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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

2

NETL: News Release - 99.99% Clean...DOE Signs Agreement to Install Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

99.99% Clean...DOE Signs Agreement to Install Advanced Pollution Control Device on S. Dakota Power Plant 99.99% Clean...DOE Signs Agreement to Install Advanced Pollution Control Device on S. Dakota Power Plant Leading-Edge System Virtually Eliminates Emissions of Microscopic Ash Particles - Otter Tail's Big Stone Power Plant - South Dakota's Big Stone Plant will soon get an environmental upgrade that will virtually eliminate particulate emissions. Photo: Otter Tail Power Co. MILBANK, SD - By this fall South Dakota will likely host one of the world's cleanest coal plants in terms of the tiny specks of fly ash emitted from its smokestack. A cooperative agreement signed between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Otter Tail Power Company paves the way for installation of a new type of pollution control device on the 450-megawatt Big Stone Power Plant in Milbank, South Dakota.

3

Data:8b9a95e2-424c-4c6e-81af-7d151eba9999 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e2-424c-4c6e-81af-7d151eba9999 e2-424c-4c6e-81af-7d151eba9999 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Johnson County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase Commercial Service Sector: Residential Description: Availability Available in all territory served by the Corporation, in accordance with the Corporation Service Rules and Regulations. Members having their principal place of business on the same premises as their home may include service for both on the same meter, in which case all service will be billed under the schedule using the rate set out below. If the member prefers, provisions may be made for two meters, in which case usage for residential purposes will be billed under the appropriate residential schedule, and usage for business purposes will be billed under this Schedule SPC. Applicability Applicable to commercial consumers up to and including 100 kVA. In general, motors having a rated capacity in excess of ten horsepower (10 h.p.) should be a three-phase service. The Corporation's Engineering department must approve any variances.

4

Data:9dffc919-09f6-464a-9798-5f0e9999d2b0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dffc919-09f6-464a-9798-5f0e9999d2b0 dffc919-09f6-464a-9798-5f0e9999d2b0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No3 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: RATE NO. 01 TOU-A RESIDENTIAL SERVICE TIME-OF-USE-Underground Sector: Residential Description: Applicability: To residential use only in single private residences or a single unit in a multiple apartment through one point of delivery and measured through one meter. Monthly minimum bill: $30.00 Source or reference: http://www.ed3online.org/view/70 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

5

Author Proof MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT 9999:18 (2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fertilizing eggs (Austin, 1951; Chang, 1951). The physiological changes that confer on sperm the ability energy sources, and serum albumin. Seminal plasma is the ¯uid portion of semen in which spermatozoa

Zaragoza, Universidad de

6

Ultrahigh-Purity Materials (>99.9999%) by Electrorefining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic Behavior of Silicon (?) in BaF2-CaF2 SiO2 Melts ... Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Uranium Chloride in Molten LiCl-KCl Eutectic.

7

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First and Last Ten Lines of the Composite ASCII Data Files se_asia.dat and First and Last Ten Lines of the Composite ASCII Data Files se_asia.dat and se_asiax.dat se_asia.dat First 10 lines: 1 44.2828 36.2251 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 2 44.3217 36.2333 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 3 44.3605 36.2416 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 4 44.3994 36.2498 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 5 44.4382 36.258 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 6 44.4771 36.2663 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 7 44.5159 36.2745 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999 -9999

8

Hector S. Valdez 999 E 789 N Apt 5 Provo, UT 84606 (777) 788-9999 valdezhector@hotmail.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sections troubleshoot LABView & Solid Works programs - Supervised and assisted students personalized

Hart, Gus

9

CLOSEOUT REPORT Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... COMP_OI Income Before Taxes $_____ (-999.9999-999.9999) ... the start of the project, did your company seek equity investment from individual ...

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

ANNUAL REPORT Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... COMP_OI Income Before Taxes $_____ (-999.9999-999.9999) ... the start of the project, did your company seek equity investment from individual ...

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight standard time - Use a code (e.g., -9999) for missing values * See Hook et al. (2010) for additional examples of parameter formats * http:daac.ornl.govPI...

12

Data:279cc751-7862-463b-8fa5-80b911a9c551 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Description: This rate is for customers who use electricity for non-residential purposes and who have a demand of 75 KW to 9999 KW per month. Customers being...

13

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available No Data Available No Data Available 108 36 milliseconds Alpha Decay 91.00% Electron Capture 9.00% Proton Emission < 1.00% 109 93.5 microseconds Proton Emission 99.99%...

14

Integration and Use of Embedded Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polypyrrole dopped with nitrate onto carbon fibers substrateVoltage (mV) Carbon fibers, 7 m diameter each, ~ 20-30= 0.9999) R 5-6 ppm 7 m carbon fiber -log(NO - ) Nitrate

Hamilton, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012-Zr behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

99.99+%, anhydrous) - 3.5 wt% Li 2 O (Alfa Aesar, 99.5%) 5 Electrolytic Reduction - Molten Salt Furnace - II (650 C) - Same argon atmosphere glovebox - 10 cm dia. x 11 cm...

16

Underwater Glider System Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs such as pumping energy, hotel load and travel time.Ee ~ 0.57, then the energy consumed by hotel loads, buoyancy99.9999% of total energy consumption is hotel loads. The

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Specifications for Recycled Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...in lead are antimony, arsenic, bismuth, copper, nickel, silver, tin, and zinc. Recently, selenium and tellurium have been added as important impurities in the United States. Primary-lead companies generally produce the 99.99% Pb grade, whereas recyclers produce the 99.97% Pb grade. The major difference...

18

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DRHOKP Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)(2*PI)**3 2.9999 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)(2*PI)**3 72.31 .5*(HC**2...

19

Highly dispersive micro-ring resonator based on one dimensional photonic crystal waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Khan, S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, H. A. Haus, and J. D. Joannopoulus, "Coupling of modes analysis optics devices, (140.4780) Optical resonators, (999.9999) slow light References and Links 1. Q. Xu, B-327 (2005). 2. Y. Akahane, T. Asano, B. Song, and S. Noda, "High-Q photonic nanocavity in a two

Levy, Uriel

20

Water washable stainless steel HEPA filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filter apparatus and system, and method for assaying particulates. The HEPA filter provides for capture of 99.99% or greater of particulates from a gas stream, with collection of particulates on the surface of the filter media. The invention provides a filter system that can be cleaned and regenerated in situ.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kW) Total Fan Power (kW) Climate Zone CZ3 (Oakland) CZ9 (Coil Sizes (kBtu/(hfloor)) Climate Zone CZ3 (Oakland) CZ9 (all three vintages and climate zones ranged from 0.9999 to

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

F:\SHARE\SE\Web_Origs\Wrk_Jan\00-055\U0027401.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GJO-99-99-TAR GJO-99-99-TAR Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Site June 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0023-05-000 Document Number U0027401 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0027401 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Tuba City, Arizona June 1999 Page iii Contents Page 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 2.0 Site Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.1 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator. Technology spotlight report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator combines and improves upon the fluidized-bed, agglomeration/ incineration-technology and the cyclonic-combustion technology developed at Institute of Gas Technolgy (IGT) over many years. The result is a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes. The system can operate over a wide range of conditions and has a destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) greater than 99.99%. Solid inorganic contaminants are contained within aglassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microsoft Word - table_23.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power State Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Average Price Alabama ..................... 13.34 99.99 10.91 81.99 7.34 20.03 -- 6.24 Alaska......................... 4.88 100.00 4.14 55.48 3.62 66.78 -- 2.79 Arizona ....................... 12.16 100.00 8.50 93.89 6.91 55.15 6.57 5.84 Arkansas .................... 11.73 100.00 8.86 80.30 8.03 5.67 6.86 6.19 California .................... 9.86 96.51 8.63 71.17 7.89 5.25 6.97 6.05 Colorado..................... 8.47 99.99 7.48 94.67 6.54 0.77 5.99 5.65 Connecticut................. 14.06 98.62 11.31 68.99 9.32 43.99 12.65 W

25

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

150k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm 150k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm K = momentum in fm**-1 RHOKN1 = neutron momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKN1 = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN1*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 3.9999 RHOKP1 = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP1 = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP1*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 2.9999 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP1*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 80.224 .5*(HC**2/MN)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN1*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 97.294 177.518 K RHOKN1 DRHOKN1 RHOKP1 DRHOKP1 **** *********** ********* *********** ********* 0 495.4 1.7788 482 1.1043 .1 499.2 1.3405 472.6 .7574 .2 499.2 .82984 443.4 .52614 .3 477.2 .5743 394.7 .38471

26

Distillation of hydrogen isotopes for polarized HD target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a cryogenic distillation system to purify Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for a polarized HD target in LEPS experiments at SPring-8. A small amount of ortho-H$_2$ ($\\sim$0.01%) in the HD gas plays an important role in efficiently polarizing the HD target. Since there are 1$\\sim$5% impurities of H$_2$ and D$_2$ in commercially available HD gases, it is inevitable that the HD gas is purified up to $\\sim$99.99%. The distillation system has a cryogenic pot (17$\\sim$21 K) containing many small stainless steel cells called Heli-pack. Commercial HD gas with an amount of 5.2 mol is fed into the pot. We carried out three distillation runs by changing temperatures (17.5 K and 20.5 K) and gas extraction speeds (1.3 ml/min and 5.2 ml/min). The extracted gas was analyzed by using a gas analyzer system combining a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a gas chromatograph. The HD gas of 1 mol with a purity better than 99.99% has been successfully obtained. The effective NTS (Number of Theoretical Stages), which is...

Ohta, T; Didelez, J -P; Fujiwara, M; Fukuda, K; Kohri, H; Kunimatsu, T; Morisaki, C; Ono, S; Rouill', G; Tanaka, M; Ueda, K; Uraki, M; Utsuro, M; Wang, S Y; Yosoi, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

TableHC11.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Household Size 1 Person............................................................... 30.0 5.5 3.8 1.7 2 Persons.............................................................. 34.8 6.5 4.8 1.7 3 Persons.............................................................. 18.4 3.4 2.4 1.1 4 Persons.............................................................. 15.9 3.0 2.4 0.7 5 Persons.............................................................. 7.9 1.4 1.2 0.2 6 or More Persons................................................. 4.1 0.7 0.6 0.1 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999.................................................. 9.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999............................................... 8.5 1.8 1.4 0.4 $15,000 to $19,999...............................................

28

TableHC14.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Household Size 1 Person............................................................... 30.0 5.7 1.5 4.2 2 Persons.............................................................. 34.8 7.4 2.9 4.5 3 Persons.............................................................. 18.4 3.9 1.2 2.7 4 Persons.............................................................. 15.9 4.0 1.1 2.9 5 Persons.............................................................. 7.9 1.7 0.5 1.3 6 or More Persons................................................. 4.1 1.5 0.4 1.1 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999.................................................. 9.9 1.6 0.4 1.2 $10,000 to $14,999............................................... 8.5 1.6 0.4 1.2 $15,000 to $19,999...............................................

29

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMlNlSTRATldN CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMlNlSTRATldN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMlNlSTRATldN CHICAGO OPERATIONS OFFICE 9999 SOUTH CASS AVENUE - .~-- ARGONNE, ILL!&+ bt.499 _ In Reply Refer TO: SEP. 1 61975 Martin B. Biles, Director Division of Operational Safety, HQ CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY (CMU) CYCLOTRON DISMANTLING PROJECT The purpose of this memorandum is to summarize the dismantling activities which have been performed or are planned at the CMU, Nuclear Research Center, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, site for purposes of preparing the site for unrestricted release from a radiological standpoint. Facility Description and Background Attachment 1 shows a schematic of the main building (which housed the synchrocyclotron, laboratories, machine shop, and offices) and adjacent ancillary facilities. Not shown (direction of location shown by arrows)

30

Kankakee Valley Rural E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

M C M C Jump to: navigation, search Name Kankakee Valley Rural E M C Place Indiana Utility Id 9999 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location ECAR NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Envirowatt Residential Electric Service(Manually Read Meter) Residential General Service Non-Demand(Using Manually read meter)) Residential General Service Non-Demand(Using Manually read meter)) Commercial RATE SCHEDULE A: RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE Residential Rate Schedule A1: Envirowatt Residential Electric Service Rate Schedule

31

AT&T, INC.'s REPLY COMMENTS EXHIBIT 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AT&T, INC.'s REPLY COMMENTS AT&T, INC.'s REPLY COMMENTS EXHIBIT 1 Application Security BW Reliability Coverage Latency Emergency Power 1 AMR High 14-100 Kbps/ node 99.0-99.99 20%- 100% 2000 ms 0-4 hours DLC High 14-100 Kbps/ node 99.0-99.99 20%- 100% 2000 ms 0-4 hours Real-time pricing High 14-100 Kbps/ node 99.0-99.99 20%- 100% 2000 ms 0-4 hours Distributed Generation High 9.6-56 kbps 99.0- 99.99% 90-100% 300-2000 ms 0-1 hour Charging PEVs at home Medium 9.6-56 kbps 99.0-

32

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) The following is a full listing of ascii file compare.dat (File 4), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file compare.wk1 (File 5). This file compares the estimated global total net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 to 1990, by year, for this database (Houghton 1999) and three earlier publications (Houghton et al. 1983, Houghton and Skole 1990, and Houghton and Hackler 1995). Note that the data for the period 1850 through 1859 attributed below to Houghton et al. (1983) were not actually presented in that publication but are present in the data used in that publication. Units = Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 1015 grams); -9.999 denotes missing value Year Houghton Houghton Houghton Houghton

33

_PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

15 dated 9/9/13 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 15 dated 9/9/13 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part I - The Schedule Sections B through H TABLE OF CONTENTS B-1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ...................................................................................... 4 B-2 CONTRACT TYPE AND VALUE (Rev. M218, M222, M236, M241, M261, M266, M288, M293, M312, M319, M344, M365, M400, M404, M443, M448, M473, M484, M0512, A0514) ............................................................................................................................ 4 B-3 AVAILABILITY OF APPROPRIATED FUNDS ................................................................. 8 B-9999 AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT WORK VALUES (Added M331; Modified: A335, A336, A340, A341, A342, A346, A347, A348, A349, A350,

34

Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Silicon Cell Basics Silicon Cell Basics Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:19pm Addthis Silicon-used to make some the earliest photovoltaic (PV) devices-is still the most popular material for solar cells. Silicon is also the second-most abundant element in the Earth's crust (after oxygen). However, to be useful as a semiconductor material in solar cells, silicon must be refined to a purity of 99.9999%. In single-crystal silicon, the molecular structure-which is the arrangement of atoms in the material-is uniform because the entire structure is grown from the same crystal. This uniformity is ideal for transferring electrons efficiently through the material. To make an effective PV cell, however, silicon has to be "doped" with other elements to make n-type and p-type layers.

35

CX-000836: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

36: Categorical Exclusion Determination 36: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Savings Performance Contracts (4494) CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 02/11/2010 Location(s): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Office(s): Y-12 Site Office This project would replace approximately 760 steam traps and 60 vacuum breakers; update the condensate return system with pipe, insulation, and pump/tank units; replace pumps and install controls in buildings 9768-8, 11, and 13, replace transformer in building 9767-13 and heat exchanger in building 9767-11; install new demineralized water system in building 9999-3 and transfer pumps near building 9404-17. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000836.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000559: Categorical Exclusion Determination

36

Borough of Milltown, New Jersey (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey (Utility Company) Jersey (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Borough of Milltown Place New Jersey Utility Id 12608 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service (Customer A)(20 Kw to 99.99 Kw) Commercial General Service (Customer B)(less than 20 Kw) Commercial Large Power and Lighting Service Commercial Residential Rates Residential Residential Rates (Heat Pump Service) Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1860/kWh Commercial: $0.1860/kWh Industrial: $0.1860/kWh

37

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A: ECOSYSTEM AREA BY REGION A: ECOSYSTEM AREA BY REGION This listing indicates the area (in units of 106 hectare) in different ecosystems for the nine regions in this database, for the years 1700, 1850, and 1990, along with the percent change from 1850 to 1990. The values in this listing replace the values in files areas.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Missing values are denoted by -9999. % Change 1700 1850 1990 1850-1990 North America Temperate evergreen forest 236 222 215 -0.03 Temperate deciduous forest 157 125 118 -0.06 Boreal forest 325 325 322 -0.01 Temperate woodland/shrubland 302 302 292 -0.03 Temperate grassland 568 481 172 -0.64

38

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

781 Federal Register 781 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 231 / Monday, December 1, 2008 / Notices Management Plan (35 points) * The extent to which the offeror provides a description of its plan for managing the project in a clear and sequential fashion, and the extent to which that plan provides credible evidence that the management of personnel, physical resources, activities, and work production will result in a robust portal with a 99.99 percent ''uptime rate.'' (20 points) * The quality of the offeror's plans to establish and work with an advisory committee that has appropriate expertise to advise the offeror on its implementation of the project. (5 points) * The extent to which the time commitments of the offeror's staff are appropriate to operating and maintaining U.S.A. Learns Web Portal.

39

TableHC10.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................................... 30.0 5.5 7.3 11.5 5.7 2 Persons........................................................................ 34.8 6.5 8.4 12.5 7.4 3 Persons........................................................................ 18.4 3.4 4.1 7.0 3.9 4 Persons........................................................................ 15.9 3.0 3.2 5.6 4.0 5 Persons........................................................................ 7.9 1.4 1.8 2.9 1.7 6 or More Persons........................................................... 4.1 0.7 0.7 1.2 1.5 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................................. 9.9 1.9 2.3 4.1 1.6 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................................

40

TableHC13.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................................... 30.0 11.5 6.2 2.1 3.2 2 Persons........................................................................ 34.8 12.5 6.5 2.1 3.9 3 Persons........................................................................ 18.4 7.0 4.0 1.1 1.8 4 Persons........................................................................ 15.9 5.6 2.9 1.2 1.5 5 Persons........................................................................ 7.9 2.9 1.5 0.3 1.1 6 or More Persons........................................................... 4.1 1.2 0.5 Q 0.6 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................................. 9.9 4.1 2.1 0.6 1.4 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

TableHC8.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................................... 30.0 14.7 5.1 5.1 5.1 2 Persons........................................................................ 34.8 12.8 6.1 7.5 8.5 3 Persons........................................................................ 18.4 7.6 3.0 3.8 3.9 4 Persons........................................................................ 15.9 6.8 2.6 3.3 3.1 5 Persons........................................................................ 7.9 3.3 1.5 2.1 1.0 6 or More Persons........................................................... 4.1 1.9 0.7 0.8 0.7 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................................. 9.9 5.2 1.6 1.2 1.9 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................................

42

TableHC12.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Household Size 1 Person............................................................... 30.0 7.3 5.0 2.3 2 Persons.............................................................. 34.8 8.4 5.7 2.7 3 Persons.............................................................. 18.4 4.1 3.0 1.1 4 Persons.............................................................. 15.9 3.2 2.2 1.0 5 Persons.............................................................. 7.9 1.8 1.4 0.4 6 or More Persons................................................. 4.1 0.7 0.4 0.3 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999.................................................. 9.9 2.3 1.8 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999............................................... 8.5 2.0 1.4 0.6 $15,000 to $19,999...............................................

43

Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990 Through 2010 (Million Kilo  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Category",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Supply" "Generation" " Electric Utilities",36489,37029,31167,34285,31932,27088,19791,23761,35911,38868,25254,1630,1569,1910,1649,1249,1043,-191,-206,-187,-186 " Independent Power Producers",253,716,1240,1099,1408,1434,1700,1556,1138,1229,15677,41097,43924,41228,42169,46809,48723,51439,52292,52182,56686 " Combined Heat and Power, Electric",2202,3824,8384,9975,12108,13591,13156,13370,13598,13525,14104,13418,13693,12777,10705,11365,9999,10653,10740,8717,8041 "Electric Power Sector Generation Subtotal",38943,41569,40791,45359,45448,42113,34647,38687,50647,53622,55035,56145,59186,55916,54523,59422,59765,61901,62825,60712,64540

44

S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory's (SRNL) National Laboratory's (SRNL) Analytical Laboratories have supported SRS operations for more than 55 years, providing high quality analyti- cal, radiometric and environmental monitoring data to a range of customers. Since the mid-1950s, the labs have provided a diverse array of scientific and technical services in support of Site missions. The labs perform analyses on a wide range of matrices, such as soil, water, gases, foodstuffs, decommission- ing debris, waste and process control samples. The laboratories maintain certifications and qualifications through a variety of govern- ing bodies, which allow multiple applications of laboratories services. Over 100,000 samples are processed yearly, producing 300,000 determinations with an error-free rate averaging 99.99 percent.

45

TableHC15.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................................... 30.0 1.8 1.9 2.0 3.2 2 Persons........................................................................ 34.8 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.2 3 Persons........................................................................ 18.4 1.1 1.3 1.2 1.8 4 Persons........................................................................ 15.9 1.0 0.9 1.0 2.3 5 Persons........................................................................ 7.9 0.6 0.6 0.9 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................................... 4.1 0.4 Q 0.5 0.7 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................................. 9.9 0.8 0.7 0.9 1.0 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................................

46

tablehc6.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30.0 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 30.0 N N N N 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 N 34.8 N N N 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 N N 18.4 N N 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 N N N 15.9 N 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 N N N N 7.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 N N N N 4.1 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 5.9 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.7 $10,000 to $14,999.......................................... 8.5 4.2 2.0 0.9 0.7 0.7 $15,000 to $19,999.......................................... 8.4 3.3 2.5

47

Distillation of hydrogen isotopes for polarized HD target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a cryogenic distillation system to purify Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for a polarized HD target in LEPS experiments at SPring-8. A small amount of ortho-H$_2$ ($\\sim$0.01%) in the HD gas plays an important role in efficiently polarizing the HD target. Since there are 1$\\sim$5% impurities of H$_2$ and D$_2$ in commercially available HD gases, it is inevitable that the HD gas is purified up to $\\sim$99.99%. The distillation system has a cryogenic pot (17$\\sim$21 K) containing many small stainless steel cells called Heli-pack. Commercial HD gas with an amount of 5.2 mol is fed into the pot. We carried out three distillation runs by changing temperatures (17.5 K and 20.5 K) and gas extraction speeds (1.3 ml/min and 5.2 ml/min). The extracted gas was analyzed by using a gas analyzer system combining a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a gas chromatograph. The HD gas of 1 mol with a purity better than 99.99% has been successfully obtained. The effective NTS (Number of Theoretical Stages), which is an indicator of the distillator performances, is obtained as 37.2$\\pm$0.6. This value is in reasonable agreement with a designed value of 37.9. The HD target is expected to be efficiently polarized under a well-controlled condition by doping an optimal amount of ortho-H$_2$ to the purified HD gas.

T. Ohta; S. Bouchigny; J. -P. Didelez; M. Fujiwara; K. Fukuda; H. Kohri; T. Kunimatsu; C. Morisaki; S. Ono; G. Rouill'; M. Tanaka; K. Ueda; M. Uraki; M. Utsuro; S. Y. Wang; M. Yosoi

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Data:8d487701-c1da-437a-b20e-87dc9dbe518d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

01-c1da-437a-b20e-87dc9dbe518d 01-c1da-437a-b20e-87dc9dbe518d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Taylor County Rural E C C Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B2 - Large Industrial Rate Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to contracts with demands of 5,000 to 9,999 KW with a monthly energy usage equal to or greater than 400 hours per KW of billing demand. Source or reference: Kentucky Public Service Commission Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

49

TableHC9.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.9 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Household Size 1 Person................................................................ 30.0 2.6 7.9 7.3 6.5 5.8 2 Persons.............................................................. 34.8 4.3 7.7 8.2 7.1 7.5 3 Persons.............................................................. 18.4 1.8 4.2 4.8 3.9 3.7 4 Persons.............................................................. 15.9 1.2 3.7 4.0 3.9 2.9 5 Persons.............................................................. 7.9 0.7 1.8 2.0 1.4 2.0 6 or More Persons................................................. 4.1 0.3 0.8 1.0 1.1 0.8 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999................................................... 9.9 0.4 2.8 2.4 2.2 2.1 $10,000 to $14,999................................................

50

Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Billion Gallons) A8. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Billion Gallons) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION / HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST A N D TRENDS 79 2001 Family Income (dollars) Income Relative to Poverty Line 2001 Household and Vehicle Characteristics Total Less than 5,000 5,000 to 9,999 10,000 to 14,999 15,000 to 19,999 20,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 34,999 35,000 to 49,999 50,000 or 74,999 75,000 or More Don't Know Below 100 % 100 to 150 % Above 150 % Don't Know Household Characteristics Total.............................. 113.1 1.1 2.6 3.0 4.9 4.5 12.5 22.3 24.0 31.9 6.2 6.7 6.2 93.9 6.2 Census Region and Division

51

Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. U.S. Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Billion Miles) A7. U.S. Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Billion Miles) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION / HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST A N D TRENDS 75 2001 Family Income (dollars) Income Relative to Poverty Line 2001 Household and Vehicle Characteristics Total Less than 5,000 5,000 to 9,999 10,000 to 14,999 15,000 to 19,999 20,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 34,999 35,000 to 49,999 50,000 to 74,999 75,000 or More Don't Know Below 100 % 100 to 150 % Above 150 % Don't Know Household Characteristics Total.............................. 2,287 23 55 62 102 93 257 450 484 639 123 139 130 1,895 123 Census Region and Division

52

tablehc4.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 11.4 1.6 1.0 1.9 6.6 0.3 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 8.0 1.9 0.8 1.5 3.5 0.3 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 5.6 1.5 0.7 1.2 1.9 0.2 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 4.3 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.6 Q 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 2.0 0.9 0.2 0.3 0.4 Q 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 1.7 0.8 Q 0.3 0.4 Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 5.2 0.6 0.7 1.1 2.7 Q $10,000 to $14,999......................................... 8.5 4.6 0.8 0.3 0.9 2.4 Q $15,000 to $19,999.........................................

53

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- AV18+UX -- 05-Sep-13 -- AV18+UX -- 05-Sep-13 VMC 20k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm K = momentum in 1/fm RHOKN = neutron momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKN = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 4.9999 RHOKP = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 4 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 119.21 .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 135.68 = 254.89 K RHOKN DRHOKN RHOKP DRHOKP **** *********** ********* *********** ********* 0 471.4 1.5677 493.6 .87357 .1 479.1 1.462 486.1 .82165 .2 491.7 1.1953 463.1 .69321 .3 488 .86019 423.5 .53537

54

TableHC2.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 18.6 13.2 1.4 0.7 1.3 2.1 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 26.8 22.9 1.3 0.5 0.7 1.4 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 12.8 10.7 0.5 0.4 Q 1.0 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 11.5 9.8 0.6 Q Q 0.9 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 5.9 5.3 0.2 Q Q 0.3 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 2.4 2.1 Q Q N Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 4.7 3.1 0.3 0.3 Q 0.8 $10,000 to $14,999.........................................

55

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He -- AV18+UX -- 12-Apr-13 He -- AV18+UX -- 12-Apr-13 VMC 100k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm K = momentum in 1/fm RHOKP = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 1.9999 RHOKN = neutron momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKN = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 5.9997 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MN)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 111.59 .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 60.26 = 171.85 K RHOKP DRHOKP RHOKN DRHOKN **** *********** ********* *********** ********* 0 395.8 .4336 322.6 3.8764 .1 381.8 .41069 489 3.4493 .2 342.8 .35723 779.6 2.4664 .3 287.6 .29048 911.2 1.492

56

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He(0+) -- AV18+UX -- 24-Apr-13 He(0+) -- AV18+UX -- 24-Apr-13 VMC 200k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm K = momentum in fm**-1 RHOKP = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 2 RHOKN = neutron momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKN = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 3.9999 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MN)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 76.244 .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 55.322 = 131.566 K RHOKP DRHOKP RHOKN DRHOKN **** *********** ********* *********** ********* 0 460.6 .45665 533 4.2624 .1 441.6 .42681 669.8 3.4945 .2 390 .35171 843.2 2.0987

57

Data:04b45a6f-0577-41c6-8a17-8b7a5eb954f1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0577-41c6-8a17-8b7a5eb954f1 0577-41c6-8a17-8b7a5eb954f1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nolin Rural Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 13- Industrial C Sector: Industrial Description: Entire Service Area- applicable to contracts with contract demands of 5,000 to 9,999 kW with a monthly energy equal to or greater than 425 hours pr kW of contract demand. Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

58

Data:C8e3890a-9d96-4b31-8834-d726b8854ee9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90a-9d96-4b31-8834-d726b8854ee9 90a-9d96-4b31-8834-d726b8854ee9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nolin Rural Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 10 - Industrial Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to contracts with contract demands of 5,000 to 9,999 kW with a monthly energy usage equal to or greater than 425 hours per kW of contract demand. Source or reference: www.nolinrecc.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

59

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Our Capabilities Analytical Laboratories at the SRS performs analyses on a wide range of materials, including soil, water, gases, foodstuffs, decommissioning debris, waste, urine, fecal matter and process control samples. The laboratories maintain certifications and qualifications through a variety of governing bodies, which allows multiple applications of our services. Each year, we process over 200,000 samples and over half a million determinations, with an error-free rate better than 99.99%. Our Services We offer a full complement of nuclear counting and chemical processing methods, including microwave/hot block digestion of solids; alpha pulse height analyzer (PHA), gamma PHA and liquid scintillation counter, diode array spectrophotometer, ICP emission spectrometer, ICP mass spectrometer, thermal ionization mass spectrometer, chemical titrators, and IR analyzer. In addition, we offer unique environmental and industrial hygiene analytical services, including rapid analysis of radiological contaminants in water, soil, and human matrices; Radiological American Industrial Hygiene Association-accredited beryllium, lead, other metals, hexavalent chromium, and asbestos analyses.

60

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power State Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Percent of Total Volume Delivered Average Price Average Price Alabama ..................... 11.81 99.98 10.07 81.91 6.64 21.24 -- 5.80 Alaska......................... 4.39 100.00 3.58 59.09 1.75 82.81 -- 2.33 Arizona ....................... 11.31 98.89 7.84 90.70 6.54 39.95 5.65 5.14 Arkansas .................... 10.33 100.00 7.67 81.88 6.94 5.35 5.28 4.37 California .................... 9.13 99.56 8.15 62.34 7.19 5.47 5.76 5.49 Colorado..................... 6.61 99.99 5.93 95.34 4.46 0.93 4.16 4.38 Connecticut................. 12.77 98.73 10.47 68.14 7.52 45.33 10.72 W

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B(3+) -- AV18+UX -- 20-Apr-13 B(3+) -- AV18+UX -- 20-Apr-13 VMC 16k samples using 250 gauss points in r out to 25.00 fm K = momentum in 1/fm RHOKP = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 4.9999 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 143.51 .5*(HC**2/MN)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 143.31 = 286.82 K RHOKP DRHOKP **** *********** ********* 0 399.5 2.4474 .1 407.9 2.3077 .2 424.2 1.9399 .3 430.2 1.466 .4 412.1 1.0128 .5 367.7 .6665 .6 305.1 .45585 .7 236.17 .34323 .8 171.72 .26901 .9 118.01 .20334 1 77.27 .14365 1.1 48.58 .095278 1.2 29.6 .062606 1.3 17.665 .046922

62

Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Thousand A9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Thousand Miles per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION / HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST A N D TRENDS 83 2001 Family Income (dollars) Income Relative to Poverty Line 2001 Household Characteristics Total Less than 5,000 5,000 to 9,999 10,000 to 14,999 15,000 to 19,999 20,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 34,999 35,000 to 49,999 50,000 or 74,999 75,000 or More Don't Know Below 100 % 100 to 150 % Above 150 % Don't Know Household Characteristics Total.............................. 23.1 13.3 13.5 13.2 16.3 16.4 19.3 23.9 28.1 31.0 19.0 16.0 18.2 24.7 19.0 Census Region and Division

63

Microsoft Word - table_23.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 23. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State and Sector, 2005 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Alabama ............................... 15.82 100.00 13.13 81.65 9.51 23.59 -- 9.67 Alaska................................... 5.73 100.00 4.93 51.19 2.59 68.65 -- 3.42 Arizona ................................. 13.54 100.00 9.85 93.29 8.53 43.63 7.91 8.24 Arkansas............................... 13.65 100.00 10.20 74.07 9.44 5.23 10.16 8.59 California .............................. 11.86 99.66 10.69 68.67 9.84 5.46 8.80 8.09 Colorado ............................... 10.29 99.99 9.39 95.15 8.68 0.59 8.17 7.41 Connecticut........................... 16.24 98.75 13.00 70.34 11.68 46.41 14.60 9.31 District of Columbia............... 16.87 79.76 13.17 100.00 --

64

Data:9c155141-a9cc-4469-ab9e-4a9d62e1d912 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-a9cc-4469-ab9e-4a9d62e1d912 1-a9cc-4469-ab9e-4a9d62e1d912 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Salt River Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 3,000 kW and over (3000 kW - 9999 kW) Sector: Industrial Description: Available to all commercial and industrial consumers for lighting and/or heating or/or power, and who are served directly from a distribution substation of 3000 kW capacity or above. Source or reference: www.srelectric.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

65

tablehc3.3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.1 8.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Household Size 1 Person......................................................... 30.0 18.6 13.2 1.4 0.7 1.3 2.1 2 Persons........................................................ 34.8 26.8 22.9 1.3 0.5 0.7 1.4 3 Persons........................................................ 18.4 12.8 10.7 0.5 0.4 Q 1.0 4 Persons........................................................ 15.9 11.5 9.8 0.6 Q Q 0.9 5 Persons........................................................ 7.9 5.9 5.3 0.2 Q Q 0.3 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 2.4 2.1 Q Q N Q 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 4.7 3.1 0.3 0.3 Q 0.8 $10,000 to $14,999......................................... 8.5 3.9 2.7 Q Q Q 0.8 $15,000 to $19,999.........................................

66

Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Gallons 0. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Gallons per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION / HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST A N D TRENDS 86 2001 Family Income (dollars) Income Relative to Poverty Line 2001 Household Characteristics Total Less than 5,000 5,000 to 9,999 10,000 to 14,999 15,000 to 19,999 20,000 to 24,999 25,000 to 34,999 35,000 to 49,999 50,000 to 75,000 75,000 or More Don't Know Below 100 % 100 to 150 % Above 150 % Don't Know Total.............................. 1,143 620 647 644 788 794 940 1,183 1,393 1,549 957 942 1,363 1,546 957 Census Region and Division Northeast......................... 1,027 547 625 515 621 592 784 1,081 1,202 1,348 903 624 750 1,087 903

67

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Light Usage by Family Income Category, Percent of U.S. 6. Light Usage by Family Income Category, Percent of U.S. Households, 1993 1993 Family Income Category Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total Less than $5,000 $5,000 to $9,999 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $19,999 $20,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $49,000 $75,000 or More RSE Column Factors: 0.4 1.8 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.9 1.1 RSE Row Factor Total............................................... 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None......................................... 10.0 18.7 14.0 12.7 10.0 10.2 9.0 7.6 8.0 6.3 12.08 1 ................................................ 22.9 35.8 33.0 29.5 28.4 22.6 24.1 16.1 13.9 14.1 6.91 2 ................................................ 28.4

68

Data:4ffd5655-3e74-4f84-8aa0-9c1e87e57c40 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ffd5655-3e74-4f84-8aa0-9c1e87e57c40 ffd5655-3e74-4f84-8aa0-9c1e87e57c40 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Salt River Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 5,000 kW - 9,999 kW Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: www.srelectric.om Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1

69

Method for the recovery of silver from waste photographic fixer solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention is directed to the recovery of silver from spent photographic fixer solutions and for providing an effluent essentially silver-free that is suitable for discharge into commercial sewage systems. The present method involves the steps of introducing the spent photographic fixer solution into an alkaline hypochlorite solution. The oxidizing conditions of the alkaline hypochlorite solution are maintained during the addition of the fixer solution so that the silver ion complexing agents of thiosulfate and sulfite ions are effectively destroyed. Hydrazine monohydrate is then added to the oxidizing solution to form a reducing solution to effect the formation of a precipitate of silver which can be readily removed by filtration or decanting. Experimental tests indicate that greater than 99.99% of the original silver in the spent photographic fixer can be efficiently removed by practicing the present method. Also, the chemical and biological oxygen demand of the remaining effluent is significantly reduced so as to permit the discharge thereof into sewage systems at levels in compliance with federal and state environmental standards.

Posey, Franz A. (Concord, TN); Palko, Aloysius A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Ceramic vane demonstration in an industrial turbine  

SciTech Connect

A DOE program with Allison Engine Co. will demonstrate ceramic vanes in an industrial turbine. First-stage ceramic vanes and metallic mounts are to be designed, fabricated, and operated in a short-term engine test (up to 50 hr). The vanes and mounts will then be retrofitted into an existing turbine for operation at a commercial site for up to 8000 hr. They have been designed. Thermal and stress analyses of the vanes have calculated acceptable fast fracture stress levels and probabilities of survival > 99.99% for turbine continuous power and emergency shutdown (thermal shock) conditions. Max calculated steady-state stress is 169 MPa at 1182 C, so currently available ceramics appear to provide acceptable fast fracture strengths for use in industrial turbines. Long-term materials test will evaluate the lifetimes and retained strength of ceramics at stress and temperature levels in the range calculated from the ceramic vane analyses. Results of these tests will support on which vane material will be used in the long duration turbine demonstration. A successful demonstration could provide a basis for incorporating first-stage ceramic vanes into current generation industrial turbines and also the introduction of ceramic airfoils into downstream rows of future high temperature Advanced Turbine System (ATS) engines.

Wenglarz, R.A.; Calcuttawala, S.M.; Pope, J.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sorption enhanced reaction process for production of hydrogen. Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is one of the most suitable energy sources from both technological and environmental perspectives for the next century, especially in the context of a sustainable global energy economy. The most common industrial process to produce high-purity (99.99+ mol%) hydrogen is to reform natural gas by a catalytic reaction with steam at a high temperature. Conventional steam-methane reforming (SMR) contributed to approximately 2.4 billion standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of hydrogen production in the US. By 1998, the growth of SMR-produced hydrogen in the US is expected to reach 3.4 billion SCFD, with the increased demand attributed to hydrogen`s use in reformulated gasolines required by the Clean Air Act. The goal of this work is to develop an even more efficient process for reforming steam and methane to hydrogen product than the conventional SMR process. The application of Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) technology to SMR has the potential to markedly reduce the cost of hydrogen through lower capital and energy requirements. The development of a more cost-effective route to hydrogen production based on natural gas as the primary energy source will accelerate the transition to a more hydrogen-based economy in the future. The paper describes the process, which includes a sorbent for CO{sub 2} removal, and the various tasks involved in its development.

Mayorga, S.G.; Hufton, J.R.; Sircar, S.; Gaffney, T.R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Humidity effects on calibrations of radiation therapy electrometers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To eliminate variation in electrometer calibration results caused by high humidity and suboptimal connectors on the standard capacitors and to implement hardware that prevents overloading of the input stage of electrometers during calibration. Methods: A humidity-controlled cabinet was installed to provide a low-humidity environment for the standard capacitors. All of the coaxial BNC connections were replaced with Triax (TRB) connectors with the exception of the output from the voltage source. A three-stage RC filter with cascaded RC low-pass sections was designed and tested. Results: The installation of the humidity cabinet resulted in a major improvement in the stability and reproducibility of the electrometer calibration system. For the three years since this upgrade, the Ionizing Radiation Standards (IRS) electrometer calibration results have been consistent regardless of the ambient relative humidity in the lab. The connector replacements improved grounding in the calibration circuit. The three-stage filter allows the voltage at the output to rise in an S-shaped waveform, resulting in a smooth rise of the current through the isolation resistor from zero and back again, with no abrupt transition. For the filter design chosen, 99.99% of the charge is delivered within 6 s. Conclusions: A three-way improvement to the calibration measurement system was successful in eliminating the observed variations, resulting in an electrometer calibration measurement system that is unaffected by humidity and allowing reliable year-round calibrations of any electrometer encountered since the implementation of these changes.

Downton, B.; Walker, S. [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Bldg. M35, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Small-scale irradiated fuel electrorefining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the metallic fuel cycle development for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), a small scale electrorefiner was built and operated in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at Argonne National Laboratory-West. The initial purpose of this apparatus was to test the single segment dissolution of irradiated metallic fuel via either direct dissolution in cadmium or anodic dissolution. These tests showed that 99.95% of the uranium and 99.99% of the plutonium was dissolved and separated from the fuel cladding material. The fate of various fission products was also measured. After the dissolution experiments, the apparatus was upgraded to stady fission product behavior during uranium electrotransport. Preliminary decontamination factors were estimated for different fission products under different processing conditions. Later modifications have added the following capabilities: Dissolution of multiple fuel segments simultaneously, electrotransport to a solid cathode or liquid cathode and actinide recovery with a chemical reduction crucible. These capabilities have been tested with unirradiated uranium-zirconium fuel and will support the Fuel Cycle Demonstration program.

Benedict, R.W.; Krsul, J.R.; Mariani, R.D.; Park, K.; Teske, G.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11-Apr-13 11-Apr-13 VMC 200k samples using 200 gauss points in r out to 20.00 fm K = momentum in 1/fm RHOKP = proton momentum distribution in fm**3 DRHOKP = Monte Carlo error bar (1 sigma) 4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**2:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 2.9999 Kinetic energy .5*(HC**2/MP)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKP*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 72.31 .5*(HC**2/MN)*4*PI*TOTINT(RHOKN*K**4:K)/(2*PI)**3 = 72.21 = 144.52 K RHOKP DRHOKP **** *********** ********* 0 576.6 1.5998 .1 571.6 1.394 .2 545.3 .95599 .3 483.7 .54967 .4 392.6 .28631 .5 292.74 .16196 .6 203.2 .11249 .7 133.59 .084216 .8 84.46 .061093 .9 52.09 .042132 1 31.7 .027818 1.1 19.211 .018165 1.2 11.686 .012798 1.3 7.181 .010731

80

S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 1997 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 101.5 6.8 11.5 7.0 5.9 NF 1997 Household Income Category Less than $5,000 ......................................... 3.8 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 16.2 $5,000 to $9,999 ......................................... 9.6 0.9 1.1 0.6 0.7 14.2 $10,000 to $14,999 ..................................... 10.3 0.4 1.6 0.8 0.7 14.3 $15,000 to $19,999 ..................................... 10.4 0.4 1.6 0.6 0.6 11.0 $20,000 to $24,999 ..................................... 8.4 0.5 0.8 0.7 0.5 11.2 $25,000 to $34,999 ..................................... 15.6 1.2 1.5 1.0 0.8 10.5 $35,000 to $49,999 .....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

82

Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preparation, characterization, and stability of calcium zinc hydrophosphate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calcium zinc hydrophosphate phases with different Zn/(Zn + Ca) molar ratios (x{sub Zn}, from 0 to 1) were synthesized using co-precipitation method at pH 10, 25 deg. C. X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the synthesized products. Thermal behavior of the products was examined by thermal analytical instruments (TG-DSC-MS), while the chemical stability of the products was tested by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results showed that the phase constituents of formed calcium zinc hydrophosphate phases were related to the molar contents of Zn{sup 2+}. With the increase of x{sub Zn}, it formed calcium-deficient hydorxyapatite (CaHap), calcium zinc hydorxyapatite (CaZnHap), CaZn{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, and Zn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O, respectively. All the calcium zinc hydrophosphates were thermally stable up to 600 deg. C, and less Zn{sup 2+} leached in a wide pH range of 2-11, which indicated that calcium zinc hydrophosphate could effectively hold Zn{sup 2+} in their crystal phases with stabilization ratios of over 99.99%.

Qian Guangren [School of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)], E-mail: grqian@shu.edu.cn; Xu Xia; Sun Weimin; Xu Yunfeng; Liu Qiang [School of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

High-fidelity CZ gate for resonator-based superconducting quantum computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A possible building block for a scalable quantum computer has recently been demonstrated [M. Mariantoni et al., Science 334, 61 (2011)]. This architecture consists of superconducting qubits capacitively coupled both to individual memory resonators as well as a common bus. In this work we study a natural primitive entangling gate for this and related resonator-based architectures, which consists of a CZ operation between a qubit and the bus. The CZ gate is implemented with the aid of the non-computational qubit |2> state [F. W. Strauch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 167005 (2003)]. Assuming phase or transmon qubits with 300 MHz anharmonicity, we show that by using only low frequency qubit-bias control it is possible to implement the qubit-bus CZ gate with 99.9% (99.99%) fidelity in about 17ns (23ns) with a realistic two-parameter pulse profile, plus two auxiliary z rotations. The fidelity measure we refer to here is a state-averaged intrinsic process fidelity, which does not include any effects of noise or decoherence. These results apply to a multi-qubit device that includes strongly coupled memory resonators. We investigate the performance of the qubit-bus CZ gate as a function of qubit anharmonicity, indentify the dominant intrinsic error mechanism and derive an associated fidelity estimator, quantify the pulse shape sensitivity and precision requirements, simulate qubit-qubit CZ gates that are mediated by the bus resonator, and also attempt a global optimization of system parameters including resonator frequencies and couplings. Our results are relevant for a wide range of superconducting hardware designs that incorporate resonators and suggest that it should be possible to demonstrate a 99.9% CZ gate with existing transmon qubits, which would constitute an important step towards the development of an error-corrected superconducting quantum computer.

Joydip Ghosh; Andrei Galiautdinov; Zhongyuan Zhou; Alexander N. Korotkov; John M. Martinis; Michael R. Geller

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Services Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen85% CNG.

Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Services Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Services Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen50% CNG fuel.

Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

91

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

MISSING WELL LOCATIONS: AN ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND REGULATORY PROBLEM FOR LOUISIANA  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project is to examine 48,953 well permits and create a digital database of the locations from various public records. The Basin Research Institute (BRI), Louisiana State University, in cooperation with the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, Office of Conservation, will obtain paper records of each well permit. Using various purchased commercial oil and gas, mapping and surveying software and data management programs, (Geographix, Arcview, AutoCad Map and ProCogo) a digital latitude and longitude for each of the missing wells is being obtained. Current status of the project is that all 48,953 permits have been examined. Of that total 48,559 have been completed and digital locations have been obtained, 270 need additional information to be completed, and no determination is possible for 124 well permits. Upon completion each permit is placed in one of the following databases determined by status-Active Producers (11,450) of which 11,444 are complete or 99.99%, Shut-in Producers (2,305) of which 2,300 are complete or 99.78%, Abandoned Previous Producer (17,513) of which 17,332 are complete or 98.96%, Abandoned Dry (9,029) of which 8,883 are complete or 98.38%, Permit Expired (7,083) of which 7,040 are complete or 99.39%, and Miscellaneous Wells (1,573) of which 1,560 are complete or 99.17%. The databases will be available in both digital and hard copy format. The completed database will help Louisiana implement risk-based regulatory policies and streamline existing policies, and provide industry and the public with access to information for all phases of the oil and gas business.

Brian Harder; Chacko John

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Improved constraints on dark energy from Chandra X-ray observations of the largest relaxed galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present constraints on the mean matter density, Omega_m, dark energy density, Omega_de, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using Chandra measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction (fgas) in 42 hot (kT>5keV), X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters spanning the redshift range 0.05energy has a negligible effect on the measurements, we measure Omega_m=0.28+-0.06 (68% confidence, using standard priors on the Hubble Constant, H_0, and mean baryon density, Omega_bh^2). Analyzing the data for all 42 clusters, employing only weak priors on H_0 and Omega_bh^2, we obtain a similar result on Omega_m and detect the effects of dark energy on the distances to the clusters at ~99.99% confidence, with Omega_de=0.86+-0.21 for a non-flat LCDM model. The detection of dark energy is comparable in significance to recent SNIa studies and represents strong, independent evidence for cosmic acceleration. Systematic scatter remains undetected in the fgas data, despite a weighted mean statistical scatter in the distance measurements of only ~5%. For a flat cosmology with constant w, we measure Omega_m=0.28+-0.06 and w=-1.14+-0.31. Combining the fgas data with independent constraints from CMB and SNIa studies removes the need for priors on Omega_bh^2 and H_0 and leads to tighter constraints: Omega_m=0.253+-0.021 and w=-0.98+-0.07 for the same constant-w model. More general analyses in which we relax the assumption of flatness and/or allow evolution in w remain consistent with the cosmological constant paradigm. Our analysis includes conservative allowances for systematic uncertainties. The small systematic scatter and tight constraints bode well for future dark energy studies using the fgas method. (Abridged)

S. W. Allen; D. A. Rapetti; R. W. Schmidt; H. Ebeling; G. Morris; A. C. Fabian

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Search for right-handed currents by means of muon spin rotation  

SciTech Connect

A muon spin rotation (..mu..SR) technique has been used to place limits on right-handed weak currents in ..mu../sup +/ decay. A beam of almost 100% polarized 'surface' muons obtained from the TRIUMF M13 beamline was stopped in essentially non-depolarizing >99.99% pure metal foils. The ..mu../sup +/ spins were precessed by 70-G or 110-G transverse fields. Decay e/sup +/ emitted within 225 mrad of the beam direction and with momenta above 46 MeV/c were momentum-analyzed to 0.2%. Comparison of the ..mu..SR signal amplitude with that expected for (V-A) decay yields an endpoint asymmetry xiP..mu..delta/rho>0.9951 with 90% confidence. In the context of manifest left-right symmetric models with massless neutrinos the results imply the 90% confidence limits M(W/sub 2/)>381 GeV/c/sup 2/ and -0.057

Stoker, D.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

Miller, S.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO{sub 3}. A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M{sub 3} of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) has recently completed a Phase I program for the development of a two-step alternative to incineration for the destruction of organics in transuranic wastes at the Savannah River Site. This process is known as thermal desorption-supercritical water oxidation, or TD-SCWO. The GA TD process uses heat to volatilize and transport organics from the waste material for subsequent treatment by SCWO. SCWO oxidizes organics in a steam medium at elevated temperatures and pressures in a manner that achieves excellent destruction efficiencies and compliance with all environmental requirements without the need for complex pollution-abatement equipment. This application of TD-SCWO is focused on a full-scale batch process for 55-gallon drums of mixed transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. The Phase I reduced-scale test results show that the process operates as intended on surrogate waste matrices chosen to be representative of Savannah River Site transuranic mixed wastes. It provides a high degree of hydrogen removal and full containment of the radionuclide surrogate, with minimal requirements for pre-treatment and post-treatment. Other test objectives were to verify that the process produces no dioxins or furans, and meets all applicable regulatory criteria for retention of toxic metals, particulate, and criteria pollutants, while meeting WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II requirements. Thermal desorption of surrogate SRS mixed wastes at 500 psi and 1000 F met all tested requirements for WIPP/WAC and TRUPACT-II. SCWO of the desorbed surrogate organic materials at 500 psi and 1500 F also appears to meet all requirements for a nonincineration alternative, although >99.99% DRE for chlorinated solvents has not yet been demonstrated.

Mike Spritzer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "9999 9999 9999" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Light Usage by Family Income Category, Million U.S. Households, 5. Light Usage by Family Income Category, Million U.S. Households, 1993 1993 Family Income Category Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total Less than $5,000 $5,000 to $9,999 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $19,999 $20,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $49,000 $75,000 or More RSE Column Factors: 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.9 1.2 RSE Row Factors Total............................................... 96.6 4.1 10.6 11.1 9.6 8.7 14.1 17.5 12.6 8.3 3.98 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None......................................... 9.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 1.0 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.0 0.5 12.52 1 ................................................ 22.1 1.5 3.5 3.3 2.7 2.0 3.4 2.8 1.8 1.2 7.83 2 ................................................ 27.4 0.9 3.1 3.3 2.9 3.2 3.8 4.9 3.3 2.0

102

Confirmation of Eclipses in KPD 0422+5421, A Binary Containing a White Dwarf and a Subdwarf B Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report additional photometric CCD observations of KPD 0422+5421, a binary with an orbital period of 2.16 hours which contains a subdwarf B star (sdB) and a white dwarf. There are two main results of this work. First, the light curve of KPD 0422+5421 contains two distinct periodic signals, the 2.16 hour ellipsoidal modulation discovered by Koen, Orosz, & Wade (1998) and an additional modulation at 7.8 hours. This 7.8 hour modulation is clearly not sinusoidal: the rise time is about 0.25 in phase, whereas the decay time is 0.75 in phase. Its amplitude is roughly half of the amplitude of the ellipsoidal modulation. Second, after the 7.8 hour modulation is removed, the light curve folded on the orbital period clearly shows the signature of the transit of the white dwarf across the face of the sdB star and the signature of the occultation of the white dwarf by the sdB star. We used the Wilson-Devinney code to model the light curve to obtain the inclination, the mass ratio, and the Omega potentials, and a Monte Carlo code to compute confidence limits on interesting system parameters. We find component masses of M_sdB = 0.36 +/- 0.16 solar masses and M_WD = 0.47 +/- 0.16 solar masses (M_total = 0.86 +/- 0.35 solar masses, 68 per cent confidence limits). If we impose an additional constraint and require the computed mass and radius of the white dwarf to be consistent with a theoretical mass-radius relation, we find M_sdB = 0.511 +0.047 -0.050 solar masses and M_WD = 0.526 +0.033 -0.030 solar masses (68 per cent confidence limits). In this case the total mass of the system is less than 1.4 solar masses at the 99.99 per cent confidence level. We briefly discuss possible interpretations of the 7.8 hour modulation and the importance of KPD 0422+5421 as a member of a rare class of evolved binaries.

Jerome A. Orosz; Richard A. Wade

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test  

SciTech Connect

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NuSTAR AND CHANDRA INSIGHT INTO THE NATURE OF THE 3-40 keV NUCLEAR EMISSION IN NGC 253  

SciTech Connect

We present results from three nearly simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra monitoring observations between 2012 September 2 and 2012 November 16 of the local star-forming galaxy NGC 253. The 3-40 keV intensity of the inner {approx}20 arcsec ({approx}400 pc) nuclear region, as measured by NuSTAR, varied by a factor of {approx}2 across the three monitoring observations. The Chandra data reveal that the nuclear region contains three bright X-ray sources, including a luminous (L{sub 2-10{sub keV}} {approx} few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) point source located {approx}1 arcsec from the dynamical center of the galaxy (within the 3{sigma} positional uncertainty of the dynamical center); this source drives the overall variability of the nuclear region at energies {approx}>3 keV. We make use of the variability to measure the spectra of this single hard X-ray source when it was in bright states. The spectra are well described by an absorbed (N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) broken power-law model with spectral slopes and break energies that are typical of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), but not active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A previous Chandra observation in 2003 showed a hard X-ray point source of similar luminosity to the 2012 source that was also near the dynamical center ({theta} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 arcsec); however, this source was offset from the 2012 source position by Almost-Equal-To 1 arcsec. We show that the probability of the 2003 and 2012 hard X-ray sources being unrelated is >>99.99% based on the Chandra spatial localizations. Interestingly, the Chandra spectrum of the 2003 source (3-8 keV) is shallower in slope than that of the 2012 hard X-ray source. Its proximity to the dynamical center and harder Chandra spectrum indicate that the 2003 source is a better AGN candidate than any of the sources detected in our 2012 campaign; however, we were unable to rule out a ULX nature for this source. Future NuSTAR and Chandra monitoring would be well equipped to break the degeneracy between the AGN and ULX nature of the 2003 source, if again caught in a high state.

Lehmer, B. D. [Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wik, D. R.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A.; Leyder, J.-C.; Venters, T.; Zhang, W. W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Antoniou, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, 12 Physics Hall, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Argo, M. K. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bechtol, K. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Boggs, S.; Craig, W. W.; Krivonos, R. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Caltech Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Maccarone, T. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield SO17 IBJ (United Kingdom); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zezas, A. [Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a SREX flowsheet for the separation of strontium from dissolved INEEL zirconium calcine  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run No.64 pilot plant calcine spiked with {sup 85}Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4{prime},4{prime}(5{prime})-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO{sub 3} wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} rinse section. The behavior of {sup 85}Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted {sup 85}Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for {sup 85}Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

INTEGRATED SYSTEM TO CONTROL PRIMARY PM 2.5 FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The performance tests at E.C. Gaston showed how the Advanced ElectroCore field prototype performance changed as a function of the gas flow, inlet loading and the voltage applied to the central electrode in the separator. With the optimum voltage applied to the electrode, the unit achieved a maximum efficiency of 96.38 percent and a minimum outlet loading of 0.0021 grains/dscf while operating with a specific separating area (SSA) of 100 square feet per thousand acfm. The minimum outlet loading translates to about 0.00575 lb{sub m}/million Btu or less than one fifth of the current NSPS standard of 0.03 lb{sub m}/million Btu. The highest efficiency for the upstream ESP was about 99.75 percent. Together these two systems are capable of removing 99.991 percent of the particulate matter coming from the uncontrolled boiler. This efficiency is higher than the target efficiency of 99.99 percent and the outlet loading of 0.00575 lb{sub m}/million Btu is almost half of the target emission rate of 0.01 lb{sub m}/million stated in the program objectives. In terms of efficiency and outlet concentration, the tests showed that the Advanced ElectroCore can meet or exceed the program goals. The mercury capture tests were conducted using the Ontario Hydro method. When injection activated carbon at the rate of 7 pounds per million cubic feet of gas, the measured removal efficiency was about 90 percent. At the time of this writing, LSR was unable to obtain the full report on the mercury testing. If it does become available, it will be included as an appendix to this report. The results show that the ElectroCore has been successfully scaled up by a factor of 12 from the 500 acfm unit tested at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller in the summer of 1997. The addition of the central electrode has improved the separation efficiency when inlet loadings get very low.

Ralph Altman

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of a SREX Flowsheet for the Separation of Strontium from Dissolved INEEL Zirconium Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning 90 Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run #64 pilot plant calcine spiked with 85 Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4',4'(5')-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO3 scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO3 strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO3 rinse section. The behavior of 85 Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted 85 Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for 85 Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO3 resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO3 scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable.

Law, Jack Douglas; Wood, David James; Todd, Terry Allen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CARBON BED MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according tohe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98 99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as bed hot spots. Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed hot spots. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from. Multiple high and high-high alarm levels should be used, with appropriate corrective actions for each level.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

LowerColoradoRiver_Comments_FutureComms.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Meter Reading (based on hourly reads) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Direct Load Control n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Real time pricing n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a At the customer premises n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a At charging stations n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 450 9,000 72 hrs 1,000,000 kbps 90% 500 ms 99.9999% 5 6 3 n/a n/a n/a

111

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the perforated plate configuration on bag protection and AHPC overall performance and to optimize the perforated plate design. Five different perforated plate configurations were evaluated in a coal combustion system. The AHPC performed extremely well even at a low current level (1.5-3.0 mA) and a low pulse trigger pressure of 6.5 in. W.C. (1.62 kPa), resulting in a bag-cleaning interval of over 40 min at an A/C ratio of 12 ft/min (3.7 m/min) for most of the test period. The longest bag-cleaning interval was 594 min, which is the best to date. The residual drag was reduced to the range from 0.25 to 0.35 in. H{sub 2}O/ft/min, showing an excellent bag-cleaning ability under the perforated plate configurations. The K{sub 2}C{sub i} at the current level of 3 mA was as low as 1.0, indicating excellent ESP performance. All the results are the best achieved to date.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set to 10 wt%. A comprehensive description of the run and the full suite of results were issued as SVF-2364-00. The list of individual feed events including the amounts of liquid and solids transferred for the first five years is added as Attachment 2; the chemical composition of the supernate feed comprises Attachment 3. For the simulant composition, only the first five years of proposed feed delivery were taken into account. The main outcome of MMR-049 was that for the first five years, the feed would come mostly from AP-farms. Multiple delivery campaigns to AP-105 are included in this average feed, while minimizing the amount of contributing tanks to the solids in the feed mix.

HUBER HJ

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Low Temperature Reduction of Alumina Using Fluorine Containing Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of the project is to establish the feasibility of using specific ionic liquids capable of sustaining aluminum electrolysis near room temperature at laboratory and batch recirculation scales. It will explore new technologies for aluminum and other valuable metal extraction and process methods. The new technology will overcome many of the limitations associated with high temperatures processes such as high energy consumption and corrosion attack. Furthermore, ionic liquids are non-toxic and could be recycled after purification, thus minimizing extraction reagent losses and environmental pollutant emissions. Ionic liquids are mixture of inorganic and organic salts which are liquid at room temperature and have wide operational temperature range. During the last several years, they were emerging as novel electrolytes for extracting and refining of aluminum metals and/or alloys, which are otherwise impossible using aqueous media. The superior high temperature characteristics and high solvating capabilities of ionic liquids provide a unique solution to high temperature organic solvent problems associated with device internal pressure build-up, corrosion, and thermal stability. However their applications have not yet been fully implemented due to the insufficient understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms involved in processing of aluminum with ionic liquids. Laboratory aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquids has been investigated in chloride and bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide based ionic liquids. The electrowinning process yielded current density in the range of 200-500 A/m2, and current efficiency of about 90%. The results indicated that high purity aluminum (>99.99%) can be obtained as cathodic deposits. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry studies have shown that initial stages of aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquid electrolyte at 30C was found to be quasi-reversible, with the charge transfer coefficient (0.40). Nucleation phenomena involved in aluminum deposition on copper in AlCl3-BMIMCl electrolyte was found to be instantaneous followed by diffusion controlled three-dimensional growth of nuclei. Diffusion coefficient (Do) of the electroactive species Al2Cl7 ion was in the range from 6.5 to 3.9107 cm2?s1 at a temperature of 30C. Relatively little research efforts have been made toward the fundamental understanding and modeling of the species transport and transformation information involved in ionic liquid mixtures, which eventually could lead to quantification of electrochemical properties. Except that experimental work in this aspect usually is time consuming and expensive, certain characteristics of ionic liquids also made barriers for such analyses. Low vapor pressure and high viscosity make them not suitable for atomic absorption spectroscopic measurement. In addition, aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquid electrolytes are considered to be governed by multi-component mass, heat and charge transport in laminar and turbulent flows that are often multi-phase due to the gas evolution at the electrodes. The kinetics of the electrochemical reactions is in general complex. Furthermore, the mass transfer boundary layer is about one order of magnitude smaller than the thermal and hydrodynamic boundary layer (Re=10,000). Other phenomena that frequently occur are side reactions and temperature or concentration driven natural convection. As a result of this complexity, quantitative knowledge of the local parameters (current densities, ion concentrations, electrical potential, temperature, etc.) is very difficult to obtain. This situation is a serious obstacle for improving the quality of products, efficiency of manufacturing and energy consumption. The gap between laboratory/batch scale processing with global process control and nanoscale deposit surface and materials specifications needs to be bridged. A breakthrough can only be realized if on each scale the occurring phenomena are understood and quantified. Multiscale numerical modeling nevertheless can help t

Dr. R. G. Reddy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System  

SciTech Connect

The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8, 1999 8, 1999 http://www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r ic e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 . 3 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 1 0 4 . 3 0 4 . 5 0 Dollars Per Million BTU N Y M E X S e t t le m e n t P r ic e H e n r y H u b S p o t W T I in $ / M M B t u N o te : T h e H e n r y H u b s p o t p r ic e is fr o m t h e G A S D A IL Y a n d is t h e m id p o in t o f th e ir h ig h a n d lo w p r ic e f o r a d a y . T h e d a te s m a r k e d 0 . 0 0 M O N T H N Y M E X D e liv e r y M o n t h ( n e a r - m o n t h c o n t r a c t ) H o l i d a y S E P T E M B E R 8 /2 7 /9 9 O C T O B E R 9 /2 8 /9 9 N O V E M B E R 7 /2 8 /9 9 A U G U S T T e n -Y e a r A v e r a g e o f H ig h T e m p e r a t u r e s , a n d D a il y H i g h e s t a n d L o w e s t H i g h T e m p e r a t u r e s fo r 6 C it i e s , M a y - S e p t e m b e r ( D a lla s / F t W o r t h , H o u s t o n , L o s A n g e le s , M ia m i, N e w O r le a n s , N e w Y o r k ) 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 8/22/99 8/24/99 8/26/99 8/28/99 8/30/99 9/1/99 9/3/99 9/5/99 9/7/99 9/9/99 9/11/99 9/13/99 9/15/99 9/17/99 9/19/99 9/21/99

118

FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational requirements for the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) melter systems, together with the feed constituents, impose a number of challenges to the off-gas treatment system. The system must be robust from the standpoints of operational reliability and minimization of maintenance. The system must effectively control and remove a wide range of solid particulate matter, acid mists and gases, and organic constituents (including those arising from products of incomplete combustion of sugar and organics in the feed) to concentration levels below those imposed by regulatory requirements. The baseline design for the RPP-WTP LAW primary off-gas system includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed (AC-S), a thermal catalytic oxidizer (TCO), a single-stage selective catalytic reduction NOx treatment system (SCR), and a packed-bed caustic scrubber (PBS). The baseline design for the RPP-WTP HLW primary off-gas system includes an SBS, a WESP, a high efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), and a HEPA filter. The HLW secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed, a silver mordenite bed, a TCO, and a single-stage SCR. The one-third scale HLW DM1200 Pilot Melter installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was equipped with a prototypical off-gas train to meet the needs for testing and confirmation of the performance of the baseline off-gas system design. Various modifications have been made to the DM1200 system as the details of the WTP design have evolved, including the installation of a silver mordenite column and an AC-S column for testing on a slipstream of the off-gas flow; the installation of a full-flow AC-S bed for the present tests was completed prior to initiation of testing. The DM1200 system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in response to attainable plenum temperatures as well as temperature increases in the sulfur impr

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z