Pu and minor actinide fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design as compared to the standard UO2 fueled core. The high discharge burnup aimed for in this Deep-Burn design results in increased power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed near the inner and outer reflector. Furthermore, the pebble power in a multi-pass in-core pebble recycling scheme is relatively high for pebbles that make their first core pass. This might result in an increase of the mechanical failure of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the PBMR design. To investigate the integrity of the particle fuel coatings as a function of the irradiation time (i.e. burnup), core position and during a Loss Of Forced Cooling (LOFC) incident the PArticle STress Analysis code (PASTA) has been coupled to the PEBBED code for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion analysis of the core. Two deep burn fuel types (Pu with or without initial MA fuel content) have been investigated with the new code system for normal and transient conditions including the effect of the statistical variation of thickness of the coating layers.

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

R and D of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Steels for High Burn-up Fuel Claddings  

SciTech Connect

Research and development of fuel clad materials for high burn-up operation of light water reactor and super critical water reactor (SCPWR) will be shown with focusing on the effort to overcome the requirements of material performance as the fuel clad. Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels are well known as a high temperature structural material. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening without accompanying loss of ductility. High Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 15 to 19 wt% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW). As for the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ODS steels, the critical hydrogen concentration required to hydrogen embrittlement is ranging 10{approx}12 wppm that is approximately one order of magnitude higher value than that of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel. In the ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel, indicating that the ODS steels are also resistant to helium He bubble-induced embrittlement. Finally, it is demonstrated that the ODS steels are very promising for the fuel clad material for high burn-up operation of water-cooling reactors. (authors)

Kimura, A.; Cho, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Kasada, R. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ukai, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai (Japan); Fujiwara, M. [Kobelco, Ltd, Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermonuclear Burning on the Accreting X-Ray Pulsar GRO J1744-28  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal stability of nuclear burning on the accreting X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28. The neutron star's dipolar magnetic field is thermonuclear instabilities are unlikely causes of the hourly bursts seen at very high accretion rates. We then discuss how the stability of the thermonuclear burning depends on both the global accretion rate and the neutron star's magnetic field strength. We emphasize that the appearance of the instability (i.e., whether it looks like a Type I X-ray burst or a flare lasting a few minutes) will yield crucial information on the neutron star's surface magnetic field and the role of magnetic fields in convection. We suggest that a thermal instability in the accretion disk is the origin of the long (~300 days) outburst and that the recurrence time of these outbursts is >50 years. We also discuss the nature of the binary and point out that a velocity measurement of the stellar companion (most likely a Roche-lobe filling giant with m_K>17) will constrain the neutron star mass.

Lars Bildsten; Edward F. Brown

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

On the Effect of Explosive Thermonuclear Burning on the Accreted Envelopes of White Dwarfs in Cataclysmic Variables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables (CVs), coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements, requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some CVs contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by white dwarf remnant burning during the common envelope phase and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in systems with thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed and a new scenario for the white dwarf's accretion-nova-outburst is given.

Edward M. Sion; Warren Sparks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Remedial investigation of the High Explosives Burn Pit facility, Building 829 complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site 300  

SciTech Connect

To assess any impact on the environment resulting from operations at the High Explosives (HE) Burn Pits at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300, we evaluated the soil, rock, and ground water beneath the burn pit facility. Between November 16, 1986, and January 12, 1987, we drilled eight exploratory holes; one was converted to a monitor well, and another was converted to a piezometer. Seven holes were drilled, geologically logged, and sampled to determine the concentration and extent of substances that may have infiltrated to the subsurface from the burn pits. The eighth hole was completed as a monitor well but was not sampled, and no detailed log was prepared. Electric logging was performed in one exploratory hole further evaluate the geologic conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Webster-Scholten, C.P.; Crow, N.B.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-F-3 PNL Burn Pit, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-042  

SciTech Connect

The 128-F-3 waste site is a former burn pit associated with the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. The site was overlain by coal ash associated with the 126-F-1 waste site and could not be located during confirmatory site evaluation. Therefore, a housekeeping action was performed to remove the coal ash potentially obscuring residual burn pit features. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Investigation of soil contamination at the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

A remedial investigation was conducted to identify soil contamination in the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The investigation included geophysical surveys to delineate the filled section of the pit, soil-gas surveys to locate the organic contamination area, field X-ray fluorescence measurements along the burning pit to identify the major metal contamination, and surface and subsurface soil analyses to investigate the nature and extent of contamination. This paper presents the results of this investigation

Wang, Ying-Ya; Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The effects of fall and spring burning on water quality and vegetative cover in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRE EPFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN TRE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEKAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Range Science THE EFFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Approved as to style...

Garza, Nick Ernest

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Investigation of the behaviour of high burn-up PWR fuel under RIA conditions in the CABRI test reactor  

SciTech Connect

Performance, reliability and economics are the goal criteria for fuel pin design and development. For steady state behaviour and operational transients, the demonstration is made worldwide that burn-up of more than 60 GWd/t can be reached reliably with improved PWR fuel. It has however not been demonstrated yet that safety criteria, related to design basis accident scenarios, are still respected at these high burn-up levels. In particular, for the reactivity initiated accident (RIA), resulting from a postulated, rapid removal of control rod elements, the amount of energy injection must be limited by design such that no severe damage to the core and its structures might occur.

Schmitz, F.; Papin, J.; Haessler, M.; Nervi, J.C. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Permezel, P. [Electricite de France, Septen (France)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol  

SciTech Connect

The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Workshop: Novas Abordagens para Monitorar a Queima de Biomassa (New Approaches to Monitor Biomass Burning) Coordenador: Emilio Chuvieco (University of Alcal, Spain)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop: Novas Abordagens para Monitorar a Queima de Biomassa (New Approaches to Monitor Biomass relevant topics associated to monitoring biomass burnings from satellite data, both at global and regional scales. Hora Título das Palestras Apresentador 9:00 Opening 9:10 Global Monitoring of Biomass Burning

319

DOE/SC-ARM-13-014 Biomass Burning Observation Project Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Biomass Burning Observation Project Science Plan LI Kleinman AJ Sedlacek September 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

320

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

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321

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Urban air quality improvement by using a CNG lean burn engine for city buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled lean-burn city bus engines has a significant potential for air quality improvement in urban areas. Particularly important is the reduction of NOx, as well as particulate and non-regulated HC-emissions. For this reason, a CNG-fuelled, lean-bum, turbocharged, intercooled engine equipped with catalytic converter was developed. The basic engine is a 6-cylinder, heavy duty, serial production Hungarian diesel engine which complies with Euro-2 emissions limits. The objective of this development was to meet European emission limits forecast for the year 2005 (NOx fuel consumption capability of the engine are reported. Based on the evaluation of economical feasibility, the costs of CNG bus operation is additionally discussed. It can be concluded that CNG city bus operation is - compared to diesel operation - a promising way to improve economically the local air quality.

Tamas Meretei; Joep A.N. van Ling; Cornelis Havenith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Microscopic theory of reversible pressure broadening in hole?burning spectra of impurities in glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to IP: 129.237.46.100 On: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:48:04 3276 B. B. Laird and J. L. Skinner: Pressure broadening in hole-burning spectra I(v) = (21T)-1 f:oo dxelVx[V- 1 f dRg(R)e-iV(R)Xr (5) Defining a new function J(x) by J(x) = f dRg(R)[I_e- iv... by an extension of the statistical method formalism. An equation for f( vii v;t:..p) similar to Eq. (3) for the line shape can be written as f(v'lv;t:..p) = 1 fdR1"'dRN P(R1, ... ,RN ) I(v)V N X8(V- itl VeRi) X8(V' - it. Vi (Ri;t:..p) ), (11) where...

Laird, Brian Bostian; Skinner, J. L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transmutation Analysis of Enriched Uranium and Deep Burn High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been under consideration for production of electricity, process heat, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. As part of the transmutation analysis efforts within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) campaign, a need was identified for detailed discharge isotopics from HTRs for use in the VISION code. A conventional HTR using enriched uranium in UCO fuel was modeled having discharge burnup of 120 GWd/MTiHM. Also, a deep burn HTR (DB-HTR) was modeled burning transuranic (TRU)-only TRU-O2 fuel to a discharge burnup of 648 GWd/MTiHM. For each of these cases, unit cell depletion calculations were performed with SCALE/TRITON. Unit cells were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were first set by using Serpent calculations to match a spectral index between unit cell and whole core domains. In the case of the DB-HTR, the unit cell which was arrived at in this way conserved the ratio of fuel to moderator found in a single block of fuel. In the conventional HTR case, a larger moderator-to-fuel ratio than that of a single block was needed to simulate the whole core spectrum. Discharge isotopics (for 500 nuclides) and one-group cross-sections (for 1022 nuclides) were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations. In addition to the discharge isotopics, one-group cross-sections were provided for the full list of 1022 nuclides tracked in the transmutation library.

Michael A. Pope

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ERRATA SHEET for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.1.1.3 of the Table of Contents reference on Page v and on Page 12 of the Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada erroneously refers to the Nevada Environmental Policy Act Determination. The correct title of the referenced document is the National Environmental Policy Act Determination.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

D.D.E. Long, A. Amer and R. Burns July 2002, Munich, Germany Group-Based Management of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© D.D.E. Long, A. Amer and R. Burns July 2002, Munich, Germany Group-Based Management, Germany Outline Motivation The Aggregating Cache Successor prediction and tracking Client Cache, Germany Motivation Improved client & server caching by grouping Reduced miss rates means fewer demand

Pâris, Jehan-François

328

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning optical microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probing nanoscale photo-oxidation in organic films using spatial hole burning near-field scanning from a stationary NSOM tip to induce photo-oxidation. The reduction in the fluorescence yield resulting photo-oxidation as a function of time, position, and environment free from the limits of far

Buratto, Steve

329

A high-resolution and multi-year emissions inventory for biomass burning in Southeast Asia during 20012010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass burning (BB) emissions from forest fires, agricultural waste burning, and peatland combustion contain large amounts of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O), which significantly impact ecosystem productivity, global atmospheric chemistry, and climate change. With the help of recently released satellite products, biomass density based on satellite and observation data, and spatiotemporal variable combustion factors, this study developed a new high-resolution and multi-year emissions inventory for BB in Southeast Asia (SEA) during 20012010. The 1-km grid was effective for quantifying emissions from small-sized fires that were frequently misinterpreted by coarse grid data due to their large smoothed pixels. The average annual BB emissions in SEA during 20012010 were 277Gg SO2, 1125Gg NOx, 55,388Gg CO, 3831Gg NMVOC, 553Gg NH3, 324Gg BC, 2406Gg OC, 3832Gg CH4, 817,809Gg CO2, and 99Gg N2O. Emissions were high in western Myanmar, Northern Thailand, eastern Cambodia, northern Laos, and South Sumatra and South Kalimantan of Indonesia. Emissions from forest burning were the dominant contributor to the total emissions among all land types. The spatial pattern of BB emissions was consistent with that of the burned areas. In addition, BB emissions exhibited similar temporal trends from 2001 to 2010, with strong interannual and intraannual variability. Interannual and intraannual emission peaks were seen during 2004, 2007, 2010, and JanuaryMarch and AugustOctober, respectively.

Yusheng Shi; Yasushi Yamaguchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

331

Feature Article Negative pressure dependence of mass burning rates of H2/CO/O2/diluent flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with predominantly CO, CO2, and H2O) as a fuel itself as synthetic gas or ``syngas" from coal or biomass gasification of burning rates, analysis of the key reactions and kinetic pathways, and modeling studies were performed and temperature dependence compared to Ar-diluted flames of the same flame temperature. Simulations were performed

Ju, Yiguang

332

[TO APPEAR IN LASER PHYSICS] Quantum interference and its potential applications in a spectral hole-burning solid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

above have been done with atomic beams or vapors. The diffusion of atoms in gas media, however this disadvantage, spectral hole-burning solids are a natural choice because of the absence of diffusion- and cascade-schemes.18 Efficient EIT in an optically solid material was first observed in a rare-earth crystal

Shahriar, Selim

333

L. John Perkins LLNL 5/8/01 Ignition/Burn is a Done Deal Or is It?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is No Fusion Analogy (Unfortunately!) 4m ~4.5m CP-1 FIRE #12;L. John Perkins LLNL 5/8/01 The Hanford Pile B-100's sub-critical experiments (No parallel) Fermi's CP-1 zero power pile ITER / FIRE / Ignitor.... Hanford critical at Hanford (fission's "ignition/burn" experiment) 1945 The rest is history! #12;L. John Perkins

334

Empirical models to predict the volumes of debris flows generated by recently burned basins in the western U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado School of Mines, Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, United States Received 9 June potential volumes of wildfire-related debris flows in different regions and geologic settings. The models were developed using data from 53 recently burned basins in Colorado, Utah and California. The volumes

335

PUBLISHED ONLINE: XX MONTH XXXX | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1027 Recent acceleration of biomass burning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 fires. Combustion of this ground-layer biomass was estimated to35 represent more than 85LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: XX MONTH XXXX | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1027 Recent acceleration of biomass the severity of biomass burning6 has proved difficult to assess. Here, we examined the depth7 of ground

Turetsky, Merritt

336

Time-dependent Integrated Modeling of Burning Plasmas TTF and US-Japan Workshop on Energetic Particle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 1 #12;Why traditional predictions of burning plasmas are inadequate PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 2 #12;Why Time-Dependent Self-Consistent Integrated Modeling of plasma conditions and current drive PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 3 #12;Goals of this Talk

Budny, Robert

337

Nonlinear control and online optimization of the burn condition in ITER via heating, isotopic fueling and impurity injection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ITER tokamak, the next experimental step toward the development of nuclear fusion reactors, will explore the burning plasma regime in which the plasma temperature is sustained mostly by fusion heating. Regulation of the fusion power through modulation of fueling and external heating sources, referred to as burn control, is one of the fundamental problems in burning plasma research. Active control will be essential for achieving and maintaining desired operating points, responding to changing power demands, and ensuring stable operation. Most existing burn control efforts use either non-model-based control techniques or designs based on linearized models. These approaches must be designed for particular operating points and break down for large perturbations. In this work, we utilize a spatially averaged (zero-dimensional) nonlinear model to synthesize a multi-variable nonlinear burn control strategy that can reject large perturbations and move between operating points. The controller uses all of the available actuation techniques in tandem to ensure good performance, even if one or more of the actuators saturate. Adaptive parameter estimation is used to improve the model parameter estimates used by the feedback controller in real-time and ensure asymptotic tracking of the desired operating point. In addition, we propose the use of a model-based online optimization algorithm to drive the system to a state that minimizes a given cost function, while respecting input and state constraints. A zero-dimensional simulation study is presented to show the performance of the adaptive control scheme and the optimization scheme with a cost function weighting the fusion power and temperature tracking errors.

Mark D Boyer; Eugenio Schuster

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

FIRE IMPACTS ON AN ENGINEERED BARRIERS PERFORMANCE: THE HANFORD BARRIER ONE YEAR AFTER A CONTROLLED BURN  

SciTech Connect

A critical unknown for long-term engineered barrier performance is the effect of wild fire during a post-institutional control environment where routine maintenance may be limited or non-existent. In September 2008, a controlled burn was conducted on one half of a vegetated, multilayered capillary barrier emplaced over a Hanford waste site. The effects on barrier performance have been monitored and documented over the past year. Soil physical, chemical, and hydrologic properties; plant floristics and density; and animal-use were characterized before and after the fire with the unburned half of the barrier serving as a control. Temperatures during the controlled burn ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Significant decreases in hydraulic conductivity and surface-soil wettability were observed immediately after the fire due primarily to hydrophobic conditions created by the fire. Major soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated post-fire. Up until June 2009, post-burn soil moisture content in the 0-1 m depth interval was significantly lower on the burned section than the unburned section and is attributed to differences in surface evaporation. Higher soil moisture contents in the 1-2 m interval on the burned section are attributed to insignificant water uptake owing to the absence of deep-rooted shrubs. Moisture profiles reversed after June to show lower water contents throughout the profile on the unburned section. Dense stands of sagebrush were destroyed from the fire allowing many more species to emerge thereby increasing species diversity. Seed sources contributing to this species diversification were from either the existing seedbank and/or wind-blown sources. Measurements are ongoing and the results are expected to help close a knowledge gap about barrier recovery after major disturbances.

Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Leary, Kevin D.; Berlin, Gregory T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nonphotochemical hole burning of organic dyes and rare earth ions in polymers and glasses: a probe of the amorphous state  

SciTech Connect

New and in depth studies of amorphous materials (e.g., glasses and polymers) probed via the low temperature optical technique of nonphotochemical hole burning (NPHB) are presented. An extensive review of the phenomena itself, along with selected topics involving the use of persistent hole burning techniques, is given. In addition, a semi-complete tabulation of essentially all hole burning systems to date is included. The deuteration dependence in an amorphous host is examined for the system of tetracene in an ethanol/methanol mixture. The results illustrate the importance of hydrogen bonding in the hole burning process. The discovery of a highly efficient (or facile) class of hole burning systems, i.e., ionic dyes in hydroxylated polymers (i.e., poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)), is presented and discussed. Ultrafast relaxation processes (i.e., dephasing) are studied for the system of cresyl violet perchlorate (CV) in PVOH. Further, for the first time, NPHB of rare earth ions, specifically Pr/sup +3/ and Nd/sup +3/, in a soft organic glass (i.e., PVOH) is discussed briefly. Detailed experimental results of two related phenomena, spontaneous hole filling (SPHF) and laser induced hole filling (LIHF), are presented and discussed for several systems: rhodamine 560 perchlorate (R560), rhodamine 640 perchlorate (R640), CV, Pr/sup +3/ and Nd..mu../sup 3/ in either PVOH or PAA. A theoretical model is developed for SPHF. The model invokes a correlated feedback mechanism from the anti-hole, which is able to account for the fact that no line broadening is observed. A tentative model is also presented for the phenomenon of LIHF.

Fearey, B.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning Paulo Artaxo, Henrique M. J. Barbosa, Luciana V. Rizzo, Joel F. Brito, Elisa T. Sena, Glauber G. Cirino, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning impacts Paulo Particles and Large Scale Biomass Burning Impacts Paulo Artaxoa , Henrique M. J. Barbosa a , Luciana V visible: The natural biogenic emissions of aerosols and VOCs, and the biomass burning emissions. A large

Barbosa, Henrique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A feasibility study of reactor-based deep-burn concepts.  

SciTech Connect

A systematic assessment of the General Atomics (GA) proposed Deep-Burn concept based on the Modular Helium-Cooled Reactor design (DB-MHR) has been performed. Preliminary benchmarking of deterministic physics codes was done by comparing code results to those from MONTEBURNS (MCNP-ORIGEN) calculations. Detailed fuel cycle analyses were performed in order to provide an independent evaluation of the physics and transmutation performance of the one-pass and two-pass concepts. Key performance parameters such as transuranic consumption, reactor performance, and spent fuel characteristics were analyzed. This effort has been undertaken in close collaborations with the General Atomics design team and Brookhaven National Laboratory evaluation team. The study was performed primarily for a 600 MWt reference DB-MHR design having a power density of 4.7 MW/m{sup 3}. Based on parametric and sensitivity study, it was determined that the maximum burnup (TRU consumption) can be obtained using optimum values of 200 {micro}m and 20% for the fuel kernel diameter and fuel packing fraction, respectively. These values were retained for most of the one-pass and two-pass design calculations; variation to the packing fraction was necessary for the second stage of the two-pass concept. Using a four-batch fuel management scheme for the one-pass DB-MHR core, it was possible to obtain a TRU consumption of 58% and a cycle length of 286 EFPD. By increasing the core power to 800 MWt and the power density to 6.2 MW/m{sup 3}, it was possible to increase the TRU consumption to 60%, although the cycle length decreased by {approx}64 days. The higher TRU consumption (burnup) is due to the reduction of the in-core decay of fissile Pu-241 to Am-241 relative to fission, arising from the higher power density (specific power), which made the fuel more reactivity over time. It was also found that the TRU consumption can be improved by utilizing axial fuel shuffling or by operating with lower material temperatures (colder core). Results also showed that the transmutation performance of the one-pass deep-burn concept is sensitive to the initial TRU vector, primarily because longer cooling time reduces the fissile content (Pu-241 specifically.) With a cooling time of 5 years, the TRU consumption increases to 67%, while conversely, with 20-year cooling the TRU consumption is about 58%. For the two-pass DB-MHR (TRU recycling option), a fuel packing fraction of about 30% is required in the second pass (the recycled TRU). It was found that using a heterogeneous core (homogeneous fuel element) concept, the TRU consumption is dependent on the cooling interval before the 2nd pass, again due to Pu-241 decay during the time lag between the first pass fuel discharge and the second pass fuel charge. With a cooling interval of 7 years (5 and 2 years before and after reprocessing) a TRU consumption of 55% is obtained. With an assumed ''no cooling'' interval, the TRU consumption is 63%. By using a cylindrical core to reduce neutron leakage, TRU consumption of the case with 7-year cooling interval increases to 58%. For a two-pass concept using a heterogeneous fuel element (and homogeneous core) with first and second pass volume ratio of 2:1, the TRU consumption is 62.4%. Finally, the repository loading benefits arising from the deep-burn and Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) concepts were estimated and compared, for the same initial TRU vector. The DB-MHR concept resulted in slightly higher TRU consumption and repository loading benefit compared to the IMF concept (58.1% versus 55.1% for TRU consumption and 2.0 versus 1.6 for estimated repository loading benefit).

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.; Yang, W. S.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effect of H2/CO ratio and N2/CO2 dilution rate on laminar burning velocity of syngas investigated by direct measurement and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laminar burning velocities of syngas/air premixed flames, varying with H2/CO ratio (from 5/95 to 75/25) and N2 or CO2 dilution rate (from 0% to 60%), were accurately measured using a Teflon coated Heat Flux burner and OH-PLIF based Bunsen flame method. Experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, with fuel/air equivalence ratios ranging from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Coupled with experimental data, three chemical kinetic mechanisms, namely GRI-Mech 3.0, USC Mech II and Davis H2CO mechanism, were validated. The Davis H2CO and USC Mech II mechanisms appear to provide a better prediction for the laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity variations with H2 and dilution gas contents were systematically investigated. For given dilution gas fraction, the laminar burning velocity reduction rate was enhanced as H2/CO ratio increasing. Effects of the syngas components and equivalence ratio variation on the concentrations of radical H and OH were also studied. It appears that there is a strong linear correlation between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum concentration of the H radical in the reaction zone for syngas. This characteristic is exclusively different from that in methane air premixed flame. These findings indicated that the high thermal diffusivity of the H radical played an important role in the laminar burning velocity enhancement and affected the laminar burning velocity reduction rate under dilution condition.

Z.H. Wang; W.B. Weng; Y. He; Z.S. Li; K.F. Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Measurements of ultrafine particles from a gas-turbine burning biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of ultrafine particles have been performed at the exhaust of a low emission microturbine for power generation. This device has been fuelled with liquid fuels, including a commercial diesel oil, a mixture of the diesel oil with a biodiesel and kerosene, and tested under different loads. Primarily attention has been focused on the measurements of the size distribution functions of the particles emitted from the system by using particle differential mobility analysis. A bimodal size distribution function of the particle emitted has been found in all the examined conditions. Burning diesel oil, the first mode of the size distribution function of the combustion-formed particles is centered at around 2-3 nm, whereas the second mode is centered at about 20-30 nm. The increase of the turbine load and the addition of 50% of biodiesel has not caused changes in the shape of size distribution of the particles. A slightly decrease of the amount of particle formed has been found. By using kerosene the amount of emitted particles increases of more than one order of magnitude. Also the shape of the size distribution function changes with the first mode shifted towards larger particles of the order of 8-10 nm but with a lower emission of larger 20-30 nm particles. Overall, in this conditions, the mass concentration of particles is increased respect to the diesel oil operation. Particle sizes measured with the diesel oil have been compared with the results on a diesel engine operated in the same power conditions and with the same fuel. Measurements have showed that the mean sizes of the formed particles do not change in the two combustion systems. However, diesel engine emits a number concentration of particles more than two orders of magnitude higher in the same conditions of power and with the same fuel. By running the engine in more premixed-like conditions, the size distribution function of the particles approaches that measured by burning kerosene in the microturbine indicating that the distribution function of the sizes of the emitted particles can be strongly affected by combustion conditions. (author)

Allouis, C.; Beretta, F.; Minutolo, P.; Pagliara, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sirignano, M.; Sgro, L.A.; D'Anna, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn of ICF targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Article, we study the hydrodynamics and burn of the thermonuclear fuel in inertial confinement fusion pellets at the ion kinetic level. The analysis is based on a two-velocity-scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck kinetic model that is specially tailored to treat fusion products (suprathermal {\\alpha}-particles) in a self-consistent manner with the thermal bulk. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. Compared to fluid simulations where a multi-group diffusion scheme is applied to model {\\alpha} transport, the full ion-kinetic approach reveals significant non-local effects on the transport of energetic $\\alpha$-particles. This has a direct impact on hydrodynamic spatial profiles during combustion: the hot spot reactivity is reduced, while the inner dense fuel layers are preheated by the escaping {\\alpha}-suprathermal particles, which are transported farther out of the hot spot. We show how the kinetic transport enhancement of...

Peigney, Benjamin-Edouard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center ( a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year. In addition, there are vast energetic materials demilitarization inventories world-wide, including those in the former Soviet Union and eastern Bloc countries. Although recycling and reusing is the preferred method of dealing with these surplus materials, there will always be the necessity of destroying intractable or unusable energetic materials. Traditionally, open bum/open detonation (OB/OD) has been the method of choice for the destruction of energetic materials. Public concerns and increasingly stringent environmental regulations have made open burning and open detonation of energetic materials increasingly costly and nearly unacceptable. Thus, the impetus to develop environmentally sound alternatives to dispose of energetic materials is great.

Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Molten salt destruction as an alternative to open burning of energetic material wastes  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput unit to test the destruction of energetic materials using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process. We have modified the unit described in the earlier references to inject energetic waste material continuously into the unit. In addition to the HMX, other explosives we have destroyed include RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. We have also destroyed a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, we have destroyed a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10 (HMX/Viton), LX-16 (PETN/FPC461, LX-17 (TATB/Kel F), and PBX-9404 (HMX)/CEF/Nitro cellulose). Our experiments have demonstrated that energetic materials can be safely and effectively treated by MSD.We have also investigated the issue of steam explosions in molten salt units, both experimentally and theoretically, and concluded that steam explosions can be avoided under proper design and operating conditions. We are currently building a larger unit (nominal capacity 5 kg/hr,) to investigate the relationship between residence time, temperature, feed concentration and throughputs, avoidance of back-burn, a;nd determination of the products of combustion under different operating conditions.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong upon reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular Type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright Type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ~0.1s, flash that precedes the Type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636-54, the only two bursts observed with RXTE at high time resolution. The dominant products of the 12C detonation are 28Si, 32S, and 36Ar. Gupta et al. showed that a crust composed of such intermediate mass elements has a larger heat flux than one composed of iron-peak elements and helps bring the superburst ignition depth into better agreement with values inferred from observations.

Nevin N. Weinberg; Lars Bildsten

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward-propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong on reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ?0.1 s, flash that precedes the type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636-54, the only two bursts observed with RXTE at high time resolution. The dominant products of the 12C detonation are 28Si, 32S, and 36Ar. Gupta et al. showed that a crust composed of such intermediate-mass elements has a larger heat flux than one composed of iron-peak elements and helps bring the superburst ignition depth into better agreement with values inferred from observations.

Nevin N. Weinberg; Lars Bildsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal  

SciTech Connect

The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chapter 5 - Mineralogy of Burning-Coal Waste Piles in Collieries of the Czech Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to long-lasting tradition of coal mining and industrial history on the territory of Czech Republic, significant amount of waste piles of various ages and scales occur. Many of them, along with scarce occurrences of naturally burned coal measures, spontaneously ignited and subsequently, served as a source of diverse assemblage of newly formed minerals products of pyrometamorphism, alteration, and sublimation. Several new minerals associated with combustion metamorphism were first described from the Czech Republic: tschermigite (1853), rosickite (1931), letovicite (1932), kratochvlite (1937), kladnoite (1942), koktaite (1948), and rostite (1979). This chapter mainly focuses on two most famous localities, both situated to the Carboniferous sedimentary basins: Kladno Coal District in Central Bohemia near the capital Prague and Radvanice at Trutnov in Eastern Bohemia, close to border with Poland. These two localities, which were studied in detail, provided nearly 100 recently formed minerals and unnamed compounds. Sulfur and AsS efflorescence nucleated around a high-temperature coal-fire gas vent in Radvanice, Czech Republic. Photo by Vladimr ?ek, 1994.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Stable carbon fractionation in size-segregated aerosol particles produced by controlled biomass burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Six different biomass fuel types (wood pellets, sunflower stalk pellets, straw pellets, buckwheat shells, mixed biomass waste pellets, and grain screenings) and wastewater sludge pellets were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size-segregated particles. Aerosol particles were sampled using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles (size <1m) in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The isotopic fractionation between aerosol particles and original biomass material varied from ?0.940.23 to 1.120.16. The largest negative fractionation ?0.940.23 was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation (1.120.16) was observed during the grain screenings combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with the isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in size-segregated aerosol particles suggested that combustion processes could strongly affect isotopic fractionation in aerosol particles of different sizes thereby potentially affecting an interpretation of ambient atmospheric observations.

A. Garbaras; A. Masalaite; I. Garbariene; D. Ceburnis; E. Krugly; V. Remeikis; E. Puida; K. Kvietkus; D. Martuzevicius

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of hot corrosion resistant coatings for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission reductions are being sought worldwide to mitigate climate change. These need to proceed in parallel with optimisation of thermal efficiency in energy conversion systems on economic grounds to achieve overall sustainability. The use of renewable energy is one strategy being adopted to achieve these needs; with one route being the burning of biomass and waste derived fuels in the gas turbines of highly efficient, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electricity generating units. A major factor to be taken into account with gas turbines using such fuels, compared with natural gas, is the potentially higher rates of hot corrosion caused by molten trace species which can be deposited on hot gas path components. This paper describes the development of hot corrosion protective coatings for such applications. Diffusion coatings were the basis for coating development, which consisted of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) trials, using aluminising and single step silicon-aluminising processes to develop new coating structures on two nickel-based superalloys, one conventionally cast and one single crystal (IN738LC and CMSX-4). These coatings were characterised using SEM/EDX analysis and their performance evaluated in oxidation and hot corrosion screening tests. A variant of the single step silicon-aluminide coating was identified as having sufficient oxidation/hot corrosion resistance and microstructural stability to form the basis for future coating optimisation.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Meteorological measurements in the vicinity of a coal burning power plant  

SciTech Connect

High concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are commonly observed during the cool season in the vicinity of a 2.5 GW coal burning power plant located in the Mae Moh Valley of northern Thailand. The power plant is the source for nearly all of the observed SO2 since there are no other major industrial activities in this region. These high pollution fumigation events occur almost on a daily basis, usually lasting for several hours between late morning and early afternoon. One-hour average SO2 concentrations commonly exceed 1,000 micrograms/cu m. As a result, an increase in the number of respiratory type health complaints have been observed by local clinics during this time of the year. Meteorological data were acquired from a variety of observing platforms during an intensive field study from December 1993 to February 1994. The measurements included horizontal and vertical wind velocity, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. In addition, turbulent flux measurements were acquired by a sonic anemometer. SO2 measurements were made at seven monitoring sites scattered throughout the valley. These data were used to examine the atmospheric processes which are responsible for these high pollution fumigation events.

Crescenti, G.H.; Gaynor, J.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Dynamical and radiative response to the massive injection of aerosol from Kuwait oil burning fires  

SciTech Connect

The effects of the injection of large amount of soot comparable to that produced in the burning of oil wells in Kuwait were studied using a 2-D mesoscale model. During the three day numerical simulation the ground-atmosphere system appears to be strongly perturbed. A surface cooling is produced in the first two days above and downwind of the sources. The cooling, between -10 C over the desert and -0.5 C over the sea is dependent on the surface characteristics. The temperature decrease at the ground results in a stratified troposphere which inhibits convection and perturbs the normal diurnal variability of the boundary layer while the upper levels are driven by the radiative warming of the aerosol layer. In this region after few hours the simulation produces a warming of 0.8 C reaching a maximum of 6 C is after 60 hours. During the last 2 days of simulation the long wave radiation emitted by the low altitude atmospheric layers contribute to mitigate the surface cooling. A detailed discussion of the radiative and the dynamical interactions is given and it is shown that beside the specific interest in the short term effects these results may be useful to parameterize the smoke source for a General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation.

Ferretti, R.; Visconti, G. [Univ. L`Aquila (Italy)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy  

SciTech Connect

As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

362

Method for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during long-term neutron dosimetry exposure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during-long term neutron dosimetry exposure. In one embodiment, duplicate pairs of solid state track recorder fissionable deposits are used, including a first, fissionable deposit of lower mass to quantify the number of fissions occuring during the exposure, and a second deposit of higher mass to quantify the number of atoms of for instance .sup.239 Pu by alpha counting. In a second embodiment, only one solid state track recorder fissionable deposit is used and the resulting higher track densities are counted with a scanning electron microscope. This method is also applicable to other burn-in interferences, e.g., .sup.233 U in .sup.232 Th or .sup.238 Pu in .sup.237 Np.

Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hygroscopicity of Water-Soluble Organic Compounds in Atmospheric Aerosols:? Amino Acids and Biomass Burning Derived Organic Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hygroscopic measurement, the chemicals were first dissolved in ultrapure water to make stock solutions that were used to generate particles by a piezoelectric droplet generator (Uni-Photon Inc., NY., USA, Model 201). ... Together with the measurements of the hygroscopicity of glucose, glycerol, humic-like substances, and arginine, which have been detected in biomass burning aerosols and found noncrystallizing in single particle measurements (8,9,16,20,28,41), these results suggest that organic species derived from biomass burning may retain water at low RH in the atmosphere. ... (6)?Zhang, Q.; Anastasio, C. Free and combined amino compounds in atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) and fog waters from Northern California. ...

Man Nin Chan; Man Yee Choi; Nga Lee Ng; Chak K. Chan

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effect of meteorological data averaging times on plume concentrations from explosive ordnance disposal open burning operations. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Open Burning (OB) operations are performed to treat and dispose of unserviceable munitions in the Department of Defense (DOD) inventory. This thesis effort sought to develop a computer model, based upon the Gaussian Puff Equation. The model varies from standard plume modeling practices by not making the assumption that the wind direction, wind speed and turbulence are uniform throughout the duration of the burn. The model assigns meteorological data to each explosion (puff) generated by the OB source. The experiments in this research effort assigned meteorological data to the puffs based upon averaging the weather data over 1, 10, and 60 minute periods. The results of the research showed that there was a statistically significant difference (95% confidence) between 1 minute and 60 minute weather data plume concentrations in the receptor grid in 100% of the experiments performed.

Widmann, I.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PHOTOCHEMICAL AND NON-PHOTOCHEMICAL HOLE BURNING IN DIMETHYL-S-TETRAZINE IN A POLYVINYL CARBAZOLE FILM  

SciTech Connect

Hole burning as well as fluorescence line narrowing experiments have been performed on the system dimethyl-s-tetrazine in polyvinyl carbazole films at low temperatures. The first singlet electronic absorption bands are typical (300 cm{sup -1} wide) of inhomogeneously broadened bands of guest molecules in amorphous organic hosts. Evidence is presented for both photochemical and non-photochemical hole burning. The narrowest holes observed were Lorentzian, had a width 0.44 cm{sup -1} at 1.8 K, and are believed to be of non-photochemical origin. A model which envisions the guest molecules to occupy different sites in the polymer host with a distribution of energy barriers between sites is used to describe these observations. The fast (20 psec) relaxation time implied by the 0,44 cm{sup -1} Lorentzian linewidth is interpreted as indicative of the rate of site interconversion in the excited state.

Cuellar, E.; Castro, G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

On the Effect of Explosive Thermonuclear Burning on the Accreted Envelopes of White Dwarfs in Cataclysmic Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables, coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some cataclysmic variables contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by repeated novae ejecta and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in ystems that underwent thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed.

Sion, Edward M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Impact of agricultural waste burning in the Shandong Peninsula on carbonaceous aerosols in the Bohai Rim, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A total of 115PM2.5 samples were collected for analyzing organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) at Tuoji Island (TI), China from November 2011 to December 2012. The results showed that annual arithmetical means of OC and EC concentrations were 3.82.7 and 2.22.2?gm?3, which contributed 8% and 4% of PM2.5 mass concentrations, respectively. High EC concentrations occurred in winter, contributed mainly by EC outflow from the northwest source region, while high OC concentrations were found during spring, attributed largely to biofuel burning in the Shandong Peninsula, and short distance and favorable transport from the peninsula to the TI. Agricultural waste open burning in the peninsula caused the largest variability of OC concentration in summer. Eliminating agricultural field burning in the peninsula can reduce at least one-third of concentration levels and half of northward transport fluxes of OC and EC in Bohai Rim in summer.

Xiaoping Wang; Yingjun Chen; Chongguo Tian; Guopei Huang; Yin Fang; Fan Zhang; Zheng Zong; Jun Li; Gan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Generation of long time series of burn area maps of the boreal forest from NOAAAVHRR composite data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time series of burned land areas was generated for a 23year period (19842006) using 10-day composites of AVHRR data. The study area covers 1.6million km2 of boreal forest in western Canada. The algorithm was intended to be consistent throughout the study period and region, and to avoid commission errors, so as to obtain a reliable sample of temporal trends in burned area in the region. The algorithm relies on temporal comparisons of several spectral indices (GEMI, BAI), as well as near infrared reflectance. It emphasizes the stability of the post-fire signal, to avoid false detections associated with cloud, cloud shadows, missed data and radiometric or geometric calibration between AVHRR sensors. Final results show a very consistent temporal adjustment to official statistics and fire perimeters, with very low commission error (<10%), but medium to high omission error (50%). Burned areas in the region were predominantly associated with coniferous forest cover, with the Taiga and Boreal Shield ecozones, in latitudes between 56 and 60N, and predominantly at long distances from populated places.

Emilio Chuvieco; Peter Englefield; Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Global Warming and Tropical Land-Use Change: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Biomass Burning, Decomposition and Soils in Forest Conversion, Shifting Cultivation and Secondary Vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical forest conversion, shiftingcultivation and clearing of secondary vegetation makesignificant...9 t of biomasscarbon of these types is exposed to burning annually,of which 1.1109 t is emitted to the atmos...

Philip M. Fearnside

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Steam thermolysis of discarded tires: testing and analysis of the specific fuel consumption with tail gas burning, steam generation, and secondary waste slime processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the process of steam thermolysis of shredded used tires for obtaining from them liquid fuel and technical carbon carried out in a screw reactor with heating due to the partial burning of obtai...

V. A. Kalitko; Morgan Chun Yao Wu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the results of the Type B Accident Investigation Board investigation of the September 23, 2009, employee burn injury at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) D Area powerhouse.

373

Short-Term Effects of Experimental Burning and Thinning on Soil Respiration in an Old-Growth, Mixed-Conifer Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To understand the roles of forest management practices in meeting the goals of forest sustainability and CO2...sequestration, we evaluated the effects of burning and thinning treatments on soil respiration and so...

Siyan Ma; Jiquan Chen; Malcolm North; Heather E. Erickson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site in Thessaloniki, sending thick black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site to break. This led to sludge flowing into some nearby houses. Authorities are due to begin the cleanup

Columbia University

375

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500C to 600C) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment Extrusion database on DU metal Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment Sintering database on DU metal Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix AMSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors Appendix BExternal presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors, Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process, Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix CFuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Dis

Sean M. McDeavitt

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of air flow rate and fuel moisture on the burning behaviours of biomass and simulated municipal solid wastes in packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of biomass and municipal solid wastes is one of the key areas in the global cleaner energy strategy. But there is still a lack of detailed and systematically theoretical study on the packed bed burning of biomass and municipal solid wastes. The advantage of theoretical study lies in its ability to reveal features of the detailed structure of the burning process inside a solid bed, such as reaction zone thickness, combustion staging, rates of individual sub-processes, gas emission and char burning characteristics. These characteristics are hard to measure by conventional experimental techniques. In this paper, mathematical simulations as well as experiments have been carried out for the combustion of wood chips and the incineration of simulated municipal solid wastes in a bench-top stationary bed and the effects of primary air flow rate and moisture level in the fuel have been assessed over wide ranges. It is found that volatile release as well as char burning intensifies with an increase in the primary air flow until a critical point is reached where a further increase in the primary air results in slowing down of the combustion process; a higher primary airflow also reduces the char fraction burned in the final char-burning-only stage, shifts combustion in the bed to a more fuel-lean environment and reduces CO emission at the bed top; an increase in the moisture level in the fuel produces a higher flame front temperature in the bed at low primary air flow rates.

Y.B Yang; V.N Sharifi; J Swithenbank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2N, 76.3E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.670.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (?30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1?1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2?2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.90.2 and 1.80.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

Prashant Rajput; M.M. Sarin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Burned area mapping time series in Canada (19841999) from NOAA-AVHRR LTDR: A comparison with other remote sensing products and fire perimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new algorithm for mapping burned areas in boreal forest using AVHRR archival data Long Term Data Record (LTDR) (0.05, ca. 5km, version 3) was developed in Canada using burn records for the period between 1984 and 1999 and evaluated against AVHRR 1km and AVHRR-PAL 8km burned area map products. The algorithm combined 1) absolute and relative radiometric thresholds, 2) a Bayesian network classifier, and 3) neighborhood analysis for spatial fire coherence. Fire event records from Canadian Forest Service National Fire Database (CFSNFD) for western Canada were used to train the algorithm. LTDR and AVHRR 1km burned area mapping were similar for the same area, and correlated well to CFSNFD annual fire event records for western Canada, r2=0.72 and 0.77, respectively. In addition, the LTDR mapping correlated well with fires for all of Canada in the CFSNFD database (r2=0.65). This mapping product was a significant improvement over an 8km AVHRR-PAL burned area map product. For mapping boreal forests burned areas globally, this study demonstrates the potential accuracy for where LTDR represents the highest spatial and temporal resolution of daily images available since the 1980s.

Jose A. Moreno Ruiz; David Riao; Manuel Arbelo; Nancy H.F. French; Susan L. Ustin; Michael L. Whiting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Implementation of strength and burn models for plastic-bonded explosives and propellants  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented the burn model in LS-DYNA. At present, the damage (porosity and specific surface area) is specified as initial conditions. However, history variables that are used by the strength model are reserved as placeholders for the next major revision, which will be a completely interactive model. We have implemented an improved strength model for explosives based on a model for concrete. The model exhibits peak strength and subsequent strain softening in uniaxial compression. The peak strength increases with increasing strain rate and/or reduced ambient temperature. Under triaxial compression compression, the strength continues to increase (or at least not decrease) with increasing strain. This behaviour is common to both concrete and polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) because the microstructure of these composites is similar. Both have aggregate material with a broad particle size distribution, although the length scale for concrete aggregate is two orders of magnitude larger than for PBX. The (cement or polymer) binder adheres to the aggregate, and is both pressure and rate sensitive. There is a larger bind binder content in concrete, compared to the explosive, and the aggregates have different hardness. As a result we expect the parameter values to differ, but the functional forms to be applicable to both. The models have been fit to data from tests on an AWE explosive that is HMX based. The decision to implement the models in LS-DYNA was based on three factors: LS-DYNA is used routinely by the AWE engineering analysis group and has a broad base of experienced users; models implemented in LS-DYNA can be transferred easily to LLNL's ALE 3D using a material model wrapper developed by Rich Becker; and LS-DYNA could accommodate the model requirements for a significant number of additional history variables without the significant time delay associated with code modification.

Reaugh, J E

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Assessment of biomass open burning emissions in Indonesia and potential climate forcing impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an emission inventory (EI) for biomass open burning (OB) sources including forest, agro-residue and municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indonesia for year 2007. The EI covered toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) and was presented as annual and monthly average for every district, and further on a grid of 0.25נ0.25. A rigorous analysis of activity data and emission factor ranges was done to produce the low, best and high emission estimates for each species. Development of EI methodology for MSW OB which, to our best knowledge, has not been presented in detail in the literature was a focus of this paper. The best estimates of biomass OB emission of toxic air pollutants for the country, in Gg, were: 9.6 SO2; 98 NOx; 7411 CO; 335 NMVOC; 162 NH3; 439 PM10; 357 PM2.5; 24 BC; and 147 OC. The best emission estimates of GHGs, in Gg, were: 401 CH4, 57,247 CO2; and 3.6 N2O. The low and high values of the emission estimates for different species were found to range from?86% to+260% of the corresponding best estimates. Crop residue OB contributed more than 80% of the total biomass OB emissions, followed by forest fire of 212% (not including peat soil fire emission) and MSW (18%). An inter-annual active fires count for Indonesia showed relatively low values in 2007 which may be attributed to the high rainfall intensity under the influence of La Nia climate pattern in the year. Total estimated net climate forcing from OB in Indonesia was 110 (20 year horizon) and 73 (100 year horizon) Tg CO2 equivalents which is around 0.91.1% of that reported for the global biomass OB for both time horizons. The spatial distribution showed higher emissions in large urban areas in Java and Sumatra Island, while the monthly emissions indicated higher values during the dry months of AugustOctober.

Didin Agustian Permadi; Nguyen Thi Kim Oanh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Study of Thermonuclear Alfven Instabilities in Next Step Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A study is presented for the stability of alpha-particle driven shear Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) for the normal parameters of the three major burning plasma proposals, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment), and IGNITOR (Ignited Torus). A study of the JET (Joint European Torus) plasma, where fusion alphas were generated in tritium experiments, is also included to attempt experimental validation of the numerical predictions. An analytic assessment of Toroidal AE (TAE) stability is first presented, where the alpha particle beta due to the fusion reaction rate and electron drag is simply and accurately estimated in 7-20 keV plasma temperature regime. In this assessment the hot particle drive is balanced against ion-Landau damping of the background deuterons and electron collision effects and stability boundaries are determined. Then two numerical studies of AE instability are presented. In one the High-n stability code HINST is used . This code is capable of predicting instabilities of low and moderately high frequency Alfven modes. HINST computes the non-perturbative solution of the Alfven eigenmodes including effects of ion finite Larmor radius, orbit width, trapped electrons etc. The stability calculations are repeated using the global code NOVAK. We show that for these tokamaks the spectrum of the least stable AE modes are TAE that appear at medium-/high-n numbers. In HINST TAEs are locally unstable due to the alphas pressure gradient in all the devices under the consideration except IGNITOR. However, NOVAK calculations show that the global mode structure enhances the damping mechanisms and produces stability in all configurations considered here. A serious question remains whether the perturbation theory used in NOVAK overestimates the stability predictions, so that it is premature to conclude that the nominal operation of all three proposals are stable to AEs. In addition NBI ions produce a strong stabilizing effect for JET. However, in ITER the beam energies needed to penetrate to the core must be high so that a diamagnetic drift frequency comparable to that of the alpha particles is produced by the beam ions which induces a destabilizing effect.

N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; R. Budny; C.Z. Cheng; G.-Y. Fu; W.W. Heidbrink; G. Kramer; D. Meade; and R. Nazikian

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pellet Fueling Technology Development Leading to Efficient Fueling of ITER Burning Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for central fueling of the ITER burning plasma, which is a requirement for achieving high fusion gain. Injection of pellets from the inner wall has been shown on present day tokamaks to provide efficient fueling and is planned for use on ITER [1,2]. Significant development of pellet fueling technology has occurred as a result of the ITER R&D process. Extrusion rates with batch extruders have reached more than 1/2 of the ITER design specification of 1.3 cm3/s [3] and the ability to fuel efficiently from the inner wall by injecting through curved guide tubes has been demonstrated on several fusion devices. Modeling of the fueling deposition from inner wall pellet injection has been done using the Parks et al. ExB drift model [4] shows that inside launched pellets of 3mm size and speeds of 300 m/s have the capability to fuel well inside the separatrix. Gas fueling on the other hand is calculated to have very poor fueling efficiency due to the high density and wide scrape off layer compared to current machines. Isotopically mixed D/T pellets can provide efficient tritium fueling that will minimize tritium wall loading when compared to gas puffing of tritium. In addition, the use of pellets as an ELM trigger has been demonstrated and continues to be investigated as an ELM mitigation technique. During the ITER CDA and EDA the U.S. was responsible for ITER fueling system design and R&D and is in good position to resume this role for the ITER pellet fueling system. Currently the performance of the ITER guide tube design is under investigation. A mockup is being built that will allow tests with different pellet sizes and repetition rates. The results of these tests and their implication for fueling efficiency and central fueling will be discussed. The ITER pellet injection technology developments to date, specified requirements, and remaining development issues will be presented along with a plan to reach the design goal in time for employment on ITER.

Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL; Maruyama, S. [ITER International Team, Garching, Germany; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Health assessment for H and H Incorporated Burn Site, Farrington, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980539878. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The H H Incorporated Burn Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia, contains a pit where dry printing ink residues were disposed of. Groundwater contaminants of concern (and maximum concentrations) include benzene (25 ppb), toluene (1180 ppb), chromium (110 ppb), barium (1,300 ppb), beryllium (20 ppb). Organics, including phthalates (131,000 ppb), vinyl chloride (3,600 ppb), toluene (82 ppb), and xylenes (45 ppb), were detected in leachate and/or runoff, presumably emanating from the pit area. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

387

High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors  

SciTech Connect

The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

Willingness to pay function for two fuel treatments to reduce wildfire acreage burned: A scope test and comparison of White and Hispanic households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research uses the Contingent Valuation Method to test whether willingness to pay increases for larger reductions in acres of forests burned by wildfires across the states of California, Florida and Montana. This is known as a test of scope, a measure of internal validity of the contingent valuation method (CVM). The scope test is conducted separately for White households and Hispanic households to determine if cultural differences influences whether the scope test is passed. The public program to reduce acres burned involved prescribed burning and a mechanical fuel reduction program. The results of CVM logit regressions show that the acreage reduction variable is statistically significant at the 1% level for the two proposed fuel reduction programs, and the two types of households. The positive sign of this variable means that the more acreage reduction proposed in the survey the more likely people would pay for the fuel reduction program. Because of the significance of the acreage reduction variable in the willingness to pay function, this function can be used to evaluate the incremental benefits of different forest fire management plans that reduce acres burned by wildfires. These benefits would be part of the justification for prescribed burning and mechanical fire fuel reduction programs to protect forests from wildfires.

John B. Loomis; Le Trong Hung; Armando Gonzlez-Cabn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

From Solar Proton Burning to Pionic Deuterium through the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei (the NNJL model), describing strong low-energy nuclear interactions, we compute the width of the energy level of the ground state of pionic deuterium. The theoretical value fits well the experimental data. Using the cross sections for the reactions nu_e + d -> p + p + e^- and nu_e + d -> p + n + nu_e, computed in the NNJL model, and the experimental values of the events of these reactions, detected by the SNO Collaboration, we compute the boron neutrino fluxes. The theoretical values agree well with the experimental data and the theoretical predictions within the Standard Solar Model by Bahcall. We argue the applicability of the constraints on the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning, imposed by helioseismology, to the width of the energy level of the ground state of pionic deuterium. We show that the experimental data on the width satisfy these constraints. This testifies an indirect measurement of the recommended value of the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning in terrestrial laboratories in terms of the width of the energy level of the ground state of pionic deuterium.

A. N. Ivanov; M. Cargnelli; M. Faber; H. Fuhrmann; V. A. Ivanova; J. Marton; N. I. Troitskaya; J. Zmeskal

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

In situ analysis of soil at an open burning/open detonation disposal facility: J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Investigators have used a field-portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer to screen soils for a suite of metals indicative of the open burning and open detonation (OB/OD) activities that occurred at the J-Field site at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The field XRF results were incorporated into a multiphase investigation of contaminants at the Toxic Burning Pits Area of Concern at J-Field. The authors determined that the field-portable XRF unit used for the study and the general concept of field XRF screening are invaluable tools for investigating an OB/OD site where intrusive sampling techniques could present unacceptable hazards to site workers.

Martino, L.; Cho, E. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [US Army Directorate of Safety, Health, and the Environment, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Chemical properties of urban waste ash produced by open burning on the Jos Plateau: implications for agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Urban centres produce most of the world's waste and between a third and a half goes uncollected. The answer to the problem of waste disposal lies partly in agriculture, as waste can be extremely nutrient-rich. In the last decade there has been a tremendous increase in the developing world in total city area under informal food production and there are many examples of waste recycling onto the urban or peri-urban plots. Farmers on the Jos Plateau, Nigeria, have developed a successful soil fertility management strategy based on the combination of inorganic fertilisers, manure and urban waste ash. This study sought to provide some preliminary data on urban waste ash produced by open burning and used in farming in a developing country. Ash samples were collected from different locations around Jos and tested for C, N, pH, P, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb. It was found that ash is an effective liming material (because of the high pH, and high Ca, Mg and K contents), and has the potential to contribute significant quantities of micro-nutrients such as Mn, Zn and Cu. Ash, however, is far from being a homogenous material and its variability means that its fertilising potential will vary between batches and that, even if mean and median levels are low, there is the risk of the formation of localised areas of soil with excessive heavy metal contents (this is particularly the case with Pb). Further research is required to determine the plant-availability of these elements in the ash and to assess the wider environmental and health implications of uncontrolled, open burning of waste as a means of producing ash for agricultural purposes.

M.W. Pasquini; M.J. Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optimization of regimes for the feed of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust for burning in a TPP-210A boiler  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for regime adjustment of feed systems for a TPP-210A boiler for the burning of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust. As compared with nonoptimal regimes, optimal regimes of high-concentration-feed systems improve the economy of the boiler by 1.7% on average.

L.V. Golyshev; G.A. Dovgoteles [JSC 'L'vovORGRES', L'vov (Ukraine)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

397

Technology Transfer: An Integrated `Culture-Friendly' I.J. Bate, A. Burns, T.O. Jackson, T.P. Kelly,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Transfer: An Integrated `Culture-Friendly' Approach I.J. Bate, A. Burns, T.O. Jackson, T. This is in contrast to many other technology transfer initiatives which have failed because academics have not truly not been prepared to perform the technology transfer in a suitable incremental and consultative manner. 1

Kelly, Tim

398

Canopy arthropod responses to thinning and burning treatments in old-growth mixed-conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canopy arthropod responses to thinning and burning treatments in old-growth mixed-conifer forest that the restoration treatments recommended for Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests have little effect on asso- ciated in the Sierra Nevada, California Thomas Rambo a, , Timothy Schowalter b,1 , Malcolm North c,2 a Forest Biology

North, Malcolm

399

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel on a Burning Plasma Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ence, although it is not designed to be the sole burning plasma facility in the world.Fusion energy methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. vened for this purposeJournal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel

Najmabadi, Farrokh

400

Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, and R.T. Mumgaard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, creating and sustaining a workforce requires a robust "pipeline" of people--from undergraduates to Ph.D stu uninterrupted and the decades of accumulated expertise are not lost due to a discontinuity in the pipeline. An e

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 401, 26 (2010) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15632.x Systematic variation in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear bursts and its implication for neutron star radius measurement Sudip area during the decay portions of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts. However, this apparent area are challenging. Thermonuclear bursts provide one of the very few promising methods to measure the neutron star

Miller, Cole

402

Volume 168, number 3,4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 4 May 1990 HOLE BURNING LINE SHAPES IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-DIMENSIONAL GLASS A MODEL FOR HOLE BURNING LINE SHAPES OF MOLECULES ON SURFACES Dee William PACK ' and Michael D of molecules in a two-dimensional glass in presented. An extension of the standard dynamic model for three-dimensional glasses is employed. A calculation of the 2-D spatial average with the proper correlation function

Fayer, Michael D.

403

A standard unit for monitoring recruitment of fishes to coral reef rubble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

settled fishes, including cryptic, secretive and small species, to be quickly and fairly completely (>83. Over time, however, the netting resulted in substantial algal growth that was associated that settler estimates are more affected by microhabitat changes from algal growth than by predation. During

Kramer, Donald L.

404

Out of the Rubble and Towards a Sustainable Future: The Greening of Greensburg, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vision of persistent local leaders, the framing of sustainability as an opportunity with an energy efficiency focus, community pride and resilience, and a clean slate rebuilding effort with substantial available funding. While Greensburgs future...

White, Stacey Swearingen

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Final RFI/RI Report Burma Road Rubble Pit (231-4F). Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site is located in Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties, in South Carolina. Certain activities at the SRS require operating or post closure permits issued in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hot corrosion tests on corrosion resistant coatings developed for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports on results of hot corrosion tests carried out on siliconaluminide coatings developed for hot components of gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases. The corrosion tests of the siliconaluminide coatings, applied to superalloys IN738LC and CMSX-4, each consisted of five 100h periods; at 700C for the type II tests and at 900C for the type I tests. Deposits of Cd+ alkali and Pb+ alkali were applied before each exposure. These deposits had been previously identified as being trace species produced from gasification of biomass containing fuels which after combustion had the potential to initiate hot corrosion in a gas turbine. Additionally, gases were supplied to the furnace to simulate the atmosphere anticipated post-combustion of these biomass derived fuel gases. Results of the type I hot corrosion tests showed that these novel coatings remained in the incubation stage for at least 300h, after which some of the coating entered propagation. Mass change results for the first 100h confirmed this early incubation stage. For the type II hot corrosion tests, differences occurred in oxidation and sulphidation rates between the two substrates; the incubation stages for CMSX-4 samples continued for all but the Cd+ alkali high salt flux samples, whereas, for IN738LC, all samples exhibited consistent incubation rates. Following both the type I and type II corrosion tests, assessments using BSE/EDX results and XRD analysis confirmed that there has to be remnant coating, sufficient to grow a protective scale. In this study, the novel siliconaluminide coating development was based on coating technology originally evolved for gas turbines burning natural gas and fossil fuel oils. So in this paper comparisons of performance have been made with three commercially available coatings; a CoCrAlY overlay, a platinum-aluminide diffusion, and triple layer nickelaluminide/siliconaluminide-diffusion coatings. These comparisons showed that the novel single-step siliconaluminide coatings provide equal or superior type II hot corrosion resistance to the best of the commercial coatings.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter  

SciTech Connect

Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a burning char particle; the implication of this correlation is that a completely new picture emerges for the combustion of a char particle in a hot fluidized bed. (author)

Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A. [University of Cambridge, Department of Chemical Engineering, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA, England (United Kingdom)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa  

SciTech Connect

Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Verhelst, S. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: Coupling experimental and computational analysis at the laboratory scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One strategy for reducing US dependence on petroleum is to develop new combustion technologies for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification of coal and biomass. Fuel-flexible combustion systems based on lean premixed combustion have the potential for dramatically reducing pollutant emissions in transportation systems, heat and stationary power generation. However, lean premixed flames are highly susceptible to fluid-dynamical combustion instabilities making robust and reliable systems difficult to design. Low swirl burners are emerging as an important technology for meeting design requirements in terms of both reliability and emissions for next generation combustion devices. In this paper, we present simulations of a lean, premixed hydrogen flame stabilized on a laboratory-scale low swirl burner. The simulations use detailed chemistry and transport without incorporating explicit models for turbulence or turbulence/chemistry interaction. Here we discuss the overall structure of the flame and compare with experimental data. We also use the simulation data to elucidate the characteristics of the turbulent flame interaction and how this impacts the analysis of experimental measurements.

M S Day; J B Bell; R K Cheng; S Tachibana; V E Beckner; M J Lijewski

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

VOC identification and inter-comparison from laboratory biomass burning using PTR-MS and PIT-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fires of biomass commonly found in the southeast and southwest U.S. were investigated with PTR-MS and PIT-MS, which are capable of fast measurements of a large number of VOCs. Both instruments were calibrated with gas standards and mass dependent calibration curves are determined. The sensitivity of the PIT-MS linearly increases with mass, because the ion trap mass spectrometer used in PIT-MS is more efficient for higher masses, whereas the quadrupole in PTR-MS is most efficient around 70amu. The identification of \\{VOCs\\} in the complicated mix of the fire emissions was done by gas chromatographic pre separation and inter-comparison with other instrumentation: GCMS, FTIR, and NI-PT-CIMS. With these state of the art identification methods only 5075% of the mass detectable by PTR-MS or PIT-MS could be identified. The amount of identified material was dependent on the type of fuel used and the phase of the burns, more can be identified in the flaming stage of the fire. Compounds with masses above 100amu contributed the largest fraction of the unidentified mass. Emission ratios with CO for all identified and unidentified compounds were determined. Small oxygenated \\{VOCs\\} had the highest emission ratios of the observed compounds.

C. Warneke; J.M. Roberts; P. Veres; J. Gilman; W.C. Kuster; I. Burling; R. Yokelson; J.A. de Gouw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An optimized groundwater extraction system for the toxic burning pits area of J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Testing and disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals at the J-Field area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) have resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater. The discharge of contaminated groundwater to on-site marshes and adjacent estuaries poses a potential risk to ecological receptors. The Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area is of special concern because of its disposal history. This report describes a groundwater modeling study conducted at J-Field that focused on the TBP area. The goal of this modeling effort was optimization of the groundwater extraction system at the TBP area by applying linear programming techniques. Initially, the flow field in the J-Field vicinity was characterized with a three-dimensional model that uses existing data and several numerical techniques. A user-specified border was set near the marsh and used as a constraint boundary in two modeled remediation scenarios: containment of the groundwater and containment of groundwater with an impermeable cap installed over the TBP area. In both cases, the objective was to extract the minimum amount of water necessary while satisfying the constraints. The smallest number of wells necessary was then determined for each case. This optimization approach provided two benefits: cost savings, in that the water to be treated and the well installation costs were minimized, and minimization of remediation impacts on the ecology of the marsh.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning  

SciTech Connect

We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Systematic variation in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear bursts and its implication for neutron star radius measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precision measurements of neutron star radii can provide a powerful probe of the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Beginning in the late 1970s it was proposed that the radius could be obtained from the apparent or inferred emitting area during the decay portions of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts. However, this apparent area is generally not constant, preventing reliable measurement of the source radius. Here we report for the first time a correlation between the variation of the inferred area and the burst properties, measured in a sample of almost 900 bursts from 43 sources. We found that the rate of change of the inferred area during decay is anticorrelated with the burst decay duration. A Spearman rank correlation test shows that this relation is significant at the <10^{-45} level for our entire sample, and at the 7x10^{-37} level for the 625 bursts without photospheric radius expansion. This anticorrelation is also highly significant for individual sources exhibiting a wide range of burst durations, such as 4U 1636-536 and Aql X-1. We suggest that variations in the colour factor, which relates the colour temperature resulted from the scattering in the neutron star atmosphere to the effective temperature of the burning layer, may explain the correlation. This in turn implies significant variations in the composition of the atmosphere between bursts with long and short durations.

Sudip Bhattacharyya; M. Coleman Miller; Duncan K. Galloway

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-F-2, 100-F Burning Pit Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-031  

SciTech Connect

The 128-F-2 waste site consisted of multiple burn and debris filled pits located directly east of the 107-F Retention Basin and approximately 30.5 m east of the northeast corner of the 100-F Area perimeter road that runs along the riverbank. The burn pits were used for incinerating nonradioactive, combustible materials from 1945 to 1965. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Focused feasibility study for surface soil at the main pits and pushout area, J-field toxic burning pits area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). J-Field is located within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning/open detonation. Portions of J-Field continue to be used for the detonation and disposal of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by open burning/open detonation under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Patton, T.; Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Butler, J. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Direct measurement of the breakout reaction {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N in explosive hydrogen-burning process  

SciTech Connect

We determined the {sup 11}C({alpha},p){sup 14}N reaction rate relevant to the nucleosynthesis in explosive hydrogen-burning stars. The measurement was performed by means of the thick target method in inverse kinematics with {sup 11}C RI beams. We derived the excitation functions for the ground-state transition and excited-state transitions using time-of-flight information for the first time. The present reaction rate is compared to the previous one.

Hayakawa, S.; Kubono, S.; Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, Dam N.; Hashimoto, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; He, J. J.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Teranishi, T.; Wanajo, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, Graduate of Science, University of Tokyo (Japan) and Institute of Physics (Japan); RCNP, Osaka University (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Institute of Modern Physics (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University (Japan); Department of Physics, Yamagata University (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Department of Physics, Chung Ang University (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Kyushu University (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Impact of natural gas fuel composition on criteria, toxic, and particle emissions from transit buses equipped with lean burn and stoichiometric engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated the impacts of varying natural gas composition on the exhaust emissions from different technology transit buses. For this study, two CNG (compressed natural gas) buses equipped with lean burn combustion and \\{OCs\\} (oxidation catalysts), and one stoichiometric CNG bus equipped with a TWC (three-way catalyst) and EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over the CBD (Central Business District) cycle on six different gas blends each. The gases represented a range of compositions from gases with high levels of methane and correspondingly lower energy contents/WN (Wobbe number) to gases with higher levels of heavier hydrocarbons and correspondingly higher energy contents/WN. For the lean burn buses, gases with low methane contents exhibited higher \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) (19%53%) and NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbon) (39%102%) emissions, but lower emissions of THC (total hydrocarbon) (9%24%), CH4 (methane) (23%33%), and formaldehyde emissions (14%45%). The stoichiometric engine bus with a TWC showed significantly reduced \\{NOx\\} and THC emissions compared to the lean burn buses, but did show higher levels of CO (carbon monoxide) and NH3 (ammonia). PM (particulate matter) mass emissions did not show any fuel effects, while PN (particle number) emissions exhibited some reductions for the higher WN gases.

Maryam Hajbabaei; Georgios Karavalakis; Kent C. Johnson; Linda Lee; Thomas D. Durbin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Health assessment for New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD981021157. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, has been proposed for the National Priorities List by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The burn pit is part of an active airport and was used from 1968-1979 for fire-training exercises. Aviation fuel, waste oil, and petroleum tank bottoms were burned and extinguished with water, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals. Samples from the pit and soil adjacent to the pit, where pit contents were drained, showed the presence of heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Investigation of the site has been limited to the pit and surrounding soil. Groundwater is close to land surface in the area and may be affected. Groundwater is used for domestic purposes within a 3-mile radius of the site. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1990-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, February 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended Corrective Action Alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 490 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah Test Range and is approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (located southwest of Area 3); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area (located west of Main Lake); 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard (located north of the northwest corner of Area 3); and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area (located south of the Area 9 Compound on the TTR). A Corrective Action Investigation was performed in July and August 2000, and analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified in soil at the Gun Propellant Burn Area or the Station 44 Burn Area; therefore, there is no need for corrective actions at these two sites. Five soil samples at the Fire Training Area and seven at the Sandia Service Yard exceeded PALs for total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel. Upon the identification of COCs specific to CAU 490, Corrective Action Objectives were developed based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the TTR, with the following three CAAs under consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure In Place - No Further Action With Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred choice for CAU 490 was Alternative 3. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at this site.

DOE /NV

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the indirect cycle designs has investigated the effects of various parameters to increase electric production at full power. For the direct-contact reactor, major issues related to the direct-contact heat transfer rate and entrainment and carryover of liquid lead-bismuth to the turbine have been identified and analyzed. An economic analysis approach was also developed to determine the cost of electricity production in the lead-bismuth reactor. The approach will be formulated into a model and applied to develop scientific cost estimates for the different reactor designs and thus aid in the selection of the most economic option. In the area of lead-bismuth coolant activation, the radiological hazard was evaluated with particular emphasis on the direct-contact reactor. In this system, the lack of a physical barrier between the primary and secondary coolant favors the release of the alpha-emitter Po?210 and its transport throughout the plant. Modeling undertaken on the basis of the scarce information available in the literature confirmed the importance of this issue, as well as the need for experimental work to reduce the uncertainties on the basic characteristics of volatile polonium chemical forms.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ambiguities of the Rate of Oxygen Formation During Stellar Helium Burning in the 12C(a,g) Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate of oxygen formation determines the C/O ratio during stellar helium burning. It is the single most important nuclear input of stellar evolution theory including the evolution of Type II and Type Ia supernova. Yet the low energy cross section of the fusion of 4He + 12C denoted as the 12C(a,g)16O reaction still remains uncertain after forty years of extensive work. We analyze and critically review the most recent measurements of complete angular distributions of the outgoing gamma-rays at very low energies (Ecm > 1.0 MeV). Our analysis of the angular distribution measured with the EUROGAM/GANDI arrays lead us to conclude considerably larger error bars than published hence they are excluded from the current sample of "world data". We show that the current sample of "world data" of the measured E2 cross section factors below 1.7 MeV cluster to two distinct groups that lead to two distinct extrapolations of SE2(300) ~ 60 or ~ 154 keVb. We point to a much neglected discrepancy between the measured E1-E2 phase difference (phi_12) and unitarity as required by the Watson theorem, suggesting systematic problem(s) of some of the measured gamma-ray angular distributions. The ambiguity of the extrapolated SE2(300) together with a previously observed ambiguity of SE1(300) represent the current state of the art of the field and they must be resolved by future measurements of complete and detailed angular distributions of the 12C(a,g) reaction at very low energies (Ecm < 1.0 MeV).

Moshe Gai

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

Work plan for focused feasibility study of the toxic burning pits area at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCIA). J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA)(predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-0021355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today-

Biang, C.; Benioff, P.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be used in medicine to treat coughs and colds Lily of the Valley~ heart stimulant, diuretic Foxglove~ can

Acton, Scott

427

PPPL Answers Burning Question  

SciTech Connect

The Science Education Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory answers Alan Alda's challenge to explain what is a flame to an audience of 11-year old children.

Zwicker, Andrew; Merali, Aliya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)or with casearin X0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BWafter which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ? We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ? We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ? We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ? We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ? The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

Prieto, A.M. [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionrios do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionrios do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Santos, A.G. [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil); Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C. [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionrios do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionrios do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Arbex, M.A. [UNIFESP Federal University of So Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, So Paulo (Brazil)] [UNIFESP Federal University of So Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, So Paulo (Brazil); Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R. [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Cavalheiro, A.J.; Silva, D.H.S.; Bolzani, V.S. [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Soares, C.P., E-mail: soarescp@hotmail.com [UNESP Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionrios do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Modelling of long-range transport of Southeast Asia biomass-burning aerosols to Taiwan and their radiative forcings over East Asia  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols and air pollutants during the springtime in Southeast Asia. At Lulin mountain background station (elevation 2862 m) in Taiwan, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter particles with diameter less than 10 ?m (PM10), were measured around 150-250 ppb, 40-60 ppb, and 10-30?g/m3, respectively at spring time (February-April) during 2006 and 2009, which are about 2~3 times higher than those in other seasons. Observations and simulation results indicate that the higher concentrations during the spring time are clearly related to biomass burning plumes transported from the Indochina Peninsula of Southeast Asia. The spatial distribution of high aerosols optical depth (AOD) were identified by the satellite measurement and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) ground observation, and could be reasonably captured by the WRF-Chem model during the study period of 15-18 March, 2008. AOD reached as high as 0.8-1.0 in Indochina ranging from 10 to 22N and 95 to 107E. Organic carbon (OC) is a major contributor of AOD over Indochina according to simulation results. The contributor of AOD from black carbon (BC) is minor when compared with OC over the Indochina. However, the direct absorption radiative forcing of BC in the atmosphere could reach 35-50 W m-2, which is about 8-10 times higher than that of OC. The belt shape of radiation reduction at surface from Indochina to Taiwan could be as high 20-40 W m-2 during the study period. The implication of the radiative forcing from biomass burning aerosols and their impact on the regional climate in East Asia is our major concern.

Lin, Chuan-Yao; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chen, Wei-Nei

2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

SciTech Connect

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Response to Comment on Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning [Phys. Plasmas17, 014701 (2010)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-voltage cathode initiates an electron emission resulting in a reduction in the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. Assuming that the observed carbon dioxide reduction is originated from the molecular decomposition the energy needed for the endothermic reaction of this carbon dioxide reduction may stem primarily from the internal energy reduction in the exhaust gas in accordance of the first law of the thermodynamics. An oxygen increase due to the reduction in carbon dioxide in a discharge gas was observed in real time.

Han S. Uhm; Chul H. Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal decomposition of energetic materials; 65: Conversion of insensitive explosives (NTO, ANTA) and related compounds to polymeric melon-like cyclic azine burn-rate suppressants  

SciTech Connect

Selected triazole, tetrazole, triazine, tetrazine, furazan, and acyclic backbone compounds are shown by IR spectroscopy to convert to polymeric, melon-like, cyclic azine residues upon heating to T [ge] 500 C. These compounds include the insensitive explosives 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 3-amino-5-nitro-1,2,4-triazole (ANTA), and nitroguanidine. The melon-like residue could suppress the burn rate if these compounds are formulated into solid rocket propellants. The IR-active gaseous products from thermolysis are determined as a function of pressure and are related to the atom connectivity in the parent molecules.

Williams, G.K.; Palopoli, S.F.; Brill, T.B. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nonequilibrium phenomena and determination of plasma parameters in the hot core of the cathode region in free-burning arc discharges  

SciTech Connect

We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma parameters (electron density n{sub e}, electron temperature T{sub e}, gas temperature T{sub g}, underpopulation factor b) in the hot-core region in front of the cathode of a low-current, free-burning arc discharge in argon under atmospheric pressure. The discharge is operated in the hot-core mode, creating a hot cathode region with plasma parameters similar to high-current arcs in spite of the fact that we use comparatively low currents (less than 20 A). We use continuum emission and (optically thin) line emission to determine n{sub e} and T{sub e}. We apply relaxation measurements based on a power-interruption technique to investigate deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). These measurements let us determine the gas temperature T{sub g}. All measurements are performed side-on with charge-coupled-device cameras as detectors, so that all measured plasma parameters are spatially resolved after an Abel inversion. This yields the first ever spatially resolved observation of the non-LTE phenomena of the hot core in the near-cathode region of free-burning arcs. The results only partly coincide with previously published predictions and measurements in the literature.

Kuehn, Gerrit; Kock, Manfred [Institut fuer Atom- and Molekuelphysik, Abteilung Plasmaphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Germany Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Universitaet Hannover (Germany) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Hannover (Germany); Institut fuer Atom- and Molekuelphysik, Abteilung Plasmaphysik, Universitaet Hannover (Germany)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS. III. A YOUNG DUSTY L DWARF COMPANION AT THE DEUTERIUM-BURNING LIMIT ,  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of an L-type companion to the young M3.5V star 2MASS J01225093-2439505 at a projected separation of 1.''45 ( Almost-Equal-To 52 AU) as part of our adaptive optics imaging search for extrasolar giant planets around young low-mass stars. 2MASS 0122-2439 B has very red near-infrared colors similar to the HR 8799 planets and the reddest known young/dusty L dwarfs in the field. Moderate-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 3800) 1.5-2.4 {mu}m spectroscopy reveals a near-infrared spectral type of L4-L6 and an angular H-band shape, confirming its cool temperature and young age. The kinematics of 2MASS 0122-2439 AB are marginally consistent with members of the {approx}120 Myr AB Dor young moving group based on the photometric distance to the primary (36 {+-} 4 pc) and our radial velocity measurement of 2MASS 0122-2439 A from Keck/HIRES. We adopt the AB Dor group age for the system, but the high energy emission, lack of Li I {lambda}6707 absorption, and spectral shape of 2MASS 0122-2439 B suggest a range of {approx}10-120 Myr is possible. The age and luminosity of 2MASS 0122-2439 B fall in a strip where ''hot-start'' evolutionary model mass tracks overlap as a result of deuterium burning. Several known substellar companions also fall in this region (2MASS J0103-5515 ABb, AB Pic b, {kappa} And b, G196-3 B, SDSS 2249+0044 B, LP 261-75 B, HD 203030 B, and HN Peg B), but their dual-valued mass predictions have largely been unrecognized. The implied mass of 2MASS 0122-2439 B is Almost-Equal-To 12-13 M{sub Jup} or Almost-Equal-To 22-27 M{sub Jup} if it is an AB Dor member, or possibly as low as 11 M{sub Jup} if the wider age range is adopted. Evolutionary models predict an effective temperature for 2MASS 0122-2439 B that corresponds to spectral types near the L/T transition ( Almost-Equal-To 1300-1500 K) for field objects. However, we find a mid-L near-infrared spectral type, indicating that 2MASS 0122-2439 B represents another case of photospheric dust being retained to cooler temperatures at low surface gravities, as seen in the spectra of young (8-30 Myr) planetary companions. Altogether, the low mass, low temperature, and red colors of 2MASS 0122-2439 B make it a bridge between warm planets like {beta} Pic b and cool, very dusty ones like HR 8799 bcde.

Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Dupuy, Trent J., E-mail: bpbowler@ifa.hawaii.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Remnants of Ritual: A discussion of burial practices and material remains of Pompeian tombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a kiln, and fragments of tiles and pottery. She also writes that the structure collapsed most likely due to unintentional burning, after which the worshippers dug a pit into the collapsed rubble to deposit a burnt offering. Here, along... of their feasts likely remained. The examination of charred remains from burial pits at a Gallo- Roman cemetery at Faulqeumont in Moselle, France, may give us insight into material deposits around 1st century Roman graves. The graves were mostly pits, with a...

Geller, Jennifer

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced atomization concept for CWF burning in small combustors. Phase 2, Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, 1 April 1991--30 June 1991  

SciTech Connect

The present project involves the second phase of research on a new concept in coal-water fuel (CWF) atomization that is applicable to burning in small combustors. It is intended to address the most important problem associated with CWF combustion; i.e., production of small spray droplets in an efficient manner by an atomization device. Phase 1 of this work was successfully completed with the development of an opposed-jet atomizer that met the goals of the first contract. Performance as a function of operating conditions was measured, and the technical feasibility of the device established in the Atlantic Research Atomization Test Facility employing a Malvern Particle Size Analyzer. Testing then proceeded to a combustion stage in a test furnace at a firing rate of 0.5 to 1.5 MMBtu/H.

Heaton, H.; McHale, E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The distribution and biomagnification of higher brominated \\{BDEs\\} in terrestrial organisms affected by a typical e-waste burning site in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil, vegetation, and several terrestrial species including turtledove, chicken, goose, grasshopper, dragonfly, butterfly and ant, were collected from an area surrounding a typical e-waste burning site in South China. The samples were examined to investigate the levels, congener profiles, and biomagnification extent of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) that may be present in the environment as a result of the e-waste, which was processed in a crude recycling style. Elevated levels of ?21PBDEs were found in the biota (1014725ngg?1 lipid weight (lw)), vegetation leaf (82.9319ngg?1 dry weight (dw)) and soil samples (5.222110ngg?1 dw), indicating that PBDE contamination in the samples collected from the e-waste burning site may pose risks to the local terrestrial ecosystem and local populations. Higher BDE congeners, especially deca-BDE (BDE-209) were the dominant homologs in organisms and nonbiological matrices, followed by nona-BDE and octa-BDE. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were calculated as the ratio of the lipid-normalized concentration in the predator to that in the prey. The highest BMF (3.4) was determined for BDE-153 in the grasshopper/turtledove food chain. Other higher brominated congeners, such as BDE-202, -203, -154, -183 and -209, were also biomagnified in the terrestrial food chain with \\{BMFs\\} of 1.73.3. BDE-47, -100, and -99 were not biomagnified in the examined food chains (BMFs<1), which suggests that bioaccumulation and biotransformation of \\{PBDEs\\} in terrestrial ecosystems could be distinguished from those in aquatic ecosystems.

Zhiqiang Nie; Shulei Tian; Yajun Tian; Zhenwu Tang; Yi Tao; Qingqi Die; Yanyan Fang; Jie He; Qi Wang; Qifei Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hole burning with pressure and electric field: A window on the electronic structure and energy transfer dynamics of bacterial antenna complexes  

SciTech Connect

Light-harvesting (LH) complexes of cyclic (C{sub n}) symmetry from photosynthetic bacteria are studied using absorption and high pressure- and Stark-hole burning spectroscopies. The B800 absorption band of LH2 is inhomogeneously broadened while the B850 band of LH2 and the B875 band of the LH1 complex exhibit significant homogeneous broadening due to ultra-fast inter-exciton level relaxation. The B800{r_arrow}B850 energy transfer rate of ({approximately}2 ps){sup {minus}1} as determined by hole burning and femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopies, is weakly dependent on pressure and temperature, both of which significantly affect the B800-B850 energy gap. The resilience is theoretically explained in terms of a modified Foerster theory with the spectral overlap provided by the B800 fluorescence origin band and weak vibronic absorption bands of B850. Possible explanations for the additional sub-picosecond relaxation channel of B800 observed with excitation on the blue side of B800 are given. Data from pressure and temperature dependent studies show that the B800 and B850 bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are weakly and strongly excitonically coupled, respectively, which is consistent with the X-ray structure of LH2. The B875 BChl a molecules are also strongly coupled. It is concluded that electron-exchange, in addition to electrostatic interactions, is important for understanding the strong coupling of the B850 and B875 rings. The large linear pressure shifts of {approximately}{minus}0.6 cm{sup {minus}1}/MPa associated with B850 and B875 can serve as important benchmarks for electronic structure calculations.

Wu, H.M.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

A. Kusiak and A. Burns, Mining Temporal Data: A Coal-Fired Boiler Case Study, Proceedings of International Conference, KES 2005, Melbourne, Australia, September 14-16, 2005, in R.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Kusiak and A. Burns, Mining Temporal Data: A Coal-Fired Boiler Case Study, Proceedings of the 9 3683, Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 2005, pp. 953-958. Mining Temporal Data: A Coal-Fired Boiler Case. This paper presents an approach to control pluggage of a coal-fired boiler. The proposed approach involves

Kusiak, Andrew

443

Recommended surrogate PCB waste feed and fuel compositions to meet requirements given in Spec. K/D 5552 for test burns in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. incinerator  

SciTech Connect

Waste feed heats of combustion, principle organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), ash contents, and organic chlorine concentrations are specified in Table 3 of Spec. No. K/D-5552 for test burns 1 through 7 in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. incinerator. The first four tests are intended to demonstrate that the incinerator will meet RCRA emission standards, HCl removal efficiencies, and requirements for destruction of POHCs. A mix containing 1,2-dichloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzenes with a small amount of hexachlorobenzene is recommended as a PCB surrogate for test burns 5 and 6 to simulate the destructibility of PCBs in plant wastes. The mix would be diluted with appropriate amounts of dimethyl malonate and kerosene to obtain a homogeneous solution having the required heat of combustion and chlorine content for the liquid waste feeds. For test burn 7 the polychlorinated benzene mix would contain a small amount of hexachlorobenzene with larger amounts of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzenes. The composition of the polychlorinated mixes is such that they should be comparable to Aroclor 1254 in overall destructibility by incineration, and achievement of a DRE for hexachlorobenzene greater than 99.99% in the test burns should provide assurance that the incinerator will be able to destroy PCBs in Aroclor 1260, which is the most refractory PCB mix present in plant wastes. If hexachlorobenzene is not available for these tests, hexachlorocyclopentadiene is recommended as a substitute for hexachlorobenzene in tests 5-7, which involve a PCB surrogate, and hexachloroethane is recommended as the alternative solid waste feed for test 4. Solutions containing kerosene and methanol are recommended as liquid fuels for tests 1 and 4 to achieve the required heats of combustion, while a dimethyl malonate-methanol solution is recommended to achieve the 7000 Btu/lb heat of combustion for test burn 2.

Anderson, R.W.

1984-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NV

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 140 consists of nine corrective action sites (CASs). Investigation activities were performed from November 13 through December 11, 2002, with additional sampling to delineate the extent of contaminants of concern (COCs) conducted on February 4 and March 18 and 19, 2003. Results obtained from the investigation activities and sampling indicated that only 3 of the 9 CASs at CAU 140 had COCs identified. Following a review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the NTS, the following preferred alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action - six CASs (05-08-02, 05-17-01, 05-19-01, 05-35-01, 05-99-04, and 22-99-04); (2) Clean Closure - one CAS (05-08-01), and (3) Closure-in-Place - two CASs (05-23-01 and 23-17-01). These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 140.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

1. Get in touch if you have any ?'s about the industry or life after Penn! And to satiate what I'm sure is burning curiosity... I took the bus.4:22 PM Feb 17th via web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'm sure is burning curiosity... I took the bus.4:22 PM Feb 17th via web 2. Well guys, that's it for my day!! Off to see what the post fashion week new york night has to offer...4:18 PM Feb 17th via web 3 to come in for the month.4:06 PM Feb 17th via web 4. Well, it's getting quiet around here now that shows

Plotkin, Joshua B.

447

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Overview and Burning Technology Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development and demonstra tion. These programs include: Energy From the Forest (ENFOR) , a contract research program dealing with forest oriented matters relating to raw material (feedstock) supply; Bioenergy Development Program (BOP), also a contract R... of the technology in that specific application. The most common and pervasive barrier to the deployment of bioenergy technologies in industry is economic. In the long term the barrier will disappear as non-renewable fuel prices increase relatively as well...

Waller, J.

449

Science in culture: Burning Bush  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their continuing potency in stimulating the creativity of Australian artists, who depict both their dramatic pyrotechnic effects and their tragic consequences. ...

Colin Martin

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

Pre-industrial charcoal production in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, Germany): Detection and evaluation of a large charcoal-burning field by combining archaeological studies, GIS-based analyses of shaded-relief maps and dendrochronological age determination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In pre-industrial times, charcoal burning was a common source of energy across Europe. Charcoal production and its related consequences for the upland environment are well known due to historical and palaeoenvironmental research. In recent years, awareness has grown regarding the use of woods in the lowlands for charcoal production. In the last 20 years, a large charcoal-burning field in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, North German Lowlands) was discovered by systematic archaeological excavations of the opencast mine of Jnschwalde. However, the excavations are limited to the mine, which only covers a portion of the Jnschwalder Heide and the surrounding forests. In this paper, we present the results of our study regarding the spatial extension and timing of charcoal production in the Jnschwalder Heide and its surrounding areas. We applied a combined approach using archaeological research results, GIS-analyses of shaded-relief maps (SRMs) and tree-ring dating of selected charcoal kiln remains. Approximately 900 excavated charcoal kiln ground plans were analysed, which provided a solid data basis for our GIS analyses. For an extensive evaluation, we enlarged our study area beyond the limits of the lignite mine. We identified and digitised the remains of the charcoal kilns by creating \\{SRMs\\} from digital elevation models (DEMs) that were based on high-resolution airborne laser scanning data (ALS). The data from the excavated and digitised charcoal kiln remains were analysed in terms of their sizes and spatial distributions. In addition, the dendrochronological ages of 16 selected charcoal kiln remains were determined. This study shows that charcoal production was more extensive than initially proven by archaeological excavations. The remains of more than 5000 charcoal kilns were detected on the \\{SRMs\\} across an area that was twice as large as the excavated charcoal-burning field. In the Jnschwalder Heide, considerably more charcoal kiln relicts exist compared with the surrounding communal areas. Furthermore, the charcoal kiln remains in the Jnschwalder Heide have larger diameters, suggesting large-scale charcoal production for supplying energy to the nearby ironworks at Peitz. However, the charcoal production on the communal land was most likely for local crafts. The ages of the charcoal kiln remains indicated that charcoal production occurred between the 17th and 19th centuries, corresponding with the main period of charcoal burning. Overall, our study suggested that charcoal production sites are underestimated in the modern landscapes of the North German Lowlands.

A. Raab; M. Takla; T. Raab; A. Nicolay; A. Schneider; H. Rsler; K.-U. Heuner; E. Bnisch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

452

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 148 UNIT NAME  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concrete rubble fpr dam and road statlilization. This concrete rubble originates f:rom many locations, one of which was the PGDP. WASTE DESCRIPTION: Concrete -concrete block...

453

Federal Facility Agreement progress report  

SciTech Connect

The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The land around typical Darfur refugee camps is cleared of all wood 2 T H E T R O U B L E W I T H C O O K I N Gthe impact of biomass-burning on health & enviornment and what we are doing about it  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O O K I N Gthe impact of biomass-burning on health & enviornment and what we are doing about it H fire By 2030, biomass use for cooking is projected to in- crease by an addi- tional 30%13 References [1-Darfur Stove World Population 3B 7B 3B 4B Biomass Users Non-Biomass Users 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0deaths annually

Eisen, Michael

455

Plant betterment for an anthracite-burning utility in Ukraine: Coal preparation as part of a SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emission control strategy  

SciTech Connect

Workers at the Energy Departments of the US and Ukraine have cooperatively devised a strategy for upgrading performance of a 200 MWe wet bottom pulverized coal boiler in eastern Ukraine at the Lugansk GRES power station. The plant currently burns poor quality anthracite (30% ash versus 18% ash design coal, as-received basis) and is in need of maintenance. Oil or gas support fuel in the amount of 30% (calorific basis) is required to stabilize the flame and supplement the calorific value of the coal feed. No NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2} controls are used at present, and unburned carbon content in the fly ash is high. An experimental program was carried out at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to estimate the improvement in plant performance that could be expected if the unit is supplied with design coal and is refurbished. High ash Ukrainian anthracite was cleaned to design specifications. Raw and cleaned coal were fed to a 490 MJ/h coal feed combustion unit at a number of conditions of support fuel use and ingress air leakage designed to simulate current and improved operations at the power plant. The results indicate the improvement in performance and reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions that can be expected as a result of the planned upgrade and conversion to use of cleaned coal. A detailed engineering and financial analysis indicates that plant rehabilitation combined with the use of cleaned schtib reduces not only pollutant emissions but also cost of electricity (COE). Additional benefits include increased plant life and capacity, and reduced supplementary fuel consumption.

Ruether, J.A.; Freeman, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Gollakota, S.V. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Krll

2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

457

Development of Burning Plasma and Advanced Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The Netherlands) IPP (Garching, Greifswald, Germany) JET-EFDA (Oxfordshire, England) KFA (Julich, Germany) Kharkov. of Kiel (Kiel, Germany) U. Toronto (Toronto, Canada) US Industries CompX (Del Mar, CA) CPI (Palo Alto, CA

458

Laser-Induced Implosion and Thermonuclear Burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In high density laser induced fusion, the key idea is laser implosion of ... times liquid density in order to initiate efficient thermonuclear burningl. Fusion yields 50100 times larger than the...5106...joules...

John H. Nuckolls

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

OSTP Perspective on Burning Plasma Experimental Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Fusion Energy #12;Joint Statement by President George W. Bush and President Vladimir V. Putin on U

460

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a-area burning rubble" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ecological disaster in Kuwait; A burning question  

SciTech Connect

Six million barrels of oil are going up in smoke each day in Kuwait, dumping 3.7 million pounds of toxic gases, soot, and smoke - including cancer-causing compounds - into the air each hour. This paper reports that the prognosis for the situation is dim. Even as specialized firefighting companies from the United States and Canada began arriving in Kuwait in March, oil officials there predicted dousing the fires would take at least two years and pumping up oil production to pre-war levels would take between five and 10 years. An oil well fire is a disaster. The effect on the ozone, the ecology, the marine life is massive. We aren't even breathing air here, we're just breathing smog.

Wray, T.K. (Waste Away Services, Perrysburg, OH (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

On the Burning Temperatures of Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...low, but the heat spread over...formed by the combustion of tobacco leaf...carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons are produced...Temperature of the combustion zone in a pipe...low, but the heat spread over...from In ternal Combustion Engines and...Polycyclic Hydrocarbons in Cigarette...

Pentti Ermala and Lars R. Holsti

1956-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA); Peuron, Unto A. (Solana Beach, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fluidized bed paint stripping and sludge burning  

SciTech Connect

High volume automated painting, as encountered in the painting of automobiles and appliances, requires that the item being painted be positioned in a conveying frame or fixture so that the painting machine or robot achieves a reproducible, high quality paint job. These conveying frames or fixtures are extensive fabrications carefully designed to position and support the item being painted. In the case of automotive painting, they are rather large and involve substantial weights, because they must be capable of supporting and positioning auto bodies and large sub-assemblies.

Bhatia, J.; Staffin, H.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-IE-84-04-136 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 15-18, 1984 _ HEAT EXCHANGER RETURN AIR mlM SPILL FLOW INNER PIPE INSULATiON 1737'F HEATSHIELD Illlll'F \\ ...~.......- 826... ESL-IE-84-04-136 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 15-18, 1984 _ HEAT EXCHANGER RETURN AIR mlM SPILL FLOW INNER PIPE INSULATiON 1737'F HEATSHIELD Illlll'F \\ ...~.......- 826...

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

On the Burning Temperatures of Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...470 - 812 C.). Combustion and distillation...obliged to inhale the dust developed by the...with raw tobacco dust on the nasal cavity...tobacco may not require combustion to be car cinogenic...because of low pressure conditions and oxidation...the formation of coal tar, as has often...

Pentti Ermala and Lars R. Holsti

1956-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Interactive simulation of fire, burn and decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We demonstrate a wide range of flame conditions, including ignition, self sustaining flames, various combustion reactions resulting in wider or narrower reaction zones, and self-extinguishing flames (Fig. 4). Note that we have published parts...

Melek, Zeki

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Interactive simulation of fire, burn and decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We demonstrate a wide range of flame conditions, including ignition, self sustaining flames, various combustion reactions resulting in wider or narrower reaction zones, and self-extinguishing flames (Fig. 4). Note that we have published parts...

Melek, Zeki

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the Burning Temperatures of Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...470 - 812 C.). Combustion and distillation...especially aro matic hydrocarbons, ( )to note the...not an important heat irritant, unless...cited in [20]). Data on tobacco chewing...may not require combustion to be car cinogenic...some carcinogenic hydrocarbons, especially 3...

Pentti Ermala and Lars R. Holsti

1956-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Terrigal Burn MD Lean Physician Champion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific reductionism is not definitive: dynamic, adaptive and interrelated systems, models of individuals of the processes of work, and the processes that support those processes, to support the people who create value for the patient (caregivers) 11 #12;lean six sigma Continuous improvement Process improvement The xx Way

Soloveichik, David

471

Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Prescribed Range Burning in Texas (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ancho del ?rea del fuego en franjas. Una vez que el fuego a favor del viento avanza entre 15 y 30 m, ya se desarrollaron las carac- ter?sticas de la flama frontal principal. Puede hac- erse un fuego en franja de 15 a 30 m para asegu- rar el ancho... para quemar la guarda raya Humedad relativa 40-60% Temperatura 5-15 o C Viento 0-13 km/h Condiciones del clima para quemar a favor del viento Humedad relativa 25-40% Temperatura 21-26 o C Viento 13-25 km/h Condiciones clim?ticas Humedad relativa menor...

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Japan is burning to be nuclear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Japan has very little in the way of indigenous energy: except for the odd earthquake ... them uranium bought mostly from the United States. To free herself somewhat of this dependence Japan is committed herself to a plutonium future of fast breeder reactors and - inevitably for ...

1978-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

NuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory May 2008 #12;The Yucca Mountain Geologic RepositoryThe Yucca Mountain Geologic repository. s In 1987 Yucca Mountain was selected as the single site for further study. s In 2002, the President signed into law a congressional resolution designating the Yucca Mountain site for development

475

The Challenge Human activities, such as the burning of fossil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil is a multinational independent exploration and production company with interests in the North Sea oil, gas fields or saline aquifers. Emissions from fossil fuel power stations could then be reduced, is the process of the capture and long-term storage of atmospheric CO2 and will play a vital role in future

Crowther, Paul

476

James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport barriers, electron thermal transport, momentum transport, ... · MHD macrostability ­ Resistive materials, divertor design, ... · Long-pulse operation ­ Heating and current drive, profile control, hybrid Uniquely BP issues · Alpha particles ­ Large population of supra- thermal ions · Self-heating ­ "Autonomous

477

Economic assessment of coal-burning locomotives: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The General Electric Company embarked upon a study to evaluate various alternatives for the design and manufacture a coal fired locomotive considering various prime movers, but retaining the electric drive transmission. The initial study was supported by the Burlington-Northern and Norfolk-Southern railroads, and included the following alternatives: coal fired diesel locomotive; direct fired gas turbine locomotives; direct fired gas turbine locomotive with steam injection; raw coal gasifier gas turbine locomotive; and raw coal fluid bed steam turbine locomotive. All alternatives use the electric drive transmission and were selected for final evaluation. The first three would use a coal water slurry as a fuel, which must be produced by new processing plants. Therefore, use of a slurry would require a significant plant capital investment. The last two would use classified run-of-the-mine (ROM) coal with much less capital expenditure. Coal fueling stations would be required but are significantly lower in capital cost than a coal slurry plant. For any coal fired locomotive to be commercially viable, it must pass the following criteria: be technically feasible and environmentally acceptable; meet railroads' financial expectations; and offer an attractive return to the locomotive manufacturer. These three criteria are reviewed in the report.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and US06, transient accelerations plus steady state * Fuels: Gasoline and intermediate ethanol blends (E0, E10, E20) * Measurements: - Particle mass: collection on Teflon-coated...

479

A neural network approach to burn-in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Way Kuo (Chair of Committee) Tep Sastri (Member) Robert Shannon (Member) Chanan Singh (Member) Way Kuo Head of Department August 1995 Major Subject; Industrial Enginccring A Neural Network Approach to Bum-in. (August 1995) Nancy L...

Clifford, Nancy Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

Manipulation of huisache communities with herbicides, burning, and mechanical methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bottomland range sites on the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge near Sinton, Texas. Low-energy grubbing to an average depth of 14 cm in August 1975, controlled 75X of the plants. Discing once in August and again in October killed 22% of the huisache... LITERATURE CITED. 93 APPENDIX. 97 VITA. 100 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE Chemical and physical characteristics of the Odem and Sinton soils collected in July and August, 1975, from the research areas on the Welder Wildlife Refuge near Sinton, Texas. 12...

Bontrager, Orvin Eli

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1120ballstatepresentation.pdf More Documents & Publications Indiana Recovery Act State Memo Coal Study Guide - Middle School BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I)...

482

GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect

The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

Horton, Claude Wendell

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

483

Coal burning leaves toxic heavy metal legacy in the Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cap in northeastern Canada have been reported (8). Pb is the most extensively studied, with results reported from Camp Century in northwestern Greenland (12) and Summit in central Greenland (11, 1316). A total of 36 discrete ice core...

Joseph R. McConnell; Ross Edwards

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

485

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

486

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is generally agreed that they result from the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf accreting matter from that a thermonuclear explosion is involved means that a realistic model requires an understanding of both the ignition

487

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

488

Burning Chemical Waste Disposal Site: Investigation, Assessment and Rehabilitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of underground fires on a site previously used for disposal of chemical wastes from the nylon industry was causing a nuisance and restricting the commercial development of the site and adjacent areas....

D. L. Barry; J. M. Campbell; E. H. Jones

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Open waste burning in Cameroonian cities: an environmental impact analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lack of technology and efficient management of solid waste coupled with poverty have motivated most developing countries to sort for cheap waste disposal methods with negative consequences on the environment. Ope...

George Teke Forbid; Julius Numbonui Ghogomu; Gnter Busch

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490