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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Projecting Monthly Natural Gas Sales for Space Heating Using a Monthly Updated Model and Degree-days from Monthly Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of projecting monthly residential natural gas sales and evaluating interannual changes in demand is investigated using a linear regression model adjusted monthly. with lagged monthly heating degree-days as the independent variable. ...

Richard L. Lehman; Henry E. Warren

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A degree-day method for residential heating load calculations specifically incorporating the utilization of solar gains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple and well known method of estimating residential heating loads is the variable base degree-day method, in which the steady-state heat loss rate (UA) is multiplied by the degree-days based from the balance temperature of the structure. The balance temperature is a function of the UA as well as the average rate of internal heat gains, reflecting the displacement of the heating requirements by these gains. Currently, the heat gains from solar energy are lumped with those from appliances to estimate an average rate over the day. This ignores the effects of the timing of the gains from solar energy, which are more highly concentrated during daytime hours, hence more frequently exceeding the required space heat and less utilizable than the gains from appliances. Simulations or specialized passive solar energy calculation methods have previously been required to account for this effect. This paper presents curves of the fraction of the absorbed solar energy utilized for displacement of space heat, developed by comparing heating loads calculated using a variable base degree-day method (ignoring solar gains) to heating loads from a large number of detailed DOE-2 simulations. The difference in the loads predicted by the two methods can be interpreted as the utilized solar gains. The solar utilization decreases as the thermal integrity increases, as expected, and the solar utilizations are similar across climates. They can be used to estimate the utilized fraction of the absorbed solar energy and, with the load predicted by the variable base degree-day calculation, form a modified degree-day method that closely reproduces the loads predicted by the DOE-2 simulation model and is simple enough for hand calculations. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Lucas, R.G.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Heating Degree Days  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Degree Days Heating Degree Days New England ................ 2,626 737 115 2,062 3,105 849 159 2,247 3,184 872 136 2,180 5,541 6,359 6,373 Middle Atlantic .............. 2,326 576 85 1,899 2,906 672 123 2,041 2,924 682 90 1,986 4,886 5,742 5,682 E. N. Central ................. 2,440 621 139 2,150 3,279 772 119 2,343 3,141 726 129 2,230 5,350 6,514 6,227 W. N. Central ................ 2,515 520 143 2,360 3,424 908 103 2,541 3,216 677 152 2,404 5,539 6,976 6,450 South Atlantic ............... 1,129 168 16 992 1,513 217 21 1,059 1,466 202 16 1,010 2,306 2,809 2,695 E. S. Central ................. 1,361 180 28 1,326 1,939 289 16 1,430 1,839 245 23 1,336 2,896 3,675 3,443 W. S. Central ................ 913 38 3 729 1,189 141 2 909 1,150 83 5 821 1,682 2,239 2,060 Mountain ....................... 2,063 542 98 1,741 2,430 689 101 1,885 2,189 642 130 1,817 4,444

4

Maximum Freezing Degree-Days as a Winter Severity Index for the Great Lakes, 1897–1977  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General regional and temporal trends in maximum freezing degree-days (FDD's) are identified for the shore zone of the Great Lakes Basin for the 80 winter periods 1897–1977. The cumulative frequency distribution of FDD's at cub of 25 locations is ...

Raymond A. Assel

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Degree Day .Net  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degree Day .Net Degree Day .Net Logo for Degree Day.net Website that generates heating and cooling degree days for locations worldwide. Degree days are commonly used in calculations relating to building energy consumption. Once you have chosen a weather station (of which there are thousands available) and specified the degree days you want (e.g. what base temperature, do you want them broken down in daily, weekly or monthly format), Degree Days.net will calculate your degree days, and give them to you as a CSV file that you can open directly in a spreadsheet. Screen Shots Keywords degree days, HDD, CDD Validation/Testing A comprehensive suite of automated tests have been written to test the software. Expertise Required Degree Days.net makes it very easy to specify and generate degree days, so

6

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Degree Day Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forecasts Forecasts Degree Day Forecasts example chart Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free 14-day ahead degree day forecasts for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada. Degree Day Forecasts charts show this year, last year and three-year average. Historical degree day charts and energy usage forecasts are available from the same site. Keywords degree days, historical weather, mean daily temperature Validation/Testing Degree day data provided by AccuWeather.com, updated daily at 0700. Expertise Required No special expertise required. Simple to use. Users Over 1,000 weekly users. Audience Anyone who needs degree day forecasts (next 14 days) for the U.S. and Canada. Input Select a weather station (1,200 available) and balance point temperature. Output Charts show (1) degree day (heating and cooling) forecasts for the next 14

7

A Study of the Severity of the Midwestern Winters of 1977 and 1978 Using Heating Degree Days Determined from Both Measured and Wind Chill Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The winters of 1976–77 and 1977–78 were severe by virtually any standard. In this study, heating degree day (NDD) accumulations for these two winters as well as for the 1941–70 normals are examined at 31 National Weather Service stations in ...

Patricia M. Dare

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heating degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating degree days Heating degree days Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, heating degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate Heating degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Heating Degree Data, by State (xls, 208.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

9

cooling degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days cooling degree days Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

10

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Variability of Population-Weighted Seasonal Heating Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and national heating fuel demand is related to both weather and population density. This study analyzes the variability of population-weighted, seasonal heating degree days for the coterminous 48 states. A risk assessment of unusual ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Degree Day Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Degree Day Reports image Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free historical degree days for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada, 1994 to present. Degree Day...

13

Climate: monthly and annual average cooling degree days above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at one-degree resolution of the World from NASASSE

(Abstract):  
Cooling Degree Days above 10 C (degree days)
The monthly accumulation of degrees when...

14

annual average heating degree days | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

average heating degree days average heating degree days Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Heating Degree Days below 18° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is below 18° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Heating Degree Days Below 18 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords annual average heating degree days climate GIS NASA SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 2.7 MiB)

15

Degree-Day Formulations and Application in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degree-days are fundamental design parameters in many application fields such as power generation and consumption, agriculture, architecture, snow melt estimation, environmental energy planning, population siting, and military domains. Depending ...

Mikdat Kadioglu; Zekai ?en

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimating Historical Heating and Cooling Needs. Per Capita Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of approximate United States average annual per capita heating and cooling degree days for the years 1895–1983 are presented. The data reflect the combined effects of climate fluctuations and population shifts, and can be used in ...

M. W. Downton; T. R. Stewart; K. A. Miller

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Climate: monthly and annual average cooling degree days above 10° C GIS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling degree days above 10° C GIS cooling degree days above 10° C GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Cooling Degree Days above 10° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is above 10° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Cooling Degree Days Above 10 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180,

18

Climate: monthly and annual average heating degree days below 18° C GIS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heating degree days below 18° C GIS heating degree days below 18° C GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Heating Degree Days below 18° C (degree days)The monthly accumulation of degrees when the daily mean temperature is below 18° C.NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly Average & Annual Sum (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Heating Degree Days Below 18 degrees C (degree days)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180,

19

Skillful Seasonal Predictions of Boreal Winter Accumulated Heating Degree-Days and Relevance for the Weather Derivative Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that boreal winter accumulated heating degree-days, a weather derivative product that is frequently demanded by energy suppliers (among others), can be skillfully predicted with a lead time of 1 month, that is, at the beginning ...

S. Brands

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The estimation of base temperature for heating and cooling degree days for Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Korea, heating degree days (HDD) and cooling degree days (CDD) have been widely used as climatic indicators for the assessment of the impact of climate change, but arbitrary or customary base temperatures have been used for calculation of HDD ...

Kyoungmi Lee; Hee-Jeong Baek; ChunHo Cho

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1.9 Heating Degree-Days by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normala 2012 2013 Percent Change Normala 2012 2013 ... F would report 25 heating degree-days for that day ... • See ...

22

cooling degree-days - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Cooling degree-days. There are no record(s) that match your search criteria.

23

Table 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949-2011: Year: New England: Middle Atlantic: East North Central: West North Central: South Atlantic: East South

24

Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) Cooling Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Included here are monthly and annual values averaged over several periods of time: 1931-2000, 1931-60, 1941-70, 1951-80, 1961-90, 1971-2000 (standard deviation is also provided). Detailed monthly climatic information (including cooling degree days) is available for the time period between 1895 and 2011, from NOAA (http://www7.ncdc.noaa.gov/CDO/CDODivisionalSelect.jsp#).

25

Heating Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

66 66 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278566 Varnish cache server Heating Degree Days, by State (Weighted by Population, per 2000 Census) Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, heating degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Included here are monthly and annual values averaged over several periods of time: 1931-2000, 1931-60, 1941-70, 1951-80, 1961-90, 1971-2000 (standard deviation is also provided). Detailed monthly climatic information (including heating degree days) is available for the time period between 1895 and 2011, from NOAA (http://www7.ncdc.noaa.gov/CDO/CDODivisionalSelect.jsp#).

26

Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40 percent of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, EIA has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. In AEO2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Trends in Heating and Cooling Degree Days: Implications for Energy Demand Issues (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Weather-related energy use, in the form of heating, cooling, and ventilation, accounted for more than 40 percent of all delivered energy use in residential and commercial buildings in 2006. Given the relatively large amount of energy affected by ambient temperature in the buildings sector, EIA has reevaluated what it considers normal weather for purposes of projecting future energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation. In AEO2008, estimates of normal heating and cooling degree-days are based on the population-weighted average for the 10-year period from 1997 through 2006.

Information Center

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Table HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. For this report, the heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of...

30

Degree-Days - Energy Explained, Your Guide To Understanding Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

31

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Degree Day Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

32

BioSAVE: Display of scored annotation within a sequence context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alongside phast- Con scores [15], which further characterise it in terms of evolutionary conservation.Page 2 of 6 (page number not for citation purposes) tion weight matrix (PWM), which allows for a numerical description of the binding site rather than a... regions. Sequence conservation is here displayed using phastCon scores. The Su(Hw) position weight matrix matches were generated with Patser and loaded through the BioSAVE plug-in system; the phastCon scores were supplied as GFF file. BMC Bioinformatics...

Pollock, Richard F; Adryan, Boris

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Regime Dependence of Degree Day Forecast Technique, Skill, and Value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation into the manner in which forecasters adjust their reliance on particular pieces of forecast information as the large-scale flow pattern evolves into different regimes, and the relationship between those adjustments and forecast ...

Paul J. Roebber

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Table 1.8 Cooling Degree-Days by Month, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 11 : 12: 11: 55 : 65 : 241 : 356 : 296 : 195 : 60 : 9 : 4 : 1,315 : 1955. 6 : 7: 20: 45 : 121 : 161 : 381 : 355 : 182 : 50 : 10 : 6 : 1,344 : ...

35

Table 1.9 Heating Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 6,291: 5,473: 5,841: 6,063: 2,713: 3,211: 1,876: 4,679: 3,296: 4,232: 1955. 6,577: 5,708: 6,101: 6,630: 2,786: 3,314: 2,083: 5,517: 3,723: ...

36

Table 1.7 Heating Degree-Days by Month, 1949-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 886: 577: 646: 261: 192: 32: 8: 18: 56: 224: 523: 809: 4,232: 1955. 927: 759: 600: 272: 121: 48: 9: 6: 56: 237: 600: 886: 4,521: 1956. 900: 723: ...

37

Contemporaneous Relationships between Global Radiation and Heating Degree Days during Severe Winters in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global radiation climate associated with anomalously cold winter months and cold winters is analyzed for the contiguous United States. The radiation data consist of rehabilitated measured and modeled monthly values of global radiation on both ...

Thomas R. Karl; Frank T. Quinlan

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Model for Decision Making Based on NWS Monthly Temperature Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Gaussian model for evaluating the probability of occurrence of forecast-contingent monthly average temperature and degree day outcomes is developed by use of forecast-verification data, and proposed for use in decision making. The model 1) ...

Richard L. Lehman

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Valuing Groundwater Services and Water Portfolio in Irrigated Agriculture with a Hedonic Pricing Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A.C. Fisher. 2007. Water Availability, Degree Days, andAn Overview. Regional Water Quality Control Board CentralRegion. 2006. California Water Boards. State of California.

Mukherjee, Monobina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Long-Term Trends in Air Temperature Distribution and Extremes, Growing Degree?Days, and Spring and Fall Frosts for Climate Impact Assessments on Agricultural Practices in Nebraska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature influences agricultural practices and production outcomes, making detailed quantifications of temperature changes necessary for potential positive and negative effects on agricultural management practices to be exploited or ...

Kari E. Skaggs; Suat Irmak

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residential electricity demand: a suggested appliance stock equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author develops a simple appliance stock equation for estimating seasonal patterns of power demand elasticity. The equation relates an index of appliances (estimates of typical use) to marginal price per kWh, to income, to average price of alternative fuels, to climate (cooling degree days and heating degree days), to age of the household head, to family size, and to race. Price elasticity is -0.785 for the winter and 0.493 for the summer, with all estimates significant to 0.001. The appliance stock coefficient is 0.801 for the winter and 0.971 for the summer. The equation may be useful in studies that do not require elaborate disaggregation of appliance stock. 7 references, 2 tables.

Garbacz, C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic model for the potential distributions of north European tree species under present and future climates. Journal of Biogeography 23(2):203- 233. A bioclimatic model based on physiological constraints to plant growth and regeneration is used here in an empirical way to describe the present natural distributions of northern Europe's major trees. Bioclimatic variables were computed from monthly means of temperature, precipitation and sunshine (%) interpolated to a 10' grid taking into account elevation. Minimum values of mean coldest-month temperature (T-c) and 'effective' growing degree days (GDD*) were fitted to species' range limits. GDD* is total annual growing degree days (GDD) minus GDD to budburst (GDD(o)). Each species was assigned to one of the

43

Household and environmental characteristics related to household energy-consumption change: A human ecological approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focused on the family household as an organism and on its interaction with the three environments of the human ecosystem (natural, behavioral, and constructed) as these influence energy consumption and energy-consumption change. A secondary statistical analysis of data from the US Department of Energy Residential Energy Consumption Surveys (RECS) was completed. The 1980 and 1983 RECS were used as the data base. Longitudinal data, including household, environmental, and energy-consumption measures, were available for over 800 households. The households were selected from a national sample of owner-occupied housing units surveyed in both years. Results showed a significant( p = household, cooling degree days, heating degree days, year the housing unit was built, and number of stories in the housing unit.

Guerin, D.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Simulated biomass and soil carbon of loblolly pine and cottonwood plantations across a thermal gradient in southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization were simulated for a 25-year loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation and for three consecutive 7-year short-rotation cottonwood (Populus deltoides) stands. Simulations were conducted for 17 locations in the southeastern United States with mean annual temperatures ranging from 13.1 to 19.4 C. The LINKAGES stand growth model, modified to include the "RothC" soil C and soil N model, simulated tree growth and soil C status. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased cumulative cottonwood aboveground biomass in the three rotations from a site average of 106 to 272 Mg/ha in 21 years, whereas the equivalent site averages for loblolly pine were unchanged at 176 and 184 Mg/ha in 25 years. Location results, compared on the annual sum of daily mean air temperatures above 5.5 C (growing-degree-days), showed contrasts. Loblolly pine biomass increased whereas cottonwood decreased with increasing growing-degree-days, particularly in cottonwood stands receiving N fertilization. The increment of biomass due to N addition per unit of control biomass (relative response) declined in both plantations with increase in growing-degree-days. Average soil C in loblolly pine stands increased from 24.3 to 40.4 Mg/ha in 25 years and in cottonwood soil C decreased from 14.7 to 13.7 Mg/ha after three 7-year rotations. Soil C did not decrease with increasing growing-degree-days in either plantation type suggesting that global warming may not initially affect soil C. Nitrogen fertilizer increased soil C slightly in cottonwood plantations and had no significant effect on the soil C of loblolly stands.

Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ac_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. For this report, the heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of...

46

Table US14. Average Consumption by Energy End Uses, 2005 Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

47

THE PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN PROCESS FOR A SMALL OFFICE/LABORATORY BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coolers. active solar heating and underground thermalbeam solar radiation is preferred to counteract the heatingdays vs. 5000 heating degree days). Passive solar potentials

Andersson, Brandt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Aligning Insect IPM Programs with a Cropping Systems Perspective: Cover Crops and Cultural Pest Control in Wisconsin Organic Corn and Soybean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a conversation among researcher, agroecology student, and farmers about the association between cover crops and seedcorn maggot in organic grain crops. Survey data showed that Wisconsin organic farmers would use cover crop management, insect degree day forecasting, and planting date cultural controls, given appropriate knowledge context and extension information provision. We developed electronic and print resources and engaged with farmers and educators nationally through the eOrganic Community of Practice. Project outcomes exemplify student and farmer ability to effect change in land grant university extension recommendations through integrated pest management content and delivery aligned with a cropping systems perspective.

Copyright Taylor; Francis Group; Eileen M. Cullen; Katelin M. Holm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight Glazing Daylight Glazing Exterior glazing over 6 feet above the finished floor. DDC See Direct Digital Control. Deadband The temperature range in which no heating or cooling is used. Decorative Lighting Lighting that is purely ornamental and installed for aesthetic effect. Decorative lighting shall not include general lighting. Degree Day See "Heating Degree Days." Degree Day Base 50F For any one day, when the mean temperature is more than 50°F, there are as many degree days as degrees Fahrenheit temperature difference between the mean temperature for the day and 50°F. Annual cooling degree days (CDDs) are the sum of the degree days over a calendar year. Demand The highest amount of power (average kilowatt over an interval) recorded for a building or facility in a selected time frame.

52

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

53

Table AP7. Average Expenditures for Home Appliances and Lighting ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

54

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

55

Table 1. Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households, 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. (5) ...

56

Table SH9. Average Expenditures for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

57

Table AC9. Average Cooled Floorspace by Equipment Type, 2005 Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station.

58

Annual Energy Review - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949– PDF XLS ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986–

59

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949– PDF XLS ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986–

60

Table CE3-1e. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dollars per Household4,a Electric Air-Conditioning Expenditures per Household ... per Household4 2001 Cooling Degree-Days per Household Total U.S. Households ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GEOCITY: a computer code for calculating costs of district heating using geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree days, population size and density, resource temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. From this input data the model designs the transmission and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system, including the production and disposal of the geothermal water. GEOCITY consists of two major submodels: the geothermal reservoir model and the distribution system model. The distribution system model calculates the cost of heat by simulating the design and the operation of the district heating system. The reservoir model calculates the cost of energy by simulating the discovery, development and operation of a geothermal resource and the transmission of this energy to a distribution center.

McDonald, C.L.; Bloomster, C.H.; Schulte, S.C.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a Toolkit for Calculating Linear, Change-Point Linear and Multiple-Linear Inverse Building Energy Analysis Models, ASHRAE Research Project 1050-RP, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of ASHRAE Research Project 1050: Development of a Toolkit for Calculating Linear, Change-Point Linear and Multiple Linear Inverse Building Energy Analysis Models. The Inverse Modeling Toolkit (WIT) is a FORTRAN 90 application for developing regression models of building energy use. IMT can identify single and multi-variable least-squares regression models. It can also identify variable-base degree-day and single and multi-variable change-point models, which have been shown to be especially useful for modeling building energy use. This report includes background information about IMT and the models, instructions for its installation and operation, and the results of accuracy and robustness testing.

Kissock, J. K.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell ...

64

Table CE4-1c. Water-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of one ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any ...

65

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of one ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any ...

66

"Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

67

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

68

Table HC9.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

69

Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

70

TableHC10.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

71

TableHC8.1.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

72

"Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

73

TableHC2.12.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

74

TableHC2.7.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

75

TableHC2.11.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

76

TableHC14.1.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

77

"Table HC14.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

78

TableHC1.1.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

79

"Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

80

"Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days.. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

82

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division Census Divisions August Cumulative January through August Normal a 2012 2013 Percent Change Normal a 2012 2013 Percent Change Normal to 2013...

83

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply ...

84

Sustaining Long-Term Energy Savings for a Major Texas State Agency Performance Contracting Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Mental Health and Mental Retardation agency, now part of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, was challenged to deal with regularly deteriorating infrastructure at twentythree large campuses located throughout the state during large statewide budget cuts in 2003. Repair and replacement funding was considerably reduced with costs amounting to more than $250 million. The agency therefore decided to take advantage of new state legislation passed in the prior biennium allowing state agencies to use utility savings performance contracting as a means to replace aging and inefficient equipment. In such contracts, the utility savings will pay for the more efficient equipment cost over a fifteen-year period. The utility savings are measured over the life of the contract in order to ensure the savings stream and maintain the savings guarantee. The agency chose an energy services firm specializing in performance contracting. This company uses a utility bill analysis software tool based on cooling degree-days and heating degree-days. To date, savings have accrued for over two years for the first phase of the project and are presented in this paper for one of the measured electric meters. This paper focuses on the on-going savings stream to demonstrate the importance of continued measurement and verification on a representative meter at the Austin State Hospital located in Austin, Texas. In this paper, the Energy Services Company (ESCO) savings results are compared to savings results calculated from a regression analysis software package using average outdoor air temperature data and actual preand post-retrofit data. The software used as the comparison calculates simple mean, two-parameter (2P), three-parameter (3P) change point, or fourparameter (4P) change point models to be used as the utility baseline. To accurately account for the guaranteed savings, it is necessary to apply detailed as well as practical measurement and verification techniques. The agency continues to work closely with the ESCO to generate a savings persistence program that both parties can effectively put into practice; thus ensuring long-term goals are met.

Culp, C.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C-Factor C-Factor Time rate of steady-state heat flow through the unit area of a material or construction surfaces. Units of C-Factor are Btu/h x ft2 x degrees Fahrenheit. Note that the C-factor does not include soil or air films. CABO The Council of American Building Officials. Cavity Insulation Insulation installed between structural members such as wood studs, metal framing, and Z-clips. CDD Cooling degree day. See "Cooling Degree Days." CDD50 Cooling degree days base 50°F. See "Degree Day Base 50F." CE Combustion efficiency. Ceiling The ceiling requirements apply to portions of the roof and/or ceiling through which heat flows. Ceiling components include the interior surface of flat ceilings below attics, the interior surface of cathedral or vaulted

87

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

88

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2006 The weather through April 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9.3 percent through April. For April alone heating degree days were down 13.8 percent from last year and were 24.0 percent lower than normal. Cooling degree days for April 2006 were 97 percent higher than last year, although April is not a significant month for space heating.

89

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data 9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: Regional degree days for each period are calculated by EIA as contemporaneous period population-weighted averages of state degree day data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations for more information. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with historical data printed in bold; estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region.

90

HYDRONIC BASEBOARD THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH OUTDOOR RESET CONTROL TO ENABLE THE USE OF A CONDENSING BOILER.  

SciTech Connect

Use of condensing boilers in residential heating systems offers the potential for significant improvements in efficiency. For these to operate in a condensing mode the return water temperature needs to be about 10 degrees below the saturation temperature for the flue gas water vapor. This saturation temperature depends on fuel type and excess air and ranges from about 110 F to 135 F. Conventional baseboard hydronic distribution systems are most common and these are designed for water temperatures in the 180 F range, well above the saturation temperature. Operating strategies which may allow these systems to operate in a condensing mode have been considered in the past. In this study an approach to achieving this for a significant part of the heating season has been tested in an instrumented home. The approach involves use of an outdoor reset control which reduces the temperature of the water circulating in the hydronic loop when the outdoor temperature is higher than the design point for the region. Results showed that this strategy allows the boiler to operate in the condensing region for 80% of the winter heating season with oil, 90% with propane, and 95% with gas, based on cumulative degree days. The heating system as tested combines space heating and domestic hot water loads using an indirect, 40 gallon tank with an internal heat exchanger. Tests conducted during the summer months showed that the return water temperature from the domestic hot water tank heat exchanger is always below a temperature which will provide condensing operation of the boiler. In the field tests both the condensing boiler and the conventional, non-condensing boiler were in the test home and each was operated periodically to provide a direct performance comparison.

BUTCHER,T.A.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

Stein, J.R.; Meier, A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monthly Climatology, Meteorology Services, Environmental Sciences...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monthly Climatology Snowfall Precipitation Solar Irradiance Max Temperature Min Temperature Mean Temperature Heating Degree-days Cooling Degree-days Meteorological Extremes Long...

93

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trend & Dummy Building Code Intensity Building Code Construction Share Heating Degree Days Cooling Degree Days Per Capita Income Natural Gas Price

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

U.S. Climate Zone Map - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Climate Zone Map Note: Cooling degree-days (CDD) and heating degree-days (HDD) are explained in the glossary.

95

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

degree-days. ** thousand cubic feet 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2012 2013 2014 Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a) (million barrels per day)...

96

Short communication: Correcting aggregate energy consumption data to account for variability in local weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing need in the atmospheric modeling community for city-scale energy consumption data to estimate the magnitude of waste heat emissions in urban areas. While energy consumption data are widely available at aggregate space and time scales ... Keywords: Anthropogenic heating, Atmospheric modeling, Degree days, Energy models, Load modeling, Urban climate

David J. Sailor; Chittaranjan Vasireddy

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 88338855, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/8833/2013/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions A. Stohl1, Z. Klimont2, S. Eckhardt1, K. Kupiainen2 in this paper). We have calculated daily residential combustion emissions using the heating degree day (HDD that us- ing daily-varying residential combustion emissions and in- troducing gas flaring emissions leads

Meskhidze, Nicholas

98

february2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data While average temperatures prevailed across the majority of the Nation in December 2007, warmer-than-average temperatures in the more heavily populated eastern United States led to a decrease in total heating degree-days for the contiguous U.S. of 3.3 percent below the average for the month of December. However, heating degree days were still 14.5 percent above the level from December 2006, leading to an increase in electricity demand from a year ago. Retail sales of electricity for the month of December 2007 increased 2.1 percent compared to December 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for December 2007 showed a 4.2-percent increase from December 2006 and a 0.8-percent decrease from

99

Direct estimation of the performance of passive structures  

SciTech Connect

Described is an analytical method of computing solar savings fraction for a given load-to-collector ratio of a passive structure in any location. The key to the computation is the use of an algorithm relating the pattern of clear days to the interaction of the thermal storage with transmittted radiation and heat load as well as a correlation of coefficient of performance with the total number of degree days in the heating season and the fraction of possible sun.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

november2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: September 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data September is a transitional month between summer and fall, when decreased electricity use coincides with a decline in cooling demand. In contrast to recent Septembers, which have been warmer than normal, cooling and heating degree days for September 2006 were each within 10 percent of the norm. In September 2006, cooling degree days were 35.0 percent lower than September 2005 and 57.1 percent lower than August 2006. The changes in temperature translated into a 5.2 percent decline in September 2006 net electricity generation when compared to September 2005, and an 18.2 percent decline when compared to August 2006. Similarly, September 2006 retail sales of electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

july2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In May 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above the monthly average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the West, Southwest, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced near normal temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States were 20.8 percent below the average for the month of May and 31.1 percent below a much colder May 2008. Likewise, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 12.4 percent above the average for the month of May and 19.8 percent above May 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 5.0 percent in May 2009 compared to May 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly

102

september2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: July 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the United States had its second hottest July on record due to a blistering heat wave throughout the country. The first seven months of 2006 was also the warmest on record in the Nation since recordkeeping began in 1895. July 2006 cooling degree days were near their historical high and more than 21 percent above normal. Year-to-date cooling degree days through July 2006 were 9.1 percent higher than in 2005. In July 2006 net generation, retail sales and retail prices of electricity all reached new highs. Year-to-date net generation for July 2006 was up 1.3

103

Winter Weather Uncertainty  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 of 15 5 of 15 Notes: Heating Degree Days (HDDs): The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season, despite the cold spell in the Northeast spanning January/February. This was particularly true in November 1999, February and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal (less HDDs means warmer temperatures). Normal temperatures this coming winter would be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year.

104

december2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, October 2007 was the ninth warmest October on record as reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Accordingly, heating degree days were 32.3 percent below the average for the month of October, and 37.2 percent lower than what was recorded in October 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the United States, cooling degree days were 55.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 89.1 percent higher than October 2006. In October 2007, electricity generation was 3.4 percent higher than what was observed in October 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 5.0 percent when compared to October 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to

105

july2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the contiguous U.S., the overall temperature for May 2007 was 2.1ºF (1.2ºC) above the average temperature observed for the month of May over the 1971-2000 time period. This was the 11th warmest May on record, with most of the contiguous U.S. observing warmer-than-normal temperatures except for Texas and South Carolina. Heating degree days for May 2007 were 32.7 percent below the normal observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 21.9 percent lower than what was recorded in May 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the U.S., cooling degree days for May 2007 were 7.7 percent above the 1971-2000 normal, and 2.8 percent higher than what was recorded in May 2006.

106

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-7 to -14% natural gas -15% to -20% fuel oil -15% to -25% natural gas -15% to -33% fuel oil -8.6% in heating degree days (2020) -11.5% in heating degree days (2030) Ruth and Lin...

107

Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the change and development of Egyptian society, Egyptian government has focused its attention of comprehensive development to various directions. One of these attentions is housing, construction and land reclamation in desert and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest of the oases in the westren desert of Egypt. It required the capital of the new wadi (Al Wadi Al Gadeed Government). The climate of this oasis is caricaturized by; aridity, high summer daytime temperature, large diurnal temperature variation, low relative humidity and high solar radiation. In such conditions, man losses his ability to work and to contribute effectively in the development planning due to the high thermal stress affected on him. In designing and planning in this region, it is necessary not only to understand the needs of the people but to create an indoor environment which is suitable for healthy, pleasant, and comfortable to live and work in it. So, efforts have been motivated towards the development of new concepts for building design and urban planning to moderate the rate, direction and magnitudes of heat flow. Also, reduce or if possible eliminate the energy expenditure for environmental control. In order to achieve this, attention has to be focused on building design to improve its thermal performance, which is a function of building form, orientation, location, and materials used and produce comfortable environmental conditions without increasing of energy consumed. This can be valid in three stage, the first one by using the bio-climatic analysis, the 2nd one by the handle and simplified calculation methods (Uvalue, Thermal time constant, and Degree day), and the 3rd one is by the simulation method. The admittance procedure is a technique for estimating cooling/heating load and temperature changes under cyclic conditions by using the thermal characteristics (Y-value, lambda, phi, Sf) of the building structure. It dependent on determining the daily means value and the swing about the mean. The admittance method is used and a computer program is developed to predict the heating and cooling load as well as the environmental air temperature by the author. This study deals with the bio-climatic analysis and thermal performance of building in Kharga Oasis. The results show that, the air catcher, court and Passive cooling systems (evaporative cooling), maintained the indoor climate in the thermal human comfort zone during the hottest period under the effect of climatic conditions of Kharga. Also shading devices, and suitable orientation achieve a harmony building with environment. Using insulating materials in exposed walls and roof save energy by about 60%. The Thermal insulation thicknesses between 0.03-0.05m for exposed walls and 0.05m for exposed roofs are suitable to valid the required thermal resistance in Kharga Oasis according to the Egyptian Residential Buildings Energy Code, ECP 306-2005.

Khalil, M. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free 14-day ahead energy usage forecasts based on the degree day forecasts for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada. The user enters the daily non-weather base load and the usage per degree day weather factor; the tool applies the degree day forecast and displays the total energy usage forecast. Helpful FAQs explain the process and describe various options for the calculation of the base load and weather factor. Historical degree day reports and 14-day ahead degree day forecasts are available from the same site. Keywords degree days, historical weather, mean daily temperature, load calculation, energy simulation Validation/Testing Degree day data provided by AccuWeather.com, updated daily at 0700.

109

Microsoft Word - 2012_sp_04.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations 1 STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations 1 September 11, 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations Average daily temperatures during the summer and winter months, reported as population- weighted cooling degree days (CDDs) and heating degree days (HDDs), respectively, are important in explaining and forecasting the consumption of energy for space cooling and heating in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). 1 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports heating and cooling degree days at the local, state, regional, and national levels. NOAA calculates degree days for

110

Design calculation procedure for passive solar houses at Navy installations in regions with cold climate. Volume I. Preliminary report, April 1980-September 1981  

SciTech Connect

A 'worksheet' approach is used in that the user may work through an example passive solar design by following the text in the report. Included are tables for heating degree days, solar heat gains, building R factors, orientation factors, roof overhang designs, etc. Performance is calculated on a monthly basis. The reports are presented for five geographical regions with content and text format similar, differing only in the appropriate regional factors. Appropriate designs are given for Navy installations in regions with cold climate.

Lumsdaine, M.; Lumsdaine, E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Streamlined energy-savings calculations for heat-island reduction strategies  

SciTech Connect

We have developed summary tables (sorted by heating- and cooling-degree-days) to estimate the potential of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., solar-reflective roofs, shade trees, reflective pavements, and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings. The tables provide estimates of savings for both direct effect (reducing heat gain through the building shell) and indirect effect (reducing the ambient air temperature). In this analysis, we considered three building types that offer the most savings potential : residences, offices, and retail stores. Each building type was characterized in detail by Pre-1980 (old) or 1980+ (new) construction vintage and with natural gas or electricity as heating fuel. We defined prototypical-building characteristics for each building type and simulated the effects of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model and weather data for about 240 locations in the U.S. A statistical analysis of previously completed simulations for five cities was used to estimate the indirect savings. Our simulations included the effect of (1) solar-reflective roofing material on building [direct effect], (2) placement of deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], and (3) ambient cooling achieved by urban reforestation and reflective building surfaces and pavements [indirect effect]. Upon completion of estimating the direct and indirect energy savings for all the selected locations, we integrated the results in tables arranged by heating- and cooling-degree-days. We considered 15 bins for heating-degree-days, and 11 bins for cooling-degree-days. Energy use and savings are presented per 1000 ft2 of roof area. In residences heated with gas and in climates with greater than 1000 cooling-degree-days, the annual electricity savings in Pre-1980 stock ranged from 650 to 1300 kWh/1000ft2; for 1980+ stock savings ranged 300 to 600 kWh/1000 ft2. For residences heated with electricity, the savings ranged from 350 to 1300 kWh/1000ft2 for Pre-1980 stock and 190-600 kWh/1000ft2 for 1980+ stocks. In climates with less than 1000 cooling-degree-days, the electricity savings were not significantly higher than winter heating penalties. For gas-heated office buildings, simulations indicated electricity savings in the range of 1100-1500 kWh/1000ft2 and 360-700 kWh/1000ft2, for Pre-1980 and 1980+ stocks, respectively. For electrically heated office buildings, simulations indicated electricity savings in the range of 700-1400 kWh/1000ft2 and 100-700 kWh/1000ft2, for Pre-1980 and 1980+ stocks, respectively. Similarly, for gas-heated retail store buildings, simulations indicated electricity savings in the range of 1300-1700 kWh/1000ft2 and 370-750 kWh/1000ft2, for Pre-1980 and 1980+ stocks, respectively. For electrically heated retail store buildings, simulations indicated electricity savings in the range of 1200-1700 kWh/1000ft2 and 250-750 kW h/1000ft2, for Pre-1980 and 1980 + stocks, respectively.

Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven J.

2003-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

GEOCITY model: description and application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree-days, population size and density, resource temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. From this input data the model designs the transmission and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system, including the production and disposal of the goethermal water.

McDonald, C.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tebei has very rich solar energy in China and needs heating in winter,but the present energy building design code has no solar correction factor for the overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope for Tebei. Based on the typical year weather data, this paper compares the solar energy of a typical city, Lassa, in Tebei with that of another city that has the same degree-days of heating period, calculates the heating energy for the building, and proposes the solar correction factors for an overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope in Tebei.

Wang, D.; Tang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Climatic indicators for estimating residential heating and cooling loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive data base of residential energy use generated with the DOE-2.1A simulation code provides an opportunity for correlating building loads predicted by an hourly simulation model to commonly used climatic parameters such as heating and cooling degree-days, and to newer parameters such as insolation-days and latent enthalpy-days. The identification of reliable climatic parameters for estimating cooling loads and the incremental loads for individual building components, such as changing ceiling and wall R-values, infiltration rates or window areas is emphasized.

Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Chang, L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Esmate compung and storage requirements as input to NERSC a nd A SCR p lanning f or n ew s ystems; e .g., M ission Need Statements (previous reviews provided esmates for 2014)....

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w n s u o Q A 6 J 9 U This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from (he Superintendent of Documents,...

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Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fellow A category of AOCS membership recognizing achievements in science or unusually important service to the Society.

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National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

63 66 64 74 00 62 58 59 11 P a j a r i t o R o a d Los Alamos Airport Di am o nd D r iv e W e st J e m e z R oad 00 Technical Areas TA-00 TA-02 TA-03 TA-05 TA-06 TA-08 TA-09 TA-11...

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Linited states rjovernment Department of Eneryy Linited states rjovernment Department of Eneryy memorandum DAE: E.115 ? 5 1994 A s 29 2 30 f'n ' y REPLvio W - 4 2 1 (Y. A. Williams. 427-1719) A'ITN OF S U W E t r Uranium Guidelines for the Schnoor Site, Springdale. Pennsylvania L . Price, OR TO This is in response to the request for approval of uranium guidelines for the Schnoor Site of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5. The site. located in western Pennsylvania. was used for uranium machining to support the Manhattan Engineer District during the 1940s. Your staff requested approval of a residual uranium guldeline for 100 picocuries per gram of total uranium, based on a draft supporting analysis by Argonne National Laboratory (AHL). Further, your staff provided a brief analysis that this

120

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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Kae A ntypas NERSC U ser S ervices Lawrence B erkeley N aonal L ab NUG M eeng 15 F ebruary 2 013 Best P racces f or R eading a nd Wring D ata o n H PC S ystems 1 Applicaon I...

122

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Answer key to the "Classy"fication Crossword Answer key to the "Classy"fication Crossword from the September/October 2012 CommuniQué 1 A 2 J U R I S D I C T I O N 3 E X E M 4 P T T O H 5 S 6 S R O U O T 7 A R B U I S I J 8 C R O S 9 T W O E O C N O Y C M E M C D T P 10 D E R I V A T I V E D E 11 C L A S S I F I 12 E R O R A S O R L V C K T C E A E U 13 T F N I I R A T N M N O I S I T E G N P O N T N 14 T W O 15 N S I O N ACROSS: 2 The offices, programs, or elements for which a DC/DD/UCNI RO is authorized to review documents [DOE O

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A A 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w n s u o Q A 6 J 9 U This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from (he Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Telephone orders may he directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Main Order Desk (202)512-1800 FAX: (202)512-2250 8 a.m. lo 4:30 p.m., eastern lime, M-F All mail orders should be directed lo: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as public and academic libraries. Federal. State, local and foreign governments. EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information and for answers to questions on energy statistics, please contact ElA's

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reacções de fusão libertam a energia que ali- reacções de fusão libertam a energia que ali- menta o sol e as estrelas. Para produzir esta energia, os plasmas de alta temperatura devem estar confinados durante um tempo suficientemente longo. Os resultados da investigação em física dos plasmas permitem recriar em laboratório as condições necessárias para a fusão ter- monuclear controlada. O objectivo a longo prazo é o aproveitamento energético, em complemento a outras fontes, para fazer face às necessidades futuras. Sobre um fundo representando o Sol e a Terra, o presente car- taz explora os diferentes temas relativos à fusão: as suas relações com outras formas de energia, a física das reacções de fusão, o confinamento e o aquecimento dos plasmas bem como o avanço da investigação neste

125

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaminated naterial was discovered in the area during an EG&G aerial radiological survey,r and confirmed by a ground-level radio- logical survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanding capabilities with new partnerships In line with the vision outlined in its strategic plan, "Forging the Future - A Ten-Year Strategic Vision" (http:bit.lyJGI-Vision)...

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Delta Darts are rubber-band- powered airplanes constructed of balsa wood and tissue paper. For a 1 materials fee, club members will pro- vide guidance in constructing and fly-...

128

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

debuggers, designed for operating on highly popular, line-oriented languages (C, C++, Java), will operate at too low a level to detect defects with the use of the high-level...

129

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Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

except for items that may be marked "disposition not except for items that may be marked "disposition not A 1 buquerque Operations Office approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. l f no records 3. M I N O R S U B D I V I S I O N are proposed for disposal, the signature of the Archivist is TIEQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY F (See Instructions on reverse) ' i -NERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1. F R O M (Agency or establrshment) Department of Energy . 2. MAJOR SUBDIVISION not required. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 15. TELEPHONE EXT. IDATE I ARCHIVIST OF THE UNITED STATES L E A V E B L A N K ' . . JOB NO. A! l-434- g p-/z D A T E R E C E I V E D f-// 9 / f y NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C 3303a the disposal request. including amendments, is approved

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% - % - A : a 4 \''\ iU BN44443 (T-9n , ' * * ' ' 1 A . I «. « » * ! * . » ' * f * \ \ "1-. EEEMEWTAMY mAMTMCEES f^' I ** ^. \ WEAM iWWEmACTimmS * ¥. p^ t** **€! c. m. Wang 1 * i 3 » 1 * ^ 1 ^1^ '**-' - *# *-*.'-'l / * f ^ *.^,1 f I * ' I '** 8 ! , « «n.l«f %«#nraelijll. HIP ' % '« ! * » * K* I ^ I' *. %IJ 1 1 1 tell ^^«s'l4t«iw€'i^er^: tfmtnisii©!! * § . ' / j '- s* ** { * \ * i ^ t- i -^ V ?*; DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

131

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 ... Average House Square Footage ... United States Cooling Degree Days RKI000:cdd_NewEngland

132

No. 2 Distillate Prices - Residential - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia-----1983-2013: Maryland-----1983-2013: New Jersey----- ... such as spot prices and heating degree days. For all other data, ...

133

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, ... 6.0 Natural Gas Energy Flow,

134

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates ... Solar U.S. CO 2 Emissions ... U.S. Weather Heating Degree Days New England Middle Atlantic East North Central ...

135

TableHC1.1.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. Q Data withheld either because the Relative Standard Error (RSE) was...

136

TableHC2.1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. Q Data withheld either because the Relative Standard Error (RSE) was...

137

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, ... Heating degree days are used in energy analysis as an indicator of space heating energy requirements or use.

138

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in September, with cooling degree days 23 percent above normal for the month. In response to increased air-conditioning demand, electricity generation in Texas during...

139

Oil and Gas Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... API Percent Difference from Annual Average Heating Degree Days Jan-Apr Average Range Lower Operational Inventory =18.5 Million ... Heating demand ...

140

EIA/NASEO Winter Fuels Conference - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating Fuel Stock Cycles. ... Retail Heating Oil Prices Should Be Lower This Year. Heating Degree-Days. Normal Weather Will Bring Higher Demand. Distillate Production.

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141

B  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 7 4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Annual Heating Degree-Days per Fuel Oil Heated Home 1978 to 1982 ... 15 5. Natural Gas Consumption and...

142

Total U.S. Main Space Heating Fuel Used U.S. Using Any Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Heating Degree Days by Main Space Heating Fuel Used, ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Any Fuel Natural Gas Fuel Oil Age of Main Heating ...

143

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

September 2012 PDF | previous editions ... 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, ... 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units,

144

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

September 2012 PDF | previous editions ... 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census ... 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel ...

145

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

major major purpose of the Techni- cal Information Center is to provide the broadest dissemination possi- ble of information DOE'S Research and Reports to business, academic community, contained in Development industry, the and federal, state and local governments. Although a small portion of this report is not reproducible, it is being made available to expedite the availability of information on the research discussed herein. 1 ~&U~ -86-4339 LA-UR--86-4339 DE87 003755 flTL~ ANALySIS OF PICOSECOND PULSEDLASERMELTED GRAPHITE AUWMS). J, Steinbeck, ~. Braunsteln, J. Speck, M. S. I')resselhaus, C. Y. Huang, A. M. Malvezzi, and N. Bloembergen DUBMITTEDTO Procccdings 'f the SympoHlum on Beam-Solid InteractlonaS Uwton, MA, December 1-6, 1986 DISCLAIMER "rhis rcpwI wcc prcpmcd s .wr ummun( of worh qrrwrwrcd hy mn npwy d lhc Unltcd '$lnlu (iovcrnrnd. Nellhcr IIW ( hrikrl Slates

147

A.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A. Federal Acouisition Circular (FAC) 2001-26 1. Electronic Representations and Certifications (Final) (FAR Case 2002-024) Effective Date: January 1. 2005 What is the purpose of this FAR Case? This final rule amends the FAR to eliminate the paper based process for the submission of representations and certifications and introduces an Online Representations and Certifications Application (ORCA) website httg://orca.bgn.gov The final rule requires offerors to: );- Submit representations and certifications (reps. and certs.) electronically via the Business Partner Network (BPN) website; thus, eliminating the need for a paper-based system; );- Update the reps. and certs. as necessary, but at least annually; );- Maintain current and complete reps. and certs.; and

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

:;~'1 :;~'1 ) A / " & - fOL-J/ ~{Z.-- 3> . \ ABANDONMENT O~ILLED HOLES CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA IT LAS lIEGt\S unRARY PROPERTY OF U.S.GOVERNMENT 6NIX & SCISSON, INC. 5105 EAST 15th STRUT TULS .... OKLAHOMA 74112 MARCH 1973 LFENIX & SCISSON. INC. 300 L"'S VEG S BOULEVARD SOUTH L"'S VEG S. NEV"'DA 89101 L U. I. ATOMIC INBROY COlllolllIlON CONTUCT U(26-1I·18 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. , , ABANDONMENT OF DRI LLED HOLES CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA MARCH 1973 This page intentionally left blank Pr'6l?ert~ 0/ U.S. DEPARTMEN~ ENERGY DOE/NV TECHN'C~t:: INFORMATION TABLE OF CONTENTS RE~OU0E e..ENTER las Vas, NV 89193 : . . Page INTRODUCTION A. Objectives

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Revisiting the Long-Term Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division March 2013 This is a pre-print of an article submitted to Energy Policy. Download from emp.lbl.gov The work described in this report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Power Program, within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6103E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

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Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel (Year 1) Final Technical Report October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007 Principle Investigator: Michael Frenkel Report Prepared By: Kenneth Kroenlein National Institute of Standards and Technology October 2007 DE-AI26-06NT42938 K. Kroenlein, V. Diky, R.D. Chirico, A. Kazakov, C.D. Muzny, and M. Frenkel National Institute of Standards and Technology Physical and Chemical Properties Division Thermodynamics Research Center (TRC) 325 Broadway Boulder, CO 80305-3328, USA NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

151

Factors influencing county level household fuelwood use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explains household fuelwood consumption behavior at the county level by linking it to economic and demographic conditions in counties. Using this link, counties are identified where potential fuelwood use problems and benefits are greatest. A probit equation estimates household probability of wood use (percent woodburners in a county heating degree days, household income, nonwood fuel price, fuelwood price, percent forest land, population density, and fraction of households using various types of heating equipment. A linear-in-parameters equation estimates average wood consumed by a woodburner based on county heating degree days, household income, percent forest land, and price of nonwood fuel divided by fuelwood price. Parameters are estimated using fuelwood use data for individual households from a 1908-81 nationwide survey. The probit equation predicts percentage of wood burns well over a wide range of county conditions. The wood consumption equation overpredicts for counties with high income and high population density (over 6000 persons per square mile). The model shows average woodburning per household over all households decreases with increasing population density, and the influence of county economic characteristics varies with density.

Skog, K.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

august2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: June 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since recordkeeping began in 1895. Year-to-date cooling degree days through June 2006 were 11.7% higher than in 2005, and June cooling degree days were 12.7 percent higher than normal. As a result, retail sales of electricity through June were up 1.0 percent year-to-date, and increased 1.1 percent compared to June 2005. The average retail price of electricity was up 11.3 percent year-to-date, largely due to higher fuel prices. Year-to-date net generation through June was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. June 2006 generation was up 0.5 percent compared

153

Table CE3-7c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Cooling Degree-Days (CDD) per Household3 1997 Cooling Degree-Days per Household Total U.S. Households ..... 1,274 775 1,132 2,494 3,547 5.7 No/Don’t Use ...

154

Program Your Thermostat for Fall and Winter Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Your Thermostat for Fall and Winter Savings Program Your Thermostat for Fall and Winter Savings Program Your Thermostat for Fall and Winter Savings October 9, 2012 - 4:17pm Q&A At what temperature do you set your thermostat to save energy and money when it's cold outside? Tell Us Addthis Use a programmable thermostat to automatically turn down the heat at night or when you're away from home. Use a programmable thermostat to automatically turn down the heat at night or when you're away from home. Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL What does this mean for me? Save 5% to 15% a year on your heating bill by setting your thermostat back 10° to 15° for 8 hours at a time. It's been a beautiful fall here in Colorado; 70 and 80 degree days and comfortably cool nights have spoiled us. We haven't had to turn on the heat

155

Climate Zones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of annual precipitation and where one or both of the following occur: A 67°F (19.5°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 3,000 or more hours during the warmest 6 consecutive months of the year; or A 73°F (23°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 1,500 or more

156

Amazing furnace-free house  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 24,450 ft/sub 2/ house is described which has the following features: (1) 100% solar heating in a 6500 degree-day climate; (2) a greenhouse which never drops below 32/sup 0/F; (3) steady fresh air inflow; (4) building costs comparable to conventional homes of the same size; (5) roof solar collector and high temperature attic thermal storage; (6) a Solar Staircase which controls seasonal insolation; (7) a rock bin (100 ton) for low temperature storage; and (8) durability with low maintenance. The design features necessary to obtain the above criteria are discussed as well as the operation of the house for winter and summer use. An air moving system (fan plus ducts) is an essential part of the house. (MJJ)

Shurcliff, W.A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Although natural gas storage inventories are currently below last year's levels, today's "In the news" features a look back at natural gas storage in 2012. This is a part of the new Natural Gas Year in Review series, which will be occasionally featured in the Natural Gas Weekly Update. Natural Gas Year-in-Review: High natural gas inventory last spring limited injections during the 2012 storage injection season Working natural gas storage inventories entered the injection season on March 31, 2012 at 2,477 billion cubic feet (Bcf), following a winter that had a combination of high natural gas production and low heating degree days. This storage volume was the highest amount recorded for that date

158

Winter fuels report, week ending October 6, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topcs: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s, I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Informatoin Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 7, for Newman Power Station, El Paso, TX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance data are given for the month of December, 1981 for a photovoltaic power supply at a Texas power station. Data include: monthly and daily electric energy produced; monthly and daily solar energy received; monthly and daily array efficiency; plots of energy produced as a function of power level, voltage, cell temperature, and hour of the day; monthly and daily electrical energy supplied by the photovoltaic system to the load; daily system availability; monthly and hourly insolation; monthly and hourly ambient temperature; monthly and hourly wind speed; wind direction distribution; heating and cooling degree days; number of freeze/thaw cycles; hourly cell temperature; and a plot of daily data acquisition mode and recording interval. Also included are brief summaries of three site events. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the country during the month of September 2008. The only deviation from normal temperatures occurred in the southern United States as below average temperatures prevailed for the month, while the western United States experienced above average temperatures during September 2008. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 9.7 percent above the average for the month of September, and 11.0 percent below a warmer September 2007. Retail sales of electricity for the month of September 2008 decreased 3.0 percent compared to the warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity observed in September 2007. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for September 2008 showed a 9.1-percent increase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Winter fuels report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

Not Available

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ back to Natural Gas Weekly Update ‹ back to Natural Gas Weekly Update In the News continued - Natural Gas Year in Review: High natural gas inventory last spring limited injections during the 2012 storage injection season Working natural gas storage inventories entered the injection season on March 31, 2012 at 2,477 billion cubic feet (Bcf), following a winter that had a combination of high natural gas production and low heating degree days. This storage volume was the highest amount recorded for that date since the Natural Gas Monthly storage dataset began in 1976, and meant that only 1,762 Bcf of demonstrated peak storage capacity was available for additional injections, versus a five-year average of 2,354 Bcf. This limited the degree to which inventories could increase from April through

163

october2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second month in a row, record warmth was observed throughout a majority of the country while the heavily populated Northeast experienced near average temperatures. Accordingly, cooling degree days for August 2007 were 26.0 percent above the average for the month of August, and 9.2 percent higher than August 2006. August 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were both up when compared to August 2006. Retail sales of electricity were 1.2 percent higher when compared to August 2006. However, residential retail sales of electricity decreased by 0.1 percent compared to August 2006. Generation for electric power was 3.8 percent higher than what was recorded in August

164

1-cc January2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Near normal temperatures prevailed across the contiguous United States in January 2009, marking the fifth straight month that temperatures have been close to average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western United States experienced warmer than normal temperatures while the Northeast and the central United States experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 3.9 percent above the average for the month of January 2009 and 6.8 percent above a warmer January 2008. Even with the colder weather, retail sales of electricity decreased 1.8 percent compared to January 2008. This decrease in January

165

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 1.9 Heating Degree-Days by Census Division Census Divisions October Cumulative July through October Normal a 2012 2013 Percent Change Normal a 2012 2013 Percent Change Normal to 2013 2012 to 2013 Normal to 2013 2012 to 2013 New England Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont ............. 467 355 405 -13 14 657 508 604 -8 19 Middle Atlantic New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania ............................ 399 319 306 -23 -4 526 408 445 -15 9 East North Central Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin ................................. 424 451 399 -6 -12 580 636 579 (s) -9 West North Central Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota ............................ 424 493 455 7 -8 607 671 579 -5 -14 South Atlantic Delaware, Florida,

166

Spring has Sprung - and So Did My Sprinkler System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring has Sprung - and So Did My Sprinkler System Spring has Sprung - and So Did My Sprinkler System Spring has Sprung - and So Did My Sprinkler System April 12, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory While it hasn't even been a month since the official arrival of spring, we've already enjoyed a handful of dry, sunny, 80-degree days. Like in many areas around the country, this time of year also means the start of regular lawn watering. Last week we turned on our sprinkler system for the first time since winterizing it last October. Part of the activation process includes testing each "zone" to ensure the sprinkler heads are working correctly and are only spraying the lawn and plants (not the sidewalk or street). Halfway through the process, I noticed that one of the sprinkler heads

167

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In July 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal. This occurred because many States in the central and eastern part of the country set new records for the coolest July ever in 115 years of record. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 8.4 percent below the average for the month of July and 12.0 percent below a warmer July 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 6.5 percent in July 2009 compared to July 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 12.5-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.9 percent in July 2009 compared to

168

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced near normal temperatures in June 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the South, Southeast, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced below normal temperatures. Cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 4.2 percent above the average for the month of June and 15.9 percent below a much warmer June 2008. In June 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 7.3 percent compared to June 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 14.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

169

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced near normal temperatures in April 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Upper Midwest and parts of the Northwest experienced below average temperatures, while much of the Northeast experienced above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.3 percent above the average for the month of April and 8.5 percent above a much warmer April 2008. In April 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.9 percent compared to April 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 13.6-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period.

170

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data During March 2007, the contiguous U.S. experienced the second warmest March over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 15.7 percent lower than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period, and 16.7 percent lower than March 2006. Despite the unseasonably warm March, retail sales of electricity increased 0.8 percent compared to March 2006, while March 2007 generation of electric power increased 0.9 percent over March 2006. These increases were primarily due to economic growth, evident by a 2.1-percent increase in the real gross domestic product for the U.S. in the first quarter of 2007 over the first quarter of 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for March 2007 showed a 5.0-percent

171

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second straight month, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the contiguous United States in October 2008. On the regional level, temperatures did deviate above normal in the western United States while parts of the South, Southeast, and Northeast experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 63.4 percent above a much warmer October 2007. In October 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.4 percent compared to October 2007, which had warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity. The average U.S. retail price of electricity continued to show an upward trend in October 2008, increasing 9.3

172

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonics Harmonics Voltages and currents at frequencies other than 60 Hz (or 50 Hz where applicable) that cause heating and other detrimental effects in the power system. HDD65 See Heating Degree Day Base 65F Heat Capacity The amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of a given mass 1°F. Numerically, the sum of the products of the mass per unit area of each individual material in the roof, wall, or floor surface multiplied by its individual specific heat. Heat Pump One or more factory-made assemblies that include an indoor conditioning coil, compressor(s) and outdoor coil or refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger, including means to provide both heating and cooling functions. Heat Trace A heating system where the externally applied heat source follows (traces)

173

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Temperatures throughout the contiguous United States were near normal for the fourth straight month in December 2008. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western, northwest, and central United States experienced colder than normal temperatures while much of the Southeast experienced warmer than normal temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.9 percent above the average for the month of December 2008 and 3.0 percent above a warmer December 2007. In December 2008, retail sales of electricity increased 0.7 percent compared to December 2007. For the 12-month period ending December 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 0.3 percent when compared to the previous 12-month period ending December 2007. The average U.S. retail price of

174

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

175

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S.energy and carbon intensity  

SciTech Connect

A recent (1996-2000) acceleration of declines in energy andcarbon intensity in the U.S. remains largely unexplained. This study usesDivisia decomposition and regression to test two candidate explanations -fuel mix and weather. The Divisia method demonstrates that fuel mix doesnot explain the declines in carbon intensity. The fuel mix, both overalland for electricity generation, became slightly more carbon intensiveover the study period (though the slight trend reversed before the end ofthe period). A regression-based correction to the Divisia indices,accounting for variation in heating- and cooling-degree-days, indicatesthat warmer weather accounts for about 30 percent ofthe total declines.This leaves declines of more than 2 percent per year (and an accelerationof more than 1 percent over previous decade) remaining to beexplained.

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Patterns and trends: New York State energy profiles, 1983--1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 1 presents a comparison of energy consumption, selected energy prices, source of petroleum products, and other factors influencing energy demand and expenditures for the US and NYS. Section 2 provides historic data for primary and net energy consumption by fuel type and sector (residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation). Section 3 presents retail level energy price data. Retail energy prices are provided by fuel type for each sector in nominal dollar costs per physical unit and per million Btu. Section 4 presents the estimated expenditure on net energy consumption by sector and fuel type in nominal dollars and in 1997 constant dollars (excluding inflation). Estimated costs were derived by multiplying consumption quantities by their respective prices. Section 5 details sources of selected New York State energy supplies. Section 6 provides several appendices, such as tables on household end-use energy consumption and expenditures, gasoline consumption by country, degree-day, conversion factors and a glossary of energy terms.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: March 2012 Highlights: March 2012 Average natural gas prices at the Henry Hub declined for the eighth straight month leading to a nearly 40% increase in consumption for electricity during March 2012. The warmest March on record for much of the central U.S. drove a 5% decrease in residential retail sales when compared to March 2011. U.S. coal supplies as measured by days of burn were above 80 days for the third straight month in March as declining coal consumption drove coal stockpile increases. Key Indicators Mar 2012 % Change from Mar 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 309,709 -2.9% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.76 1.5% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 282,453 -2.6% Heating Degree-Days 377 -36.4% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 2.22 -45.7% Coal Stocks

178

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2010 December 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In December 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were near normal. However, there was a significant contrast in temperatures across the country as the western United States experienced above average temperatures, while the more densely populated eastern part of the nation experienced temperatures that were significantly below average. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 9.9 percent above the December normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 2.9 percent from December 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.3 percent. For the 12-month period ending December 2010, the average U.S. retail price of

179

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In March 2009, the contiguous United States experienced slightly above average temperatures. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Northwest experienced below average temperatures while the Southwest and Central regions observed above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.9 percent below the average for the month of March and 5.7 percent below a colder March 2008. Retail sales of electricity in March 2009 decreased 3.9 percent compared to March 2008. This decrease in March 2008-to-March 2009 retail sales was caused by the warmer weather observed in March 2009 and by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 12.7 percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity

180

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

january2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, November 2007 was the twenty-fifth warmest November over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 3.3 percent below the average for the month of November, but 11.6 percent higher than what was recorded in a fairly mild November 2006. In November 2007, electricity generation was 1.4 percent higher than what was observed in November 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 2.6 percent when compared to November 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to generation is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas.

182

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2011 January 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in January 2011. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 4.3 percent above the January normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 1.8 percent from January 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 2.9 percent. For the 12-month period ending January 2011, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.1 percent over the previous 12-month period ending January 2010. In January 2011, total electric power generation in the United States increased 0.5 percent compared to January 2010 (the change in electric power generation does not necessarily coincide with the change in retail sales of electricity

183

newhigh  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September, 1999 September, 1999 Highlights What's New This Month Weather Assumptions. Beginning with this issue of the Outlook, we have changed our assumptions about expected weather conditions (degree-days) in the forecast. The new methodology adopts the implications of apparent temperature trends identified in recently published research by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The methodology change is discussed in "The Impact of Temperature Trends on Short-Term Energy Demand," a technical paper released by EIA on September 2, 1999. The net effect of this change is that, all else the same, energy consumption on an annual basis is expected to be about 0.3 percent lower in our short- term forecast than would otherwise have been the case. This result follows from

184

august2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports that warmer- and drier-than-average conditions dominated much of the United States during the first half of 2007. June 2007 was the 23rd warmest June on record, increasing the cooling needs of the residential and commercial customers in the Nation. Cooling degree days for June 2007 were 9.3 percent above the average, but unchanged from June 2006. June 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were little changed from June 2006. Retail sales of electricity for the month of June 2007 increased only 0.2 percent compared to June 2006, while June 2007 generation for electric power was down 0.4 percent. The average U.S. retail price of electricity (all sectors) for June 2007 showed a 2.4-percent increase from

185

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in August 2009, particularly many States in the Central and Upper Midwest. However, above normal temperatures dominated the higher populated regions of the Northeast and Southeast, so on balance, total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 6.6 percent above the average for the month of August. In August 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 2.3 percent compared to August 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.7-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.4 percent in August 2009

186

1-es September2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2010 September 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in September 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 26.5 percent above the September normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 6.1 percent compared to September 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 0.5 percent. For the 12-month period ending September 2010, total sales of electricity increased 3.5 percent over the previous 12-month period ending September 2009. In September 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 5.3 percent compared to September 2009.

187

1-cc August2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2010 August 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in August 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 22.8 percent above the August normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 8.1 percent compared to August 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.0 percent. For the 12-month period ending August 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 0.9 percent over the previous 12-month period ending August 2009. In August 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 7.3 percent compared to August 2009. Over the

188

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climatic Data Center, after "the 11th record warmest December on record in 2006", more typical winter conditions returned, particularly in the Eastern United States, in the latter part of January 2007. For the month, heating degree days were 26.1 percent higher than January 2006, but still 8.9 percent lower than normal. In January 2007, increased demand for winter heating, coupled with economic strength, as observed by growth in industrial production, resulted in a 7.7 percent growth in electricity generation compared to January 2006. (Industrial production increased 1.92

189

january2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data November is typically the month when generation reaches a trough before the winter season heating demand picks up in December. November 2006 was also warmer than normal and the heating degree days were 12.9 percent lower than normal. Consequently, total net generation in November 2006 was down 3.9 percent from October 2006, but was up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Similarly, retail sales of electricity in November 2006 were down 4.8 percent from October 2006, but were up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Year-to-date, through November 2006, total net generation rose 0.3 percent and retail sales of electricity were up 0.4 percent,

190

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2012 | Release Date: November 8, 7, 2012 | Release Date: November 8, 2012 | Next Release: November 15, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Inventories Finish 2012 Storage Injection Season at Record Levels Lower 48 working natural gas inventories as of October 31, 2012 were at an end-of-season record of 3,923 billion cubic feet (Bcf), based off an interpolation of the levels reported in the last two Weekly Natural Gas Storage Reports (which estimated stock levels for October 26 and November 2). This reflects a 3.0 percent year-over-year increase over inventories in 2011, and is 6.8 percent above the five-year average storage levels on October 31 for 2007-2011. The 264 heating degree-days recorded for October 2012 was the highest level

191

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In September 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above normal. This occurred because almost all western States experienced record or near record above average temperatures in September 2009. Total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 7.1 percent above the average for the month of September, although they were 2.9 percent below September 2008. Accordingly, retail sales of electricity decreased by 3.9 percent compared to September 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

192

april2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Flash Estimates of Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: February 2006 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data After an unusually warm January, February weather reverted to a historically more normal seasonal pattern. February 2006 heating degree days were, however, still 8 percent higher than in February 2005, which had been warmer than normal.

193

august2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In June 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 31.0 percent above the June normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 8.0 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity remained relatively unchanged. For the 12-month period ending June 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased by 1.9 percent over the previous 12-month period ending June 2009. Total electric power generation in the United States increased 7.9 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.2 percent, and natural gas generation increased 8.7 percent. Petroleum liquids

194

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well

195

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: August 2011 Highlights: August 2011 Extreme heat in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona drove significant increases in the retail sales of electricity in the Southwest. Wind generation increased in much of the United States, except the middle of the country where total generation declined. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 14% from August 2010. Key indicators Same Month 2010 Year to date Total Net Generation -1% 11% Residential Retail Price -6% 11% Cooling Degree-Days -3% 2% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub -6% -9% Bituminous Coal Stocks -14% -14% Subbituminous Coal Stocks -10% -17% Heat wave drives record demand and wholesale prices in Texas A prolonged August heat wave in Texas stressed available generating capacity and produced very high wholesale prices in the Electric

196

december2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: October 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data As the transition from the summer into the fall season continues, October 2006 total net generation declined 2.9 percent from September 2006 due to declining cooling needs. Similarly, October 2006 retail sales of electricity were down 8.4 percent from September 2006. Comparing October 2006 to October 2005, however, net generation increased by 1.8 percent, due to a cooler October in 2006, leading to higher heating demand. October 2006 heating degree days were up 27.4 percent from October 2005. Year-to-date, through October 2006, both total net generation and retail sales of electricity were up 0.3 percent, compared to the first

197

september2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2010 July 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in July 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 19.9 percent above the July normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 9.5 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.3 percent. For the 12-month period ending July 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 1.4 percent over the previous 12-month period ending July 2009. In July 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 9.2 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.4 percent, and natural gas generation increased 11.4 percent. Petroleum

198

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

199

june2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The overall temperature for the contiguous U.S. during April 2007 was 0.3ºF (0.2ºC) below the average temperature observed for the month of April over the 1971-2000 time period. A record cold outbreak was observed from April 4th to April 10th as record low temperatures were set in 1,200 locations across the contiguous U.S. before warmer weather returned later in the month. This cold snap was evident in the fact that heating degree days were 10.7 percent higher than normal as observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 44.7 percent higher than what was recorded in April 2006. Consequently, retail sales of electricity for the month of April 2007 increased 2.7 percent compared to April 2006, while April 2007

200

Winter Fuels Report for the week ending November 2, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The report is to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for PADD I, II, and III;natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADDs; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city.

1990-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: (1) distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; (2) propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; (3) natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; (4) residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; (5) crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and (6) US total heating degree-days by city.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Winter fuels report, week ending November 16, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs., 12 tabs.

1990-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Degree-Days by Month, 1949-2011 18 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 April May June July August September October 0 100 200 300 400 500 Cooling...

204

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: August 6, 2013 | Next Release Date: September 10, 2013 | ... Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 ; Heating Degree Days U.S. Average ...

205

DOE/EIA-0130(96/08) Distribution Category/UC-950 Natural Gas...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

temperatures have resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by electric utilities. Cooling degree days have been 3 to 15 percent cooler than normal in many eastern cities of...

206

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

were 2 percent less than normal for the week, while also having 20 percent less electric home air conditioning customer weighted cooling degree-days. Overall, the total net...

207

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.10 - Heating Degree-Days by Month 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Normal 1 January 887 728 886 935 778 944 957 917 February 831 655 643 725 670 801 769 732 March 680...

208

1-Flash Estimate September 2005 Final.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report...

209

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... per Household3 1997 Cooling Degree-Days per Household Total U.S. Households ..... 1,274 1,166 1,562 1,010 6.6 No/Don’t Use Air-Conditioning ...

210

Chapter 8, Whole-Building Retrofit with Billing Analysis Evaluation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on all of the post-period dummy variable components, annual normal or TMY heating, andor cooling degree days for participants with measure k and the mean household characteristics...

211

Total U.S. Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment U.S. Using Any ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. 2 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of ...

212

Table AC11. Expenditures Intensity by Equipment Type, 2005 Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

climate zone according to the 30-year average annual degree-days for an appropriate nearby weather station. 2 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of ...

213

Improving 30-Day Great Lakes Ice Cover Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Great Lakes ice cover is important for winter operations and planning activities. Current 30-day forecasts use accumulated freezing degree-days (AFDDs) to identify similar historical events and associated ice cover. The authors ...

Raymond Assel; Sheldon Drobot; Thomas E. Croley II

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes  

SciTech Connect

To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Residential Use of Building Integrated Photo Voltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Integrated Photo Voltaics (BIPVs) are devices which are manufactured to replace building components exposed to sufficient sunlight to generate energy. Photo Voltaic Roof tiles are Building Integrated components which can be used instead of traditional roofing materials. The following thesis is focused on comparing traditional, cheaper asphalt roof tiles with Photo Voltaic (PV) roofing tiles in terms of energy cost savings during their respective Net Present Values. The method used for achieving this is computer simulation made possible by software named "Solar Advisory Model" (SAM), developed by National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL), to simulate energy output and resultant energy costs saved. The simulations have been run on a prototype example of a model of a dwelling unit's roof area. The simulations have been repeated for 35 cities all over the U.S.A. for 5 different climatic zones on the same prototype example of the dwelling unit. Similarly, the roof area being laid with an array of PV roof tiles has been estimated for coverage by traditional asphalt roof shingles by using data from the RS Means construction costs data. The estimated costs associated with the asphalt roof area have been adjusted to a different set of 35 locations from the 5 climatic zones by using the location factor from RS Means. A statistical analysis was done to analyze the data, net present value of roofing materials being the dependent variable versus climatic zones and roofing material as the independent variables. The statistical model also included CDD (Cooling Degree Days) and HDD (Heating Degree Days) as co-variates. The results indicate that NPV (Net Present Value) of BIPV roof is significantly different from that of asphalt roof. Another statistical analysis was done to determine the effect of climatic zones on energy savings due to the use of BIPV roofing. Energy savings (in US$) was used as a dependent variable, and climatic zone as the independent variable. HDD AND CDD were also included in this model as co-variates. The results of this test indicate that both climatic zone and HDD have an effect on total energy savings.

Balabadhrapatruni, Aswini

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the contiguous U.S., the overall temperature for May 2007 was 2.1ºF (1.2ºC) above the average temperature observed for the month of May over the 1971-2000 time period. This was the 11th warmest May on record, with most of the contiguous U.S. observing warmer-than-normal temperatures except for Texas and South Carolina. Heating degree days for May 2007 were 32.7 percent below the normal observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 21.9 percent lower than what was recorded in May 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the U.S., cooling degree days for May 2007 were 7.7 percent above the 1971-2000 normal, and 2.8 percent higher than what was recorded in May 2006. Retail sales of electricity for the month of May 2007 increased 2.0 percent compared to May 2006, while May 2007 generation for electric power was essentially flat, decreasing by 0.3 percent compared to May 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for May 2007 showed a 3.6-percent increase from May 2006 and a 1.4-percent increase from April 2007. For the 12-month period ending May 2007, the U.S. average retail price increased by 6.1 percent over the previous 12-month period ending May 2006. In May 2007, extreme drought conditions continued for areas east of the Mississippi River and in the Far West. Accordingly, conventional hydroelectric generation decreased by 15.1 percent from May 2006. Relative to May 2006, both petroleum liquids and natural gas generation increased in May 2007. Petroleum liquids generation increased by 23.6 percent and natural gas generation increased by 2.3 percent as both fuels are utilized mainly for peak load generation. Nuclear generation for May 2007 increased 12.0 percent from April 2007, as we are now coming out of the time of year where scheduled nuclear plant outages normally occur.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume III. Western United States: TRY data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 24 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Winter fuels report, week ending October 8, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`S; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solar radiation data manual for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Architects and engineers use solar resource information to help design passive solar and daylighting features for buildings. Solar resource information includes data on how much solar radiation and illuminance are available for different window orientations, and how they vary. This manual provides solar radiation and illuminance values for a horizontal window and four vertical windows (facing north, east, south, and west) for 239 stations in the United States and its territories. The solar radiation values are monthly and yearly averages for the period of 1961--1990. Included are values showing the solar radiation incident on the window and the amount transmitted into the living space, with and without exterior shading of the window. Illuminance values are presented r average dismal profiles for 4 months of the year. In addition to the solar radiation and illuminance data, this manual contains tables listing climatic condition such as average temperature, average daily minimum and maximum temperature, record minimum and maxi mum temperature, average heating and cooling degree days, average humidity ratio, average wind speed, an average clearness index. The solar radiation, illuminance, and climatic data a presented in tables. Data for each station are presented on a single page, and the pages are arranged alphabetically by the state or territory two-letter abbreviation. Within a state or territory, the pages are arranged alp betically by city or island.

Marion, W.; Wilcox, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Winter fuels report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Winter fuels report, week ending January 7, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`S; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing, data for heating oil and propane for those States participating, in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating, Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Winter fuels report, week ending January 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`S; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1994-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Winter fuels report. Week ending: December 15, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city. 36 figs., 13 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Winter fuels report. Week ending: March 3, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city. 36 fig., 13 tabs.

NONE

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Winter fuels report, Week ending December 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policy makers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for PADD`s 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumptive for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices. Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Market oriented approach to energy conservation identifying disadvantaged families as target groups for energy assistance programs  

SciTech Connect

Energy expenditures, perceived family well-being, and energy conservation actions were analyzed by family composition and income level. Data were taken from a three state subsample (Arizona, Colorado, and Oregon; N = 2633) of a larger stratified random sample of households in the Western US. Data were collected by mail survey in spring 1981. Self-reported annual energy expenditures were correlated with scores on an Index of Well Being, measuring the extent of cut-backs in several areas of consumption. No significant correlation was found between energy expenditures and the Index of Well Being. The proportion of income spent on residential energy, the energy budget share, however, was significantly correlated with the Index of Well Being. Families were classified according to income and also according to a modernize family-life-cycle (FLC) model, using age of the head of household, marital status, and family size. Significant differences between family types and income groups existed for energy expenditures, the energy budget share, as well as the Index of Well Being. There was no interaction between the two grouping factors, family type and income category, in the case of energy expenditures and scores on the Index of Well Being. A relationship between energy expenditures and climate, measured by heating and cooling degree days, was not found. The inverse relationship between heating and cooling requirements, as well as systematic differences in per unit energy cost appeared to account for this fact.

Marganus, M.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Winter fuels report, week ending October 15, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`S; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Winter fuels report, Week ending December 2, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policy makers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s 1, 2, and 3; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices. Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Does it matter which weather data you use in energy simulations?  

SciTech Connect

Users of energy simulation programs often have a variety of weather data from which to choose--from locally recorded, measured weather data to preselected typical years--a bewildering range of options. In the last two years, several organizations have developed several new typical weather data sets including WYEC2, TMY2, CWEC, and CTZ2. Unfortunately, neither how these new data influence energy simulation results nor how they compare to existing typical data sets or actual weather data is well documented. In this paper, the authors present results from the DOE-2.1E hourly energy simulation program for a prototype office building as influenced by local measured weather data for multiple years and several weather data sets for a set of North American locations. They compare the influence of the various weather data sets on simulated annual energy use and energy costs. Statistics for temperature, solar radiation, and heating and cooling degree days for the different locations and data sets are also presented. Where possible, they explain the variation relative to the different designs used in developing each data set. They also show the variation inherent in actual weather data and how it influences simulation results. Finally, based on these results, they answer the question--does it really matter which weather data you use?

Huang, Y.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Crawley, D.B. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Building Systems

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Winter fuels report. Week ending: October 13, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10-Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city. This report is published weekly by the EIA starting the second week in October 1995 and will continue until the second week in April 1996. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 36 figs., 13 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Winter fuels report, week ending: March 25, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city. The distillate fuel oil and propane supply data are collected and published weekly.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Winter fuels report. Week ending: December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a U.S. level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for PADD`s I,II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the U.S. and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the U.S. and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30 day,and 90 day outlook for temperature and precipitation and U.S. total heating degree-days by city. This report is for the week ending December 31, 1993.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Winter fuels report. Week ending December 10, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a U.S. level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the U.S. and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the U.S. and selected cities; and a 6--10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and U.S. total heating degree-days by city. 37 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Climate influences vegetative and reproductive components of primocane-fruiting red raspberry cultivars  

SciTech Connect

Climatic elements (solar radiation, daylength, water supply, growing degree days (GDD), corn heat units (CHU), soil, and air temperatures) were monitored to determine which elements could account for the variability in yield of primocane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) cultivars. The climatic elements were classed as either having a major or minor influence on the vegetative and reproductive components, based on the frequency of the significance of the multiple regression coefficients. Soil temperature and water supply had a major influence, while daylength, solar radiation, and above ground temperature (i.e., air, GDD, or CHU) had a lesser influence on these components. Soil temperature had the largest influence during April and May, while water supply was equally influential at all times during the season. Air temperature and solar radiation had their largest influence during the period of flower initiation and development (i.e., June and July), while daylength was most influential from June to October. Berry count, weight, and yield had the highest frequency of associations among the climatic elements, indicating the complexity of the association between these yield components and climate. Total number of nodes/cane, length of the fruiting section/cane, and the harvest period showed the fewest number of associations. Not all cultivars responded similarly to changes in their yield components. Autumn Bliss' was less sensitive to climatic variation than either Heritage' or Redwing'. When Redwing' was the anomaly, it was usually related to air or soil temperatures.

Prive, J.P.; Sullivan, J.A.; Proctor, J.T.A. (Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Allen, O.B. (Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

How and why distribution loads vary  

SciTech Connect

Because the maximum-use rates of gas customers having differing appliance combinations do not coincide, a distribution system's peak-hour flow rate depends on the relative proportions of the load contributed by the appliances of all the different types of residential, commercial, and industrial customers. The maximum load on Central Hudson's distribution system coincides with the maximum hourly gas flow rate for all residential space-heating purposes; however, Central Hudson analyzes the peak-hour load of its commercial and industrial customers individually. The gas-system sendout presented as a sendout-duration curve is a convenient way to show how these various loads determine gas requirements and to compare the economics of alternative supply methods. The sendout-duration curve consists of long-term weather data plotted against time intervals of 1-365 days. If the threshold temperature and the heating load per degree-day are known, the curve allows the calculation of both normal and design annual peakshaving quantities.

Haber, D.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2013 | Release Date: May 23, 2, 2013 | Release Date: May 23, 2013 | Next Release: May 30, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: In the News: April-September cooling degree days up 4 percent in revised STEO forecast The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)'s May 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) forecasts 1,273 CDDs for April-September 2013, 4.3 percent more than in the April 2013 STEO, and 1,257 CDDs for April-September 2014, an upward revision of 4.1 percent. Both of these revised totals remain below the 1,390 CDDs recorded during a seasonably warm April-September 2012. Typically, around 90 percent of the CDDs for a given year occur during the April-September period. The May 2013 STEO uses data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Simulation and analysis of district-heating and -cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model, GEOCITY, was developed to study the design and economics of district heating and cooling systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, energy source, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree-days, population size and density, energy supply temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. For district cooling, maximum temperature and cooling degree-hours are required. From this input data the model designs the fluid transport and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY was originally developed to simulate geothermal district heating systems and thus, in addition to the fluid transport and distribution models, it includes a reservoir model to simulate the production of geothermal energy from geothermal reservoirs. The reservoir model can be adapted to simulate the supply of hot water from any other energy source. GEOCITY has been used extensively and has been validated against other design and cost studies. GEOCITY designs the fluid transport and distribution facilities and then calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY can simulate nearly any financial and tax structure through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. Both private and municipal utility systems can be simulated.

Bloomster, C.H.; Fassbender, L.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comparative report: performance of active solar space cooling systems, 1982 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. Five solar cooling systems were monitored in 1982; four of these have absorption chillers and one has a Rankine engine. Of the four absorption chillers, two are directly solar fired and two are boiler fired using solar energy as the preheat to the boiler. The composite data for the five sites covers the period from September 1981 through December 1982. There are 36 site months of data covered in the report. These are all commercial systems with buildings ranging in size from 5000 to 84,000 square feet. There are three evacuated-tube, one flat-plate, and one linear concentrating collector systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data is provided include: Energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; Overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; Hourly building cooling loads; Actual and long-term weather conditions; Collector performance; Chiller performance; Normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and Cooling solar fractions, design and measured. Conclusions and lessons learned from the comparative analysis are presented.

Logee, T.; Kendall, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comparative report: performance of active-solar space-cooling systems, 1981 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. There is comprehensive data on four absorption chiller cooling systems and one Rankine cooling system. Three of these systems, including the Rankine system, demonstrated that solar cooling can be operated efficiently and provide energy savings. Good designs and operating procedures are discussed. Problems which reduce savings are identified. There is also a comparison of solar cooling by absorption, Rankine, and photovoltaic processes. Parameters and performance indices presented include overall system delivered loads, solar fraction of the load, coefficient of performance, energy collected and stored, and various subsystem efficiencies. The comparison of these factors has allowed evaluation of the relative performance of various systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data are provided include: energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; energy savings in terms of dollars; overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; hourly building cooling loads; actual and long-term weather conditions; collector performance; collector area to tons of chiller cooling capacity; chiller performance; normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and cooling solar fractions, design and measured.

Wetzel, P.; Pakkala, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Field test and assessment of thermal energy storage for residential heating  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) heating units can be connected to the utility grid to accept electricity only during utility off-peak periods and yet provide round-the-clock comfort heating. Their use by an increasingly larger part of the electric-heat market could provide economic and oil-saving benefits. A field test was carried out over two full heating seasons in Vermont and Maine at 45 TES sites and 30 control sites heated by electric baseboard heaters. The TES users were billed under applicable time-of-day (TOD) rates. All sites were instrumented, and measurements of inside and outside temperatures and electrical energy consumption for heating were made and recorded every 15 min. Analysis of the data has led to the following findings and conclusions: Overall technical performance of the TES units was good under extreme weather conditions. Annualized energy use was the same for the TES and the control households. Proper sizing of the storage systems is much more important for storage heaters than for nonstorage heaters. TES users were satisfied with performance. Electric-heat bills were much lower for TES users. Occupancy effects were large and caused wide variations in energy consumption on days that had the same number of heating degree-days. The individual building heat loss determined experimentally from an analysis of the actual energy consumption per heating degreeday was 30% to 50% smaller than that determined by a walkthrough energy audit.

Hersh, H.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 12. Climate Zone 4 cross-tabulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responses for Climate Zone 4 to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) are presented. Climate Zone 4 is defined according to the sum of heating and cooling degree days, and amounts to over 8000. A map outlines the four zones. The fifty questions were cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, with a total of 4030 households sampled; 992 househould were sampled in Climate Zone 4. Information on 54 tables is explained. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Model of home heating and calculation of rates of return to household energy conservation investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to find out if households' investments on energy conservation yield expected returns. It first builds a home-heating regression model, then uses the results of the model to calculate the rates of return for households' investments on the energy conservation. The home heating model includes housing characteristics, economic and demographic variables, appliance related variables, and regional dummy variables. Housing characteristic variables are modeled according to the specific physical relationship between the house and its heating requirement. Data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) of 1980-1981 is used for the empirical testing of the model. The model is estimated for single-detached family houses separately for three major home-heating fuel types: electricity, natural gas and fuel oil. Four scenarios are used to calculate rates of return for each household. The results show in the Northern areas the rates of return in most of the cases are a lot higher than market interest rates. In the Western and Southern areas, with few exceptions, the rates of return are lower than market interest rates. The variation of heating degree days and energy prices can affect the rates of return up to 20 percentage points.

Hsueh, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 11. Climate Zone 3 cross-tabulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responses for Climate Zone 3 to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) are presented. Climate Zone 3 is defined according to the sum of heating and cooling degree days, and amounts to 7000 to 7999. A map outlines these four zones. The fifty questions were cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above fall into six categories: dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, with a total of 4030 households sampled. 480 households were sampled in Climate Zone 3. Information on 54 tables is explained. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

251

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

252

Case Study and Energy Performance Optimization for Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas (DCMCCT) is the first hospital in the world to achieve LEED Platinum certification. A major contributor to this certification is an on-site 4.3 Megawatt combined heating, cooling and power plant (CHP) owned and operated by Austin Energy that provides 100% of the hospital’s electricity, chilled water and steam requirements. The operation and efficiency of this plant is not addressed by this paper. The energy efficiency strategies employed for the design of the hospital included exhaust heat recovery, dedicated outside air units, BAS control strategies, lighting controls, and high performance glazing. Preconstruction energy modeling for the hospital was estimated at 17% better performance than an ASHRAE 90.1 compliant design. Energy consumption for the first three months of operation was 75% over the design estimates. Over the past eighteen months, the energy performance of the hospital has tracked within the 5% of the modeled performance while the cooling degree days have been 25% greater than average.

Risner, P. S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Residential energy use and conservation actions: analysis of disaggregate household data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration recently published data they collected from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). NIECS includes detailed information on 4081 individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances therein, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and cost for the April 1978 to March 1979 one-year period. This data set provides a new and valuable resource for analysis. The NIECS data on household energy consumption - total energy use, electricity use, and use of the primary space heating fuel, are summarized and analyzed. The regression equations constructed explain roughly half the variation in energy use among households. These equations contain ten or fewer independent variables, the most important of which are fuel price, year house was built, floor area, and heating degree days. Regression equations were developed that estimate the energy saving achieved by each household based on their recent retrofit actions. These equations predict 20 to 40% of the variation among households. Total annual energy use is the most important determinant of retrofit energy saving; other significant variables include age of household head, household income, year house was built, housing tenure, and proxies for the cost of heating and air conditioning the house.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.; Carney, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 9. Climate Zone 1 cross-tabulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responses for Climate Zone 1 to fifty questions asked during the survey (plus four variables computed from responses to several other questions) are presented. Climate Zone 1, defined according to the sum of heating and cooling degree days, amounts to less than 6000. The fifty questions were cross-tabulated against responses to nine questions which represent key explanatory characteristics of residential energy use. The nine key questions are: means of payment for housing; type of dwelling; year dwelling built; total square-footage of living space; type of fuel for main heating system; combined 1978 income; unit cost of electricity; annual electricity consumption; and annual natural gas consumption. The fifty questions and four computed variables which were cross-tabulated against the above fall into six categories; dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and dwelling characteristics; and insulation. The survey was conducted throughout the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, with a total of 4030 households sampled; 1873 households were sampled in Climate Zone 1. Information in 54 tables is explained. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of multifamily buildings in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the opportunities available to make multifamily housing more affordable by using energy efficiency practices in housing rehabilitation. Use of the energy conservation measures discussed in this report enables developers of multifamily housing to substantially reduce annual energy costs. The reduction in natural gas usage was found to be approximately 10 Btu per square foot per heating degree-day. The study focuses on a number of Chicago multifamily buildings. The buildings were examined to compare energy efficiency measures that are commonly found in multifamily building rehabilitation with the high-energy-efficiency (HE) techniques that are currently available to community developers but are often unused. The HE measures include R-43 insulation in attics, R-19 insulation in exterior walls, low-emissivity coatings on windows, air infiltration sealing, and HE heating systems. The report describes the HE features and their potential benefits for making housing more affordable. It also describes the factors influencing acceptance. This report makes recommendations for expanding cost-effective energy conservation in the multifamily building sector. Among the recommendations are: expand HE rehab and retrofit techniques to multifamily building rehabs in which demolition of the interior structures is not required (moderate rehabs) or buildings are not vacant (e.g., weatherization upgrades); and expand research into the special opportunities for incorporating energy conservation in low-income communities.

Katrakis, J.T.; Knight, P.A.; Cavallo, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Policy and Economic Analysis Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The weather through May 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since record keeping began in 1895. Year-to-date, heating degree days were down 10.2 percent and cooling degree days were up 44.7 percent through May. For May alone heating degree days were down 22.5 percent, and cooling degree days were 38.5 percent higher than last May. Year-to-date net generation through May was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. Because of the advent of the summer cooling season and strong seasonal economic activity, May 2006 generation was up 5.1 percent compared to May 2005, and up 11.5 percent

257

The Relative Effects of U.S. Population Shifts (1930-80) on Potential Heating, Cooling and Water Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on potential heating, cooling and water demand induced by the shift and growth of population from cooler and wetter regions of the country to warmer and drier areas were examined. Heating and cooling degree day totals for each of the ...

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.11 - Cooling Degree-Days by Month 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Normal 1 January 9 15 10 3 8 5 5 ary 4 14 10 12 6 7 5 er 5 9 4 11 5 4 6 9 Febru 8 March 13 21 25 11...

259

Weather Derivatives Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions had always been recognized as one of the most significant factors affecting energy consumption are geared to an index of Cooling Degree Day (CDD) values, days in which energy is used for air conditioning for air conditioning. #12;The problem of weather risk #12;Measuring Monthly Index Values · Monthly HDD

Etherton, Brian J.

260

International Journal of Computer Mathematics Vol. 00, No. 00, February 2008, 135  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of significant physical values such as the electrical consumption, the heating load, or use statistical tools such as the heating and cooling degree-days and their corre- lations with the electrical load. In the same way to the electrical consumption prediction Table 5. Index x real signal y forecasted signal s standard deviation n

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

OFF A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

94 . OFF A u s t r a l O i l C o m p a n y I n c o r p o r a t e d PROJECT RULISON POST-SHOT I ? < V E S T I G . k T I O N S S u m m a r y of & - E n t r y O p e r z t i o n s J a...

262

A-71  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A-80: Salvinia sp Applied to AMD Treatment: Equilibrium Time and Biomass Characterization · A-81: Beyond Hume-Rothery Rules in Al-Based Approximants  ...

263

Publications A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A150-A153. 1995. Antezana, FJ and HY Cheh, Component fugacities in hydrogen-ammonia-propane mixtures. I. The fugacity of hydrogen. Ind. ...

264

Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST - National Institute of Standards and Technology PaaS - Platform as a Service OMB - Office of Management and Budget SaaS - Software as a ...

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Lighthouse.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This lighthouse is a visual anchor from land and sea. Its three concrete towers reach 250 feet tall with a base diameter of 75 feet.… (more)

Weppler, Carly Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Appendix A:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCPI and ICCS ProjeCt faCt SheetS Clean Coal Power InItIatIve InduStrIal Carbon CaPture and SequeStratIon A-1 aPPendIx a: CCPI and ICCS ProjeCt faCt SheetS aPPendIx b: Carbon...

267

Exhibit A, Attachment A-1 Exhibit A Attachment A-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy retrofit incentive programs and tax credits. · Regional priority for program delivery ­ Collaborate with Clean Energy Training Program to support local training programs for skills necessary1 Exhibit A, Attachment A-1 Exhibit A Attachment A-1 Elements of Energy Upgrade California Program

268

+3 a -  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a, N N 0 z L 0 I n Page 5. U tr t3 IL 5 a rb Halon O~tionsTechnlcal W a ~ lng Conference 6-8 May 1997 371 8 Page 6. A Y 0 0 C n ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

A19  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A18: Effect of Local Alendronate Delivery on In Vivo Osteogenesis From PCL ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

270

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 171 10 171 Appendix A Summary of Data Collection and Report Methodology The 2010 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, published data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. The Form EIA-176 is a five-page form consisting of seven

271

i: a  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i: a i: a ,-I > II c I 3 - I' 3 3 t s' j ] ~- i I, 0 0 p 7 ; : 1 _ * ' , i ,..' I $J - y,' n;:*? -jeer , 3potoctio:-; ::. 13 Se?;3 ~escriati:zc G I ii.?j.?J 4 ,fk;e ori,;iz::.? -1 'I>:: : .-I tJ ,, ' "1 .i:Fi!@ai'l..':: pyLt~lG_Yi 70 fiA;ea 53.. t; T ;; 'lyr;JJcbl for tLlo test;; L&i x!-,eq;or :;=pc m*,.,.:* 'Y';;? ,3qJ~os.:.?;: ! I >'. II '3 Qqllipp&d >;it;k sal3i;y .:3agaZ zag veni;ad to ::.a ,I8 JTSCS i:;c:-.Li::::; ri;! c:a J ,.).A " r.x2i;?Lxoti V@ nateria1 i;:~?o13od di 1 :?i-,c *:,negerj5 :L ys.jic!&.-icn: ~p0-p~~~ to expiq-eos o.t ^'3,rlbi81 0," to i;.-.e :C;:el2.1 31a&-lic. An ex~loaio;i 2sezrra.3 in :;.Ic r;eat '

272

i/' A',  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for nuclear material packaging for the safe storage ofnuclear materials outside of engineered contamination barriers. The Office ofHealth, Safety and Security (HSS), with the support of a complex-wide working group, has developed these packaging requirements and included them in a draft Nuclear Material Packaging Manual. This draft Manual has been submitted to the Department's Office ofManagement for distribution through the Directives System for complex-wide review and comment. The draft Manual will be available for a 60-day comment period. In addition, as committed to in the IP, on March 9, 2007, HSS issued a request for the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Nuclear Energy, the Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration to provide, within 120 days, a schedule and funding plan for implementing the Manual requirements at their sites with defense nuclear facilities (enclosed). Included with the request were the draft Manual and a risk ranking methodology for the sites ' use in evaluating their repackaging needs and priorities. These two documents resolve the open items identified in our July 27, 2006, letter to you on this subject. HSS will establish a complex-wide schedule based upon the site-specific schedules received and provide that schedule to the Board as committed to in the IP. Please contact me at (301) 903-3777 or Dr. James O'Brien, ofmy staff, at (30 I) 903-1408 ifyou have questions or comments.

A. J. Eggenberger; Glenn S. Podo Y

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Boy in a Canoe.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation consists of a collection of personal essays about hunting and fishing. Because the essays are narratives and contain dialogue, characterization, description, themes, etc.,… (more)

Parr, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A3.  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District,...

275

A-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By making use of ReaxFF the polymer and the metal oxide were built and .... Lithiation Mechanism of Individual SnO2 Nanowires in a Flooding Geometry.

276

APPENDIX A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Participation in community or business-sponsored civic activities such as joining a search and rescue team or Section J, Appendix I, Page 30 DE-NA0000622 volunteer fire...

277

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 165 Appendix A Summary of Data Collection and Report Methodology The 2006 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Cautionary Note: Number of Residential Consumers There may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial consumers reported for the years presented in this report, 2002 through 2006. EIA collects data on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that

278

Introduction A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction A merica has the technological capacity to change its energy future. There is no reason, for example, why our nation must continue following a path of rising oil imports when billions of barrels of crude oil remain in domestic oil fields. There is no reason why we cannot continue to use our abundant supplies of high-value, low-cost coal when we have the scientific know-how to remove virtually all of its pollutants and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. There is no reason why we cannot turn increasingly to clean-burning natural gas and tap the huge supplies we know exist within our borders. We remain a nation rich in the fuels that have powered economic growth. Today 85 percent of the energy we use to heat our homes and businesses, generate our electricity, and fuel our vehicles comes from coal,

279

SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully solved every puzzle submitted to it since.

GARDNER, P.R.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 - ' A B j a u g j o u o j i d u i n s u o o u o j i d w n s u o o A 6 j 9 u g 6 u u n ) o e j n u e | / \ | U O I ; B U J J O J U | ( 9 8 ) 2 l - 9 0 - V I 3 / 3 O a This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Ordering infor mation and purchase of this and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the EIA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the N'EIC. Addresses and telephone numbers appear below. National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20402 (202) 783-3238 Released for Printing November 18,1988

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Electricity supply, disposition, prices, and emissions A8. Electricity supply, disposition, prices, and emissions (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, prices, and emissions Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Generation by fuel type Electric power sector 1 Power only 2 Coal .................................................................. 1,692 1,478 1,606 1,650 1,652 1,640 1,635 0.4% Petroleum ......................................................... 26 18 15 16 15 15 16 -0.5% Natural gas 3 ...................................................... 804 1,000 1,020 1,135 1,256 1,374 1,471 1.4% Nuclear power ................................................... 790 769 779 779 782 786 811 0.2%

282

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Travel indicators (billion vehicle miles traveled) Light-duty vehicles less than 8,501 pounds .... 2,623 2,662 2,851 2,977 3,138 3,303 3,434 0.9% Commercial light trucks 1 ................................. 62 63 76 83 90 96 103 1.8% Freight trucks greater than 10,000 pounds ..... 252 245 310 339 362 385 411 1.9% (billion seat miles available) Air ................................................................... 982 990 1,064 1,101 1,135 1,165 1,199 0.7%

283

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 78.99 79.28 85.71 89.73 93.56 96.99 100.37 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 28.13 28.24 30.55 32.18 33.98 35.82 37.61 1.0% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.58 6.41 5.70 5.46 5.29 5.14 5.03 -0.9% Total ................................................................. 113.70 113.93 121.96 127.38

284

GRACE A+-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GRACE GRACE A+- hf.)/,, ;i,? Pd i 36 3 Davison Chemical Division ' A. R. Grace & Cc P C. Box 21 17 Baltimore, Maryland 21203 October 9,1978 Dr. William E. Mott Director of Division of Environmental Control Technology Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: Enclosed is the report by our consultant Radiation Management Corporation, concerning the radio- active waste disposal site at our Curtis Bay Plant. Also, attached is our account of the facts pertaining to this site along with the photos and property plat you requested. I trust this information is sufficient to enable you to determine what further investigation will be necessary. If I can provide any additional information please call. Yoys "yYp ,' _ ., ! / ,' ,' ,' \ ,,, .' ,,'

285

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 165 5 165 Appendix A Summary of Data Collection and Report Methodology The 2005 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Cautionary Note: Number of Residential Consumers There may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial consumers reported for the years presented in this report, 2001 through 2005. EIA collects data on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that

286

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption Shipments, prices, and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Value of shipments (billion 2005 dollars) Manufacturing ..................................................... 4,370 4,525 5,735 6,467 7,148 7,784 8,443 2.3% Agriculture, mining, and construction .................. 1,556 1,623 2,226 2,311 2,389 2,457 2,551 1.6% Total ................................................................. 5,926 6,147 7,960 8,778 9,537 10,241 10,994 2.1% Energy prices (2012 dollars per million Btu) Propane .............................................................. 22.63 21.09 20.64 22.06 23.27 24.73 25.84 0.7%

287

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 80.2 80.8 87.1 91.9 96.2 100.8 106.5 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.7 82.4 89.1 93.9 98.2 103.1 108.9 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.2 100.7 98.5 96.7 95.6 94.6 93.9 -0.3%

288

A J  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008-06 2008-06 $&upFP, Acquisition Regulation Date 0211 9/08 [ $ 1 . y A J b J ' : . %wd ACQUISITION LETTER T h ~ s Acquls~tlon Letter Ir Issued under the author~ty ot the DOE and NN9A Procurement kuecut~ves Subject: Domestic and Foreign Procurement Preference Requirements References: FAR Part 25 - Foreign Acquisition DEAR Part 925 - Foreign Acquisition Buy American Act, 41 {J.S.C. 1 O a Miller Act, 40 U.S.C. 3 13 1 et seq Trade Agreements Act, 1 9 U.S.C. 25 12 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective upon issuance. When Does this AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded or canceled. Who is the Point of Contact? Kevin M. Smith, Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, (202)287-1614, or at l i e \ i n . M . S ~ l l i t I ~ ( I I1~1.cioc.go~ .

289

Series A.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.WGJPH-146 ' .WGJPH-146 ' 3 .P' , p3 ."J$i v-e- \. Cont&ning 3 pages Consisting of 0 figuree. Copy No. &of-G copies Series A. , / October 19, 1943 I:. ;I, ' , r;l ?" I ' I' 0 : J. Chipman r'rcro: John P. Howe In Re: Trip to ClYveland, Ohio, October 11, I.943 Thie is to report on the conference held on October 11th in which the pro+. 'g'.*rSs of the coating pork at the Cirasselli Labara*torios ores reviewed. lh05e pToSs;lt were: A. S. I?;ey,uendt; J, C. !'ioodhouse; M. T. Goebel; L. R. kstbrook; .4. Ii. Gray; J. P. Howe; Z. Ft. Keller. YI.,XTFXIP~UTIN~ - A, G. Grcv --- Gray summar ized the progress j;n ,elactropkti:~y, much as is givan ic Yr:e : &.$. .:r : -3 reports of the !l'whnicriL Division. ,. .I c.. , lhe.main points were: ~~'orit i< f:c~!--

290

A3.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States 1983 ...................................... 96.2 89.6 83.9 81.2 76.6 72.6 65.1 60.9 1984 ...................................... 92.7 89.2 83.7 81.3 79.6 70.7 69.6 65.8 1985 ...................................... 88.0 86.3 79.9 77.4 77.3 67.2 62.3 58.2 1986 ......................................

291

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Electricity generating capacity A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Net summer capacity 1 Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 2 Power only 3 Coal ..................................................................... 307.9 301.9 254.9 254.0 254.0 254.0 254.1 -0.6% Oil and natural gas steam 4 .................................. 103.4 99.2 84.9 77.2 70.9 68.7 68.5 -1.3% Combined cycle ................................................... 178.8 186.2 205.1 224.1 259.6 291.0 316.2 1.9% Combustion turbine/diesel ................................... 135.4 136.4 146.3 166.1 180.6 199.5 220.4 1.7% Nuclear power 5 .................................................... 101.5 102.1 97.8 97.8 98.2 98.8 102.0 0.0%

292

Henry A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government & Industry Affairs Government & Industry Affairs 1050 K Street, NW Suite 900 Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 962-8550 April 19, 2012 To: Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-005 From: Ric Erdheim, Senior Counsel, Philips Electronics Re: Ex Parte Communication Participants: Peter Shreve and Ric Erdheim, Philips Electronics Vic Petrolatti, DOE Michael Kido, DOE General Counsel Office Matt Nardotti, Navigant Consulting Discussion: Philips staff asked a series of questions regarding the application of the test procedure and the proposed standard for class I inductive charge battery chargers. 1) Philips asked whether based on statements in the TSD it would be technically feasible for appliances with Ni based batteries to meet the proposed Class 1 (inductive

293

ATTACHMENT A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENHANCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF COAL- ENHANCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF COAL- FIRED POWER PLANTS - DOE'S INNOVATIONS FOR EXISTING PLANTS PROGRAM Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager Innovations for Existing Plants Program National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a set of national priorities that includes the goal to promote secure, competitive, and environmentally responsible energy systems that serve the needs of the public. The Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) program, managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), provides technological solutions to the myriad of environmental issues (air, solid, and water) affecting the existing fleet of coal-based

294

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.51 0.51 0.42 0.40 0.38 0.36 0.35 -1.3% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -2.5% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.53 0.51 0.46 0.41 0.37 0.34 0.31 -1.7% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.05 1.02 0.89 0.82 0.75 0.70 0.66 -1.5%

295

A1.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama............................................. 5,484 6,146 662 12.1 Alaska ................................................ 30,824 31,767 942 3.1 Arizona............................................... 26,692 19,248 -7,444 38.7 Arkansas............................................ 27,880 33,988 6,107 21.9 California............................................ 307,570 318,035 10,465 3.4 Colorado ............................................ 4,788 5,511 722 15.1 Connecticut........................................ 10,075 10,456 381 3.8 Delaware............................................ 21,979 23,370 1,391 6.3 Florida................................................

296

A Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Review of BNL Direct-Wind Superconducting IR Magnet Experience 30th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Luminosity e+e - Collisions October 13-16, 2003 Stanford, California Presented by Brett Parker for the Brookhaven Superconducting Magnet Division * Overview of Past and Current Projects. - HERA-II Luminosity Upgrade IR Magnets. - NLC Superconducting Final Focus Magnets. - BEPC-II Luminosity Upgrade IR Magnets. * Winding Technology Overview. - New Types of "Serpentine" Coil Windings. - Winding Test of BEPC-II Serpentine Coil. * Some Issues Relevant for Super B-Factory. - Cryostat & Warm Bore Allowance. - Quadrupole Coil Layout Options. - Magnetic Length Vs. Slot Length. - Dipole Torque Considerations. " A R e v i e w o f B N L D i r e c t - W i n d Superconducting IR Magnet Experience." HERA-II GO Magnet Installed in H1 BNL Winding Machine Stainless

297

Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

none,

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bates, G.T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December on record in 2006”, more typical winter conditions returned, particularly in the Eastern United States, in the latter part of January 2007. For the month, heating degree days were 26.1 percent higher than January 2006, but still 8.9 percent lower than normal. In January 2007, increased demand for winter heating, coupled with economic strength, as observed by growth in industrial production, resulted in a 7.7 percent growth in electricity generation compared to January 2006. (Industrial production increased 1.92 percent from January 2006 to January 2007.) January 2007 retail sales of electricity increased 3.7 percent when compared to January 2006. The lower growth rate for sales of electricity is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas. These lags were significant this month, given the fact that the latter part of January 2007 was significantly colder than the first part of the month. The average U.S. retail price of electricity in January 2007 showed a 4.3 percent jump from January 2006, and a 2.2 percent increase from December 2006. Electricity generation in January 2007 from all major fuel categories was up from January 2006, with the exception of hydroelectric generation, which was down by 4.7 percent due to lower than normal precipitation in the Northwestern region. Coal generation increased 4.2 percent, natural gas generation increased 41.3 percent, petroleum liquids generation increased 6.9 percent, and nuclear generation was up 2.9 percent. The lower natural gas prices in January 2007, which declined nearly one-third from January 2006, in addition to the colder weather resulted in an unusual surge of natural gas fired generation.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.84ºF (1.02ºC) below the 20th century mean of 34.7ºF (1.5ºC), making it the 34th coldest February in the 1895-2007 record. For the month, heating degree days were 18.6 percent higher than February 2006, and 15.7 percent higher than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period. In February 2007, increased demand for winter heating resulted in a 5.3-percent growth in electricity generation compared to February 2006. February 2007 retail sales of electricity increased 7.6 percent when compared to February 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to generation is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas. The average U.S. retail price of electricity in February 2007 showed a 3.7-percent jump from February 2006, and a 0.2-percent increase from January 2006 Electricity generation in February 2007 from all major fuel categories was up from February 2006, with the exception of hydroelectric generation, which was down 25.7 percent due to significantly lower than normal precipitation observed in the northeastern and northwestern regions of the country. Coal generation increased 2.8 percent, natural gas generation increased 24.0 percent, petroleum liquids generation increased 136.0 percent, and nuclear generation was up 4.2 percent. The significantly higher generation for both natural gas and petroleum liquids, normally associated with peaking generators, can be attributed to the below normal temperatures that were observed in February 2007.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems. An energy study on ten low-income apartments  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O&M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O&M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O&M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O&M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O&M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O&M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O&M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O&M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Use of electricity billing data to determine household energy use fingerprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ways to analyze billing data are discussed. The starting point for these analyses is a method developed at Princeton University. Their Scorekeeping model permits decomposition of total household energy use into its weather- and nonweather-sensitive elements; the weather-sensitive portion is assumed proportional to heating degree days. The Scorekeeping model also allows one to compute weather-adjusted energy consumption for each household based on its billing data and model parameters; this is the model's estimate of annual consumption under long-run weather conditions. The methods discussed here extend the Scorekeeping results to identify additional characteristics of household energy use. In particular, the methods classify households in terms of the intensity with which the particular fuel is used for space heating (primary heating fuel vs supplemental heating fuel vs no heating at all with the fuel). In addition, households that use the particular fuel for air conditioning are identified. In essence, the billing data and model results are used to determine household energy use fingerprints. The billing data and model results can also be used to identify and correct anomalous bills. The automated method discussed here identifies anomalously high or low utility bills, which are then dropped before re-estimation of the Scorekeeping model parameters. Alternatively, a pair of bills may be combined if one is very high and a temporally adjacent bill is very low. The Scorekeeping model is then re-estimated after the two bills are combined into one. The methods permit careful examination and analysis of changes in energy use from one year to another.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.; White, D.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During March 2007, the contiguous U.S. experienced the second warmest March over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 15.7 percent lower than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period, and 16.7 percent lower than March 2006. Despite the unseasonably warm March, retail sales of electricity increased 0.8 percent compared to March 2006, while March 2007 generation of electric power increased 0.9 percent over March 2006. These increases were primarily due to economic growth, evident by a 2.1-percent increase in the real gross domestic product for the U.S. in the first quarter of 2007 over the first quarter of 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for March 2007 showed a 5.0-percent increase from March 2006. For the twelve month period ending March 2007, the U.S. average retail price increased by 7.2 percent over the previous twelve month period ending March 2006. Electricity generation in March 2007 from all major fuel categories saw little change from March 2006. The exception was petroleum liquids which increased 79.3 percent, as petroleum liquid-fired generators drew on reserves that were purchased at lower prices than current petroleum liquid prices. Coal generation in March 2007 decreased 0.9 percent from the previous year, natural gas generation increased 4.4 percent, nuclear generation increased 0.9 percent, and hydroelectric generation was down 2.2 percent from the prior year. In the electric power sector, March 2007 coal stocks were up 5.9 percent from February 2007. The February 2007-to-

Key Indicators Of Generation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Briv un An Entfer (A Letter and a Reply)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTypwip-Tagnya** x _ r x rp^anp px p s ^ n x a*a i n ^n'a a$isnr a&n px 3 D # T O * I s p*anp n P X " nxirr o m i a^a»p^as;' "a T 8 * nsa^n px ? p*anp yas^aTOö sfry-Tnt * Y I w x

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Burn Non-Lignite Coal Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: October 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In October 2010, the contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were above average. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 15.6 percent below the October normal. Retail sales of electricity remained relatively unchanged from October 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.8 percent. For the 12-month period ending October 2010, the average U.S.

306

may2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: March 2006 The weather through March 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9 percent through March. For March alone heating degree days were down 7.8 percent from last year and were 2.2 percent lower than normal. Because of the warmer weather, year-to-date net generation through March was 1.3 percent less than in 2005, and

307

climate | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

climate climate Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

308

A discrete curvature on a planar graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a planar graph derived from a spherical, euclidean or hyperbolic tessellation, one can define a discrete curvature by combinatorial properties, which after embedding the graph in a compact 2d-manifold, becomes the Gaussian curvature.

M. Lorente

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Generalization of A Leibniz Geometrical Theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we present a generalization of a Leibniz's geometrical theorem and an application of it.

Mihaly Bencze; Florin Popovici; Florentin Smarandache

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A fluctuation theorem in a random environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple class of chaotic systems in a random environment is considered and the fluctuation theorem is extended under the assumption of reversibility.

F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; G. Gentile

2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Tree Swaying in a Turbulent Wind: A Scaling Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tentative scaling theory is presented of a tree swaying in a turbulent wind. It is argued that the turbulence of the air within the crown is in the inertial regime, An eddy causes a dynamic bending response of the branches according to a time criterion. The resulting expression for the penetration depth of the wind yields an exponent which is in agreement with that pertaining to the morphology of the tree branches. An energy criterion shows that the dynamics of the branches is basically passive. The possibility of hydrodynamic screening by the leaves is discussed.

Theo Odijk

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Understanding Copyrights: A Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collective Work: A collective work is a work such as a periodical issue, anthology, or encyclopedia in which a number of contributions constituting separate and ...

313

A Bruised Sky Falling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following thesis is a memoir in essays. The narrative is a reflection of memory as a chaotic system. Each essay stands alone as a… (more)

Dotson, Holly

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

app_a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Site Evaluation Process A-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-1 A.1 Introduction A-1 A.2 Methodology A-1 A.3 High-Level Waste Treatment and Interim Storage Site Selection A-3 A.3.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-3 A.3.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-3 A.3.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-3 A.3.4 Evaluation Process A-4 A.3.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-6 A.4 Low-Activity Waste Disposal Site Selection A-6 A.4.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-7 A.4.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-8 A.4.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-8 A.4.4 Evaluation Process A-8 A.4.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-9 A.4.6 Final Selection of a Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility

315

Establishing a Residence for a Relocation Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2010 4, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTORS c:::::::;...-~ l-- -- FROM: SARAH J. ILLA, DIRECTOR OFFICE OF MAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF THE CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER SUBJECT: POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #14: ESTABLISHING A RESIDENCE FOR A RELOCATION INCENTIVE An employee who is relocating to a new commuting area must establish a temporary or permanent residence before s/he is eligible for a payment of a relocation incentive. Neither OPM's regulations or guidance nor GSA's Federal Travel Regulation address this issue. DOE guidance is as follows. This guidance will be incorporated in the DOE Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives as an appendix during the next update. Temporary Residence. a. For a temporary change of station (TeS) of at least 6 months, but not more than 30

316

Is a Patent a Monopoly? — Antitrust Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under patent law, a patent does not give one a monopoly in the sense of having the absolute right to practice the protected invention. It gives one the right to ...

317

A Renaissance Depiction of a Tornado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Renaissance, impressive weather features inspired considerable interest among artists. The depiction of a tornado and other weather features are discussed that appear on a sixteenth-century series of 12 huge tapestries (“Conquest of Tunis”)...

Klaus P. Hoinka; Manuel de Castro

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together using a data communications network. The data communications network optimized for point to point data communications and is characterized by at least two dimensions. The compute nodes are organized into at least one operational group of compute nodes for collective parallel operations of the parallel computer. One compute node of the operational group assigned to be a logical root. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer includes: establishing a Hamiltonian path along all of the compute nodes in at least one plane of the data communications network and in the operational group; and broadcasting, by the logical root to the remaining compute nodes, the logical root's message along the established Hamiltonian path.

Berg, Jeremy E. (Rochester, MN); Faraj, Ahmad A. (Rochester, MN)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for broadcasting a message in a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes connected together using a data communications network. The data communications network optimized for point to point data communications and is characterized by at least two dimensions. The compute nodes are organized into at least one operational group of compute nodes for collective parallel operations of the parallel computer. One compute node of the operational group assigned to be a logical root. Broadcasting a message in a parallel computer includes: establishing a Hamiltonian path along all of the compute nodes in at least one plane of the data communications network and in the operational group; and broadcasting, by the logical root to the remaining compute nodes, the logical root's message along the established Hamiltonian path.

Berg, Jeremy E. (Rochester, MN); Faraj, Ahmad A. (Rochester, MN)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

A security panel with a keypad  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several control panels presently use keypads to enter data. Sometimes panels require secure keypads in that they must prevent others nearby from seeing the information inputted by the keypad. The invention provides a secure keypad, which is easy to use by the user, yet is difficult for a nonuser to see. The invention places the keypad in a cavity, and provides an opening to allow access to the keypad and a window for viewing the keypad.

Banks, W.W. Jr.; Uhlig, F.

1988-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

What is a blister?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is a blister? Name: Craig E Tanner Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What is happening, on a molecular level, when a person gets a blister, for example, from a...

322

A Convective Cell in a Hurricane Rainband  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 10 October 1983 the two NOAA WP-3D aircraft completed a mission designed to provide airborne Doppler radar data for a convective cell embedded in a weak rainband on the trailing side of Hurricane Raymond. Comparisons of the wind field produced ...

G. M. Barnes; J. F. Gamache; M. A. LeMone; G. J. Stossmeister

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Prescriptive Codes: A Cure or a Curse?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prescriptive Codes: A Cure or a Curse? Pat Huelman NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership University of Minnesota Prescriptive Codes: A Cure or a Curse? The Context * Historically, residential building codes have been prescriptive in nature with a strong product bias and reliance on visual inspection and enforcement. * While prescriptive codes may be simpler to implement, easier to verify, and provide certainty for the designer and builder, they tend to be ill-suited to properly prescribe complex, dynamic, and interactive systems. - For further simplicity and clarity, they are usually developed around well-established products and practices. * And this approach inevitably limits or stifles flexibility, innovation, and least-cost solutions.

324

Urbaenerg a S A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urbaenerg a S A Urbaenerg a S A Jump to: navigation, search Name UrbaenergÃ-a S.A. Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28700 Sector Wind energy Product Developing a 50MW Teso Santo wind project near the town of Santiz in Salamanca, Castilla y León. Coordinates 40.4203°, -3.705774° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4203,"lon":-3.705774,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

A New Knot Invariant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A polynomial is presented that models a topological knot in a unique manner. It distinguishes all types of knots including the orientation and has a group theory interpretation. The topologies may be labeled via a number, which upon a base 2 expansion generate the polynomial; the equivalent numbers via Reidemeister moves are grouped into a superset polynomial with coefficients labeling the equivalent knots.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Q&A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Per the definition provided for a Target Requirement, failure to meet a Target Design requirement does NOT make the proposal non-responsive. However, if a requirement...

327

A FISH called WANDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 A FISH called WANDA, 2013 A FISH called WANDA WANDA: A Measurement Tool for ... Stefan Giesler, Freiburg, Germany FISH-new: ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Chumash Pottery Jar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Papers 21. A Chumash Pottery Jar ROBERT H. CRABTREE CLAUDEnote describes a pottery jar associated with a burial in acultures of CHUMASH POTTERY JAR Northern Mexico and the

Crabtree, Robert H; Warren, Claude N

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Proposal for a High-Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This memory is a shared memory to which the input interface, the flow classifier, the APUs, and the scheduler have access. Once a packet is stored in the data memory it is not moved anymore. This way only a pointer to the packet has to be passed between the different processing stages instead of the complete packet, which greatly reduces the internal bandwidth of the ANPE

Active Hardware Architecture; Tilman Wolf; Tilman Wolf

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Building Magazine Article: A House & a Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... solar energy To 120/240 volT power anD pass ... Tw also installed a rubber membrane weather barrier system that helped seal the house. ...

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

A diagnostic model using a clustering scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been recognized that it is a challenging problem to deal with the situation where learners have diverse computing backgrounds and the learning content to be covered is also in the broad coverage. In the case, it’s required to devise a sophisticated ...

Seong Baeg Kim; Kyoung Mi Yang; Cheol Min Kim

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Comprehensive Educator's Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

said. The researchers used a new instrument at NSLS designed to answer key questions about in- triguing observed a new way in which magnetic and electric properties -- which have a long history of ignoring on a computer's hard drive. Ferroelectrics are materials that display a permanent electric polarization -- a set

Mathis, Wayne N.

333

BNL | Louis A. Peña  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louis A. Peña Louis A. Peña Director, Nuclear Chemistry Summer School For more information on this joint DOE and ACS undergraduate program, see: www.bnl.gov/ncss/ Research Interests Radiation Biology Neurobiology/Neuro-oncology Growth Factor/Cytokine Receptors Radiotracer/PET Probe Development Our laboratory investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity. Ionizing radiation can induce cells to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), independent of DNA damage. Toxic effects are mediated by stress signal transduction, such as the JNK/SAPK pathway, and antagonized by AKT/PKB and MAPK/ERK pathways. Our goal is to exploit these pathways develop drugs that protect normal cells or, conversely, sensitize tumor cells. A major focus is on non-neuronal cells of the CNS. This includes

334

Persistence of a pinch in a pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of low-dimensional solid objects combines geometry and physics in unusual ways, exemplified in structures of great utility such as a thin-walled tube that is ubiquitous in nature and technology. Here we provide a particularly surprising consequence of this confluence of geometry and physics in tubular structures: the anomalously large persistence of a localized pinch in an elastic pipe whose effect decays very slowly as an oscillatory exponential with a persistence length that diverges as the thickness of the tube vanishes, which we confirm experimentally. The result is more a consequence of geometry than material properties, and is thus equally applicable to carbon nanotubes as it is to oil pipelines.

L. Mahadevan; A. Vaziri; Moumita Das

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

A. Sandoval-Villalbazo a and R. Maartens b a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brillouin scattering of photons off the density fluctuations in a fluid is potentially important for cosmology. We derive the Brillouin spectral distortion of blackbody radiation, and discuss the possible implications for the cosmic microwave background. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is slightly modified by Brillouin distortion, but only at very long wavelengths. 1

Departmento De Física Y Matemáticas; Lomas Santa; Fe México D. F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Model of Proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I suggest to consider a proton as a body in a state of free precession. Such approach allows to define a proton as periodic system with two rotary degrees of freedom with corresponding frequency ratio and resonances. In result on a power scale the points corresponding to a birth of leptons are designated. The interrelation between masses of leptons is established through a fine structure constant. The given approach is distributed to a nucleus. Other representation is given on the nature of X-rays which connect with a charge of a nucleus and its mass.

Vladislav Shchegolev

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

A A Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A.A. Energy Ltd. A.A. Energy Ltd. Place Nagpur, Maharashtra, India Zip 440 001 Sector Biomass Product Nagpur-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 26.93874°, 83.20292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.93874,"lon":83.20292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

A Billion Digits on a PC - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic data format is a simple fixed point number format, using explicit disk based .... The challenge is to do it on systems that shouldn't be capable of it!

339

A Requirements Analyst's Apprentice: A Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Requirements Analyst's APprentice (RAAP) partially automates the modeling process involved in creating a software requirement. It uses knowledge of the specific domain and general experience regarding software requirements ...

Reubenstein, Howard

340

A Numerical Study of a Rotating Downburst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have revealed that convective storms often contain intense small-scale downdrafts, termed “downbursts,” that are a significant hazard to aviation. These downbursts sometimes possess strong rotation about their vertical axis in ...

David B. Parsons; Morris L. Weisman

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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341

D A T  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- ,c - ,c ., 7 m .i l'lx& Listed P & w . ~ D A T a z J u n e 2 1 , 1 9 6 3 y :' s. R . s a p lrie , k n a g e r O a k ,Ridge o p e r a tio n s O ffice T h e m a terials l& e h b e l o w h a v e b e e n declared e x o e e e by A to m ic8 I,n te r n a tio n a l , a n d organizatlo n a having a n interest in th e s e m a terials a r e a a k e d to co@ ,act M r. J, & Y o u n g o f A to ~ @ ca In te r n a tio n a l a t te l e p h o n e D i a m o n d l-1000, E xtension 1 6 9 1 , or by,writing P . 0 . B o x 3 0 9 , C a tm g a P a r k , California by A u g u s t 1 , 1 9 6 3 . T h e only o h a r g a s for these-itema w o u l d ' b e a h i p p i n g c o a ts, plus th e cost o f returning th e e m p ty shlpping c o n tainers. 1 . 3 .7 kg. 'JO 2 pyzler, ceramic g r a d e , 9 3 % enriched (7 c o n tainers), originated from S N A P 1 9 C .;. critical. - 2 .~ ,1 2 9 .8 kg T H - ~ .IJ% c rods (21) N a K b o n d e d , 9 3 % enriched U , T o m S R E C o r e I e x p e r i m e n tal.

342

A transparent grid filesystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing data management solutions fail to adequately support data management needs at the inter-grid (interoperability) level. We describe a possible solution, a transparent grid filesystem, and consider in detail a challenging use case.

Brian Coghlan; Geoff Quigley; Soha Maad; Gabriele Pierantoni; John Ryan; Eamonn Kenny; David O'Callaghan

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Test Example - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 10, 2000 ... A Test Example. Consider A:=21/6+31/5. The advantage of picking a simple algebraic number for our test is that we can easily precompute the ...

344

Q&A Blog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q&A Blog Participate with us Participate Share your Stories Museum Fan Downloads invisible utility element Q&A Blog Favorite museum Q&A What's the most commonly asked question here...

345

Serve on a Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consider serving on a committee and make a difference to your professional society. Serve on a Committee Volunteer Opportunities aocs Author authors. speakers awards call for papers committees fats global governance inform job listings member memb

346

A Black Hole Levitron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of spatially stabilising four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes kept in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al's multi-center solutions provides a supergravity description of such backgrounds within which a black hole can be trapped in a given volume. This is realised by levitating a black hole over a magnetic dipole base. We comment on how such a construction resembles a mechanical Levitron.

Xerxes D. Arsiwalla; Erik P. Verlinde

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

ARCHITECTURE FOR A COMMUNITY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Architecture for a Community is an architectural project intent on inspiring a sense of community in my hometown, Montpelier, Ohio. Based on the views of… (more)

KANNEL, CHRISTOPHER M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Illinois a La Liette  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

boat. Afterwards you find virgin forests on both sides, consisting of tender walnuts, ash, whitewood (linden), cottonwood, a few maples, and grass, taller in places than a man....

349

Appendix A. Request Letter  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall Appendix A. Request Letter U.S. Energy Information...

350

Copositive Programming – a Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimum of a (not necessarily convex) quadratic function over the standard simplex. ..... the cofactors of the last row are all positive has a positive determinant.

351

Dr. Mark A. Kedzierski  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dr. Kedzierski is applying a fundamental metric that resulted from the refrigerant ... is a co-author of "Condensation" Chapter 15 in Handbook of Heat ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

352

Repurposing a Hydroelectric Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis project explores repurposing a hydroelectric plant along Richmond Virginia's Canal Walk. The building has been redesigned to create a community-oriented space programmed as… (more)

Pritcher, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Studio with a view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berklee College of Music (in Boston) needed a new studio in which to teach stereo mixing and critical listening. A small synthesis lab (adjacent to the main lobby

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Become a Volunteer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Become a Volunteer Participate with us Participate Share your Stories Museum Fan Downloads invisible utility element BECOME A VOLUNTEER Help us spread the word about the cool world...

355

ARM - Become a User  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMBecome a User About Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Facility Documents ARM Management Plan (PDF,...

356

Towards a Neutron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Towards a Neutron Microscope. Summary: ... The novel lens is a Wolter Optic similar in design to the telescope of the CHANDRA x-ray observatory. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

(a,b)-tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition of (a,b)-tree, possibly with links to more information and implementations. NIST. (a,b)-tree. (data structure). ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Gale A. Holmes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Education: Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 1994. MS, Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 1992. ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Documentation for a model: a hierarchical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of documents and their organization according to functional requirements in order to produce information that will facilitate the use of models are described. The authors discuss the role of models in the policy process and of documentation in ... Keywords: model documentation, model evaluation and assessment, policy model utility

Saul I. Gass; Karla L. Hoffman; Richard H. F. Jackson; Lambert S. Joel; Patsy B. Saunders

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A bottle in a freezer Pavel Krejci  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case of water and ice. There is an abundant classical literature on the study of phase transition a formula for the undercooling coefficient in terms of the elasticity constants, latent heat, and the phase of the phase parameter. Finally, we prove some results on the long time behavior of solutions. Key words: Phase

Rocca, Elisabetta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A mobile relational algebra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the dynamic query optimization methods proposed in the literature are centralized. This centralization, in a large-scale environment, generates a bottleneck due to relatively important message exchange on a network with a weak bandwidth and strong ... Keywords: Large scale data distribution, decentralization, dynamic query optimization, mobile agents, performance evaluation

Franck Morvan; Abdelkader Hameurlain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SSMP Annex A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on AppropriationsArmed Services March 2010 Annex A May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy S S S t t t o o o c c c k k k p p p i i i l l l e e e S S S t t t e e e w w w a a a...

363

A. K. Betts,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 a 181. 1 A Camada Limite da Amaznia e Circulaes de Mesoescala A. K. Betts, 1 G. Fisch, 2 C. von Randow, 3 M. A. F. Silva Dias, 4 J. C . P. Cohen, 5 R. da Silva, 6 e D. R....

364

A compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

Manrique, J.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A disintegrating cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple sandwich gravitational wave of the Robinson-Trautman family. This is interpreted as representing a shock wave with a spherical wavefront which propagates into a Minkowski background minus a wedge. (i.e. the background contains a cosmic string.) The deficit angle (the tension) of the string decreases through the gravitational wave, which then ceases. This leaves an expanding spherical region of Minkowski space behind it. The decay of the cosmic string over a finite interval of retarded time may be considered to generate the gravitational wave.

J. B. Griffiths; P. Docherty

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

A true virtual window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research from environmental psychology shows that human well-being suffers in windowless environments in many ways and a window view of nature is psychologically and physiologically beneficial to humans. Current window substitutes, still images and video, lack three dimensional properties necessary for a realistic viewing experience ? primarily motion parallax. We present a new system using a head-coupled display and image-based rendering to simulate a photorealistic artificial window view of nature with motion parallax. Evaluation data obtained from human subjects suggest that the system prototype is a better window substitute than a static image and has significantly more positive effects on observers? moods. The test subjects judged the system prototype as a good simulation of, and acceptable replacement for, a real window, and accorded it much higher ratings for realism and preference than a static image.

Radikovic, Adrijan Silvester

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A conserved Parity Operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry of Nature under a Space Inversion is described by a Parity operator. Contrary to popular belief, the Parity operator is not unique. The choice of the Parity operator requires several arbitrary decisions to be made. It is shown that alternative, equally plausible, choices leads to the definition of a Parity operator that is conserved by the Weak Interactions. The operator commonly known as CP is a more appropriate choice for a Parity operator.

Mark J Hadley

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY Revision 1 10/31/07 Approved by: DOE Records Management Division, IM-23 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY 1. GENERAL. A records inventory is compiling a descriptive list of each record series or system, including the location of the records and any other pertinent data. A records inventory is not a list of each document or each folder. 2. DEFINE THE RECORDS INVENTORY GOAL(S). The goals of a records inventory should be to: a. Gather information for scheduling purposes; b. Prepare for conversion to other media or to identify the volume of classified and/or permanent records in your organization's custody; and c. Identify any existing shortcomings, deficiencies, or problems with

369

Z Prime: A Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an imaginary story that could come to pass involving a detector, a Boson, and good resolution. It was written for Snowmass 2013, as a white paper for the New Physics group. The story describes a scenario in which nature has designated the existence of a Left-Right Symmetric Model Z' at a pole mass of 3 TeV, which is observed by analysers through the dilepton decay channel. Signal and Background samples were generated for a proton-proton collider at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 33 TeV, with enough events to represent a dataset of up to 3000 fb$^{-1}$ for each centre of mass energy. These samples were passed through the Delphes fast simulation framework to produce detector reconstructed events. The story is played out from first hints to a well established new discovery with plentiful data, and attempts to capture the journey and excitement that this entails.

Daniel Hayden; Raymond Brock; Christopher Willis

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

A note on DSR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the physical meaning of Deformed, or Doubly, Special Relativity (DSR). I argue that DSR could be physically relevant in a certain large-distance limit. I consider a concrete physical effect: the gravitational slowing down of time due to the gravitational potential well of a massive-particle, and its effect on the dynamics of the particle itself. I argue that this physical effect can survive in a limit in which gravitation and quantum mechanics can be disregarded, and that taking it into account leads directy to the Girelli-Livine DSR formalism. This provides a physical interpretation to the corresponding 5d spacetime, and a concrete physical derivation of DSR.

Carlo Rovelli

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nozzle for a turbomachine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, and an injection nozzle operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle includes a main body having a first end section that extends to a second end section to define an inner flow path. The injection nozzle further includes an outlet arranged at the second end section of the main body, at least one passage that extends within the main body and is fluidly connected to the outlet, and at least one conduit extending between the inner flow path and the at least one passage.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Melton, Patrick Benedict

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Inflation in a Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a given path with multiple branches, in principle, it can be expected that there are some fork points, where one branch is bifurcated into different branches, or various branches converge into one or several branches. In this paper, it is showed that if there is a web formed by such branches in a given field space, in which each branch can be responsible for a period of slow roll inflation, a multiverse separated by domain wall network will come into being, some of which might corresponds to our observable universe. We discuss this scenario and show possible observations of a given observer at late time.

Sheng Li; Yang Liu; Yun-Song Piao

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

A multiprocessor description language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A language for describing multiprocessor systems is presented. The language, called MPDL, provides a flexible and unambiguous model of concurrency and allows for hierarchical construction of concurrent systems. MPDL encourages the user to encapsulate ...

William T. Overman; Stephen D. Crocker; Vittal Kini

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A distributed Hash table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DHash is a new system that harnesses the storage and network resources of computers distributed across the Internet by providing a wide-area storage service, DHash. DHash frees applications from re-implementing mechanisms ...

Dabek, Frank (Frank Edward), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microgrid: A Conceptual Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to realize the emerging potential of distributed generation is to take a system approach which views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a “microgrid”. During disturbances, the generation and corresponding loads can separate from the distribution system to isolate the microgrid’s load from the disturbance (providing UPS services) without harming the transmission grid’s integrity. This ability to island generation and loads together has a potential to provide a higher local reliability than that provided by the power system as a whole. In this model it is also critical to be able to use the waste heat by placing the sources near the heat load. This implies that a unit can be placed at any point on the electrical system as required by the location of the heat load.

Robert H. Lasseter; Paolo Piagi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from inhalation of uranium mine atmospheres. HEALTH PHYS.07/--/69. A S R C : Uranium mine and laboratory experimentsTest chambers in a dormant uranium mine were monitored to

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A. Richard Baldwin Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society's highest service award. A. Richard Baldwin Award Awards Program achievement aocs application award Awards baldwin distinguished division memorial nomination poster program recognizing research service A. Richard Baldwin Award aocs aw

378

Jennifer A. Salisbury  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Jennifer A. Salisbury received her Juris Doctor from the University of New Mexico’s School of Law. Early in her career, Ms. Salisbury served as Director of Legislation to a United States...

379

A!JG  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c '. - ,' ,- '3, .: . LaGTone, Manager Oak. Ridge Operations office As a result of the House-Senate Conference Report and the Energy and W a ter Appropriations Act for FY 1984,...

380

A Molecular Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tale of Two States and More: Modeling of New Generation of Lattice Stability from Zero ... Analysis of Nano Fluid Using CFD-A Hybrid Approach for Cooling Purpose ... Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Grain Boundary Free Energy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Molecular Dynamic Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tale of Two States and More: Modeling of New Generation of Lattice Stability from Zero ... Analysis of Nano Fluid Using CFD-A Hybrid Approach for Cooling Purpose ... Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Grain Boundary Free Energy and

382

A. Materials for Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A13: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery ... A26; Effect of Atomic Layer Deposited Thin TiO2 Layers on the Performance of ...

383

Still Have a Question?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element Still Have a...

384

A U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS Railcar Platform Granted US Patent AIKEN, S.C. (April 22, 2013) - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions has been awarded a US Patent for a unique ladder attachment platform. This...

385

A View from Elsewhere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arcadia Project Review - A View From Elsewhere Tony Hirst Department of Communication and Systems, The Open University a.j.hirst@open.ac.uk Summary This report provides an overview of activities carried out during Michaelmas Term...

Hirst, Tony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

SCHEDULE: a hypercube implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCHEDULE, a tool for developing portable parallel Fortran programs, was converted for use on the Ncube hypercube. Developed at Argonne National Laboratory by Dongarra and Sorensen, SCHEDULE was originally intended for a shared memory system such as the ...

A. L. Beguelin

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biology as a career  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology as a career Name: Heather Skeba Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: When I get into the real world I was thinking of being a biologist. How much schooling do you...

388

A Patent Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the profits on the sale of a particular piece of apparatus or a product according to the percentage of cost or sale price attributable to the patented invention and ...

389

A New Thermocouple Thermometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate thermometer with fast response and high reliability has been designed and built by using a very fine copper-iron thermocouple coated with sputtered gold, and a newly available ultralow drift operational amplifier.

Yasuo Sugamura; James W. Telford

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A game of chess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis begins with a critical Introduction, which defines the genre of the short story and examines my work in light of this definition. The Introduction is followed by a collection of four stories.

Gayle, Chad A

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

When is a dose not a dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although an enormous amount of progress has been made in the fields of radiation protection and risk assessment, a number of significant problems remain. The one problem which transcends all the rest, and which has been subject to considerable misunderstanding, involves what has come to be known as the 'linear non-threshold hypothesis', or 'linear hypothesis'. Particularly troublesome has been the interpretation that any amount of radiation can cause an increase in the excess incidence of cancer. The linear hypothesis has dominated radiation protection philosophy for more than three decades, with enormous financial, societal and political impacts and has engendered an almost morbid fear of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation in large segments of the population. This document presents a different interpretation of the linear hypothesis. The basis for this view lies in the evolution of dose-response functions, particularly with respect to their use initially in the context of early acute effects, and then for the late effects, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. 11 refs., 4 figs. (MHB)

Bond, V.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Daniel A. Hitchcock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dr. Daniel A. Hitchcock is the acting Associate Director for Advanced Scientific Computing in the Office of Science.

393

Reality or a Dream?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Carburizing nearly without Process Gas Consumption – Reality or a Dream? Geopolymer Products from Jordan for Sustainability of the Environment.

394

Dr. A. Hunter Fanney  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Insulations and Substitutes for Residential and Commercial Construction." Dr. Fanney hold a patent for an innovative solar water heating system. ...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Complexity: A Guided Tour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexity: A Guided Tour. Purpose: As science probes the nature of life, society, and technology ever more closely, what ...

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

A computer music instrumentarium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6. COMPUTERS: To Solder or Not toMusic Models : A Computer Music Instrumentarium . . . . .Interactive Computer Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Oliver La Rosa, Jaime Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Community Divided  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case is based in a small Midwestern school district. It was developed for use in a doctoral level course in Public Engagement and has been revised as a result of student feedback. As developed for this course, the concept of public engagement is ...

Ellen Bueschel

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Catalogue of a Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalogue of a Loss is a collection of sixty-two prose poems written within the past year and half. The work is printed on 4x6 cards. Each poem may be read individually from a single card or the poems can be read in ...

Berger, Larisa (Larisa A.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A dc transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although conventional transformers are ac, a device that may be termed a dc transformer has been constructed by using superconductors. To provide an understanding of how such a transformer would operate, some of the properties of type I and type II superconductors ...

I. Giaever

1966-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Striped Holographic Superconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inhomogeneous solutions of a 3+1-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-scalar theory. Our results provide a holographic model of superconductivity in the presence of a charge density wave sourced by a modulated chemical potential. We find that below a critical temperature superconducting stripes develop. We show that they are thermodynamically favored over the normal state by computing the grand canonical potential. We investigate the dependence of the critical temperature on the modulation's wave vector, which characterizes the inhomogeneity. We find that it is qualitatively similar to that expected for a weakly coupled BCS theory, but we point out a quantitative difference. Finally, we use our solutions to compute the conductivity along the direction of the stripes.

Raphael Flauger; Enrico Pajer; Stefanos Papanikolaou

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A regulated magnetron pulser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

Rose, C.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop. In 1996 Dupont management announced that it was considering moving the facility out of Philadelphia primarily due to the high operating cost compared to where they were considering relocating. The city officials responded by bringing the local electric and gas utilities to the table to negotiate better rates for Dupont. Trigen also requested the opportunity to propose energy savings opportunities, and dedicated a team of engineers to review Dupont's steam system to determine if energy savings could be realized within the steam system infrastructure. As part of a proposal to help Dupont reduce energy costs while continuing to use Trigen's steam, Trigen recommended modifications to increase energy efficiency, reduce steam system maintenance costs and implement small scale cogeneration. These recommendations included reducing the medium pressure steam distribution to low pressure, eliminating the medium pressure to low pressure reducing stations, installing a back pressure steam turbine generator, and preheating the domestic hot water with the condensate. Dupont engineers evaluated these recommended modifications and chose to implement most of them. An analysis of Dupont's past steam consumption revealed that the steam distribution system sizing was acceptable if the steam pressure was reduced from medium to low. After a test of the system and a few modifications, Dupont reduced the steam distribution system to low pressure. Energy efficiency is improved since the heat transfer losses at the low pressure are less than at the medium pressure distribution. Additionally, steam system maintenance will be significantly reduced since 12 pressure reducing stations are eliminated. With the steam pressure reduction now occurring at one location, the opportunity existed to install a backpressure turbine generator adjacent to the primary pressure reducing station. The analysis of Dupont's steam and electric load profiles demonstrated that cost savings could be realized with the installation of 150 kW of self-generation. There were a few obstacles, including meeting the utility's parallel operation requirements, that made this installation challenging. Over two years have passed since the modifications were implemented, and although cost savings are difficult to quantify since process steam use has increased, the comparison of steam consumption to heating degree days shows a reducing trend. Dupont's willingness to tackle energy conservation projects without adversely affecting their process conditions can be an example to other industrial steam users.

Larkin, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Analysis of fuel savings associated with fuel computers in multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research was undertaken to quantify the energy savings associated with the installation of a direct monitoring control system (DMC) on steam heating plants in multi-family buildings located in the New York City metropolitan area. The primary objective was to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings employing a DMC relative to those using the more common indirect monitoring control system (IMC) and if so, to what extent. The analysis compares the fuel consumption of 442 buildings over 12 months. The type of control system installed in these buildings was either a Heat-Timer (identified as IMC equipment) or a computer-based unit (identified as DMC equipment). IMC provides control by running the boiler for longer or shorter periods depending on outdoor temperature. This system is termed indirect because there is no feedback from indoor (apartment) temperatures to the control. DMC provides control by sensing apartment temperatures. In a typical multifamily building, sensors are hard wired to between 5 and 10 apartments sensors. The annual savings and simple payback were computed for the DMC buildings by comparing annual fuel consumption among the building groupings. The comparison is based on mean BTUs per degree day consumed annually and normalized for building characteristics, such as, equipment maintenance and boiler steady state efficiency as well as weather conditions. The average annual energy consumption for the DMC buildings was 14.1 percent less than the annual energy consumption for the IMC buildings. This represents 3,826 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil or $2,295 at a price of $0.60 per gallon. A base DMC system costs from $8,400 to $10,000 installed depending on the number of sensors and complexity of the system. The standard IMC system costs from $2,000 to $3,000 installed. Based on this analysis the average simple payback is 2.9 or 4.0 years depending on either an upgrade from IMC to DMC (4.0 years) or a new installation (2.9) years.

McNamara, M.; Anderson, J.; Huggins, E. [EME Group, New York, NY (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A statistical mechanical curiosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike most other laws of nature, the second law of thermodynamics is according to Boltzmann statistical in nature, meaning that its reliability arises from the vast number of particles present in macroscopic systems. This means that such systems will lead towards their most likely state, that is, the one with the most homogeneous probability distribution. But Boltzmann states that entropy decreasing processes can occur (without doing any work), it is just very improbable. It is therefore not impossible, in principle, for all 6 x 10^23 atoms in a mole of a gas to spontaneously move to one half of a container; it is only fantastically unlikely. A similar idea has been applied on a human cell. All somatic cells seem to age and deteriorate in unfavorable conditions. If the aging process is defined as the accumulation of dysfunctional polymers resulting from among other things chemical bond breakage, where polymers aggregate into harmful arrangements, spreading randomly out in the cell, leading to an altered function, then it also applies that there will be a difference in entropy between an individual of, say, 20 years, and the same individual 80 years old. The goal of this article is to demonstrate that the second law does not tell us that the cell necessarily must go toward a high entropy state and stay that way, but that it is possible according to statistical mechanics for an old cell to experience a return to a younger state. We find the probability of this spontaneous return to a more ordered state to be expressed by P = 10^(-202)^(-889). In spite of this number, it does show that a reversal of the aging process is not prohibited by nature. There is a theoretical possibility of rejuvenation. Whether this will ever become a practical reality is another matter.

Ian von Hegner

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Attachment 3.a. Part A Page 1 of 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Page 1 of 6 A Page 1 of 6 Section A - General Terms and Conditions ................................................................................................ 2 A.1. Purpose .................................................................................................................................................. 2 A.2. Authority ............................................................................................................................................... 2 A.3. Part A Identifier .................................................................................................................................... 2 A.4. Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

406

TESTIMONY OF ARPAD A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ARPAD A. BERGH, OF ARPAD A. BERGH, PRESIDENT OF THE OPTOELECTRONICS INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION to the SENATE COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES JULY 18, 2001 "S. 1166 - THE NEXT GENERATION LIGHTING INITIATIVE ACT" * * * On behalf of the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association ("OIDA"), I would like to offer support for a government-industry initiative to develop a new form of energy efficient lighting based on solid state optoelectronics. In particular, OIDA en- dorses legislation recently introduced by Senators Jeff Bingaman and Mike DeWine -- S. 1166 -- that would establish a government-industry initiative to accelerate the develop- ment of solid state lighting. The "Next Generation Lighting Initiative Act" would create a 10-year program for

407

A-Team Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 A-Team Report The Applications Team is a joint venture of the Energy & Environment Division and the Lab's Facilities/In-House Energy Management Section. Its goals are to speed the transfer of new and underused energy-efficient technology for buildings, to support demonstrations of these technologies in a variety of facilities showing how they can be adopted widely, and to improve communication between the Lab and the users of efficient building technologies, from engineering construction firms to building managers. The A-Team is involved in a growing number of chiller plant efficiency projects aimed at demonstrating how cooling systems in many settings can be made more efficient. In addition to the projects described in the cover story, A-Team efforts in

408

A NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for producing thermoelectric power is described. The reactor core comprises a series of thermoelectric assemblies, each assembly including fissionable fuel as an active element to form a hot junction and a thermocouple. The assemblies are disposed parallel to each other to form spaces and means are included for Introducing an electrically conductive coolant between the assemblies to form cold junctions of the thermocouples. An electromotive force is developed across the entire series of the thermoelectric assemblies due to fission heat generated in the fuel causing a current to flow perpendicular to the flow of coolant and is distributed to a load outside of the reactor by means of bus bars electrically connected to the outermost thermoelectric assembly.

Luebke, E.A.; Vandenberg, L.B.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Linear collider: a preview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

Wiedemann, H.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Lattice for Persistence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intrinsic connection between lattice theory and topology is fairly well established, For instance, the collection of open subsets of a topological subspace always forms a distributive lattice. Persistent homology has been one of the most prominent areas of research in computational topology in the past 20 years. In this paper we will introduce an alternative interpretation of persistence based on the study of the order structure of its correspondent lattice. Its algorithmic construction leads to two operations on homology groups which describe a diagram of spaces as a complete Heyting algebra, which is a generalization of a Boolean algebra. We investigate some of the properties of this lattice, the algorithmic implications of it, and some possible applications.

Primož Škraba; João Pita Costa

411

Winter fuels report. Week ending, January 26, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: (1) distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a U.S. level; (2) propane net production, imports and stocks on a U.S. level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; (3) natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the U.S. and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; (4) residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; (5) crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the U.S. and selected cities; and (6) a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and U.S. total heating degree-days by city. The distillate fuel oil and propane supply data are collected and published weekly. The data are based on company submissions for the week ending 7:00 a.m. for the preceding Friday. Weekly data for distillate fuel oil are also published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report. Monthly data for distillate fuel oil and propane are published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly. The residential pricing information is collected by the EIA and the State Energy Offices on a semimonthly basis for the EIA/State Heating Oil and Propane Program. The wholesale price comparison data are collected daily and are published weekly. Residential heating fuel prices are derived from price quotes for home delivery of No. 2 fuel oil and propane. As such, they reflect prices in effect on the dates shown. Wholesale heating oil and propane prices are estimates using a sample of terminal quotes to represent average State prices on the dates given.

NONE

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

Bayesian Analysis of Savings from Retrofit Projects  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of savings from retrofit projects depend on statistical models, but because of the complicated analysis required to determine the uncertainty of the estimates, savings uncertainty is not often considered. Numerous simplified methods have been proposed to determine savings uncertainty, but in all but the simplest cases, these methods provide approximate results only. The objective of this paper is to show that Bayesian inference provides a consistent framework for estimating savings and savings uncertainty in retrofit projects. We review the mathematical background of Bayesian inference and Bayesian regression, and present two examples of estimating savings and savings uncertainty in retrofit projects. The first is a simple case where both baseline and post-retrofit monthly natural gas use can be modeled as a linear function of monthly heating degree days. The Efficiency Valuation Organization (EVO 2007) defines two methods of determining savings in such cases: reporting period savings, which is an estimate of the savings during the post-retrofit period; and normalized savings, which is an estimate of the savings that would be obtained during a typical year at the project site. For reporting period savings, classical statistical analysis provides exact analytic results for both savings and savings uncertainty in this case. We use Bayesian analysis to calculate reporting period savings and savings uncertainty and show that the results are identical to the analytical results. For normalized savings, the literature contains no exact expression for the uncertainty of normalized savings; we use Bayesian inference to calculate this quantity for the first time, and compare it with the result of an approximate formula that has been proposed. The second example concerns a problem where the baseline data exhibit nonlinearity and serial autocorrelation, both of which are common in real-world retrofit projects. No analytical solutions exist to determine savings or savings uncertainty in this situation, but several simplified formulas have been proposed. We model the data using a 5-parameter model with first-order autoregressive errors, and use Bayesian inference to develop distributions for the model parameters and for the reporting period savings, which allows us to determine the savings uncertainty. We find the energy savings to be about 5% lower than the result obtained by ignoring the autocorrelation. In addition, the Bayesian analysis finds the savings uncertainty to be narrower than the approximate uncertainty calculated using the simplified formula. These results show that Bayesian inference can be used to determine savings and savings uncertainty for a wide variety of real-world problems.

Im, Piljae [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Quantum Bousso Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bousso bound requires that one quarter the area of a closed codimension two spacelike surface exceeds the entropy flux across a certain lightsheet terminating on the surface. The bound can be violated by quantum effects such as Hawking radiation. It is proposed that at the quantum level the bound be modified by adding to the area the quantum entanglement entropy across the surface. The validity of this quantum Bousso bound is proven in a two-dimensional large N dilaton gravity theory.

Andrew Strominger; David Thompson

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Accountability as a service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that accountability be a first-class network service, independent of addressing and routing. We design a scheme for allowing accountability services, rather than connectivity-providing ISPs, to vouch for traffic, allowing victims to report abuse, filter abusive traffic, and isolate malicious senders. We discuss how accountability services may evolve, how they may facilitate new applications, and the implications of shifting the burden of network policing to a dedicated service. 1

Adam Bender; Neil Spring; Dave Levin; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A New Integral Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Bauer's expansion and properties of spherical Bessel and Legender functions, we deduce a new transform and briefly indicate its use.

B. G. Sidharth

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

A U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

changed our approach to problems," said Dr. Terry Michalske, Director of SRNL. "Public-private collaborations such as this one are important to the mission of a National...

417

A Phenomenal Spring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and insects are more than a month ahead of normal. Bluebirds, meadow larks and redwing blackbirds were seen on February 27. Skunk cabbage bloomed in Black Partridge forest...

418

Towards a feminist funny.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chelsea Handler is a comedian and host of the TV show Chelsea Lately. She has been successful in the late night comedy talk show genre… (more)

Walleser, Lauren.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Jeffrey A. Fagan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SWCNTs are an exciting nanomaterial class with significant potential for use in a wide range of applications from solar energy to nano-medicine, to ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Dr. Richard A. Perkins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... His thesis work focused on the thermal conductivity of synthetic fuels from coal and included development of a unique transient-hot-wire apparatus ...

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Convenient Small Osmometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The instrument described here is a modification of the apparatus described by Sands and Johnson ... Finally, the screw plug is screwed in hand tight. ...

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

A-Team Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alcatraz has more than enough wind to capture its energy in a power generation system, wind turbines in all potential locations are visible to tour boats. However, the...

423

Toward a sustainable UGA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sustainability of the college campus is a growing trend and complex pursuit. While The University of Georgia is making strides in several areas of campus… (more)

Kirsche, Kevin Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Baldrige Success Story  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laptops, cell phones, the Internet, eBooks, iPads—and the list goes on— signify a revolution in how society gathers and distributes information. ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

Making a Material Difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 3, 2008 ... Met. Trans. Home .... there is any doubt that the TMS community has a distinct advantage in the area of energy usage and efficiency,” he said.

426

a r ! t  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for nonconventional energy was less than 1 billion and was almost entirely for oil shale, including a 10 The Arabian American Oil Company (Aramco) consists of Exxon, Mobil,...

427

Dennis A. Smith  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dennis A. Smith is the National Clean Cities Director in the Vehicle Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the Department of Energy.

428

Arsenic immunotoxicity: a review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and respiratory tract infections (RTI) [26,29,35]. A recentmorbidity and male infant RTI [77]. These findings areand 20% in infant lower RTI and diarrhea, respect- ively,

Dangleben, Nygerma L; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Martyn T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Legacy of Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Over more than three decades, FE research and development has established a legacy of significant achievement and return of value and benefits for the public funds invested.

430

Dr. Jack A. Stone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Latest Publications. Weak value thermostat with 0.2 mK precision; Performing three dimensional measurements on micro-scale features using a ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

A LUNAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A concept of a nuclear power plant to be assembled on earth and operated on the moon is presented. The two principal design objectives are reliability and high specific power. Wherever there is an incompatibility between these two objectives, the decision favors reliability. The design is based on the premise that the power plant must be designed on the basis of current technology and with a minimum amount of research and development. The principal components consist of a fast reactor in a direct cycle with a mercury-vapor turbine. The high- frequency generator, hydrogen compressor for the generator cooling system, mercury-recirculating pump, and condensate pump are on an extension of the turbine shaft. Ths mercury vapor is condensed and the hydrogen cooled in wing radiators. The reactor is of a construction quite similar to EBR-I Mark IlI for which there is a large amount of operating experience. The radiator is a vertical tube-and-fin type built in concentric cylindrical sections of increseing diameter. The curved headers are connected by swivel joints so that, upon arrival, the radiator can be quickly unfolded from the compact cylindrical package it formed during transportation. (auth)

Armstrong, R.H.; Carter, J.C.; Hummel, H.H.; Janicke, M.J.; Marchaterre, J.F.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A User's Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Then and Now A User’s Manual The rationale for Part II isIn addition to this “User’s Manual,” Part II contains three

Ascoli, Albert Russell; Starn, Randolph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Ch7_Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... enable Prototypes and pilot models of flat ... Distributed Multi-agent-based optimization “Real-time Control ... a generic mathematical model of process ...

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

Choosing a Residential Window  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choosing a Residential Window LBNLs Windows and Daylighting Group provides technical support to government and industry efforts to help consumers and builders choose...

435

Stephen A. Klein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. This Speaker's Seminars How can Weather-Forecasting Facilitate the Improvement of Moist Processes in Climate Models?...

436

Sociology of a stove  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the acceptance and use made of the Lorena cooking stove in Guatemala. The stove is designed to contain heat, conserve fuel and reduce smoke.

Shaller, D.V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Molecular Simulation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced CO2 Adsorption in Ti-exchanged Zirconium Organic Frameworks – A Molecular Simulation Study. Author(s), Ravichandar Babarao ...

438

Dr. Joseph A. Main  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He was a visiting researcher in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark in the fall of 2003. ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

APPENDIX A: FIGURES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APPENDIX A: FIGURES Project Name: Archbold Area Schools Wind Turbine Source Information: USGS, TRG Survey Figure Name: Turbine Location Notes: Turbine Location TRG Archbold...

440

APPENDIX A: FIGURES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APPENDIX A: FIGURES Project Name: Pettisville Local Schools Wind Turbine Source Information: USGS, TRG Survey Figure Name: Turbine Location Notes: Turbine Location TRG...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Stephen A. Cauffman  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US–side panel of the US–Japan Joint Panel on Wind and Seismic ... propulsion systems for a small interceptor missile and gas generator-based fire ...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

a. ACCREDITATION COMMITTEE BYLAWS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program evaluators must attend of a training session for refresher ... training schedules and sites, development and maintenance of training materials, and.

443

TECHNICAL NOTE A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNICAL NOTE A novel FRET approach for in situ investigation of cellulase-cellulose interaction Liqun Wang & Yiqing Wang & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 15 May 2010 Revised: 9...

444

Programming a paintable computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A paintable computer is defined as an agglomerate of numerous, finely dispersed, ultra-miniaturized computing particles; each positioned randomly, running asynchronously and communicating locally. Individual particles are ...

Butera, William J. (William Joseph)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

David A. Long  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurement Science grant I will be starting a new program which will ... I will be focusing upon measurements of rare isotopes, including carbon-14. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Star in a jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sonoluminescing bubble has been modeled as a thermally conducting, partially ionized two-component plasma. The use of accurate equations-of-state, plasma physics, and radiation physics distinguishes our model from all previous models. The model provides an explanation of many features of single bubble sonoluminescence that have not been collectively accounted for in previous models, including the origin of the picosecond pulse widths and spectra. The calculated spectra for sonoluminescing nitrogen and argon bubbles suggest that a sonoluminescing air bubble probably contains only argon, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis.

Moss, W.C.; Clarke, D.B.; Young, D.A.

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Session 4a Enjeti  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... enjeti.tamu.edu Texas A&M University http://www.tamu.edu Medium voltage DVR - ABB Page 13. 14 Power Electronics ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dr. Kenneth A. Snyder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4SIGHT computer model that was sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ... a patent application, by NIST, for this technology, referred to ...

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

Poli A. Marmolejos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poli A. Marmolejos currently serves as Director of the Department of Energy’s Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA).  OHA has jurisdiction for conducting administrative hearings and...

450

Appendix A: Conceptual Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL-Research Support Facilities TABLE OF CONTENTS NREL-Research Support Facilities TABLE OF CONTENTS Solicitation No. RFJ-8-77550 Appendix A: Conceptual Documents Page 1 of 299 February 6, 2008 Appendix A CONCEPTUAL DOCUMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 2 PART 1-PROCEDURES .......................................................................................................... 3 PART 2-PROGRAM ............................................................................................................... 59 PART 3-PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................... 245 APPENDIX LIST .................................................................................................................. 299

451

Current status of AED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the previous SHARE Design Automation Workshop a general description of the then current activities of the MIT Computer-Aided Design Project was given. The principal activities which were outlined were: (1) The cooperative AED-1 Project in which visiting ...

Douglas T. Ross

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Folding a better checkerboard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Folding an n ×n checkerboard pattern from a square of paper that is white on one side and black on the other has been thought for several years to require a paper square of semiperimeter n 2 [superscript 2]. Indeed, within ...

Demaine, Erik D.

453

A Holographic Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a holographic energy model in which the energy coming from spatial curvature, matter and radiation can be obtained by using the particle horizon for the infrared cut-off. We show the consistency between the holographic dark-energy model and the holographic energy model proposed in this paper. Then, we give a holographic description of the universe.

P. Huang; Yong-Chang Huang

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Holographic Energy Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a holographic energy model in which the energy coming from spatial curvature, matter and radiation can be obtained by using the particle horizon for the infrared cut-off. We show the consistency between the holographic dark-energy model and the holographic energy model proposed in this paper. Then, we give a holographic description of the universe.

Huang, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A TCP tuning daemon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many high performance distributed applications require high network throughput but are able to achieve only a small fraction of the available bandwidth. A common cause of this problem is improperly tuned network settings. Tuning techniques, such as setting ... Keywords: TCP, autotuning, data grids, high-performance networking

Tom Dunigan; Matt Mathis; Brian Tierney

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A Moored Profiling Instrument*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specifications and performance of a moored vertical profiling instrument, designed to acquire near-full-ocean-depth profile time series data at high vertical resolution, are described. The 0.8-m-diameter by 0.4-m-wide device utilizes a ...

K. W. Doherty; D. E. Frye; S. P. Liberatore; J. M. Toole

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Smooth Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a large-eddy “smooth” cloud (SC) model will be presented with smooth implying that the entire model converges under a Newton-based solution procedure or that time scales within the SC model are being resolved. Besides ensuring that ...

J. M. Reisner; C. A. Jeffery

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Form EIA-871A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Approval Approval OMB No.: 1905-0145 Expires: 11/30/2002 Form EIA-871A U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey for 1999 BUILDING QUESTIONNAIRE TABLE OF CONTENTS About This Questionnaire ...................................................................................................... 3 Section A. Building Size and Age Square Footage .................................................................................................... 5 Floors .................................................................................................................... 8 Year Constructed .................................................................................................. 9 Section B. Principal Building Activity

459

Solid Cold - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By the early 20th century, the way in which temperatures of solid objects changed as they absorbed heat was considered strong evidence that matter was not made of atoms. Einstein used some recent discoveries about light to turn this assessment around. A B C D E F A. A puzzle, and a surprising solution Take equal masses of lead and aluminum. Heat them until their temperatures are both 10 degrees higher. Will it take the same amount of heat for each? Back in the 18th century, the chemist Joseph Black discovered that different materials required different amounts of heat to raise their temperatures by equal amounts. The amount by which the temperature of a material changes as it absorbs or gives off heat can even be used to help identify the material. Among solid materials near room temperature,

460

A-Team Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 A-Team Report We are pleased to introduce a new department to CBS News. In each issue, you will find a brief update on projects being conducted by our new Applications Team. The Houston air traffic control tower The A-Team has completed the first phase of work to help the Federal Aviation Administration become more energy-efficient (CBS News, Fall 1994). Phase one includes a detailed energy audit of an example of each type of facility in the FAA building stock, located in the Houston metropolitan region. Air route traffic control center Terminal radar approach control Automated flight service station Air traffic control tower (commercial airport) Air traffic control tower (private airport) Air surveillance radar Air route surveillance radar The team has identified significant potential energy savings from energy-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

A-Team Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 A-Team Report Energy Savings Performance Contracts The federal government is the largest single consumer of energy in the United States, spending more than $3 billion yearly to light, heat, and operate its buildings. Money is also spent to maintain aging buildings, many of which are inefficient, having been built before the 1970s. As these costs have increased, budgets have been dramatically cut back during the last two years at the Departments of Energy and Defense and the General Services Administration. Last spring, DOE announced the award of a new type of contract for federal agencies to purchase "energy services," the super energy savings performance contract (Super-ESPC). This contract is a partnership between a Federal agency and a private-sector energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO

462

A New Path Forward  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, Fourth Quarter, 2011 4, Fourth Quarter, 2011 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 A New Path Forward A Column from the Office of Fossil Energy's Chief Operating Officer 4 A Legacy of Benefit A Look at How the Office of Fossil Energy Has Returned National Benefit 5 Increasing Production and Storage New Study Explains How CO2 Injection in Oilfield Can Increase Production 6 A Medical Improvement NETL Helps Develop Improved Coronary Stents for Heart Patients 9 International Efforts CSLF Ministerial Reinforces Support for CCUS Construction activities began at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demon- strate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale

463

Membranes with a boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the recently developed theory of multiple membranes. In particular, we consider open membranes, i.e. the theory defined on a membrane world volume with a boundary. We first restrict our attention to the gauge sector of the theory. We obtain a boundary action from the Chern-Simons terms. Secondly, we consider the addition of certain boundary terms to various Chern-Simons theories coupled to matter. These terms ensure the full bulk plus boundary action has the correct amount of supersymmetry. For the ABJM model, this construction motivates the inclusion of a boundary quartic scalar potential. The boundary dynamics obtained from our modified theory produce Basu-Harvey type equations describing membranes ending on a fivebrane. The ultimate goal of this work is to throw light on the theory of fivebranes using the theory of open membranes.

David S Berman; Daniel C Thompson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ACYSYS in a box  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerator Control System at Fermilab has evolved to enable this relatively large control system to be encapsulated into a 'box' such as a laptop. The goal was to provide a platform isolated from the 'online' control system. This platform can be used internally for making major upgrades and modifications without impacting operations. It also provides a standalone environment for research and development including a turnkey control system for collaborators. Over time, the code base running on Scientific Linux has enabled all the salient features of the Fermilab's control system to be captured in an off-the-shelf laptop. The anticipated additional benefits of packaging the system include improved maintenance, reliability, documentation, and future enhancements.

Briegel, C.; Finstrom, D.; Hendricks, B.; King, C.; Lackey, S.; Neswold, R.; Nicklaus, D.; Patrick, J.; Petrov, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Schumann, C.; /Fermilab

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data Section 1. Commentary Data for:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall temperature for the contiguous U.S. during April 2007 was 0.3ºF (0.2ºC) below the average temperature observed for the month of April over the 1971-2000 time period. A record cold outbreak was observed from April 4th to April 10th as record low temperatures were set in 1,200 locations across the contiguous U.S. before warmer weather returned later in the month. This cold snap was evident in the fact that heating degree days were 10.7 percent higher than normal as observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 44.7 percent higher than what was recorded in April 2006. Consequently, retail sales of electricity for the month of April 2007 increased 2.7 percent compared to April 2006, while April 2007 generation of electric power increased 2.1 percent over April 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for April 2007 showed a 3.9percent increase from April 2006 and a 0.9-percent increase from March 2007. A majority of the increase from March 2007 is due to the 4.2percent increase in the residential sector. For the 12-month period ending April 2007, the U.S. average retail price increased by 6.7 percent over the previous 12-month period ending April 2006. Electricity generation in April 2007 increased from 12 months before for all major fuel categories with the exception of nuclear, which decreased 0.5 percent, and conventional hydroelectric, which decreased 16.4 percent. Conventional hydroelectric generation decreased by a significant amount due to the drier than average conditions that have persisted throughout most of the northwestern United States and the Tennessee Valley. Petroleum liquids generation increased 30.2 percent in April 2007 and natural gas generation increased 9.3 percent from April 2006 as both are mainly utilized for peak load generation. Coal generation, normally used to satisfy baseload energy requirements,

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

E. A. Crosbie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-134 -134 E. A. Crosbie November 1988 4 THORETICAL ESTIHATION OF TH DYNIC APERTUR FOR A CRMA-GREHN UTICE If Vx is close enough to Vx = 1 per period, the Hamiltonian for the particle motion in a lattice with reflective symmetry can be written as H 18 Jx (JxA33coS Q33 + (3 JxAii - 6 Jy B11) cos Q11J where Qjm = j (~x - ~x) + (jVx - m)6 ~x is the particle phase, ~x is the lattice phase) and 6 is the angular coordinate along the orbit. Using a reflective symmetry point as reference, the harmonic components are given by Ajm Sk I 48rr cos (j~x - (jVx - m)6) Bii Sk ~ 48rr cos (~x - (Vx - 1)6) where Sk 13 3/2B" (x) )I (X Bp )k 13 1/213 B"(x))I Sk = ( x ~p )k B"(x))I and Bp are the sextupole strengths. 2 Since H f (e) 18 (Vx -1) Jx i/2 (3 A33Jxsin Q33 +~13 JxA11 ~ 6 JyB1i )sinQ11 J

468

A matterless double slit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double-slits provide incoming photons with a choice. Those that survive the passage have chosen from two possible paths which interfere to distribute them in a wave-like manner. Such wave-particle duality continues to be challenged and investigated in a broad range of disciplines with electrons, neutrons, helium atoms, C60 fullerenes, Bose-Einstein condensates and biological molecules. All variants have hitherto involved material constituents. We present a matterless double-slit scenario in which photons generated from virtual electron-positron pair annihilation in head-on collisions of a probe laser field with two ultra-intense laser beams form a double-slit interference pattern. Such electromagnetic fields are predicted to induce material-like behaviour in the vacuum, supporting elastic scattering between photons. Our double-slit scenario presents on the one hand a realisable method to observe photon-photon scattering, and demonstrates on the other, the possibility of both controlling light with light and non-locally investigating features of the quantum vacuum's structure.

B. King; A. Di Piazza; C. H. Keitel

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

469

A-<  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

< < Enclosure 2 ..- Page 1 of 2 RECORDS DlSPOSrrlON AUTHORITY (k IrrEtnx;tmr wl ma^) DATE RECEIVED 1. FROM (AgbncyoreaWWmmt NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY DepamncntofErmyy . 1 4.. NA?$E OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5. TELEPHONE I 6 . A G t N C Y CtK l ItlCATION I ~ E a r t i f y t M I m ~ b 3 ~ f D T ~ . o 1 c 1 c y m ~ p b c . t r i n b . g t o t h e ~ o f ~ r s c o r e b u d t f r t t t h a r s c o r d r ~ f o r ~ m t h s d b e h d p r g s ( s ) w s n o t m n r c b d f o r t h a k a i n s r r o f t h b . g c n c y ~ w i l l n o t b s m d s d r r R t r t h s ~ p c w i o d r r p e c i f i e d ; P d m ~ a n c u r r s n o e f r a t h e ~ ~ D f f i a , w h p r w k a n s o f R t h 8 o f t h t GAO ktuunl for Guidance d Fsddnl Apsndro, Core Contract Records See attached description 115.109 NSN STANDARD FORM 115 (REV. 3.91) PREVIOUS EDITION NOT USABLE P-bul by NARA 36 CFR 1228 Enclosure 2 Page 2 of 2 (1) Unit - PNR Contracts and Security ~ivision (2) Description - Contracts for procurement of reactor cores,

470

A Gold Bubble?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financial bubbles make good entertainment. One often reads speculation that a certain stock, commodity, or even housing is in the midst of a price bubble. For stocks, examples often come from initial public offerings (IPOs), the most recent being LinkedIn (see for example [3]), and a large collection of such occurred during the dot com mania around the turn of the century. Part of the problem in deciding whether an asset is experiencing a price bubble is that there is not a widespread understanding of what a bubble actually is, although there is plenty of expressed desire to detect one in real time. Indeed, the President of the Federal Reserve, Ben Bernanke, said during his confirmation hearings in 2009, “It is extraordinarily difficult in real time to know if an asset price is appropriate or not”[1] Commodities are also great examples of alleged price bubbles. A famous example was the oil price increases of 2007/2008. Nobel prize winning economist Paul Krugman wrote in the New York Times that oil prices were not a bubble, and two days later Ben Stein wrote in the same paper that they were. Without a quantitative procedure, experts often have different opinions about the existence of price bubbles. In this regard William Dudley, the President of the New York Federal Reserve, in an interview with Planet Money stated “...what I am proposing is that we try to identify bubbles in real time, try to develop tools to address those bubbles, try to use those tools when appropriate to limit the size of those bubbles and, therefore, try to limit the damage when those bubbles burst. ” [5

Robert A. Jarrow; Younes Kchia; Philip Protter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A graphene electron lens  

SciTech Connect

An epitaxial layer of graphene was grown on a pre patterned 6H-SiC(0001) crystal. The graphene smoothly covers the hexagonal nano-holes in the substrate without the introduction of small angle grain boundaries or dislocations. This is achieved by an elastic deformation of the graphene by {approx_equal}0.3% in accordance to its large elastic strain limit. This elastic stretching of the graphene leads to a modification of the band structure and to a local lowering of the electron group velocity of the graphene. We propose to use this effect to focus two-dimensional electrons in analogy to simple optical lenses.

Gerhard, L.; Balashov, T.; Wulfhekel, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Moyen, E.; Ozerov, I.; Sahaf, H.; Masson, L.; Hanbuecken, M. [CINaM-CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Campus Luminy - Case 913, 18288 Marseille (France); Portail, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Parc de Sophia - Antipolis, rue B. Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common sunflower is a competitive annual native dicot found in disturbed areas, on roadsides, dry prairies, and in row crops. Common sunflower is a competitive weed, but little data exist on interference, economic impacts, and competition in field corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control with herbicides; 4) and define the economic impact of common sunflower interference with corn. Corn grain yield was significantly reduced when common sunflower densities reached 1 plant/m of row and potentitially damaging common sunflower densities occurred if allowed to compete for more than 2 to 4 wk after planting for maximum corn yield. No significant corn yield reduction occurred if common sunflowers emerged 8 wk after planting. Growing degree day (GDD) heat units for corn showed that the critical point for control of common sunflower was approximately 300 GDD. Atrazine applied PRE, atrazine followed by (fb) glyphosate or halosulfuron POST, glyphosate POST, halosulfuron POST, and halosulfuron plus nicosulfuron POST controlled >87% of common sunflower. Atrazine applied PRE in a 30-cm band, nicosulfuron POST, and atrazine broadcast plus S-metolachlor PRE showed significantly lower common sunflower control and corn grain yield, when compared to atrazine PRE fb glyphosate POST. Economic impact of one sunflower/6 m of crop row caused a yield loss of 293 kg/ha. Various corn planting densities showed that corn yield can be reduced 1990 kg/ha with common sunflower competition. Corn planting densities of 49400 and 59300 plants/ha provided the greatest net returns with or without the presence of common sunflower competition. The highest net returns occurred with no common sunflower competition in 2006 and 2007, at $3,046/ha and $2,687/ha, respectively, when net corn prices were $0.24/kg ($6.00/bu). Potential control costs of various herbicide treatments revealed net returns of $1,156 to $1,910/ha in 2006 and $1,158 to $1,943/ha in 2007. Determining the economic impact of common sunflower interference in field corn allows producers to estimate the overall net return based upon density and duration of common sunflower interference, while considering varying net corn prices, crop planting density, and herbicide application costs.

Falkenberg, Nyland R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Appendix A-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A-1 A-1 Table -1 This scale is created to provide a guide for the physician determination of ability to work for HRP certified persons with certain conditions and while taking certain medications. This is meant to be a reference to induce some degree of consistency in making these determinations. It is not intended to be all inclusive or comprehensive. Condition Medication / Treatment Job Task Analysis Notes High level of Concern Seizures Anti Seizure Medication DOT Driver not allowed by DOT Rules, evaluate carefully with JTA Pain Narcotics - regular use HRP position evaluate each case, highly concerning Muscular Strains Muscle Relaxer medications HRP position can cause drowsiness, fatigue, nervousness, confusion, dizziness, visual disturbance, seizures, tachycardia, fainting,

474

A Symbol of Excellence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Symbol of Excellence Symbol of Excellence A Symbol of Excellence Every Challenge Home offers a cost-effective, high performance package of energy savings, comfort, health, and durability unparalleled in today's marketplace. Existing Home A Symbol of Excellence This label indicates relative performance of this DOE Challenge Home to existing homes (built between 1990 and 2010) and ENERGY STAR qualified homes. Actual performance may vary. DOE Challenge Home ENERGY STAR Home KEY QUALITY BUILT HEALTHFUL ENVIRONMENT DURABILITY ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY ULTRA EFFICIENT COMFORT PLUS The Future of Housing-Today Only a select group of the top builders in the country meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified by U.S. Department of Energy guidelines. LEARN MORE AT: buildings.energy.gov/challenge

475

A-Team Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of payment for ESPCs. The goals of recent A-Team projects were to create baselines of electricity and gas usage at the Presidio in San Francisco and an FAA air traffic control...

476

0707A5 Certificate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Material Address: 2710 S. Boulder Drive, Urbana, IL 61802 USA Email: CRM@aocs.org Tel:+1-217-359-2344; Fax: +1-217-351-8091 ISO Guide 34 A2LA Certificate 3438.01

477

What is a photon?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the absorber theory of radiation as put forward by Wheeler and Feynman. We show that it gives a better understanding of the photon compared to the usual quantum electrodynamics (QED) picture.

Vasant Natarajan

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Dictionary for Transparency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many terms that are used in association with the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Transparency Project associated with the Mayak Fissile Materials Storage Facility. This is a collection of proposed definitions of these terms.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Draw a computer scientist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each fall in the first class of the introductory computer science course I do an opening exercise with the incoming freshmen students. I give out a short survey asking for some general demographic information about them - gender, age, nationality, and ...

C. Dianne Martin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Quadratic Programming Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 27, 2001 ... Our branching strategy makes extensive use of dual information associated ...... consumer population and have differential costs of production and marketing. ...... Analysis of the federal energy agency program by a quadratic ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "a tion-weighted degree-day" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Catastrophes A testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generally appear as an accident of occlusion and thus extrinsic to the grating. We hypothesized, Damascus, MD) for positioning and to prevent movement. A scleral search coil for measuring eye position

Chaperon, Marc - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

482

A gathering of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Sc+.a,E-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaminated mai,erial was discovered in the area during an EG8G aerial radiological survey,l and confirnred by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

484

Simultaneous clustering: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although most of the clustering literature focuses on onesided clustering algorithms, simultaneous clustering has recently gained attention as a powerful tool that allows to circumvent some limitations of classical clustering approach. Simultaneous clustering ... Keywords: biclusters, block clustering, simultaneous clustering

Malika Charrad; Mohamed Ben Ahmed

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A personal learning apprentice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract requesting certain types of meetings. In order to be Personalized knowledge-based systems have not yet become widespread, despite their potential for valuable assistance in many daily tasks. This is due, in part, to the high cost of developing and maintaining customized knowledge bases. The construction of personal assistants as learning apprentices-- interactive assistants that learn continually from their users-- is one approach which could dramatically reduce the cost of knowledge-based advisors. We present one such personal learning apprentice, called CAP, which assists in managing a meeting calendar. CAP has been used since June 1991 by a secretary in our work place to manage a faculty member’s meeting calendar, and is the first instance of a fielded learning apprentice in routine use. This paper describes the organization of CAP, its performance in initial field tests, and more general lessons learned from this effort about learning apprentice systems.

Lisa Dent; Jesus Boticario; John Mcdermott; Tom Mitchell; David Zabowski

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A Pioneering Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be able to see them, but tiny airborne particles are everywhere. Tens of millions of kilograms of the smallest particles, known as PM2.5, float over a typical big city in the form...

487

A Thunderstorm Bow Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thunderstorm solitary gust or bow wave, observed by Doviak and Ge, is examined from the viewpoint of boundary layer wave theory. It is concluded that all its well defined characteristics are consistently modeled as a bow wave of ducted ...

G. Chimonas; Carmen J. Nappo

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A Spectral Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 5 years of daily initialized height fields from the National Meteorological Center, expressed as coefficients of spherical harmonies, a climatology of the annual cycle has been formulated for the 1000, 700, 500 and 250 mb surfaces. The ...

Edward S. Epstein

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD...

490

A Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ab Initio Local Energy and Local Stress Calculations: Applications to Materials ... Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Results for the Horizontal .... Films and Applications to a New Generation of Multifunctional Devices/Systems.

491

Pinch Technology: A Primer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pinch technology is a technique for analyzing and optimizing total energy systems. This guide describes the technique and shows how it can be used to reduce industrial production costs while maximizing the cost-effective use of electricity.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

A question of substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the week of January 27th to February 2nd, 1986 a design symposium was held in the Department of Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This symposium, entitled "An Architecture of Substance" was ...

Gitlin, Jane M

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

EPCglobal : a universal standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

AIR M A IL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

design. The ingot size will be 5 inch diameter and 46 inches long approximately before crop- ping. It i estimated-that the total cycle for a run containing zinc will be 12 hours,...

495

A REVIEW ON LICORICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Licorice (Glycyrrhizaglabra L) is an important herb used in almost all systems of medicine. The author tries to present in this article a comprehensive review on all aspects of Licorice.

K. Venkata; Subba Rao

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

DIGITALECONOMY PIONEERING A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. IT as a utility Digital infrastructure should be so simple, accessible and reliable it is invisible. In delivering age. It is important that we ensure digital interaction enhances, not replaces, current interactions

Zharkova, Valentina V.

497

A Monumental Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 555 feet, the Monument is the tallest structure in Washington, D.C. Made of marble, granite, and sandstone, the gleaming and dignified obelisk serves as a symbol of the Nation's...

498

ORIGINAL ARTICLE A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A methodological framework for comparative assessments of equipment energy efficiency policy measures Helcio Blum & Barbara Atkinson & Alex B. Lekov Received: 28 December 2011 / Accepted: 4 June 2012 / Published online: 28 July 2012 # Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract When government policy-makers propose new policies, they need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures to compare them to existing and alternative policies and to rank them accord- ing to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers' budgets, on national energy con- sumption and economics, and on the environment. A useful methodology to perform such policy analysis should represent in a single framework the characteristics

499

A rigged market  

SciTech Connect

The mobile rig market remains a unique sector of the global upstream oil and gas industry. Big oil is continuing to emerge blinking from the darkness of its recent cash-starved existence to bask in the glory of a resurgent oil price. But the rig sector is once again lagging behind the pace being set by operators as they open up their wallets for new or delayed exploration and production projects. This paper gives statistics on worldwide count and contracts.

Thomas, M.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

New HP 1304A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of others will make you more productive (and more valuable!) If no one else has seen the problem, you must solve it yourself. At this stage, apply the Rules of Logical Troubleshooting. This consists of “milking ” the instrument for all symptoms available. Use your eyes, ears and nose. Are lights lit? Readouts active? Are there any signs of heat or broken components? Are there any abnormal sounds? Pops, hissing, hum? Is there a smell associated with a particular area? Essence

Servl Ce; Info R Mati; N From; He Wlett-packard

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z