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1

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial sweep methodology to create pointwise confidence intervals for the equal error rate (EER). The EER is the rate methods to to estimate the variability in both the DET and the EER. Our radial sweep is based

Adler, Andy

2

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial sweep methodology to create pointwise confidence intervals for the equal error rate (EER). The EER is the rate or bootstrap methods to estimate the variability in both the DET and the EER. Our radial sweep is based

Schuckers, Michael E.

3

Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

E. S. Smith

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Confidence intervals for state probabilities of system capacity outages and for LOLP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONFID"NC. , INTERVALS FO- S'TATE PROBABILITIES OF SYSTEM CAPACITY OUTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thcsi. , bv ATHANASIOS STASINOS Submi. tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STA1'E PROBABILITIES OF STSTEM CAPACITY OVTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thesis by ATHANASIOS STASINOS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Stasinos, Athanasios

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Confidence Interval Estimation for Inequality Indices of the GiniFamily  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present some nonparametric bootstrap methods to construct distribution-free confidence intervals for inequality indices belonging to the Gini family. These methods have a coverage accuracy better than that obtained with the asymptotic ... Keywords: Gini index family, Monte Carlo experiment, income distribution, nonparametric bootstrap

Paola Palmitesta; Corrado Provasi; Cosimo Spera

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

7

Investor Confidence Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects (under $1MM), Lighter engineering requirements – V1 Released September 2013 • Targeted Commercial – Single Measure or Non-Interactive Retrofits – Release Date Dec 2013 • Multifamily – Release Q1 2014 • Quality Assurance Protocol – Currently in BETA...Environmental Defense Fund’s Investor Confidence Project Delivering Investment Quality Energy Efficiency to Market ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Investor Confidence Project...

Golden, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

9

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

10

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

11

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

12

8 FEBRUARY 2005 Over 95 percent of the approximate1y 1.5 million  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States each year are framed with wood, the world's most sustainable building material. Wood, and molded wall panels as both skin and structural ele- ments. The exterior application of structural wood building materials because they consume wood much faster than native subterranean termites

13

jfpe_425 1220..1233 BOOTSTRAP CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR THE KINETIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.073 m) was heated in a steam retort at 126.7C. Antho- cyanin retention was measured by high bands, allows more accurate process design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher-quality design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher- quality nutraceutical products. INTRODUCTION

14

Computing confidence intervals on solution costs for stochastic grid generation expansion problems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A range of core operations and planning problems for the national electrical grid are naturally formulated and solved as stochastic programming problems, which minimize expected costs subject to a range of uncertain outcomes relating to, for example, uncertain demands or generator output. A critical decision issue relating to such stochastic programs is: How many scenarios are required to ensure a specific error bound on the solution cost? Scenarios are the key mechanism used to sample from the uncertainty space, and the number of scenarios drives computational difficultly. We explore this question in the context of a long-term grid generation expansion problem, using a bounding procedure introduced by Mak, Morton, and Wood. We discuss experimental results using problem formulations independently minimizing expected cost and down-side risk. Our results indicate that we can use a surprisingly small number of scenarios to yield tight error bounds in the case of expected cost minimization, which has key practical implications. In contrast, error bounds in the case of risk minimization are significantly larger, suggesting more research is required in this area in order to achieve rigorous solutions for decision makers.

Woodruff, David L..; Watson, Jean-Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Confidence Intervals Estimation in the Identification of Electromechanical Modes from Ambient Noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from ambient data resulting from random load switching throughout the day in power systems effectiveness in reducing the number of trials, which would be beneficial for on-line power system monitoring-- Power system oscillations, modal analysis, power system monitoring, system identification, prediction

Cañizares, Claudio A.

16

Dynamics of acyclic interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 6 (2009) Dynamics of acyclic interval maps [16] D.orbits and bifurcation of maps of the interval. SIAM J.Dynamics of acyclic interval maps Morris W. Hirsch He who

Hirsch, Morris W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence Presentation made by David W. Pstrak for the...

18

Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

Darby, John L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Germany and America: Crisis of confidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper examines the deterioration in German-American relations. The reasons for this downturn in German-American relations are quite simple. Washington views the Persian Gulf crisis as a defining moment in European-American relations and in the creation of a new world order. It is also the first diplomatic test of a unified Germany and a new German-American relationship. It is a test that Germany is thus far seen as having failed for three reasons. First, from the outset many Americans sensed that Germans did not comprehend what this crisis meant for the United States. A second and, in many ways, more worrying factor was the growing sense that the Germans were not being good Europeans. The third and most serious American concern, however, was the unsettling appearance of a very selective German definition of collective defense and common security. The result has been a crisis of confidence in the performance of the German political elite that goes beyond the problems in German-American relations during the early 1980s and the INF debate.

Asmus, R.D.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

22

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Abstract:...

24

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR

25

Exploiting Sensing Diversity for Confident Sensing in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unneeded nodes. Using real vehicle detection trace data, we demonstrate that Wolfpack provides confident, and disaster warning all have stringent accuracy requirements for detecting or classifying events while maximizing system lifetime. We define meeting such user accuracy requirements as confident sensing

Zhou, Gang

26

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION Robi Polikar Department evaluation (NDE) applications resort to pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms for automated classification and characterization of NDE signals. Applications of such systems include defect identification

Polikar, Robi

27

STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

Katz, Richard

28

About equivalent interval colorings of weighted graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given a graph G=(V,E) with strictly positive integer weights @w"i on the vertices i@?V, a k-interval coloring of G is a function I that assigns an interval I(i)@?{1,...,k} of @w"i consecutive integers (called colors) to each vertex i@?V. If two adjacent ... Keywords: Equivalent colorings, Interval coloring problem, Weighted graphs

Mathieu Bouchard; Mirjana angalovi?; Alain Hertz

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Spectral Statistics of RR Intervals in ECG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The statistical properties (fluctuations) of heartbeat intervals (RR intervals) in ECG are studied and compared with the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT). It is found that heartbeat intervals only locally exhibit the fluctuation patterns (universality) predicted by the RMT. This finding shows that heartbeat dynamics is of the mixed type where regular and irregular (chaotic) regimes coexist and the Berry-Robnik theory can be applied. It is also observed that the distribution of heartbeat intervals is well described by the one-parameter Brody distribution. The parameter $\\beta $ of the Brody distribution is seen to be connected with the dynamical state of the heart.

Martinis, M; Knezevic, A; Crnugelj, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Trust, control and confidence in logistics outsourcing decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of theoretical constructs and models exist for framing logistics outsourcing decisions. In transaction cost economics, it is argued that the dimensions of transactions, notably asset specificity, are the main criteria to consider in outsourcing situations. Resource-based approaches focus on the company's assets and capabilities that should be protected and developed while non-core activities should be outsourced. Behaviourally oriented theories explore the human and social factors facilitating outsourcing decisions. In this paper, the model of Das and Teng (1998) is used to examine the role of trust and control as facilitators creating confidence in outsourcing when relationship specific investments are present in the outsourcing relationship. A conceptual model is developed and tested with structural equation modelling using survey data from Finnish industrial companies. The results show that confidence is positively associated with the propensity to outsource logistics when the outsourcing relationship is disposed to specific investments.

Jari Juga; Jouni Juntunen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection of the Great Lakes is vital as they contain 95 percent of the surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by expanding and enhancing many existing programs and implementing new innovative projects that address Targeted for Remediation Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution · Decision Support Tools is an important complement to AOC remediation investments. Great Lakes Sediment Contamination Database High

33

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection of the Great Lakes is vital as they contain 95 percent of the surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by expanding and enhancing many existing programs and implementing new innovative projects that address Targeted for Remediation Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution · Decision Support Tools

34

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection of the Great Lakes is vital as they contain 95 percent of the surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Great Lakes comprise the largest freshwater ecosystem on Earth. The restoration and protection and Beach Forecasting* · Identifying Land Use Tipping Points that Threaten Great Lakes Ecosystems* Aquatic Invasive Species · Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System Expansion* · Regional Ecosystem

35

Frequency domain design of interval controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant role in the analysis and design of interval systems. Its external properties are also discussed. The image set approach & frequency domain criteria can be used to calculate the IP stability margin. The frequency domain criteria are used...

Park, Wunyong

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Extremal properties of interval control systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXTREMAL PROPERTIES OF INTERVAL CONTROL SYSTEMS A Thesis by FARIS RAGHEB KAMAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering EXTREMAL PROPERTIES OF INTERVAL CONTROL SYSTEMS A Thesis by FARIS RAGHEB I&AMAL Approved as to style and content b1 Mohammed A. Dahleh (Chair of Committee) ostas Georghiades (Member ) Ehsani Mehrdad (Member...

Kamal, Faris Ragheb

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Interval Data Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interval Data Systems Inc Interval Data Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Interval Data Systems Inc Address 135 Beaver Street Place Waltham, Massachusetts Zip 02452 Sector Efficiency Product Efficiency and monitoring solutions for buildings Website http://www.intdatsys.com/ Coordinates 42.384614°, -71.207508° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.384614,"lon":-71.207508,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Quiz # 4, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, March 25, 2009 Q10 (Page 301). Each of the following is a confidence interval for = true average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@clarkson.edu #12;Q12 (Page 302). Heavy-metal pollution of various ecosystem is a serious environmen- tal threat

Sanyal, Suman

39

Preliminaries Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline Preliminaries Results Conclusion Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes.Rizzi@unitn.it August the 16th Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12 Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12;Outline

Blin, Guillaume

40

ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ENTROPY OF INTERVAL MAPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ENTROPY OF INTERVAL MAPS ALEXANDER BLOKH AND JOZEF BOBOK Abstract. We obtain upper estimates on the entropy of interval maps of given modality and Sharkovskii type. Following our results we formulate a conjecture on asymptotic behavior of the entropy of interval maps. 1

Blokh, Alexander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Steam turbine-generator outage interval extension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the industry`s growing competitive climate, utilities are seeking ways to tap the economic benefits to be derived from maximizing intervals between major turbine-generator (T-G) inspections and overhauls--while ensuring protection of these assets. EPRI and others have developed a substantial body of technology which addresses many of the condition assessment issues that underlie T-G inspection and overhaul decisions. Examples include remaining life determination of critical components such as rotors and blades. While the initial focus of this technology had previously been to support T-G run-repair-replace decision making, this technology can also serve as a basis for run-inspect decisions. This paper describes EPRI`s initiative to develop and implement a T-G Health Management System. By providing key status reports reflecting the on-line health of critical components, in terms of life consumption, performance degradation and probability of failure, this system will provide a means to justify extending T-G operations between inspections and overhauls.

McCloskey, T.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pollard, M. [Carolina Power & Light Company, Raleigh, NC (United States); Dewey, R.; Roemer, M. [Stress Technology Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduating Medical Students Entering EM Residency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

favorably viewed their EM Boot Camp experience and felt that57 UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduatinghave used some type of Boot Camp, modeled after military

Watson, L F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An analysis of confidence limit calculations used in AAPM Task Group No. 119  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The report issued by AAPM Task Group No. 119 outlined a procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of IMRT commissioning. The procedure involves measuring gamma pass-rate indices for IMRT plans of standard phantoms and determining if the results fall within a confidence limit set by assuming normally distributed data. As stated in the TG report, the assumption of normally distributed gamma pass rates is a convenient approximation for commissioning purposes, but may not accurately describe the data. Here the authors attempt to better describe gamma pass-rate data by fitting it to different distributions. The authors then calculate updated confidence limits using those distributions and compare them to those derived using TG No. 119 method. Methods: Gamma pass-rate data from 111 head and neck patients are fitted using the TG No. 119 normal distribution, a truncated normal distribution, and a Weibull distribution. Confidence limits to 95% are calculated for each and compared. A more general analysis of the expected differences between the TG No. 119 method of determining confidence limits and a more time-consuming curve fitting method is performed. Results: The TG No. 119 standard normal distribution does not fit the measured data. However, due to the small range of measured data points, the inaccuracy of the fit has only a small effect on the final value of the confidence limits. The confidence limits for the 111 patient plans are within 0.1% of each other for all distributions. The maximum expected difference in confidence limits, calculated using TG No. 119's approximation and a truncated distribution, is 1.2%. Conclusions: A three-parameter Weibull probability distribution more accurately fits the clinical gamma index pass-rate data than the normal distribution adopted by TG No. 119. However, the sensitivity of the confidence limit on distribution fit is low outside of exceptional circumstances.

Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Analysis of interval-censored data with Weibull lifetime distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& OR Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B.T. Road, Kolkata, Pin 700108, India. Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Pin 208016, India. Corresponding author, e point. The event time is considered to be interval censored when an event occurs within some interval

Kundu, Debasis

46

Limulus amebocyte lysate: an evaluation as a method for biological wastewater process monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Relat1onsh1p between BDDS without nitrif1cation 1nhibitor and endotoxin concentration with a 95 percent confidence interval on Equation I Figure A-1. BOD w1thout n1trification 1nhibitor versus 5 total suspended solids. F1gure A-2. BOD without nitrif... percent of the initial dissolved oxygen content. Wagenhals, Theriault, and Hommon advocated that the best method available for estimating the strength of raw sewage was the BOD test. They felt the BOD test in conjunction with the suspended solids test...

Hawkins, Scott John

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Horizontal velocities in the central and eastern United States from GPS surveys during the 1987-1996 interval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Geodetic Survey and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission jointly organized GPS surveys in 1987, 1990, 1993, and 1996 to search for crustal deformation in the central and eastern United States (east of longitude 108{degrees}W). We have analyzed the data of these four surveys in combination with VLBI data observed during the 1979-1995 interval and GPS data for 22 additional surveys observed during the 1990-1996 interval. These latter GPS surveys served to establish accurately positioned geodetic marks in various states. Accordingly, we have computed horizontal velocities for 64 GPS sites and 12 VLBI sites relative to a reference frame for which the interior of the North American plate is considered fixed on average. None of our derived velocities exceeds 6 mm/yr in magnitude. Moreover, the derived velocity at each GPS site is statistically zero at the 95% confidence level except for the site BOLTON in central Ohio and the site BEARTOWN in southeastern Pennsylvania. However, as statistical theory would allow approximately 5% of the 64 GPS sites to fall our zero-velocity hypothesis, we are uncertain whether or not these estimated velocities for BOLTON and BEARTOWN reflect actual motion relative to the North American plate. We also computed horizontal strain rates for the cells formed by a 1{degrees} by 1{degrees} grid spanning the central and eastern United States. Corresponding shearing rates are everywhere less than 60 nanoradians/yr in magnitude, and no shearing rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level except for a grid cell near BEARTOWN whose rate is 57 {+-} 26 nanoradians/yr. Also corresponding areal dilatation rates are everywhere less than 40 nanostrain/yr in magnitude, and no dilatation rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level.

Snay, R.A.; Strange, W.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya (Knoxville, TN); Chaum, Edward (Memphis, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tables for Trials and Failures with PD for Designated Confidence Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two attachments are provided for performance testing of sensors and other Physical Protection System (PPS) components.#2; The first attachment is a table of Trials and Failures, giving Probability of Detection (PD) for a designated confidence level and sorted by trials.#2; The second attachment contains the same data, sorted by failures.

Leach, Janice

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Rapid Deployment with Confidence: Calibration and Fault Detection in Environmental Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working hypothesis is that the influx of dissolved arsenic into the ground water is greatly enhanced where and a system for online fault remediation. Care in the calibration process for ion selective electrodes used for water quality assists interpretation of the data. Scientists will have more confidence in the data

Nowak, Robert

52

CONFIDENCE-BASED DENOISING RELYING ON A TRANSFORMATION-INVARIANT, ROBUST PATCH SIMILARITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONFIDENCE-BASED DENOISING RELYING ON A TRANSFORMATION-INVARIANT, ROBUST PATCH SIMILARITY Exploring ways to improve patch synchronous summation Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, France {angelino,debreuve,barlaud}@i3s.unice.fr Keywords: Denoising, image patch, patch denoising

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

PATCH CONFIDENCE K-NEAREST NEIGHBORS DENOISING Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, Fellow IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PATCH CONFIDENCE K-NEAREST NEIGHBORS DENOISING Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, barlaud}@i3s.unice.fr ABSTRACT Recently, patch-based denoising techniques have proved to be very effective. Indeed, they account for the correlations that exist among patches of natural images. Taking

Boyer, Edmond

54

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Phase Structure of Gauge Theories on an Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss gauge symmetry breaking in a general framework of gauge theories on an interval. We first derive a possible set of boundary conditions for a scalar field, which are compatible with several consistency requirements. It is shown that with these boundary conditions the scalar field can acquire a nontrivial vacuum expectation value even if the scalar mass square is positive. Any nonvanishing vacuum expectation value cannot be a constant but, in general, depends on the extra dimensional coordinate of the interval. The phase diagram of broken/unbroken gauge symmetry possesses a rich structure in the parameter space of the length of the interval, the scalar mass and the boundary conditions. We also discuss 4d chiral fermions and fermion mass hierarchies in our gauge symmetry breaking scenario.

Fujimoto, Yukihiro; Ohya, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Makoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Phase Structure of Gauge Theories on an Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss gauge symmetry breaking in a general framework of gauge theories on an interval. We first derive a possible set of boundary conditions for a scalar field, which are compatible with several consistency requirements. It is shown that with these boundary conditions the scalar field can acquire a nontrivial vacuum expectation value even if the scalar mass square is positive. Any nonvanishing vacuum expectation value cannot be a constant but, in general, depends on the extra dimensional coordinate of the interval. The phase diagram of broken/unbroken gauge symmetry possesses a rich structure in the parameter space of the length of the interval, the scalar mass and the boundary conditions. We also discuss 4d chiral fermions and fermion mass hierarchies in our gauge symmetry breaking scenario.

Yukihiro Fujimoto; Tomoaki Nagasawa; Satoshi Ohya; Makoto Sakamoto

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Flood control project selection using an interval type-2 entropy weight with interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flood control project is a complex issue which takes economic social environment and technical attributes into account. Selection of the best flood control project requires the consideration of conflicting quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria. When decision-makers’ judgment are under uncertainty it is relatively difficult for them to provide exact numerical values. The interval type-2 fuzzy set (IT2FS) is a strong tool which can deal with the uncertainty case of subjective incomplete and vague information. Besides it helps to solve for some situations where the information about criteria weights for alternatives is completely unknown. Therefore this paper is adopted the information interval type-2 entropy concept into the weighting process of interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS. This entropy weight is believed can effectively balance the influence of uncertainty factors in evaluating attribute. Then a modified ranking value is proposed in line with the interval type-2 entropy weight. Quantitative and qualitative factors that normally linked with flood control project are considered for ranking. Data in form of interval type-2 linguistic variables were collected from three authorised personnel of three Malaysian Government agencies. Study is considered for the whole of Malaysia. From the analysis it shows that diversion scheme yielded the highest closeness coefficient at 0.4807. A ranking can be drawn using the magnitude of closeness coefficient. It was indicated that the diversion scheme recorded the first rank among five causes.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Improved approximation algorithm for the jump number of interval orders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The jump number problem for posets is to find a linear extension in which the number of incomparable adjacent pairs is minimized. In this paper the class of interval orders is considered. Three 3/2-approximation algorithms for this problem have been known for some time. By a previous work of Mitas, the problem may be reformulated as a subgraph packing task. We prove that the problem reduces also to a set cover task, and we establish an improved bound of 1.484 to the approximation ratio of the jump number on interval orders.

Przemys?aw Krysztowiak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

Fertin, Guillaume

62

Quantum ergodicity for graphs related to interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove quantum ergodicity for a family of graphs that are obtained from ergodic one-dimensional maps of an interval using a procedure introduced by Pakonski et al (J. Phys. A, v. 34, 9303-9317 (2001)). As observables we take the L^2 functions on the interval. The proof is based on the periodic orbit expansion of a majorant of the quantum variance. Specifically, given a one-dimensional, Lebesgue-measure-preserving map of an interval, we consider an increasingly refined sequence of partitions of the interval. To this sequence we associate a sequence of graphs, whose directed edges correspond to elements of the partitions and on which the classical dynamics approximates the Perron-Frobenius operator corresponding to the map. We show that, except possibly for subsequences of density 0, the eigenstates of the quantum graphs equidistribute in the limit of large graphs. For a smaller class of observables we also show that the Egorov property, a correspondence between classical and quantum evolution in the semiclassical limit, holds for the quantum graphs in question.

G. Berkolaiko; J. P. Keating; U. Smilansky

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stochastic EM algorithm for doubly interval-censored data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the are sampled from a finite set of values. Recall that, for...vector for are based on the risk set at each event time (i.e...To ensure that the intervals cover most of the generated values...the th iteration: where is the set of parameters estimated from......

David Dejardin; Emmanuel Lesaffre

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Use of Utility Interval Meters in an Industrial Energy Audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a unique approach to an energy audit of a large tank farm. The audit was unusual in that it was located out-of-doors and the energy-using equipment was made up almost entirely of pumps. The auditors used the utility interval...

Wallace, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

R-R interval based paroxysmal atrial fibrillation analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection and classification of Atrial complexes from the ECG is of considerable importance in critical patient care monitoring of dangerous heart conditions. Accurate detection of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (PAF) using Atrial Premature Complexes(APC) ... Keywords: APC, ECG, PAF, R-R interval, arrhythmia

S. S. Kadge; M. S. Panse

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Constraining Red-shift Parametrization Parameters in Brans-Dicke Theory: Evolution of Open Confidence Contours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Brans Dicke theory of gravity, from the nature of the scalar field-potential considered, the dark energy, dark matter, radiation densities predicted by different observations and the closedness of the universe considered, we can fix our $\\omega_{BD}$, the Brans Dicke parameter, keeping only the thing in mind that from different solar system constrains it must be greater than $5\\times 10^{5}$. Once we have a value, satisfying the required lower boundary, in our hand we proceed for setting unknown parameters of the different dark energy models' EoS parameter. In this paper we work with three well known red shift parametrizations of dark energy EoS. To constrain their free parameters for Brans Dicke theory of gravity we take twelve point red shift vs Hubble's parameter data and perform $\\chi^{2}$ test. We present the observational data analysis mechanism for Stern, Stern+BAO and Stern+BAO+CMB observations. Minimising $\\chi^2$, we obtain the best fit values and draw different confidence contours. We analyze the contours physically. Also we examine the best fit of distance modulus for our theoretical models and the Supernovae Type Ia Union2 sample. For Brans Dicke theory of gravity the difference from the mainstream confidence contouring method of data analysis id that the confidence contours evolved are not at all closed contours like a circle or a ellipse. Rather they are found to be open contours allowing the free parameters to float inside a infinite region of parameter space. However, negative EoSs are likely to evolve from the best fit values.

Ritabrata Biswas; Ujjal Debnath

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Generalizing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for interval data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Here we propose an adaption of Wilcoxon's two-sample rank-sum test to interval data. This adaption is interval-valued: it computes the minimum and maximum values of the statistic when we rank the set of all feasible samples (all joint samples compatible with the initial set-valued information). We prove that these bounds can be explicitly computed using a very low computational cost algorithm. Interpreting this generalized test is straightforward: if the obtained interval-valued p-value is on one side of the significance level, we will be able to make a decision (reject/no reject). Otherwise, we will conclude that our information is too vague to lead to a clear decision. Our method is also applicable to quantized data: in the presence of quantized information, the joint sample may contain a high proportion of draws, which can prevent the test from drawing a clear conclusion. According to the usual convention, when there are ties, the ranks for the observations in a tie are taken to be the average of the ranks for those observations. This convention can lead to wrong conclusions. Here, we consider the family of all possible rank permutations, such that a sample containing ties will not just be associated with a single value, but rather with a collection of values for the Wilcoxon's rank-sum statistic, with each one of them being associated with a different p-value. When the impact of quantization is too high to lead to a clear decision, our test provides an interval-valued p-value that includes the chosen significance level. It indicates that there is no clear conclusion according to this test. Two different experiments exemplify the properties of the generalized test: the first one illustrates its ability to avoid wrong decisions in the presence of quantized data. The second one shows the performance of the generalized test when used with interval data.

Julien Perolat; Inés Couso; Kevin Loquin; Olivier Strauss

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ECG beats classification using waveform similarity and RR interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper present an electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification method based on waveform similarity and RR interval. The purpose of the method is to classify six types of heart beats (normal beat, atrial premature beat, paced beat, premature ventricular beat, left bundle branch block beat and right bundle branch block beat). The electrocardiogram signal is first denoised using wavelet transform based techniques. Heart beats of 128 samples data centered on the R peak are extracted from the ECG signal and thence reduced to 16 samples data to constitute a feature. RR intervals surrounding the beat are also exploited as feature. A database of annotated beats is built for the classifier for waveform comparison to unknown beats. Tested on 46 records in the MIT/BIH arrhythmia database, the method shows classification rate of 97.52%.

Ka, Ahmad Khoureich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Mapping musical intervals to affective qualities: A projective study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many claim that the various musical intervals used in Western music create identifiable affective impressions which musicians use for musical communication. Alain Danielou has proposed furthermore that these affective impressions form a space with a three?dimensional structure isomorphic to the natural three?dimensional structure of the intervals themselves (ratios composed of positive and negative powers of 2 3 and 5). To test this hypothesis 36 Marathi?speaking college students at Ahmednagar College Maharastra India were asked to imagine that each of 24 complex?tone melodicintervals was the “sound?name” of a person in some distant village. They were then given 36 bipolar adjective pairs and asked to rate the personality of the parson they imagined on five?point scales. (Previous studies have shown that subjects make affective judgments about sounds far more easily when imagining personalities than when rating the sounds themselves.) Results indicate that Indian students associate the main intervals used in Western music with separable personalities and that these personalities compare well with those Western listeners reported in a previous study. [Work supported by the American Institute of Indian Studies.

Scott Makeig

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.

Vannoni, M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Methods for Predicting More Confident Lifetimes of Seals in Air Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been working for many years to develop improved methods for predicting the lifetimes of polymers exposed to air environments and have recently turned our attention to seal materials. This paper describes an extensive study on a butyl material using elevated temperature compression stress-relaxation (CSR) techniques in combination with conventional oven aging exposures. The results initially indicated important synergistic effects when mechanical strain is combined with oven aging, as well as complex, non-Arrhenius behavior of the CSR results. By combining modeling and experiments, we show that diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) anomalies dominate traditional CSR experiments. A new CSR approach allows us to eliminate DLO effects and recover Arrhenius behavior. Furthermore, the resulting CSR activation energy (E{sub a}) from 125 C to 70 C is identical to the activation energies for the tensile elongation and for the oxygen consumption rate of unstrained material over similar temperature ranges. This strongly suggests that the same underlying oxidation reactions determine both the unstrained and strained degradation rates. We therefore utilize our ultrasensitive oxygen consumption rate approach down to 23 C to show that the CSR E{sub a} likely remains unchanged when extrapolated below 70 C, allowing very confident room temperature lifetime predictions for the butyl seal.

Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hand, Michael S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Computing electricity spot price prediction intervals using quantile regression and forecast averaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine possible accuracy gains from forecast averaging in the context of interval forecasts of electricity spot prices. First, we test whether constructing empirical prediction intervals (PI) from combined electricity

Jakub Nowotarski; Rafa? Weron

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Computer-controlled time-interval generator for pulse EPR relaxometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a time-interval generator with eleven output channels; the generator is controlled by an Elektronika D3-28 computer. High flexibility in the shaping of various pulse combinations allows automatic control of the EPR relaxometer under all research conditions. A maximum of 16 intervals can be generated in each channel. The interval range is 1 usec to 4 X 10/sup 3/ sec. The generator can also be used to control other pulse instruments for physics experiments.

Safonov, S.D.; Dudkov, V.N.; Ivanov, V.G.; Muromtsev, V.I.; Nyrtsov, I.V.; Sukharev, V.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - aware interval caching Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: aware interval caching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Technical Report No. 11980001 University of Rhode Island Summary: Engineering Kingston, RI 02881, USA...

78

OPTIMAL EXTERNAL MEMORY INTERVAL MANAGEMENT # LARS ARGE + AND JEFFREY SCOTT VITTER #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e#cient external data structures. Key words. interval management, stabbing queries, I/O e/O) transmits one page of B elements. We measure the e#ciency of an algorithm in terms of the number of IOPTIMAL EXTERNAL MEMORY INTERVAL MANAGEMENT # LARS ARGE + AND JEFFREY SCOTT VITTER # SIAM J. COMPUT

Arge, Lars

79

Interval type-2 fuzzy PID load frequency controller using Big Bang-Big Crunch optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes an optimization based design methodology of interval type-2 fuzzy PID (IT2FPID) controllers for the load frequency control (LFC) problem. Hitherto, numerous fuzzy logic control structures are proposed as a solution of LFC. However, ... Keywords: Big Bang-Big Crunch optimization, Interval type-2 fuzzy PID controllers, Load frequency control

Engin Yesil

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems and experiment for the thermal subprocess of a high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell system. Keywords: Interval analysis, model-predictive control, sensitivity analysis, tracking control, solid oxide fuel cells AMS

Kearfott, R. Baker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Holt’s exponential smoothing and neural network models for forecasting interval-valued time series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interval-valued time series are interval-valued data that are collected in a chronological sequence over time. This paper introduces three approaches to forecasting interval-valued time series. The first two approaches are based on multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural networks and Holt’s exponential smoothing methods, respectively. In Holt’s method for interval-valued time series, the smoothing parameters are estimated by using techniques for non-linear optimization problems with bound constraints. The third approach is based on a hybrid methodology that combines the MLP and Holt models. The practicality of the methods is demonstrated through simulation studies and applications using real interval-valued stock market time series.

André Luis Santiago Maia; Francisco de A.T. de Carvalho

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

?-Dominance relation and rough sets in interval-valued information systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Though rough set has been widely used to study systems characterized by insufficient and incomplete information, its performance in dealing with initial interval-valued data needs to be seriously considered for improving the suitability and scalability. The aim of this paper is to present a parameterized dominance-based rough set approach to interval-valued information systems. First, by considering the degree that an interval-valued data is dominating another one, we propose the concept of ?-dominance relation. Second, we present the ?-dominance based rough set model in interval-valued decision systems. Finally, we introduce lower and upper approximate reducts into ?-dominance based rough set for simplifying decision rules, we also present the judgement theorems and discernibility functions, which describe how lower and upper approximate reducts can be calculated. This study suggests potential application areas and new research trends concerning rough set approach to interval-valued information systems.

Xibei Yang; Yong Qi; Dong-Jun Yu; Hualong Yu; Jingyu Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Safety and Efficacy of a Pentavalent Human–Bovine (WC3) Reassortant Rotavirus Vaccine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and safety end-point adjudication committee (listed in Part I of the Supplementary Appendix). The investigators had access to all study data. This report was drafted primarily by Drs. Vesikari, Dallas, DiNubile, and Heaton and was reviewed and approved by each coauthor. The Indian Health Service approved... In this randomized trial, the clinical efficacy of an oral, live pentavalent human–bovine reassortant vaccine was estimated to be 98.0 percent against severe gastroenteritis due to rotavirus. In the safety study, which included 68,038 infants, the rates of intussusception were similar in the vaccine and placebo groups (relative risk, 0.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.3 to 1.8).

Vesikari T.; Matson D.O.; Dennehy P.

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

volumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies, suggesting that innovation and social learning propensities have evolved together. Species range size did not correlatevolumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing

Reader, Simon

85

Extension of multivariate regression trees to interval data. Application to electricity load profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several data can be presented as interval curves where ... particular, this representation is well adapted for load profiles, which depict the electricity consumption of a class of customers. Electricity load pro...

Véronique Cariou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Relationship between cutoff frequency and accuracy in time-interval photon statistics applied to oscillating signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the accuracy in the determination of the period of an oscillating signal, when obtained from the photon statistics time-interval probability, is studied as a function of...

Rebolledo, M A; Martinez-Betorz, J A

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

No O(N) queries for checking if N intervals cover everything or for piercing N pairs of intervals. An O(N log N)-steps algorithm for piercing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complexity of two related geometrical (indeed, combinatorial) problems is considered, measured by the number of queries needed to determine the solution. It is proved that one cannot check in a linear in N number of queries whether N intervals cover a whole interval, or whether for N pairs of intervals on two lines there is a pair of points intersecting each of these pairs of intervals ("piercing all pairs of intervals"). The proofs are related to examples which show that there is no "Helly property" here - the whole set of N may cover the whole interval (resp. may have no pair of points piercing all pairs of intervals) while any proper subset does not. Also, for the piercing problem we outline an algorithm, taking O(N log N) steps, to check whether there is a pair of points piercing all pairs of intervals and if there is, to find it.

Katchalski, Meir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interval analysis applied to the maximum loading point of electric power systems considering load data uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a simple and efficient power flow method to calculate, in an interval manner, the main variables corresponding to the maximum loading point, under load data uncertainties. The resulting interval nonlinear system of equations is solved using Krawczyk method. The proposed methodology is implemented in the Matlab environment using the Intlab toolbox. Results are compared with those obtainable by Monte Carlo simulations. IEEE 30 bus system and a South-southeastern Brazilian network are used to validate the proposed methodology.

L.E.S. Pereira; V.M. da Costa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers’ confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

Robert Youngblood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Time interval and lattice vibration in Raman effect, photoelectric effect and plane mirror reflection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time interval between the incident and scattered photon in Raman effect and absorption of photon and emission of electron in photoelectric effect has not been determined till now. This is because there is no such high level instrument discovered till now to detect time interval to such a small level. But this can be calculated theoretically by applying a basic principle of physics like impulse is equal to the change in momentum. Considering the collision between electron and photon as perfect inelastic collision in photoelectric effect, elastic and inelastic collision in Raman effect and elastic collision in plane mirror reflection and the interaction between electron and photon as strong gravitational interaction we calculate the required time interval. During these phenomena there is lattice vibration which can be quantized as phonon particles.

M. Kumar; S. Sahoo

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is investigating the potential benefits of incorporating interval electricity data into its residential energy end use models. This includes interval smart meter and submeter data from utility assets and systems. It is expected that these data will play a significant role in informing residential energy efficiency policies in the future. Therefore, a long-term strategy for improving the RECS end-use models will not be complete without an investigation of the current state of affairs of submeter data, including their potential for use in the context of residential building energy modeling.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations at stopping and post-exercise times on d 28 when compared to d 0. However it was only following interval training that this increase in aerobic capacity response was repeated on d 31. On d 31 of the conventional protocol, plasma lactate...

Haney, Elizabeth anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

40 Cognitive Science class intervals that are equally spread across the data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 Cognitive Science class intervals that are equally spread across the data range. For example and geographic visualization. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PearsonJPrentice Hall. COGNITIVE SCIENCE Cognitive science. Cognition includes perception, thinking, learning, memory, reasoning and problem solving, and linguistic

Montello, Daniel R.

94

TradeO# Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Static Measurements under Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade­O# Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Static Measurements under Interval Uncertainty situations, we are not satisfied with the accuracy of the existing measurements. There are two possible ways to improve the measurement accuracy: . first, instead of a single measurement, we can make repeated

Ward, Karen

95

Trade-Off Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Measurements under Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade-Off Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Measurements under Interval Uncertainty Hung T practical situations, we are not satisfied with the accuracy of the existing measurements. There are two possible ways to improve the measurement accuracy: · first, instead of a single measurement, we can make

Kreinovich, Vladik

96

Trade-Off Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Static Measurements under Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade-Off Between Sample Size and Accuracy: Case of Static Measurements under Interval Uncertainty situations, we are not satisfied with the accuracy of the existing measurements. There are two possible ways to improve the measurement accuracy: · first, instead of a single measurement, we can make repeated

Ward, Karen

97

Application of SAFER-PC program to determine turbine rotor boresonic inspection intervals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) used EPRI`s SAFER-PC Program to evaluate their HP/IP, LP, and generator rotors from Cherokee Station Unit 3, to determine appropriate boresonic re-inspection intervals. The program uses fracture mechanics to calculate critical crack sizes, which could lead to catastrophic failure of the rotors. Conservative stress and fracture mechanics analyses showed negligible fatigue crack growth of assumed bore surface cracks would occur over the proposed inspection interval of eighteen years. The evaluation assumed consistent operational start-up procedures for the inspection interval. If the unit experiences more severe operational procedures, the analysis may not be applicable, with smaller critical crack sizes and accelerated crack growth rates expected. The SAFER-PC analysis resulted in an extension of the previously recommended reinspection interval by eight years. By eliminating just this one inspection, PSCC achieved savings in the range of $100,000. Further savings are anticipated by utilizing the SAFER-PC Program to evaluate these and other PSCC rotors in the future.

Sachse, D.G.; Hellner, R.L.; Dupont, E.J. [Public Service Co., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fire-Return Intervals in Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Kings River Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire-Return Intervals in Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems,070-ha study area in the Dinkey Creek watershed. Stumps in mixed-conifer forest were examined for fire a similar period in mixed-conifer forests at Redwood Mountain and Bearskin Creek, 40-50 km south of Dinkey

Standiford, Richard B.

99

VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation values obtained from models utilizing satellite or cloud cover observation data with solarVARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola Department of Physics to evaluate satellite and cloud cover models, it is useful to understand the short-term variability of solar

Oregon, University of

100

A generalized interval probability-based optimization method for training generalized hidden Markov model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently a generalized hidden Markov model (GHMM) was proposed for solving the information fusion problems under aleatory and epistemic uncertainties in engineering application. In GHMM, aleatory uncertainty is captured by the probability measure whereas ... Keywords: Generalized Baum-Welch algorithm, Generalized Jensen inequality, Generalized hidden Markov model, Generalized interval probability, State recognition

Fengyun Xie; Bo Wu; Youmin Hu; Yan Wang; Guangfei Jia; Yao Cheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Their Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including applications to the seismic inverse problem in geosciences, to chip design in computer engineering of a pollutant on the fish, we check on the fish daily; if a fish was alive on Day 5 but dead on Day 6, then the only information about the lifetime of this fish is that it is somewhere within the interval [5, 6]; we

Kreinovich, Vladik

102

Fast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Their Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including applications to the seismic inverse problem in geosciences, to chip design in computer engineering#ect of a pollutant on the fish, we check on the fish daily; if a fish was alive on Day 5 but dead on Day 6, then the only information about the lifetime of this fish is that it is somewhere within the interval [5, 6]; we

Kreinovich, Vladik

103

Comparison of Rough-set and Interval-set Models for Uncertain Reasoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Rough-set and Interval-set Models for Uncertain Reasoning Y.Y. Yao and Xining Li Department of Computer Science Lakehead University Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1 Abstract In the rough-set of their extended set-theoretic operators. The operators in the rough-set model are not truth-functional, while

Yao, Yiyu

104

Towards an interval-valued estimation of the density Bilal Nehme and Olivier Strauss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

belonging to the considered set. I. INTRODUCTION In the last ten years, there has been an increasing-valued pdf. This paper is organized as follows: section II introduces some necessary preliminary concepts. In section III we show how to built our interval-valued estimator based on a particular kernel. Section IV

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 26922700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 2692­2700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator Sevilla, Spain Available online 10 May 2007 Abstract Address­Event­Representation (AER) is a communication). In developing AER-based systems it is very convenient to have available some means of generating AER streams

Barranco, Bernabe Linares

106

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

107

CP(N-1) model on finite interval in the large N limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CP(N-1) \\sigma\\ model on finite interval of length R with Dirichlet boundary conditions is analysed in the 1/N expansion. The theory has two phases, separated by a phase transition at R ~ 1/\\Lambda, \\Lambda\\ is dynamical scale of the CP(N-1) model. The vacuum energy dependence of R, and especially Casimir-type scaling 1/R, is discussed.

A. Milekhin

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

An analysis of beef cattle weights and gains measured at varying intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 1967 Major Subject. Animal Breeding AN ANALYSIS OF BEEF CATTLE WEIGHTS AND GAINS MEASURED AT VARYING INTERVALS A Thesis JAMES DAVID FOX Approved as to style and content hy: (Chairman Co t e) j ('. (Head of Department) embe ) (Member (N..., and inaccuracy of the scale or scale operator. The standard error (the square root of the residual variance component) of a weight measures the amount of un- accountable variation. A main objective of this study was to analyze statistically the variation...

Fox, James David

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Differential properties and attracting sets of a simplest skew product of interval maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a skew product of interval maps with a closed set of periodic points, the dependence of the structure of its {omega}-limit sets on its differential properties is investigated. An example of a map in this class is constructed which has the maximal differentiability properties (within a certain subclass) with respect to the variable x, is C{sup 1}-smooth in the y-variable and has one-dimensional {omega}-limit sets. Theorems are proved that give necessary conditions for one-dimensional {omega}-limit sets to exist. One of them is formulated in terms of the divergence of the series consisting of the values of a function of x; this function is the C{sup 0}-norm of the deviation of the restrictions of the fibre maps to some nondegenerate closed interval from the identity on the same interval. Another theorem is formulated in terms of the properties of the partial derivative with respect to x of the fibre maps. A complete description is given of the {omega}-limit sets of certain class of C{sup 1}-smooth skew products satisfying some natural conditions. Bibliography: 33 titles.

Efremova, Lyudmila S [N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chaotic data analysis of heart R-R interval EKG data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cardiac beat-to-beat interval data is analyzed with a chaotic data analysis toolkit. The embedding dimension of ten data sets from healthy subjects is 7 or at most 8. Ten of the eleven pathological data sets have an embedding dimension of 9 or greater. Statistically, the first local minimum of average mutual information for healthy hearts is larger than the pathological cases. But, there is a large standard deviation for this metric that blurs the distinction between the healthy and pathological data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Frison, T.W. [Randle, Inc., P.O. Box 1010, Great Falls, Virginia 22066 (United States); Peng, C.K.; Goldberger, A. [Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Katz, R.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Factors affecting the relationship between calving interval of cows and weaning weights of calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that all F values of the additional variables were highly inflated. GESL was then deleted from the variables considered in the stepwise procedures, since DPCN and GESL form a linear combination for CI. These stepwise proce- dures also had similar... AS THE RESPONSE VARIABLE Variable a Abbreviation Interval INA INB INC IND INE INF ING INH IN I INJ INT INU INV INW INX INY 1NZ INAA INAB INAL INAM INAN INAO INAP INAQ INAR INAS INBB INBC INBD INBE INBF INBG Previous conception...

Doren, Philip Erich

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 99 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:37, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:37, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650 (99 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

113

Application of the CSP Approach and the Interval Computation for the Optimal Sizing of a Compression Spring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this present study a new design approach based on intervals calculation method and Constraint Satisfaction Problem technique «CSP approach» was discussed. It has been ... dynamic of design steps), since with t...

Hassen Trabelsi; Pierre-Alain Yvars…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Quality characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef as affected by postmortem chill, storage temperature and storage interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the deoree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Animal Science QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE...

Beebe, Sammy Denzil

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Variable interval time/temperature (VITT) defrost-control-system evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two variable-interval-time/temperature (VITT) heat pump defrost control systems are analyzed to determine if systems manufactured by Honeywell and Ranco qualify for credit for heat pumps with demand defrost control. The operation of the systems is described. VITT controls are not demand defrost control systems but utilize demand defrost control as backup systems in most Ranco models and all Honeywell models. The evaluations and results, intended to provide DOE information in making its determinations regarding credits for the control systems are discussed. The evaluation methodology utilizes a modified version of the Heat Pump Seasonal Performance Model (HPSPM) and the important modifications are discussed in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a detailed listing and discussion of the HPSPM output. (MCW)

None

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

116

Interval Between Surgery and Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy for Distal Rectal Cancer: Does Delayed Surgery Have an Impact on Outcome?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The optimal interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgery in the treatment of patients with distal rectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether this interval has an impact on survival. Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent surgery after CRT were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a sustained complete clinical response (cCR) 1 year after CRT were excluded from this study. Clinical and pathologic characteristics and overall and disease-free survival were compared between patients undergoing surgery 12 weeks or less from CRT and patients undergoing surgery longer than 12 weeks from CRT completion and between patients with a surgery delay caused by a suspected cCR and those with a delay for other reasons. Results: Two hundred fifty patients underwent surgery, and 48.4% had CRT-to-surgery intervals of 12 weeks or less. There were no statistical differences in overall survival (86% vs. 81.6%) or disease-free survival rates (56.5% and 58.9%) between patients according to interval ({<=}12 vs. >12 weeks). Patients with intervals of 12 weeks or less had significantly higher rates of Stage III disease (34% vs. 20%; p = 0.009). The delay in surgery was caused by a suspected cCR in 23 patients (interval, 48 {+-} 10.3 weeks). Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates for this subset were 84.9% and 51.6%, not significantly different compared with the remaining group (84%; p = 0.96 and 57.8%; p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in surgery for the evaluation of tumor response after neoadjuvant CRT is safe and does not negatively affect survival. These results support the hypothesis that shorter intervals may interrupt ongoing tumor necrosis.

Habr-Gama, Angelita [Habr-Gama Research Institute, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br; Perez, Rodrigo Oliva; Proscurshim, Igor; Nunes dos Santos, Rafael Miyashiro [Department of Gastroenterology, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kiss, Desiderio; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Cecconello, Ivan [Habr-Gama Research Institute, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Gastroenterology, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

Petty, D.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based on the Properties of Rough Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based, 121 35 Prague 2, Czech Republic Abstract Web usage mining involves application of data mining techniques to discover usage patterns from the web data. Clustering is one of the important functions in web

120

Sensitivity of diabetic retinopathy associated vision loss to screening interval in an agent-based/discrete event simulation model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective: To examine the effect of changes to screening interval on the incidence of vision loss in a simulated cohort of Veterans with diabetic retinopathy (DR). This simulation allows us to examine potential interventions without putting patients ... Keywords: Agent based modeling, Diabetic eye screen, Diabetic retinopathy, Discrete event simulation

T. Eugene Day, Nathan Ravi, Hong Xian, Ann Brugh

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Biotic dynamics and carbonate microfacies of the conspicuous Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) `Tljsten' interval, south-central Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) `Täljsten' interval, south-central Sweden Mats E. Eriksson a, , Anders Lindskog a , Mikael Calner of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden b School of Earth Sciences, Division Ordovician Kinnekulle Sweden Enclosed in the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) part of the reddish

Calner, Mikael

122

ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

123

ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin

124

ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

125

Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

output, and metabolic parameters such as blood lactate concentrations as being indicative measures of fitness. Cardiorespiratory and skeletal muscle responses to endurance or aerobic training have also been studied, However, physical training...EXERCISE OVERLOADING IN THE EQUINE CARDIORESPIRATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSE TO A COMBINED LONG& SLOW, DISTANCE AND INTERVAL TRAINING EXERCISE REGIMEN A Thesis by LEANN FRANCINE DROZD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Drozd, Leann Francine

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An interval fixed-mix stochastic programming method for greenhouse gas mitigation in energy systems under uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an interval fixed-mix stochastic programming (IFSP) model is developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction management under uncertainties. In the IFSP model, methods of interval-parameter programming (IPP) and fixed-mix stochastic programming (FSP) are introduced into an integer programming framework, such that the developed model can tackle uncertainties described in terms of interval values and probability distributions over a multi-stage context. Moreover, it can reflect dynamic decisions for facility-capacity expansion during the planning horizon. The developed model is applied to a case of planning GHG-emission mitigation, demonstrating that IFSP is applicable to reflecting complexities of multi-uncertainty, dynamic and interactive energy management systems, and capable of addressing the problem of GHG-emission reduction. A number of scenarios corresponding to different GHG-emission mitigation levels are examined; the results suggest that reasonable solutions have been generated. They can be used for generating plans for energy resource/electricity allocation and capacity expansion and help decision makers identify desired GHG mitigation policies under various economic costs and environmental requirements.

Y.L. Xie; Y.P. Li; G.H. Huang; Y.F. Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A study of the sensitivity of topological dynamical systems and the Fourier spectrum of chaotic interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lifting some topological properties from a given dynamical system (Y,S) to an- other (X,T). After studying some basic facts about topological dynamical systems, we move to the particular case of interval maps. We know that through the knowl- edge... discussion with some basic concepts of what a dynamical system is and how the dynamic is generated. Definition 2.1. A dynamical system (X,T) consists of a topological compact metric space X and a surjective, continuous map T : X ?X. The first thing we have...

Roque Sol, Marco A.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate Modeling: A Case Study on DDT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present and future concentrations of DDT in the environment are calculated with the global multi-media model CliMoChem. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the importance of uncertainties in substance property data, emission rates, and environmental parameters for model results. Uncertainties in the model results, expressed as 95percent confidence intervals of DDT concentrations in various environmental media, in different geographical locations, and at different points in time are typically between one and two orders of magnitude. An analysis of rank correlations between model inputs and predicted DDT concentrations indicates that emission estimates and degradation rate constants, in particular in the atmosphere, are the most influential model inputs. For DDT levels in the Arctic, temperature dependencies of substance properties are also influential parameters. A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach is used to update uncertain model inputs based on measurements of DDT in the field. The updating procedure suggests a lower value for half-life in air and a reduced range of uncertainty for KOW of DDT. As could be expected, the Bayesian updating yields model results that are closer to observations, and model uncertainties have decreased. The combined sensitivity analysis and Bayesian Monte Carlo approach provide new insight into important processes that govern the global fate and persistence of DDT in the environment.

Schenker, Urs; Scheringer, Martin; Sohn, Michael D.; Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Intensity and interval of recovery in strength exercise influences performance: salivary lactate and alpha amylase as biochemical markers. A pilot study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of intensity and interval of recovery on performance in the bench press exercise, and the response of salivary lactate and alpha amylase levels.

Mateus K. Vuolo; Jonathann C. Possato; Loreana S. Silveira…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nanoparticle diffusion probing of the structure of water and aqueous organic solutions near a porous surface and in its bulk in a wide temperature interval  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scattering of laser radiation by nanoparticles (latex balls and silver nanoparticles) is investigated in a wide temperature interval. It is demonstrated that water is structured near the porous surface of a solid...

V. V. Bryukhanov; I. G. Samusev; A. M. Ivanov; N. A. Myslitskaya

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

Faber, Vance (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EFFECTS OF AN ANTIDEPRESSANT DOSE OF KETAMINE ON PREFRONTAL ASPARTATE, GLUTAMINE AND GABA LEVELS IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS: ASSESSING THE POST-INFUSION INTERVAL WITH 1H-MRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS: ASSESSING THE POST-INFUSION INTERVAL WITH 1H-MRS Milan Scheidegger1,2 , Alexander Fuchs1 at investigating the neurometabolic changes in the 3-4 hour post-infusion interval when the antidepressant effect by a continuous infusion of 0.25 mg/kg/h over 40 minutes. Single voxel 1 H MRS data were acquired from a volume

133

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Validity of First-Order Approximations to Describe Parameter Uncertainty in Soil Hydrologic Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jasper A. Vrugt* and Willem Bouten ABSTRACT system under study. Confidence intervals on the cali- brated

Vrugt, Jasper A.

136

HIV-related sexual behaviors, drugs, and violence among high risk populations in Baja California, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude Odds Ratio Confidence Interval Sociodemographic characteristics Born in the United States Born in Mexico

Volkmann, Tyson Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Application of interval 2-tuple linguistic MULTIMOORA method for health-care waste treatment technology evaluation and selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The management of health-care waste (HCW) is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing countries. Selection of the best treatment technology for HCW can be viewed as a complicated multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem which requires consideration of a number of alternatives and conflicting evaluation criteria. Additionally, decision makers often use different linguistic term sets to express their assessments because of their different backgrounds and preferences, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. In response, this paper proposes a modified MULTIMOORA method based on interval 2-tuple linguistic variables (named ITL-MULTIMOORA) for evaluating and selecting HCW treatment technologies. In particular, both subjective and objective importance coefficients of criteria are taken into consideration in the developed approach in order to conduct a more effective analysis. Finally, an empirical case study in Shanghai, the most crowded metropolis of China, is presented to demonstrate the proposed method, and results show that the proposed ITL-MULTIMOORA can solve the HCW treatment technology selection problem effectively under uncertain and incomplete information environment.

Hu-Chen Liu; Jian-Xin You; Chao Lu; Meng-Meng Shan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The effect of socio-economic status and food availability on first birth interval in a pre-industrial human population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Around 60% of the energy consumed by working...i) Social status and first birth interval...women had a positive energy balance [41,42...the lowest social status [45]. Nevertheless...availability and nutritional status shape fecundity...reproductive traits allowing us to show that even...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Convergence and error theorems for Hermite function pseudo-RBFs: Interpolation on a finite interval by Gaussian-localized polynomials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Any basis set { ? j ( x ) } can be rearranged by linear combinations into a basis of cardinal functions C j ( x ) with the property that C j ( x k ) = ? j k where the x k are the interpolation points and ? j k is the usual Kronecker delta-function, equal to one when j = k and equal to zero otherwise. The interpolant to a function f ( x ) then takes the simple form f N ( x ) = ? j = 1 N f ( x j ) C j ( x ) . In a companion study, Boyd and Alfaro showed that the cardinal functions for five different spectrally accurate radial basis functions (RBFs) are well approximated by polynomial cardinal functions multiplied by a Gaussian function when the RBF kernels are wide and the number of interpolation points N is small or moderate. Here, we abandon \\{RBFs\\} by using interpolants that are Gaussian-localized polynomials. This basis is equivalent to Hermite functions, a widely used basis for unbounded domains. We prove a rigorous convergence theorem for uniform grid on a finite interval that asserts a geometric rate of convergence for such Gaussian localized polynomial interpolants. Experimentally, we show that Hermite functions are also successful for interpolation on finite irregular grids, even on random grids. If a simple formula for the construction of the cardinal basis is known, then this is great treasure: a costly dense matrix problem is unnecessary. Lagrange invented an explicit product form for polynomial cardinal functions; Hermite function cardinals can be constructed by merely multiplying Lagrange's product by a Gaussian, exp ? ( ? q x 2 ) . We give guidelines for choosing the constant q; theory is simple because the Gaussian localizer is the same for all N cardinal functions. Gaussian \\{RBFs\\} are much more costly, much more ill-conditioned than Gaussian-localized polynomial interpolants.

John P. Boyd

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sandia National Laboratories: increase investor confidence in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis The solar industry is now more than 60% of the way toward achieving...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: UKE1520 MMU Hollings Energy Audit/SE/Rel 1 Date: December 2008 NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House.3 Brief Description of the Site 6 1.4 Acknowledgement 7 2.0 ENERGY AUDIT 8 2.1 Site Configuration 8 2 ANALYSIS APPENDIX 5 ENERGY MANAGEMENT MATRIX #12;UKE1520 MMU Hollings Audit Rel 1 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

142

Election Auditing and Nonparametric Confidence Bounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ballot measure in Marin County, CA, a November 2008 bond measure in Yolo County California, with audits · Random selection · Hypothesis testing framework: the math · The realities · Examples: 2008 Yolo Measure W

Stark, Philip B.

143

ISEE 3 observations during the CDAW 8 intervals: Case studies of the distant geomagnetic tail covering a wide range of geomagnetic activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data obtained by the ISEE 3 spacecraft during the eight Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop 8 (CDAW 8) intervals provide an excellent opportunity to study the structure and dynamics of the distant geomagnetic tail under a wide range of geomagnetic activity ranging from intervals of magnetic quiet punctuated by isolated substorms to extended intervals of strong disturbance. By examining the properties of the plasma sheet, evidence has been found for the persistence of reconnection in the tail during long intervals of magnetic quiet, with the neutral line lying {approx}100 to 200 R{sub E} or more downtail. The suggestion that the distant tail plasma sheet is populated exclusively by tailward moving closed flux tubes under quiet geomagnetic conditions is therefore not supported. However, a slow plasma sheet regime is also found during such conditions, in which closed flux tubes move slowly tailward in a thick region adjacent to the magnetopause, presumably due to some form of viscous momentum transfer from the magnetosheath. This process does not appear to simultaneously transfer mass into the tail, and there is some indication that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is involved. The observations strongly suggest that the closed flux tubes originate from the closed field line plasma sheet region earthward of the neutral line rather than, for example, from the near-Earth low-latitude boundary layer. Plasmoids are observed in the distant tail following disturbance enhancements, the time of their appearance being generally consistent with disconnection from the near-Earth region at the time of the enhancement. Their structure is entirely consistent with the neutral line model.

Richardson, I.G.; Owen, C.J.; Cowley, S.W.H. (Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (GB)); Galvin, A.B. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (USA)); Sanderson, T.R. (Space Science Department, European Space Agency, European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands)); Scholer, M. (Max-Planck-Institut feur Physik und Astrophysik, Garching, (Federal Republic of Germany)); Slavin, J.A. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (USA)); Zwickl, R.D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering WATER AND GAS CONING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM...

Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A pseudo-optimal inexact stochastic interval T2 fuzzy sets approach for energy and environmental systems planning under uncertainty: A case study for Xiamen City of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, a new Pseudo-optimal Inexact Stochastic Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Sets Linear Programming (PIS-IT2FSLP) energy model is developed to support energy system planning and environment requirements under uncertainties for Xiamen City. The PIS-IT2FSLP model is based on an integration of interval Type 2 (T2) Fuzzy Sets (FS) boundary programming and stochastic linear programming techniques, enables it to have robust abilities to the tackle uncertainties expressed as T2 FS intervals and probabilistic distributions within a general optimization framework. This new model can sophisticatedly facilitate system analysis of energy supply and energy conversion processes, and environmental requirements as well as provide capacity expansion options with multiple periods. The PIS-IT2FSLP model was applied to a real case study of Xiamen energy systems. Based on a robust two-step solution algorithm, reasonable solutions have been obtained, which reflect tradeoffs between economic and environmental requirements, and among seasonal volatility energy demands of the right hand side constraints of Xiamen energy system. Thus, the lower and upper solutions of PIS-IT2FSLP would then help local energy authorities adjust current energy patterns, and discover an optimal energy strategy for the development of Xiamen City.

L. Jin; G.H. Huang; Y.R. Fan; L. Wang; T. Wu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

UNIVERSITY AVENUE ROLLINS STREET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Building Design guidelines. Project in- novations include: reusing 95 percent of the existing

Taylor, Jerry

149

Vienna proposal for interval standardization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.mat.univie.ac.at/neum with improvements suggested by remarks of Bo Einarsson, Maarten van Emden, Michel Hack, Nate Hayes, Ulrich Kulisch above. In particular, comprehensive discussions with Michel Hack, who read and com- mented in detail

Neumaier, Arnold

150

Independent Major -Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Realistic Confidence Intervals for the Activation Energy Determined from of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 South, 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Astatisticalprocedureisproposedforestimatingrealistic confidence intervals for the activation energy determined by using an advanced isoconversional

Lipson, Michal

151

Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conclusion Comparing genomes Genomes evolved from a common ancestor tend to share the same varieties of gene clusters used in genomes comparison. . . . seeking for gene clusters between their genomes. A gene cluster = a set of genes appearing, in spatial proximity along the chromosome, in at least two genomes. G. Blin

Blin, Guillaume

152

2013, Latin American Public Opinion Project www.AmericasBarometer.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suriname Guatemala Guyana 0 10 20 30 40 50 Trust in Iranian Government 95% Confidence Interval (Design

Bordenstein, Seth

153

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sonic anemometer (Campbell Scien- tific CSAT3). The vertical bar indicates the 95% confidence interval, calculated as described by Young (

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anemometer (Campbell Scien- tific CSAT3). The vertical bar indicates the 95% confidence interval, calculated as described by Young (

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Petrophysical properties and geology of selected intervals in the Frio Formation, Stratton field, South Texas for modeling interwell seismic logging response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic or continuity logging consists of locating a seismic source in one borehole near or in a low-velocity layer and deploying a detector array in a second borehole. Detection of guided waves transmitted between the two wells indicates bed connectivity. The guided wave signatures are either leaky modes or normal modes (or both). The technique has numerous applications in various types of heterogeneous geological environments, including many Gulf Coast gas reservoirs. It can be used to determine the continuity of beds between wells, estimate and locate variations in the thickness of beds, and estimate the average rock physical properties of the beds. Stratton field was selected as the Gulf-Coast-gas-play type field for a project to model interwell seismic logging responses. Stratton is a mature gas field located in the south Texas Gulf Coast, about 30 miles southwest of Corpus Christi. It encompasses over 120,000 acres in portions of Kleberg, Nueces, and Jim Wells counties. Stratton is one of 29 fields in the Frio Formation fluvial-deltaic lay associated with the Vicksburg fault zone along the Texas Gulf Coast Basin. This poster presentation explains the technique of interwell seismic logging, documents the petrophysical properties and geology of intervals in the upper and middle Frio, and presents the results of the forward modeling tests.

Collier, H.A. [Tarleton State Univ., Stephenville, TX (United States); Parra, J.O. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A parametric building energy cost optimization tool based on a genetic algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................64 Fig. 13. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals for genetic algorithm solution with population size P = 5.................................................67 Fig. 14. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals... for genetic algorithm solutions with population size P = 10 .............................................68 Fig. 15. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals for genetic algorithm solutions with population size P = 20...

Tan, Xiaowei

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recurrence of Lung Adenocarcinoma After an Interval of 15 Years Revealed by Demonstration of the Same Type of EML4–ALK Fusion Gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We carried out an experiment on a 58-year-old man with multiple left lung tumors and swelling of multiple lymph nodes. For clinical staging and therapeutic purposes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and lung biopsy were performed. The biopsy specimen revealed the left lower lung mass to be immunohistochemically ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive adenocarcinoma. Using the BAL specimen from the left lower lung, EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4)-ALK variant 1 fusion gene was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). His past history showed that he had undergone an operation for lung adenocarcinoma of the right lower lobe 15 years before, and the pathological specimen at that time revealed that the lung adenocarcinoma with pleural invasion and single metastasis of mediastinal lymph node showed a mucinous cribriform pattern and/or signet-ring cell pattern. The typical histology led us to examine the ALK rearrangement in the primary lung cancer and mediastinal metastatic tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ALK was positive, and ALK break apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a positive result. Moreover, RT-PCR using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from the right lung cancer also demonstrated EML4–ALK variant 1 fusion gene. Although there is a possibility that the left lung cancer is de novo one with multiple metastases, detection of the same fusion gene of the very rare EML4–ALK variant 1 in both tumors suggests that the left cancer is a recurrence of the right lung cancer after an interval of 15 years.

Yoshitane Tsukamoto; Kiyonobu Kanamori; Takahiro Watanabe; Koji Mikami; Ryuji Ieki; Takashi Nakano; Kazuyoshi Kajimoto; Seiichi Hirota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Boron Neutron Capture Therapty (BNCT) in an Oral Precancer Model: Therapeutic Benefits and Potential Toxicity of a Double Application of BNCT with a Six-Week Interval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given the clinical relevance of locoregional recurrences in head and neck cancer, we developed a novel experimental model of premalignant tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies and demonstrated the partial inhibitory effect of a single application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on tumor development from premalignant tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a double application of BNCT with a 6 week interval in terms of inhibitory effect on tumor development, toxicity and DNA synthesis. We performed a double application, 6 weeks apart, of (1) BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT); (2) BNCT mediated by the combined application of decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and BPA [(GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT] or (3) beam-only, at RA-3 nuclear reactor and followed the animals for 8 months. The control group was cancerized and sham-irradiated. BPA-BNCT, (GB- 10 + BPA)-BNCT and beam-only induced a reduction in tumor development from premalignant tissue that persisted until 8, 3, and 2 months respectively. An early maximum inhibition of 100% was observed for all 3 protocols. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was detected. Reversible mucositis was observed in premalignant tissue, peaking at 1 week and resolving by the third week after each irradiation. Mucositis after the second application was not exacerbated by the first application. DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in premalignant tissue 8 months post-BNCT. A double application of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT, 6 weeks apart, could be used therapeutically at no additional cost in terms of radiotoxicity in normal and dose-limiting tissues.

Andrea Monti Hughes; Emiliano C.C. Pozzi; Elisa M. Heber; Silvia Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; Ana J. Molinari; Marcela A. Garabalino; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Temperature changes with time in the slotted interval of a deep, shut-in geothermal well near thermal equilibrium: East Mesa Well 31-1, Imperial County, California, 1977-1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five precision temperature logs were obtained over a five year period (1977-1982) beginning three years after drilling and one year after last significant testing in East Mesa well 31-1 (32/sup 0/48.6'N, 115/sup 0/15.7'W). A sensitivity of measurement of 0.001/sup 0/C was maintained to the bottom of the well (165/sup 0/C, 180 bars). Useable precision was limited by convective motions within the hole (0.01-0.3/sup 0/C depending on ambient geothermal gradient), fluid leakage through the lubricator at the well head (4 bars) and, occasionally, by electrical or electronic noise. Comparison of these continuous logs indicates a general warming in and just above the slotted interval (1647-1877 m) which is attributed to flow into the lower levels of the slotted interval and up the casing and out into permeable zones at higher levels. Some flow continued upward through an uncemented interval of the annulus between casing and hole and out into the formation where it is blocked by cement ( about 1594 m). Some points of entrance or egress of fluid are marked by small, sharp temperature anomalies which have persisted over the 5-year period. Apparently, the uncemented part of the annulus has partly filled in, and flow into the bottom of slotted interval has increased (1978-1982). Both of these changes may have been induced by the nearby ( about 30 km) Imperial Valley earthquake of 10/15/79, or by the production or testing of nearby wells.

Diment, W.H.; Urban, T.C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Probing Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov dynamics in the dijet cross section at large rapidity intervals in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1800 and 630 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Received 15 December 1999) Inclusive dijet production at large pseudorapidity intervals (Dh) between the two jets has been sug- gested as a regime for observing Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) dynamics. We have mea- sured the dijet cross section... for large Dh in p?p collisions at p s H33527 1800 and 630 GeV using the D0 5723 VOLUME 84, NUMBER 25 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 19JUNE 2000 where E T 1 (E T 2 ) and h 1 (h 2 ) are the transverse energy and pseudorapidity h 1 2h 2 $ transfer during ing...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU ZP-1 Wells 299-W10-33 and 299-W11-48  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slug-test results obtained from single and multiple, stress-level slug tests conducted during drilling and borehole advancement provide detailed hydraulic conductivity information at two Hanford Site Operable Unit (OU) ZP-1 test well locations. The individual test/depth intervals were generally sited to provide hydraulic-property information within the upper ~10 m of the unconfined aquifer (i.e., Ringold Formation, Unit 5). These characterization results complement previous and ongoing drill-and-test characterization programs at surrounding 200-West and -East Area locations (see Figure S.1).

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Confidence Boosting: Improving the Introspectiveness of a Boosted Classifier for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rudolph Triebel Hugo Grimmett Ingmar Posner Mobile Robotics Group, Dep. of Engineering Science, Univ ciency in terms of memory requirements, computation time and energy consumption as well as plasticity presented in [1]. Our modification specifically applies to the standard Ad- aBoost [2] algorithm. However

Cremers, Daniel

163

The stress field in Europe: optimal orientations with confidence limits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Apennines, the Southern Tyrrhenian and Cyprus) are characterised by high data densities...Busetti M., Ramella R., Volpi V. Gas seeps linked to salt structures in the...mapping Mediterranean region Middle East natural hazards neotectonics orientation risk assessment......

M. M. C. Carafa; S. Barba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

5. A Crisis of Confidence: Shifting Stakeholder Perspectives on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs (Little Hoover Commission, 2005) and put institutional reform of CALFED on the administration

Pasternack, Gregory B.

165

Detailed search Dutch ministers quietly confident about achieving Presidency priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of European cooperation in the field of research infrastructures, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and European technology platforms, explained the ministers. Speaking about the European Research Council, Ms

166

Confidence-Driven Image Co-matting Linbo Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the task of estimating accurate foreground opacity from a given image, is a severely ill stack than applying state-of-the-art single image matting techniques individually on each image fore- ground opacity from natural images. Specifically, given an input image I, it estimates

Wang, Jue

167

Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are known as monitoring and control respectively. The relationship between accurate monitoring and improved control and performance has been borne out in multiple research studies. Unfortunately, people's metacognitive judgments are far from perfect; for low...

Miller, Tyler

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Mathematics Teaching in Schools?The Growth of Confidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with "8"? Fig. 3 cial message that the organised, well-ordered and systematic approach is the one most likely to suc- ceed. Students with a higher level of attainment are sometimes prone to attack the problem along somewhat more sophisticated lines......

KEITH HEDGER

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Confidence, uncertainty and decision-support relevance in climate predictions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmospheric chemistry, the carbon cycle, stratospheric dynamics, ice dynamics, etc.) as they develop into Earth System Models (ESMs). For these processes, and therefore for climate forecasting, there is no possibility of a true cycle...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Confidence regions for maximum response and associated design optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BECAUSE I GF IRREGULAR (TIES IN THE DATA ) GO TG 1 6 STOP END SUBROUTINE iVEWT (ApB&C yD&E pXp I pN) 060 010 C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C 1 2 10 15 20 25 26 30 h I S 4 U. '. Clfr, =!~SICNAL ARRAY CF COEFFICIENTS. 8 I 5 TIJ...65?60 R 1=R5 GO TO 53 I=I+1 X( I)=85 GO TO 15 RETURN ENO SUBROUTINE SUBRTl (NgM?NM&Ct 8 ~ XKy Al) 380 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 THIS SUBRCUTINE SETS UP...

Hartmann, Norbert Alfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Metacognition in human decision-making: confidence and error monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some 20 cm away. This design allowed the researchers...information in the processing pipeline drives the DV across...detected as successive crossings of decision boundaries...31,32] or as double crossings of a single decision...paths at a fork in the road. However, most of our...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Simultaneous Parametric Confidence Bands for Cumulative Distributions from Censored Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), a function that is used to assess nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. Keywords: Bootstrap, likelihood example is the need to quantify nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. NDE methods are used

173

INTRODUCTION Terminal Proterozoic glacial intervals are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, paleontologic, and chemostratigraphic records from sections in Spitsbergen, Canada, Australia, and the Congo synthesis by using detailed 13C and 87Sr/86Sr records from the Congo craton, where a thick succession (>1000 the Congo craton succession as one of the least ambiguous records of chemo- stratigraphic and geologic

Kennedy, Martin J.

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - area prediction models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the area-specific model, and recalibrate confidence interval... predictive logis- tic regression ... Source: Montana, University of - Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit...

175

Childhood Obesity Among Children of Mexican Descent: A Binational Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and crude odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for weight status, CHAMACOS (Salinas, CA) and Proyecto Mariposa (Guanajuato, Jalisco, and Michoacan, Mexico)

Rosas, Lisa G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibodies predict relapse Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

relapse-free interval (hazard ratio (HR) 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1 Source: Price, Paul A. - Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego...

177

Microsoft Word - Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2004 April 2004 Summer 2004 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary * Gasoline markets are tight as the 2004 driving season begins and conditions are likely to remain volatile through the summer. High crude oil costs, strong gasoline demand growth, low gasoline inventories, uncertainty about the availability of gasoline imports, high transportation costs, and changes in gasoline specifications have added to current and expected gasoline costs and pump prices. * For the upcoming summer driving season (April to September 2004), retail gasoline prices (regular grade, all formulations) are projected to average $1.76 per gallon, about 20 cents above last summer. A 95-percent confidence range for the summer price average, excluding specific consideration of major

178

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Incidence of Invasive Breast Cancer and Ductal Carcinoma In situ in a Screening Program by Age: Should Older Women Continue Screening?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E-mail: b.erbas@unimelb.edu.au Alison Amos 2 Ashley Fletcher 1 Anne M. Kavanagh...scale (y-axis); dashed lines, point-wise 95 confidence intervals. and 2. Figure...scale (y-axis); dashed lines, point-wise 95 confidence intervals. The nonlinear...

Bircan Erbas; Alison Amos; Ashley Fletcher; Anne M. Kavanagh; and Dorota M. Gertig

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nonconservative exact small-sample inference for discrete data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exact small-sample methods for discrete data use probability distributions that do not depend on unknown parameters. However, they are conservative inferentially: the actual error probabilities for tests and confidence intervals are bounded above by ... Keywords: Binomial distribution, Clopper-Pearson confidence interval, Fuzzy inference, Mid-P-value

Alan Agresti; Anna Gottard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs Main FAQs: 2003-2007 Comparison Graphs Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Jump to: Figure 1 | Figure 2 | Figure 3 | Figure 4 | Figure 5 Figure 1 Number of Large Hospital Buildings and 95% Confidence Intervals by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 2 Total Floorspace and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 3 Major Fuel Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 4 Electricity Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Figure 5 Natural Gas Intensity and 95% Confidence Intervals in Large Hospital Buildings by Census Region, 2003 and 2007 Specific questions on this product may be directed to:

182

CX-000066: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grant Program. Activity includes replacing inefficient boilers in the Government Recreation Center with 95 percent efficient triangle tube boilers. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR...

183

Estimating the Burden of Neurocysticercosis in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region (p< 0.05). The mean total number of DALYs lost due to NCC in Mexico was estimated to be 99,866 (95 percent CR: 43,187 –189,182), with a mean of 0.95 (95 percent CR: 0.4–1.8) DALYs lost per thousand persons per year....

Bhattarai, Rachana

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Defining a Technical Basis for Confidence in PV Investments - A Pathway to Service Life Prediction (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four levels of accelerated test standards for PV modules are described in the context of how the community can most quickly begin using these.

Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Jordan, D.; Miller, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Offering Community Engagement Activities To Increase Chemistry Knowledge and Confidence for Teachers and Students  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Established in 2000, this club, Khanya Maths and Science Club (KMSC; Khanya means “light” in isiXhosa, the African language of the area),(28, 29) is coordinated and run by staff and graduate and undergraduate students of the Department of Chemistry. ... The club meets every Saturday morning in term time and lessons and workshops are presented by scientists and Chemistry students in an accessible and easy to understand manner. ... Relevant IYC objectives include increasing the public appreciation and understanding of chem. in meeting world needs, encouraging the interest of young people in chem., and generating enthusiasm for the creative future of chem. ...

Joyce D. Sewry; Sarah R. Glover; Timothy G. Harrison; Dudley E. Shallcross; Kenneth M. Ngcoza

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Approximately optimum confidence bounds on series system reliability for exponential time to failure data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......exponential time to failure data NANCY R. MANN FRANK E. GRUBBS Rocketdyne, North American Rockwell Corporation U.S. Army Aberdeen...reliability for exponential time to failure data BY NANCY R. MANN Rocketdyne, North American Rockwell Corporation AND FRANK E. GRUBBS......

NANCY R. MANN; FRANK E. GRUBBS

1972-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cheap talk and credibility: The consequences of confidence and accuracy on advisor credibility and persuasiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con?ict in judge-advisor decision making. Organizationaland expertise in a judge- advisor system. Organizational= .71, p = .40. Unlike the advisor credibility rating, there

Sah, Sunita; Moore, Don A; MacCoun, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Model-Based Methodology for Building Confidence in a Dynamic Measuring System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimentation and computational simulation methods will be used to build trust in this measurement system. This process of establishing credibility will be presented in the form of a proposed methodology. This proposed methodology will utilize verification...

Reese, Isaac Mark

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Increased confidence in concept design through trade space exploration and multiobjective optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growing size, complexity and demands of engineering systems requires paying greater attention to the initial design of the system concept. To improve the process by which concept design is carried out, this thesis ...

Odegard, Ryan Glenn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Object-level fusion and confidence management in a multi-sensor pedestrian tracking system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sensor fusion system dedicated to detect, recognize and track pedestrians. The fusion by tracking method is used multi-sensor pedes- trian detection, recognition and tracking system, is introduced. However, sensors and estimate vehicle and pedestrians' kinematical state. Section IV presents the detection and recogni- tion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

A Learning-based Approach to Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and surveillance, have stringent accuracy requirements for detecting or classifying events and demand long system-specified accuracy. Event detection systems are also challenged to provide a generic system that effi- ciently adapts-specified accuracy. Through evaluation with real vehicle detection trace data and a building traffic monitoring

Zhou, Gang

194

On Estimating the Size and Confidence of a Statistical Audit Javed A. Aslam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this formula never exceeds the optimal sample size by more than 3 for c 0.9975, and by more than (- ln(1 - c

Rivest, Ronald L.

195

The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deserves the funding which it asks for," says Michael Lubell, head of public affairs at the American Physical Society in Washington. Lubell says that the field badly needs to make more of the spin- offs from

McDonald, Kirk

196

Earthquake source parameters and their confidence regions by a genetic algorithm with a 'memory'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......splitting of the complete rupture process The RJ plot in Fig. 19 indicates...curve rising upwards rupture process (Fig. 16). As far as subevent...Miller, A.D., 1994. Rupture process of large earthquakes, eruptions...Geophysicists, 6oth Ann. Int. Mtg Exposition, September 2327......

J. Šíleny

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Self-confidence and the re-entry experience for North American women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seven themes emerged in a review of the literatureregarding the experience of North American re-entrywomen. The two most salient appeared to be linked tothe concept of transitions in adulthood and issuesrelate...

Karen E. Killy; William A. Borgen

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Resampling confidence regions and test procedures for second degree stochastic efficiency with respect to a function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

�s utility function. By maximizing expected utility, an agent seeks to balance expected returns with the inherent risk in each investment alternative. This can be accomplished by ranking prospects based on the certainty equivalent associated with each...

Schumann, Keith Daniel

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Numerical Code Comparison Project - A Necessary Step Towards Confidence in Geothermal Reservoir Simulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A necessary first step in resolving differences and in evaluating the usefulness of numerical simulators for geothermal reservoir analysis is the comparison of simulator results for a set of well-specified problems involving processes applicable in reservoir analysis. Under the direction of DOE'S Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Management Program (GREMP), a set of six test problems has been developed in an attempt to meet this need. The problem set covers a range of reservoir situations including single- and two-phase flow under 1, 2, and 3 dimensional conditions. Each problem has been test run to insure that the parameter specifications will yield workable solutions, and in several cases analytical solutions are available for comparison. Brief descriptions of the problems are given in each problem, the desired grid and time-step sizes were specified to minimize differences in results due to numerical discretization.

Sorey, Michael L.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WHY INTERVALS? WHY FUZZY NUMBERS? TOWARDS A NEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about the physical world is measurements; see, e.g., [20]. Measurements are never 100% accurate. As a result, the result #x of the measurement is, in general, di#erent from the (unknown) actual value x of the desired quantity. The di#erence #x def = #x - x between the measured and the actual values is usually

Kreinovich, Vladik

202

WHY INTERVALS? WHY FUZZY NUMBERS? TOWARDS A NEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about the physical world is measurements; see, e.g., [20]. Measurements are never 100% accurate. As a result, the result x of the measurement is, in general, different from the (unknown) actual value x of the desired quantity. The difference x def = x - x between the measured and the actual values is usually

Kreinovich, Vladik

203

Why Intervals? Why Fuzzy Numbers? Towards a New Justification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a practical explanation. One of the main source of information about the physical world is measure­ ments; see, e.g., [20]. Measurements are never 100% accurate. As a result, the result # x of the measurement is - x between the measured and the actual values is usually called a measurement error

Ward, Karen

204

Why Intervals? Why Fuzzy Numbers? Towards a New Justi cation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a practical explanation. One of the main source of information about the physical world is measure- ments; see, e.g., [20]. Measurements are never 100% accurate. As a result, the result x of the measurement is between the measured and the actual values is usually called a measurement error. The manufacturers

Ward, Karen

205

Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/min (Bredel peristaltic pumps, model 505S; Watson-Marlow, Falmouth, Cornwall, UK) with Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution (in mM: NaCl 119, NaHCO3 25, KCl 4, KH2PO4 1.2, MgCl2 1, CaCl2 1.8, glucose Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: J. A. Fraser... . The anesthetized mice were placed on a heating pad with continuous monitoring of body temperature for three-lead ECG measurements in lead II for over 10 min using subcutaneous needle electrodes and a PowerLab 26T system (ADInstru- ments, Oxfordshire, UK...

Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Fraser, James A.

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

INTERVAL COMPUTATIONS WITH INTLAB SIEGFRIED M. RUMP, HAMBURG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; A = rand(n); B = rand(n); C = zeros(n); tic for i=1:n for j=1:n for k=1:n C(i,j) = C(i,j) + A(i,k)*B(k,j); end end end toc C = zeros(n); tic for i=1:n for j=1:n C(i,j) = C(i,j) + A(i,:)*B(:,j); end end toc C = zeros(n); tic for i=1:n C(i,:) = C(i,:) + A(i,:)*B; end toc C = zeros(n); tic C = A*B; toc The following

Rump, Siegfried M.

207

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there are resources such as miner- als at a certain location is to actually drill a borehole and analyze the materials different measurement results that can be obtained without actually drilling the boreholes: e.g., gravity half of the 20th century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate

Kreinovich, Vladik

208

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there are resources such as miner­ als at a certain location is to actually drill a borehole and analyze the materials different measurement results that can be obtained without actually drilling the boreholes: e.g., gravity half of the 20th century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate

Kreinovich, Vladik

209

Applications of Fuzzy Measures and Intervals in Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investment assets in order to diversify risk and obtain a maximal return for the given acceptable level sought goals are max- imization of the return for a given acceptable level of risk and minimization, the problem of selecting an investment portfolio to guarantee a given return, at a minimal risk, have been

Magoc, Tanja

210

An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to collect residential AMI data. Over 43 million households and businesses currently use Green Button to access their energy usage data and dozens of utilities serving millions of...

211

Variation in human gait intervals on a treadmill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The placement of the optical sensor and reflector is shown in figure 9. The reflective sensor consists of a narrow beam red LED and a modified infrared detector module. The reflective strip was detected when LED light was reflected back to the sensor. The red... LED was a useful light source because it was very tightly focused, with a half power angle of only three degrees. The light from the red LED was also visible which simplified the optimization of the geometry of the final reflective sensor...

Abrams, Mark Alan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Probability and Statistics 1530-005 Prof. G. Goldstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Inference (Chapters 21-24) Confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, use and abuse of statistics Test Dates: Test 1 February 11 Test 2 March 18 Test 3 April 22 #12;Required Equipment: Access to internet

Hagen, Thomas

213

Effects of Exogenously Applied Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) to Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

micronaire, fiber length, length uniformity, fiber strength and elongation. Statistical analysis was done using SAS 9.2 with a mixed model and means were separated with Fisher LSD at a 95% confidence interval. Results and Discussion There were...

Clement, Jenny D.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case control study using life grid interviews.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study....

Edwards, R; Pless-Mulloli, T; Howel, D; Chadwick, TJ; Bhopal, Raj; Harrison, R N; Gribbin, H

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Biological Monitoring of Fire Fighters: Sister Chromatid Exchange and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-DNA Adducts in Peripheral Blood Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels...exposure to carcinogenic combustion products. Cytoge...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; CI, confidence interval...estimating exposures to combustion and pyrolysis products...into water, briefly heat denatured (100 Cfor...

Saou-Hsing Liou; David Jacobson-Kram; Miriam C. Poirier; Dung Nguyen; Paul T. Strickland; and Melvyn S. Tockman

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A test of the oxidative damage hypothesis for discontinuous gas exchange in the locust Locusta migratoria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are presented 95% confidence interval. The effect of different PO2 treatments on DGC duration was analysed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance with Dunn's post hoc test. Differences in mean DGC duration between control and...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Predicting the binding preference of transcription factors to individual DNA k-mers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......significantly higher mean top-100 overlap than PCR [95% confidence interval (CI) for difference, 3.92-109; Kruskal-Wallis test]. Moreover, NN often shows the greatest difference from random, and has the fewest predicted profiles with......

Trevis M. Alleyne; Lourdes Peña-Castillo; Gwenael Badis; Shaheynoor Talukder; Michael F. Berger; Andrew R. Gehrke; Anthony A. Philippakis; Martha L. Bulyk; Quaid D. Morris; Timothy R. Hughes

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

In support of null hypothesis significance testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...support of null hypothesis significance testing Michael Mogie Centre for Mathematical...levelled at null hypothesis significance testing (NHST). It is argued here that although...hypothesis. null hypothesis significance testing|p-value|confidence intervals| In...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_hh_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2011 10 12 8 10 4 6 2 4 0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2010 2010 2011...

220

Documentation of Idiotypic Cascade after Lym-1 Radioimmunotherapy in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Basis for Extended Survival?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and 2 GPC Biotech Inc., Princeton, New Jersey Grant support: GPC Biotech Inc., Princeton, NJ. The costs of publication...confidence intervals for peak plasma concentration and area under...and analytical analysis: plasma pharmacokinetics. A total...

Bonnie M. Bradt; Sally J. DeNardo; Gary R. Mirick; and Gerald L. DeNardo

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Abstract B08: Occupational and recreational physical activity in relation to prostate cancer aggressiveness: The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for age, race, body mass index, CaP screening history, smoking status, and energy intake. Additional adjustment for educational status was done for the occupational PA models. Results: Recreational PA...

Samuel Antwi; Susan E. Steck; L. Joseph Su; Bonny Blackard; Swann Arp-Adams; James R. Hebert; Elizabeth TH Fontham; Jeannette Bensen; James L. Mohler; Lenore Arab

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal... Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

Shadfan, Adam

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

Approximated Distributions of Sampling Inequality Indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Often, in finite samples, the true level of the confidence intervals for natural estimators of inequality indices belonging to the Gini family differs greatly from their nominal level, which is based on the asymptotic confidence limits. This paper ... Keywords: Gini index family, Gram-Charlier approximation, Monte Carlo experiment, algebraic computer software, income distribution

Paola Palmitesta; Corrado Provasi; Cosimo Spera

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Other facts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub natural gas price and Henry Hub natural gas price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 - December 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2007 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 2 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2007 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 3 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2007 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 4 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2007 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 5 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2007 $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 6

225

Other facts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Texas Intermediate crude oil price West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 - December 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 4 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 5 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300

226

Evaluation of preservation methods for selected nutrients in ground water at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water from 28 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was sampled as part of the US Geological Survey`s quality-assurance program to determine the effect of different preservation methods on nutrient concentrations. Samples were preserved with filtration and with mercuric chloride and chilling, chilling only, or sulfuric acid and chilling. The samples were analyzed for ammonia, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, and orthophosphate by the US Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory. The study was done in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. The comparison between samples preserved with mercuric chloride and chilling and samples preserved by chilling only showed that all sample pairs were in statistical agreement. Results for ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate samples preserved with sulfuric acid and chilling were within the 95 percent confidence level of the results for the samples preserved by the other two methods and can be considered equivalent to them. Results of this study indicate that discontinuing the use of mercuric chloride as a preservation method for nutrients in water samples will not affect the comparability of data collected at the INEL before and after October 1, 1994.

Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Tender Texas Chicken: The Natural Light Meat.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sanitation be strictly monitored. Modern poultry processing systems have been designed so that a 95 percent overall reduction in bacterial content is achieved from the live bird to the finished ready-to-cook product. Strict temperature control...

Denton, J.H.; Gardner, F.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic implications of natural gas vehicle technology in U.S. private automobile transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation represents almost 28 percent of the United States' energy demand. Approximately 95 percent of U.S. transportation utilizes petroleum, the majority of which is imported. With significant domestic conventional ...

Kragha, Oghenerume Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Unifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Key Lab. of High Confidence Software Tech.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of modeling. The architecture combines agent-oriented models of software systems in which service providers of service-oriented architectures is the dynamic service composition through discovering and invokingUnifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Zhi Jin Key Lab. of High

Zhu, Hong

231

Self-motivated readers and confident writers : how literacy in ASL can help develop written English literacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cookie do you eat? Can you help me? How are you? you canExplain that this will help them become better readers, bythe illustrations? Do they help you to better understand the

Wudel, Madelyn Celeste

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

fMRI activation to visible and invisible faces and houses using Continuous Flash Suppression with a confidence rating task  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-0.25 -0.2 -0.15 -0.1 -0.05 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 fMRI activation to visible and invisible faces AreaundertheROC Mask Contrast F 12.5% H F 25% H F 50% H F 100% H 0 5 10 15 20 Visible Borderline Invisible mask invisible and to investigate the associated unconscious neuronal processes. Evidence for a significant BOLD

Adolphs, Ralph

233

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_hh_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09 - 09 - December 2010 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2009 $18 $20 $12 $14 $16 $8 $10 $12 $2 $4 $6 $0 $2 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2009 $18 $20 $12 $14 $16 $8 $10 $12 $2 $4 $6 $0 $2 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2009 $18 $20 $12 $14 $16 $8 $10 $12 $2 $4 $6 $0 $2 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2009 $18 $20 $12 $14 $16 $8 $10 $12 $2 $4 $6 $0 $2 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 4 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2009 $18 $20 $12 $14 $16 $8 $10 $12 $2 $4 $6 $0 $2 Jan Jul Jan

234

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_hh.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 - 11 - December 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2011 $10 $12 $8 $10 $4 $6 $2 $4 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2011 $10 $12 $8 $10 $4 $6 $2 $4 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2011 $10 $12 $8 $10 $4 $6 $2 $4 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2011 $10 $12 $8 $10 $4 $6 $2 $4 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 4 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2011 $10 $12 $8 $10 $4 $6 $2 $4 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 5 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Past Henry Hub Price and 95% NYMEX

235

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 - December 2012 January 2011 December 2012 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 4 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 5

236

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_wti.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 - January 2014 January 2013 January 2014 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2013 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2013 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2013 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2013 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 4 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, May 2013 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 5 2012

237

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reproducibility). J Orthop Sci 2011, 16:7–13. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35:2406–2414. 21... Sci 2011, 16:7–13. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35...

Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Impact of a modified data capture period on Liu comorbidity index scores in Medicare enrollees initiating chronic dialysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation coefficient was es- timated, along with 95% confidence intervals. To further evaluate the Modified Liu Index 1–90 as an estimate of the original Liu Index, we conducted a one-sample t-test of the score difference to test for bias (indicated... of subjects whose differences were zero, within one, two, three, four, and five were estimated along with their corresponding 95% Wald confidence intervals. A histogram of the scorescores ± standard deviation for the original index and the modified index were...

Rigler, Sally K.; Wetmore, James B.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Dong, Lei; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Shireman, Theresa I.

2013-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

Development and Use of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Eight Army Installations Around the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.14. Percentage change in annual energy use per conditioned area with respect to baseline year (FY86) for Fort Hood. Negative change indicates decrease in energy use and vice versa. 95% confidence intervals for the percentage change are also shown 89 Figure 7.15....14. Percentage change in annual energy use per conditioned area with respect to baseline year (FY86) for Fort Hood. Negative change indicates decrease in energy use and vice versa. 95% confidence intervals for the percentage change are also shown 89 Figure 7.15...

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? • A data acquisition system. • Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? • Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

Herrin, D. G.

242

Estimation of interval anisotropy parameters using velocity-independent layer stripping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by VILS in the shale layer above the reservoir are more plausible and less influenced by noise than those homogeneous VTI overburden. For 3D wide-azimuth data from layered azimuthally anisotropic media, the effective . Unfortunately, NMO velocity often is insufficient to build the ve- locity field for anisotropic media, even

Tsvankin, Ilya

243

A Magnetizer for Studying Transient Processes in Magnets over a Wide Time Interval  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetizer is intended for studies of transient processes ... planar films. The main element of the magnetizer is a strip line consisting of thin ... using a removable longitudinal sence loop. The magnetizer ...

O. S. Kolotov; A. V. Matyunin; O. A. Mironets…

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CruzDB: software for annotation of genomic intervals with UCSC genome-browser database  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and remotely hosted datasets. We showcase the syntax...indicating a role of nuclear organization in their...a recent report that nuclear clustering of olfactory...receptor-induced changes in nuclear architecture influence...and remotely hosted datasets, as well as annotation......

Brent S. Pedersen; Ivana V. Yang; Subhajyoti De

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic interval training Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute anaerobic interval Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 19 THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY 213:405-416 (1980) Anaerobic Metabolism, Gas Exchange, and Acid-Base Summary: THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY 213:405-416...

247

Locating regional seismic events with global optimization based on interval arithmetic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......connected to the Helsinki bulletin locations with mislocation vectors. The explosion sites form clear clustering at Estonia oil shale quarries, mines in Russian Karelia, the Siilinja rvi mine in Central Finland and deep seabed excavation works in Bothnian......

Matti Tarvainen; Timo Tiira; Eystein S. Husebye

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Continuous training versus interval training in deep water running: health effects for obese women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives To search intermittent and continous trainning (IT and CT, respectively) effects through deep water running for the control and prevention of excessive body fat accumulation and improvement of quality of life. Methods Experimental study composed by 30 women, aged between 34 to 58 years old, during 12 weeks, three sessions per week, 47 minutes each. Body composition, cardiorespiratory condition and Quality of Life by WHOQOL-Brief were considered. Student's and Wilcoxon's non parametric tests were applied at 5% significance level. Results With the only exception for social domain of quality of life, all investigated variables revealed improvement in both groups for IT in comparison to CT. Conclusion Deep water running contributes to body fat reduction, physical fitness evolution and improvement of WHOQOL-Brief domains, regardless of the trainning type conducted.

S.R. Pasetti; A. Gonçalves; C.R. Padovani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

From Interval Methods of Representing Uncertainty To A General Description of Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hunguyen@nmsu.edu Abstract Measurements do not result in an exact value of the measured quantity; even of the measured quantity. Traditionally, in science and engineering, this uncertainty is character­ ized measurements. Some of this knowl­ edge comes not from measurements but from the ex­ pertise of scientists

Kreinovich, Vladik

251

Estimating Variance under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Case of Hierarchical Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In practice, these values come either from measurements or from expert estimates. In both case, we get only for these characteristics. It is desirable to estimate the accuracy of these approximations. Case of measurement uncertainty. Measurements are never 100% accurate. As a result, the result x of the measurement is, in general, different

Kreinovich, Vladik

252

Statistical Genetic Interval-Valued Type-2 Fuzzy System and its Application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years, the type-2 fuzzy sets theory has been used to model and minimize the effects of uncertainties in rule-base fuzzy logic system. In… (more)

Qiu, Yu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

screened intervals (415421 m and 689695 m; Figure 2) in the observations wells will be useful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies.We thank Bayshore Concrete and Ray Otten of the Sustainable Technology Park for access Chesapeake Bay Crater,522 pp.,Springer-Verlag, New York. Rieke,H.H.,and G.V.Chilingarian (1974),Compaction.Edwards,and Jean M. Self-Trail,USGS,Reston,Va.; and Roger H.Morin, USGS,Lakewood,Colo. For additional information

Sprintall, Janet

254

The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the use of CCTV systems has been diversified. The cameras, today, not only provide views, but also perceive objects, and, therefore, some traffic cameras can monitor the speed and detect speeding cars (Norris and Armstrong 1998). Besides, some more...

Choi, Ji Won

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Substantial narrowing of the Niemann–Pick C candidate interval by yeast artificial chromosome?complementation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Christiano Cummings Jill A. Morris Stacie K. Loftus Dana Zhang Katherine G. Coleman Adele M. Cooney Marcy E. Comly Laura Fandino...Genet 6 : 59 – 68 , 9002671 . 21 Davison R L O’Malley K A Wheeler T B ( 1976 ) Somatic Cell Genet 3 : 271 – 280 . 22 Srivastava...

Jessie Z. Gu; Eugene D. Carstea; Christiano Cummings; Jill A. Morris; Stacie K. Loftus; Dana Zhang; Katherine G. Coleman; Adele M. Cooney; Marcy E. Comly; Laura Fandino; Calvin Roff; Danilo A. Tagle; William J. Pavan; Peter G. Pentchev; Melissa A. Rosenfeld

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

STATISTICA INFERENZIALE SHEDA N. 2 INTERVALLI DI CONFIDENZA PER IL VALORE ATTESO E LA FREQUENZA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dati campionari. In questa scheda costruiremo un intervallo nel quale ci aspettiamo stia il parametro

Rogantin, Maria Piera

257

Predictive multiple sampling algorithm with overlapping integration intervals for linear wide dynamic range integrating image sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine vision systems are used in a wide range of applications such as security, automated quality control and intelligent transportation systems. Several of these systems need to extract information from natural scenes ...

Acosta Serafini, Pablo M. (Pablo Manuel), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Semi-Heuristic Target-Based Fuzzy Decision Procedures: Towards a New Interval Justification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the values of several quantities. For example, when we buy a car, we are interested in its cost, its energy], [11], [14]) deal with the problems in which the quality of each possible alternative is characterized range of values. Sometimes, there is only one alternative that satisfies all these requirements

Ward, Karen

259

Interval-valued Fuzzy-Rough Feature Selection and Application for Handling Missing Values in Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UK {rkj,qqs}@aber.ac.uk Abstract One of the many successful applications of rough set theory has been to the area of feature selection. The rough set ideol- ogy of using only the supplied data and no other information has many benefits, where most other methods require sup- plementary knowledge. Fuzzy-rough set

Lucas, Simon M.

260

Interval-Based Model-Predictive Control for Uncertain Dynamic Systems with Actuator Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for the control of the thermal behavior of high-temperature fuel cell stacks. This application scenario uncertainty due to limited measurement facilities in the interior of the fuel cell stack can be expressed performance by the minimization of suitable cost functions in real time. These criteria typically take

Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at a certain location is to actually drill a borehole and analyze the materials extracted. How­ ever actually drilling the boreholes: e.g., gravity and magnetic measurements, analyzing the travel century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate resources such as the oil

Kreinovich, Vladik

262

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at a certain location is to actually drill a borehole and analyze the materials extracted. How- ever actually drilling the boreholes: e.g., gravity and magnetic measurements, analyzing the travel century. The result was the discovery of many large relatively easy to locate resources such as the oil

Kreinovich, Vladik

263

Interval operations in rounding to nearest submitted for publication, February 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and finite c := fl(a b) the monotonicity (2) implies a b [c1, c2] where c1 := fl(fl(c - 2u|c|) - ) and c2 := fl(fl(c + 2u|c|) + ). (4) (Note that the above remains true if a b is replaced by any real y

Rump, Siegfried M.

264

Common variants at ten loci influence QT interval duration in the QTGEN Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hofman4,16, Susan R Heckbert9,12,17, Christopher J O'Donnell3,18,19, Andre´ G Uitterlinden4,8,16, Bruce M Psaty9,10,12,17,20, Thomas Lumley5,23, Martin G Larson3,7,23 & Bruno H Ch Stricker4,8,15,16,21,23 QT

de Bakker, Paul

265

A Fuzzy Formal Logic for Interval-valued Residuated Lattices B. Van Gasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that this truth- functional approach, along with the residu- ation principle, has some consequences that seem truth values instead of only `true' and `false'. A wide range of such logics were introduced cases it may be preferable to work with graded truth values, e.g. for propositions like `a cat

Gent, Universiteit

266

Modernization Magnitude: An Interval Measure Applicable to Post- and Pre-Industrial Societies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reflect. Qatar, and several other oil producing nations,X in oil producing countries such as Qatar and Bahrain. (NoTable 8. Oil producing countries such as Qatar and Bahrain

Denton, Trevor D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Principal Component Analysis for Interval-Valued Observations A. Douzal-Chouakria1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the merits of some entity (e.g., wine quality) can be along the lines of 90 ± with = 5 when reasonably sure and = 10 when the uncertainty increases. Rather than uncertainty, in order to protect confidentialities

Boyer, Edmond

268

Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Joint Solar Engineering Conference, 1995. Reddy, T.A., Claridge, D.E., 2000. Uncertainty of ?Measured? Energy Savings from Statistical Baseline Models. HVAC&R Research. ESL-IC-09-11-23 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

269

Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09 09 - December 2010 January 2009 December 2010 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 3 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, April 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 4 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX

270

Testing tidal-torque theory – I. Spin amplitude and direction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......a linear model to a discrete set of points. However, because...confidence interval, obtained by locating the values corresponding to...delaying the onset of matter domination and lowering the effective value...including the normalizations set by cluster abundance and by......

Cristiano Porciani; Avishai Dekel; Yehuda Hoffman

2002-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

jnci.oxfordjournals.org JNCI | Article 1 DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djs034 Published by Oxford University Press 2012.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press 2012. The question of whether diesel exhaust causes lung cancer in humans has been investigated) classified diesel exhaust as a "probable" carcinogen (IARC classification: Group 2A) based on "sufficient exposed to diesel exhaust as 1.33 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.24 to 1.44) (2) and 1.47 (95% CI = 1

Reid, Nancy

272

Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Parameter Estimation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Bayesian Approach ­Thumbtack vs Coin Toss · Uniform Prior vs Beta Prior ­Multinomial · Dirichlet Prior 2 · Statistical estimation theory deals with Confidence Intervals ­E.g., in election polls 61 + 2 percent plan

273

BOOK REVIEWS 143 attention to covariate-conditioned average and quantile effects, along with as-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confidence intervals and testing hypotheses. Their method is applied to a study of the impact of crude oil prices on gasoline prices. Hendry developed the general-to-specific (GETS) procedure for model se, for example, asset prices, whose marginal distributions display strong nonnormal features such as skewness and

Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

274

Overview of UltraSAN W. Douglas Obal II, M. Akber Qureshi, Daniel D. Deavours, William H. Sanders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interface and choose from a variety of ana- lytic and simulation modules for transient and steady- state to speed up transient solutions of some systems with rare events. UltraSAN also pro- vides direct simulation for transient and steady-state solutions. Specification of confidence intervals ensures greater

Sanders, William H.

275

A small-angle neutron scattering model for polydisperse spherical particles with diffusion zones and application to soft magnetic metallic glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An enhanced polydisperse model for small-angle scattering intensity for a diluted system of spherical precipitates with diffusion zones is presented. A nonlinear regression based on the analytic result supplies parameter values and confidence intervals to verify the inhibitor concept of nanocrystallization in amorphous alloys.

Heinemann, A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Temporal hyperacuity in the electric sense of fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... response (JAR), the fish Eigenmannia determines whether a neighbour's electric organ discharge (EOD), which is jamming its own signal, is higher or lower in frequency than ... (Fig. 2). For a sample period of 300 ms (and thus -100 EOD cycles), which is the latency of the JAR, the 95% confidence intervals around ...

Gary Rose; Walter Heiligenberg

1985-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Oklahoma Public Health Environmental Tracking System (OK-PHETS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microsoft Access, Excel, ArcView GIS and SAS Binomial confidence interval and Chi-Square tests were used clustering Cases were geocoded based on physical street address using ArcView GIS Many rural route for number of Coal mines, Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) in tons and Air Emissions Inventory (AEI) in tons

278

Research Article Environmetrics Received: 15 August 2013, Revised: 14 November 2013, Accepted: 2 January 2014, Published online in Wiley Online Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the gamma distribution to environmental data. In industrial exposure assessment, the sample sizes are often. INTRODUCTION Gamma distributions are widely used for the analysis of meteorological data, pollution data-parameter gamma distribution to fit annual maximum flood series data in order to construct confidence intervals

Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

279

ONE-WAY ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE: GPA BY SEAT LOCATION EXAMPLE There are 384 students in the dataset. Y = GPA and there is one categorical variable, "Seat" which is a response to the question "Where do you  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.001391 ** Residuals 381 113.778 0.29863 #12;Here is how you get the Tukey simultaneous confidence intervals (default in means being positive, making them easier to read and understand. > TukeyHSD(Model, ordered = T) Tukey mean GPAs for those two groups do not differ significantly. The plot to the left is created using: plot(Tukey

Utts, Jessica

280

10.18 a. 90% (See Table 10.1) b. 95% (or 95.44%)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the sample that prefers sitting in the middle. (There are 239 students in the data set, but one student gave school in California are truly representative of that population on the question of where they'd like population of interest and is not a sample from a larger group. A confidence interval is unnecessary because

Hunter, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Continuing Challenges of Leprosy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...population (5.4) Saline BCG Japan, 4 batches Yes? 48 (34-59...Unvaccinated HK M. leprae/BCG Japan/Mix BCG No 42 (1-66...confidence interval. d HHC, household contacts. The photographs...vaccines among high-risk household contacts in the Calcutta metropolis...

D. M. Scollard; L. B. Adams; T. P. Gillis; J. L. Krahenbuhl; R. W. Truman; D. L. Williams

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nipple Aspirate Fluid Collection, Related Factors and Relationship between Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Nipple Aspirate Fluid and Breast Diseases in Women in Harbin, PRC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...61) 0.01 2.28 (1.44-3.60) 0.01 Ear wax* Dry type 471 131 (27.81) 1.00 1.00 Wet type 109 66 (60...wax was 3.98 times greater than that in women who had dry-type ear wax (OR, 3.98; 95 confidence interval, 2.58-6...

Ya-shuang Zhao; Da Pang; Fan Wang; Ying-wei Xue; Dan-ning Gao; Hui Li; Kang Li; Bin-you Wang; Da Wang; Hong-yuan Li

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

"Killer" character does not influence the transmission of mitochondrial genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitivity markers, and it does not result in bias. Whereas...and Ephrussi (22). Killer does not interact with the suppressive...confidence interval. component does not interact with mitochon...In R. C. King (ed.), Handbook of genetics, vol. 1. Plenum...

R A Young; P S Perlman

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

May 15, 2012, Federal Technical Capability Program Face to Face Meeting - Business Case for Accreditation Incentives … Challenge the Enterprise to Foster Confidence and Support of TQP Accreditation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accreditation Processes Pros Accreditation Processes Pros Cons Discussion NSO - achieve formal recognition of TQP. NSO - takes considerable effort and commitment to establish infrastructure to achieve and maintain. NSO - establishing a well-performing program and then getting the recognition can foster better formality of ops attitudes with site personnel and can lead to suggestions that improve the local and complex TQP. SSO - Obtain external (of site office) evaluation and accreditation of TQP to assure program meets goals of FTCP. Recent (less than 12 months) accreditation seems to meet the requirements of a CDNS review (evidence is SSO 2009 CDNS Review Report). SSO - Resource cost necessary to prepare for

286

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. Cross-linking is the process of covalently joining two proteins using cross-linking reagents. After proteolytic cleavage, the cross-linked peptides can be identified using tandem mass spectrometry. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linkering reagent and/or protein to aid both identification and quantitation. However, these approaches have various limitations. These limitations can be overcome with a label-free approach and application of associated data analysis algorithms described in this work.

Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Statement of position of the United States Department of Energy in the matter of proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste (waste confidence rulemaking)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this proceeding is to assess generically the degree of assurance that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, to determine when such disposal or off-site storage will be available, and to determine whether wastes can be safely stored on-site past license expiration until off-site disposal/storage is available. (DLC)

None

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Comparison of Education, Business, and Engineering Undergraduate Students’ Internet Use and their Experience, Confidence, and Competence in Using New Literacies of the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and engineering majors .............................................................................. 24 3.2 Number and percent of education students? majors ................................... 25 3.3 Number and percent of business students? majors... ............................................................. 33 4.1 Number and percent of underclassmen?s high school-related Internet use: Overall frequency of Internet use .............................................................. 35 4.2 Number and percent of underclassmen...

Kim, Su Yeon

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

The use of temperature data from poorly sited stations can lead to a false sense of confidence in the robustness of multidecadal surface air temperature trend assessments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; BLISS AND DOESKEN--Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; CAI PIELKE SR., JOHN NIELSEN-GAMMON, CHRISTOPHER DAVEY, JIM ANGEL, ODIE BLISS, NOLAN DOESKEN, MING CAI University, Fort Collins, Colorado; HUBBARD AND LIN--School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska

Pielke, Roger A.

290

The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing -looking back on 40 years of excellence; looking forward with a confident vision and strategic direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the direct provision and satellite derived products to facilitate emergency response. Recent examples include again to the position of the national DFO Director of Oceanography and Climate Science research programs commanded six HMC Ships for various periods at sea, Port Security Unit Four and HMCS CARLETON, Canada

291

Determination of monitor unit check tolerances based on a comparison with measurement and treatment planning system data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: This work describes the experimental validation of treatment planning system monitor unit (MU) calculations against measurement for a range of scenarios. This, together with a comparison of treatment planning system MUs and an independent MU check method, allows the derivation of confidence intervals for the check process. Data were collected for open and 60° motorized wedge fields using an Elekta Synergy linac at 6 and 8 MV using homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Masterplan (Version 4.0) pencil-beam and collapsed cone algorithms were used for the primary MU calculations with full inhomogeneity correction. Results show that both algorithms agree with measurement to acceptable tolerance levels in the majority of the cases studied. The confidence interval for the pencil-beam algorithm MU against an independent check was determined as + 1.6% to ?3.4%. This is modified to + 2.3% to ?2.5% when data collected with low-density heterogeneities are removed as this algorithm is not used clinically for these cases. The corresponding interval for the collapsed cone algorithm was + 1.2% to ?4.3%, indicating that an offset tolerance for the independent check is appropriate. Analysis of clinical conformal treatment plan data generated using the pencil-beam algorithm (1393 beams) returned 93% of beams within the independent check tolerance. Similarly, using the collapsed cone algorithm as the primary MU calculation, 77% (of 1434 beams) were within the confidence interval.

Curtis, Helen [Medical Physics Department, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Richmond, Neil, E-mail: neil.richmond@stees.nhs.uk [Medical Physics Department, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Burke, Kevin; Walker, Chris [Medical Physics Department, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Online Sensor Calibration Monitoring Uncertainty Estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical modeling techniques have been applied to online process monitoring to detect equipment and instrumentation degradations. However, few applications provide prediction uncertainty estimates, which can provide a measure of confidence in decisions. This paper presents the development of analytical prediction interval estimation methods for three common nonlinear empirical modeling strategies: artificial neural networks, neural network partial least squares, and local polynomial regression. The techniques are applied to nuclear power plant operational data for sensor calibration monitoring, and the prediction intervals are verified via bootstrap simulation studies.

Hines, J. Wesley; Rasmussen, Brandon [University of Tennessee (United States)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO: IEEE COMPUTER, 2002, JANUARY 28, 2002 1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Web Users with Rough K-means Pawan Lingras Chad West Abstract Data collection and analysis in web mining faces certain unique challenges. Due to a variety of reasons inherent in web browsing and web techniques in web mining need to accommodate such data. Fuzzy and rough sets provide the ability to deal

294

Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time can be known so that its energy consumption can be estimated accurately. In order to verify the simulation accuracy, an actual room equipped with a gas-engine heat pump (GHP) air-conditioning system is studied by both simulation and measurement...

Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Cane Creek clastic interval of the Pennsylvanian Paradox formation - an exciting new horizontal target; Part I: Regional Geology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cane Creek is a fractured, abnormally pressured, self-sourcing reservoir, making it a good candidate for exploitation through horizontal technology. This concept was successfully applied to the Cane Creek in 1991 when Columbia Gas Development and Exxon Company USA, on an Enserch farmout, completed the Kane Springs Federal 27-1 for 914 BOPD. Since that time, two additional horizontal discoveries have potentialed for 1158 and 1325 BOPD, respectively. The Cane Creek was deposited in a partly restricted evaporitic environment in the Paradox basin during the Pennsylvanian. The Cane Creek consists of fifth-order shoaling-upward cycles within the transgressive to early highstand systems tracts. The reservoir comprises 20-30 ft of organic-rich, dolomitic siltstone and shale directly overlain and underlain by interbedded anhydrite, shale, and siltstone. In most areas, the Cane Creek is sealed above and below by halite, which maintains the abnormal pressure in the reservoir. Core information and reservoir engineering data indicate the Cane Creek produces from fracture porosity with minor contribution from the matrix. Initial fracture development may have occurred as a result of movement along basement-involved faults during the Pennsylvanian, followed by or coincident with salt mobilization from Pennsylvania-Jurassic. Hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring during maximum burial in the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary created additional fractures or enhanced existing ones. The dominant fracture orientation is northeast-southwest to north-south, which is consistent with the regional stress regime during Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

Rawlins, D.M. (Exxon Company USA, Midland, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effect of Alfaprostol, Lasalocid and Once Daily Suckling on postpartum interval in Brahman and Brahman crossbred cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by age, breed and date of calving to one of 8 treatments (Table 1): 1) Control; 2) Lasalocid (Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc. , Nutley, N. J. ); 3) Once daily suckling; 4) Alfaprostol (Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc. , Nutley, N. J. ); 5) Lasalocid and once daily... by age, breed and date of calving to one of 8 treatments (Table 1): 1) Control; 2) Lasalocid (Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc. , Nutley, N. J. ); 3) Once daily suckling; 4) Alfaprostol (Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc. , Nutley, N. J. ); 5) Lasalocid and once daily...

Del Vecchio, Ronald Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Dopamine or thyrotropin-releasing hormone effects on luteinizing hormone secretion in heifers and on the postpartum interval in cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dr. D. W. Forrest for devoting many hours in the planning and critique of this manuscript. Appreciation is also extended to Dr. J. D. Williams and Dr. P. G. Harms for support and instruction as members of the authors graduate committee.... 6 + 0. 3 ng/ml, respectively). Carruthers and Hafs (5) observed that ovulation occurred on days )9. 7 and 21. 2, respectively, for suckled and nonsuckled dairy cows. Both frequency and amplitude of episodic LH peaks was reduced on days 7 and 14...

Lovin, Jeffrey Clay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interrelationship of endogenous and exogenous prostaglandins with uterine involution and postpartum interval in beef cows and heifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

versus C. 100 90 80 +I 70 60 e 50 +J 40 m 30 20 10 / / / / / 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 * Do not differ (p&, 05) Days postpartum Figure 6. Treatment effects on cumu1ative frequency of return to estrus... frequency of return to estrus in Hrangus cows. APP versus UP. 100 90 4J 70 60 o 50 40 E 30 20 10 / / / r , /~ I I / I / I / I / / I 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 * Differ at p&, 05 Days postpartum Treatment...

Tolleson, Douglas Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

A reliable and accurate calculation of excitation capacitance value for an induction generator based on interval computation technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) offers many advantages for wind...C exct ) is very crucial for the selfexcitation and voltage build-up as well as volt...

Rajesh Kumar Thakur; Vivek Agarwal…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Testing and interval estimation for two-sample survival comparisons with small sample sizes and unequal censoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......CHSS model. Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference (2004) 126:535-551. Breslow NE . A generalized Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing K-samples subject to unequal patterns of censoring. Biometrika (1970) 57:579-594. Cox......

Rui Wang; Stephen W. Lagakos; Robert J. Gray

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The General, Linear Let a1 (x) , a2 (x) , . . . , an (x) be continuous functions defined on the interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c1 and c2, u = c1u1+c2u2 is also a solution of this equation. · Suppose u1 and u2 are solutions c1 and c2, u = c1u1+c2u2 is a solution of the inhomogeneous equation Lu = r where r = c1r1 + c2r2

Lebovitz, Norman

303

Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting NEW IMPROVED SYSTEM FOR WWVB BROADCAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by use of a binary coded decimal (BCD) format, allowing the reception of a time-of-day code. However The WWVB broadcast of the time-code signal has undergone no major changes in its communications protocol

304

Analysis of Cardiac Micro-Acceleration Signals for the Estimation of Systolic and Diastolic Time Intervals in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

error and coefficient stability. Models for mitral valve closing, aor- tic valve closing and opening, fitted between CMA features and echo timings, were eval- uated with their correlation coefficient, model instants showed satisfactory results, whereas the estimation of the opening instant of the mitral valve

Boyer, Edmond

305

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Markets & Finance - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Charts Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Charts Selected Charts Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices Figure 6: Probability of the November 2012 WTI contract expiring above different price levels Figure 7: Historical RBOB futures prices and crack spreads Figure 9: Probability of November 2012 retail gasoline exceeding different prices levels at expiration Figure 13: Historical front month U.S. natural gas prices Figure 15: Probability of the November 2012 Henry Hub contract expiring above price levels West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price Confidence Intervals XLS West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price Probabilities XLS Henry Hub Natural Gas Prices and Confidence Intervals XLS Henry Hub Natural Gas Price Probabilities XLS

307

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

308

Solar Census - Perfecting the Art of Automated, Remote Solar Shading Assessments (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To validate the work completed by Solar Census as part of the Department of Energy SunShot Incubator 8 award, NREL validated the performanec of the Solar Census Surveyor tool against the industry standard Solmetric SunEye measurements for 4 residential sites in California who experienced light to heavy shading. Using the a two one-sided test (TOST) of statistical equivalence, NREL found that the mean differences between the Solar Census and SunEye mean solar access values for Annual, Summer, and Winter readings fall within the 95% confidence intervals and the confidence intervals themselves fall within the tolerances of +/- 5 SAVs, the Solar Census calculations are statistically equivalent to the SunEye measurements.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy. The integrated carbon sequestration in 1994 was 2.1 t C ha-l y-l with a 90% confidence interval due to sampling an overall uncertainty on the annual carbon sequestration in 1994 of --0.3to +0.8 t C ha-l y-l. Keywords

Rose, Michael R.

310

A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

29,759 29,759 PROJECT NUMBER FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Conversion and Fouling Background Coal and biomass gasification is an approach to cleaner power generation and other uses of these resources. Currently, the service life of gasifiers does not meet the performance needs of users. Gasifiers fail to achieve on-line availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications and 95 percent in applications such as chemical production. The inability to meet these goals has created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. Gasifier output is a hot gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), known as synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas cooler is one of the key components identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities

312

Constructivist-Based Asynchronous Tutorial to Improve Transfer between Math and Chemistry Domains: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of the Impact of ReMATCH on General Chemistry Course Performance and Confidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The two-year implementation of ReMATCH, a web-based math and problem-solving tutorial, in a traditionally arranged general chemistry classroom at the University of Kansas examined the impact of a designed intervention to assist students...

Barker, M. Danielle

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Distributed Bayesian Algorithms for Fault-Tolerant Event Region Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a distributed solution for a canonical task in wireless sensor networks---the binary detection of interesting environmental events. We explicitly take into account the possibility of sensor measurement faults and develop a distributed Bayesian algorithm for detecting and correcting such faults. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that 85-95 percent of faults can be corrected using this algorithm, even when as many as 10 percent of the nodes are faulty.

Bhaskar Krishnamachari; Sitharama Iyengar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Versatile P(acman) BAC Libraries for Transgenesis Studies in Drosophila melanogaster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We constructed Drosophila melanogaster BAC libraries with 21-kb and 83-kb inserts in the P(acman) system. Clones representing 12-fold coverage and encompassing more than 95percent of annotated genes were mapped onto the reference genome. These clones can be integrated into predetermined attP sites in the genome using Phi C31 integrase to rescue mutations. They can be modified through recombineering, for example to incorporate protein tags and assess expression patterns.

Venken, Koen J.T.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Schulze, Karen L.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Spokony, Rebecca; Wan, Kenneth H.; Koriabine, Maxim; de Jong, Pieter J.; White, Kevin P.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hoskins, Roger A.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

S. Africa: ESKOM's Massive investment hits new snag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ESKOM, the government-owned company that generates nearly 95 percent of the power in South Africa, has been facing serious capacity shortages for some time, forcing it to resort to mandatory rationing of major industrial users and occasional outages. A combination of rapid economic growth and chronic underinvestment in infrastructure resulted in the disappearance of a once plentiful capacity surplus. Considerable rate increases and emphasis on conservation are planned.

NONE

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Differences in Mexican-American and Anglo-American Women's Response to a Modified Clothing TAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise conclusions in the statistical sense, could be drawn. For the Mexican-American women studied, there was a direct relationship between cloth- ing awareness and social status scores (P. = 75-90 per- ' cent), occupational rating (no statistical....5 percent). Area of ma jnr socialization did not affect Mexican-American ~z-omen'( cognizance of clothing. Anglo-Americans were more likely to have Iliqher clothing awareness scores (P. = 95 percent) than werr the Mexico-born women. Although...

Bathke, Carol Sander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field, Kangal basin, Sivas, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses a case study on global estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field from the Sivas–Kangal basin, which is one of the most productive lignite basins in eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The two lignite seams, which were developed in a fresh-water lacustrine depositional environment during the Pliocene time, are currently being exploited in the Kalburcayiri open-cast mine for feed coal to a power plant with 300-MW capacity. Tonnage, thickness and quality parameters (ash yield, total sulphur content, and calorific value) of the lignite are variables considered in this study. The global estimates of these variables together with 95% confidence limits are obtained using the approximation principle of global estimation. A random stratified grid is fitted to available boreholes; the variograms for thickness and lignite quality parameters are estimated and modeled. The models are used in calculating estimation error variances that will later be used in constructing 95% confidence intervals for the true values.

A.Erhan Tercan; Ali Ihsan Karayigit

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ENTOMOLOGY O.B. Kovanci et al. (2005) Phytoparasitica 33(4):334-342 Effects of Application Rate and Interval on the Efficacy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENTOMOLOGY O.B. Kovanci et al. (2005) Phytoparasitica 33(4):334-342 Effects of Application Rate sustain themselves in apples alone in NC, Received Nov. 22, 2004; accepted March 12, 2005; http://www.phytoparasitica

319

3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

Arzuman, Sadun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Subsurface Geology of Arsenic-Bearing Permian Sedimentary Rocks in the Garber-Wellington Interval of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer, Cleveland County, Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Central Oklahoma Aquifer is an important source of drinking water in central Oklahoma. The major formations making up the aquifer, the Garber Sandstone and… (more)

Abbott, Ben Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Challenges and Opportunities in Implementing the FDA Default Parametric Tolerance Interval Two One-Sided Test for Delivered Dose Uniformity of Orally Inhaled Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2009, the International Pharmaceutical Aerosol Consortium on Regulation and Science (IPAC-RS) conducted DDU Seminars in order to discuss with member companies industry’s experiences with the PTI-TOST. During t...

Greg Larner; Andrew Cooper; Svetlana Lyapustina; Stefan Leiner…

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DMSP-IEES: A Stochastic Programming Model Based on Dual-Interval and Multi-Stage Scenarios Modeling Approaches for Energy Systems Management and GHG Emissions Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-related activities contribute a major portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions into the atmosphere. In this ... -environment systems management, in which issues of GHG-emission mitigation ca...

G. C. Li; G. H. Huang; Z. F. Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Understanding the Impact of Open-Framework Conglomerates on Water-Oil Displacements: Victor Interval of the Ivishak Reservoir, Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Victor Unit of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is characterized by high net-to-gross fluvial sandstones and conglomerates. The highest permeability is found within sets of cross-strata of open-framework conglomerate (OFC). They are preserved within unit bar deposits and assemblages of unit bar deposits within compound (braid) bar deposits. They are thief zones limiting enhanced oil recovery. We incorporate recent research that has quantified important attributes of their sedimentary architecture within preserved deposits. We use high-resolution models to demonstrate the fundamental aspects of their control on oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. We found that when the pressure gradient is oriented perpendicular to the paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller, than when it is oriented parallel to paleoflow. The pressure differe...

Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sex-related Impact on Clinical Outcome of Everolimus-eluting Versus Bare-metal Stents in ST-segment Myocardial Infarction. Insights From the EXAMINATION Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction and objectives The use of second-generation drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reduces the rate of major adverse cardiac events. We aimed to evaluate the impact of sex on the performance of everolimus-eluting stents vs bare-metal stents in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2-year follow-up. Methods This is a sub-study of the EXAMINATION trial that randomized 1498 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to everolimus-eluting or bare-metal stents. Primary end point was combined all-cause death, any recurrent myocardial infarction, and any revascularization. All end points were analyzed according to sex at 2-year follow-up. Results Of 1498 patients included in the trial, 254 (17.0%) were women. Women were older and had higher prevalence of hypertension and lower prevalence of smoking compared with men. In contrast with men, stent diameter was smaller in women. After multivariate analysis, the primary end point was similar between women and men (hazard ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.37), and among women, between those treated with bare-metal vs everolimus-eluting stents (hazard ratio = 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-6.46). Women showed a lower rate of repeat revascularization than men (hazard ratio = 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.95) despite worse baseline characteristics. This difference was driven by better performance of the everolimus-eluting stent in women. Conclusions Despite poorer baseline clinical characteristics, women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention showed outcomes similar to men. The use of everolimus-eluting stents may represent an added value in women as it showed a reduced rate of repeated revascularization compared to men.

Ander Regueiro; Diego Fernández-Rodríguez; Salvatore Brugaletta; Victoria Martín-Yuste; Monica Masotti; Xavier Freixa; Ángel Cequier; Andrés Íñiguez; Patrick W. Serruys; Manel Sabaté

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Efficacy, Safety, and Immunogenicity of an Enterovirus 71 Vaccine in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for 80% statistical power to show that the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval for vaccine efficacy exceeded that observed with placebo at a significance level of 0.05, assuming a vaccine efficacy rate of 80% and an incidence density of 8 cases of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease or... Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an important cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease, especially in China. In this phase 3 trial involving 10,077 infants and children in China, an EV71 vaccine provided protection against EV71-associated disease.

Zhu F.; Xu W.; Xia J.

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comprehensive safeguards evaluation methods and societal risk analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Essential capabilities of an integrated evaluation methodology for analyzing safeguards systems are discussed. Such a methodology must be conceptually meaningful, technically defensible, discriminating and consistent. A decompostion of safeguards systems by function is mentioned as a possible starting point for methodology development. The application of a societal risk equation to safeguards systems analysis is addressed. Conceptual problems with this approach are discussed. Technical difficulties in applying this equation to safeguards systems are illustrated through the use of confidence intervals, information content, hypothesis testing and ranking and selection procedures.

Richardson, J.M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hospital-acquired infection rate in a tertiary care teaching hospital in China: a cross-sectional survey involving 2434 inpatients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary A single-day hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) point prevalence study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in China. The overall prevalence rate of \\{HAIs\\} was 3.53% (95% confidence interval 2.80–4.26%) among 2434 inpatients surveyed. Respiratory system infection was the most common type of HAI (49.43%), followed by surgical site infection (22.99%). The pathogen detection results for 50 patients showed Pseudomonas aeruginosa to account for 24.00% of isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.00%) and Escherichia coli (14.00%).

Xiu-Bin Tao; Li-Hua Qian; Yan Li; Qun Wu; Jing-Jing Ruan; Dong-Zhen Cai; Hui Peng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A soil moisture budget analysis of Texas using basic climatic data while assuming a possible warming trend across the state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the slope (dashed lines) of the regression line of precipitation on mean temperature for the Lower Valley. 35. Isopleths of MTRANGE (in 'F) for Texas during August. 71 36. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control... are significant at the 95% confidence interval. 74 37. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control), I' F, 2'F, 3'F, and 4'F increase in the mean annual temperature of Texas. Mean monthly temperatures increase non...

Bjornson, Brian Matthew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine — Preliminary Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...titer with the 95% confidence interval. Fisher's exact test was used for between-group comparisons of positive response rates, Student's t-test for comparisons of the magnitude of the antibody response after log transformation, and the Wilcoxon test for comparisons of the magnitude of T-cell responses... In August 2014, the World Health Organization declared the epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa to be a public health emergency of international concern. This was the first time in more than 20 outbreaks since EVD was identified in 1976 ...

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Coverage Study of the CMSSM Based on ATLAS Sensitivity Using Fast Neural Networks Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the coverage properties of confidence and credible intervals on the CMSSM parameter space inferred from a Bayesian posterior and the profile likelihood based on an ATLAS sensitivity study. In order to make those calculations feasible, we introduce a new method based on neural networks to approximate the mappin between CMSSM parameters and weak-scale particle masses. Our method reduces the computational effort needed to sample the CMSSM parameter space by a factor of ~10^4 with respect to conventional techniques. We find that both the Bayesian posterior and the profile likelihood intervals can significantly over-cover and trace back the origin of this effect to physical boundaries in the parameter space and overly-simplified likelihood functions.

Bridges, M; Feroz, F; Hobson, M; de Austri, R Ruiz; Trotta, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Wind energy potential assessment considering the uncertainties due to limited data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new Bayesian approach is proposed to estimate the annual energy production (AEP) of a site where construction of wind turbines is considered. The approach uses long-term wind speeds of a nearby weather station and short-term wind speeds near the target site. Uncertainties exist due to the limited amount of data in the target site, in addition to the inherent uncertainties in the wind speed, the air density, the surface roughness exponent, and the power performance of the turbine. The proposed method systematically addresses these uncertainties and provides the distribution of the AEP. For illustration, we used the wind speed data near Yeosu, Korea, and the power performance curve of a 3 MW turbine. For the site and the turbine studied, the range given by the 95% confidence interval corresponded to 8.9% of the mean AEP, and the range given by the 99% confidence interval corresponded to 11.9% of the mean AEP. Benefits of using the Bayesian approach compared to the classical statistical inference was also illustrated with the case study. The proposed approach provides a more conservative estimation considering the uncertainties due to the limited amount of data. Distributions of parameters of the prediction model are also provided, which enables a more detailed analysis of the prediction.

Sungmoon Jung; O. Arda Vanli; Soon-Duck Kwon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Representative Doses to Members of the Public from Atmospheric Releases of 131I at the Mayak Production Association Facilities from 1948 through 1972  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping epidemiologic studies performed by researchers from the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute revealed an excess prevalence of thyroid nodules and an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among residents of Ozersk, Russia, who were born in the early 1950s. Ozersk is located about 5 km from the facilities where the Mayak Production Association produced nuclear materials for the Russian weapons program. Reactor operations began in June 1948 and chemical separation of plutonium from irradiated fuel began in February 1949. The U.S.–Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research conducted a series of projects over a 10-year period to assess the radiation risks in the Southern Urals. This paper uses data collected under Committee projects to reconstruct individual time-dependent thyroid doses to reference individuals living in Ozersk from 131I released to the atmosphere. Between 3.22×1016 and 4.31×1016 Bq of 131I released may have been released during the 1948–1972 time period, and a best estimate is 3.76×1016 Bq. A child born in 1947 is estimated to have received a cumulative thyroid dose of 2.3 Gy for 1948–1972, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.51–7.3 Gy. Annual doses were the highest in 1949 and a child who was 5 years old in 1949 is estimated to have a received an annual thyroid dose of 0.93 Gy with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19–3.5 Gy.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: The actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.

Kim, Young-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, In Kyung; Song, Sang Woo [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Participant characteristics and intervention processes associated with reductions in television viewing in the High Five for Kids study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To evaluate the High Five for Kids intervention effect on television within subgroups, examine participant characteristics associated with process measures and assess perceived helpfulness of television intervention components. Method High Five (randomized controlled trial of 445 overweight/obese 2–7 year-olds in Massachusetts [2006–2008]) reduced television by 0.36 h/day. 1-year effects on television viewing, stratified by subgroup, were assessed using linear regression. Among intervention participants (n = 253), associations of intervention component helpfulness with television reduction were examined using linear regression and associations of participant characteristics with processes linked to television reduction (choosing television and completing intervention visits) were examined using logistic regression. Results High Five reduced television across subgroups. Parents of Latino (versus white) children had lower odds of completing ? 2 study visits (Odds Ratio: 0.39 [95% Confidence Interval: 0.18, 0.84]). Parents of black (versus white) children had higher odds of choosing television (Odds Ratio: 2.23 [95% Confidence Interval: 1.08, 4.59]), as did parents of obese (versus overweight) children and children watching ? 2 h/day (versus < 2) at baseline. Greater perceived helpfulness was associated with greater television reduction. Conclusion Clinic-based motivational interviewing reduces television viewing in children. Low cost education approaches (e.g., printed materials) may be well-received. Parents of children at higher obesity risk could be more motivated to reduce television.

Elizabeth M. Cespedes; Christine M. Horan; Matthew W. Gillman; Steven L. Gortmaker; Sarah Price; Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman; Kathleen Mitchell; Elsie M. Taveras

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Early Results with the Use of Heparin-bonded Stent Graft to Rescue Failed Angioplasty of Chronic Femoropopliteal Occlusive Lesions: TASC D Lesions Have a Poor Outcome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate early patency rate of the heparin-bonded stent grafts in atherosclerotic long femoropopliteal occlusive disease, and to identify factors that affect outcome. Methods: Heparin-bonded Viabahn stent grafts were placed in 33 limbs in 33 patients during 2009-2010. The stents were deployed to rescue failed conventional balloon angioplasty. Mean age was 69 (range 44-88) years, and 67 % (22 of 33) were men. Most procedures (21 of 33, 64 %) were performed for critical limb ischemia (33 % for rest pain, 30 % tissue loss). Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox regression analysis were used to identify significant risk factors. Results: The average length of lesions treated was 25 {+-} 10 cm, and they were predominantly TASC (Transatlantic Intersociety Consensus) D (n = 13) and C (n = 17) lesions. The median primary patency was 5.0 months (95 % confidence interval 1.22-8.77). The mean secondary patency was 8.6 months (95 % confidence interval 6.82-10.42). Subsequently, 4 patients underwent bypass surgery and 5 patients underwent major amputation. One patient died. There were 5 in-stent or edge-stent stenoses. Cox multivariate regression analysis identified TASC D lesions to be a significant risk factor for early occlusion (p = 0.035). Conclusion: TASC D lesions of femoropopliteal occlusions have poor patency rates with the use of heparin-bonded stent grafts after failed conventional angioplasty. Alternative options should be considered for these patients.

Kuhan, Ganesh, E-mail: gkuhan@nhs.net; Abisi, Said; Braithwaite, Bruce D.; MacSweeney, Shane T. R. [Nottingham University Hospitals, Vascular and Endovascular Unit, Queens Medical Centre (United Kingdom); Whitaker, Simon C.; Habib, Said B. [Nottingham University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Queen's Medical Centre (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas) Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas) Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Commerce Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) allows for the retention of employee payroll withholding taxes for qualified companies or third parties performing services on behalf of such companies. This program offers qualified companies the ability to retain 95 percent of their payroll withholding tax for up to five to seven years. PEAK is available to new

338

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect of pH on the uptake and activity of acifluorfen and 2,4-D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and ammonium chloride (34). Addition of diammonium phosphate and urea-ammonium nitrate fertilizer solution to bentazon (3-(1-methyl- ethyl) ? (1H) -2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazin-4 (3H) -one 2, 2-dioxide) has been shown to increase its uptake and foliar activity... varies with weed species. Common cocklebur degraded 55 percent of the applied acifluorfen compared to 45 percent degradation in common ragweed after seven days. Frear (11) found that 85 to 95 percent of acifluorfen was degraded in 24 h by soybeans...

Simpson, David Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Spectrum of Neutrons from Thermal Fission of U235  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A proton recoil counter has been used to determine the neutron spectrum, in the energy range 3.3-17 Mev, of a beam produced by irradiating 95 percent U235 (metal) in the central experimental hole of the Los Alamos Homogeneous Reactor. Most of the fissions were induced by slow neutrons. The data are combined with those obtained by D. Hill and by T. W. Bonner, R. A. Ferrell and M. C. Rinehart; the composite spectrum so obtained extends from 0.075 to 17 Mev. Fits with two general formulas are discussed.

B. E. Watt

1952-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Improving quality of discriminating signal from background for Higgs portal model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In our universe nearly 95 percent of matters are unknown yet, we only have theory, so called Standard Model, for 5 percent of universe. Consequently, our next target of high energy physics is naturally Dark Matter and Dark Energy. In this study we studied Dark matter especially for Higgs portal model. In this study we found discrimination power is improved if we impose MET significance cut instead of MET cut and we don't need to include many variables when we impose MET significance cut.

Kim, Manki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Search for Neutrinos from the Sun  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

A solar neutrino detection system has been built to observe the neutrino radiation from the sun. The detector uses 3,900,000 liters of tetrachloroethylene as the neutrino capturing medium. Argon is removed from the liquid by sweeping with helium gas, and counted in a small low level proportional counter. The recovery efficiency of the system was tested with Ar{sup 36} by the isotope dilution method, and also with Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by fast neutrons. These tests demonstrate that Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by neutrino capture can be removed with a 95 percent efficiency by the procedure used.

Davis, Raymond Jr.

1968-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

343

Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

Francis, Jasmine H., E-mail: francij1@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Brodie, Scott E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Validation of a zero-dimensional model for prediction of \\{NOx\\} and engine performance for electronically controlled marine two-stroke diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to derive a methodology suitable for energy system analysis for predicting the performance and \\{NOx\\} emissions of marine low speed diesel engines. The paper describes a zero-dimensional model, evaluating the engine performance by means of an energy balance and a two zone combustion model using ideal gas law equations over a complete crank cycle. The combustion process is divided into intervals, and the product composition and flame temperature are calculated in each interval. The \\{NOx\\} emissions are predicted using the extended Zeldovich mechanism. The model is validated using experimental data from two MAN B&W engines; one case being data subject to engine parameter changes corresponding to simulating an electronically controlled engine; the second case providing data covering almost all model input and output parameters. The first case of validation suggests that the model can predict specific fuel oil consumption and \\{NOx\\} emissions within the 95% confidence intervals given by the experimental measurements. The second validation confirms the capability of the model to match measured engine output parameters based on measured engine input parameters with a maximum 5% deviation.

Fabio Scappin; Sigurður H. Stefansson; Fredrik Haglind; Anders Andreasen; Ulrik Larsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An optimization model for regional micro-grid system management based on hybrid inexact stochastic-fuzzy chance-constrained programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Micro-grid system management considering air pollutant control and carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation is a challenging task, since many system parameters such as electric demand, resource availability, system cost as well as their interrelationships may appear uncertain. To reflect these uncertainties, effective inexact system-analysis methods are desired. In this study, a hybrid inexact stochastic-fuzzy chance-constrained programming (ITSFCCP) was developed for micro-grid system planning, and interval-parameter programming (IPP), two-stage stochastic programming (TSP) and fuzzy credibility constrained programming (FCCP) methods were integrated into a general framework to manage pollutants and CO2 emissions under uncertainties presented as interval values, fuzzy possibilistic and stochastic probabilities. Moreover, FCCP allowed satisfaction of system constraints at specified confidence level, leading to model solutions with the lowest system cost under acceptable risk magnitudes. The developed model was applied to a case of micro-grid system over a 24-h optimization horizon with a real time and dynamic air pollutant control, and total amount control for CO2 emission. Optimal generation dispatch strategies were derived under different assumptions for risk preferences and emission reduction goals. The obtained results indicated that stable intervals for the objective function and decision variables could be generated, which were useful for helping decision makers identify the desired electric power generation patterns, and CO2 emission reduction under complex uncertainties, and gain in-depth insights into the trade-offs between system economy and reliability.

L. Ji; D.X. Niu; M. Xu; G.H. Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Data:7bac3461-66ed-496b-9a07-22219bd24ad6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bac3461-66ed-496b-9a07-22219bd24ad6 bac3461-66ed-496b-9a07-22219bd24ad6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power, Schedule LP Sector: Industrial Description: Available in OTEC service territory for non-residential service to connected loads of 1,000 kVA or more, subject to policies as established by the Board of Directors. Minimum monthly bill: Shall be the monthly delivery charge plus $1.00/kVA of installed transformer capacity and applicable taxes. Power factor adjustment: (a.) The consumer agrees to maintain unity power factor as nearly as practicable. Demand charges will be adjusted to correct for average power factors lower than 95 percent. (b.) Such adjustments will be made by increasing the measured demand one percent for each one percent by which the average power factor is less than 95 percent.

348

A New Table of Observed Travel-Times of Earthquake Waves for Distances of 10° and 180° at One-Degree Intervals Applicable Only to Earthquakes of Shallow Focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excep- tion the fundamental requirement that...interior- wall of boiler-room. This...the buildings safe for operation and providing...amperes for normal operation. A Laon tube...0.1, the fundamental REPORTS AND PAPERS...

J. B. Macelwane; S.J.

349

Increased Dose Density Is Feasible: A Pilot Study of Adjuvant Epirubicin and Cyclophosphamide followed by Paclitaxel, at 10- or 11-Day Intervals with Filgrastim Support in Women with Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...feasibility of dose-dense FEC followed by alternating weekly taxanes in...four or more node-positive breast cancer...INT C9741: dose-dense chemotherapy...adjuvant epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel, at 10...

Monica N. Fornier; Andrew D. Seidman; Diana Lake; Gabriella D'Andrea; Jacqueline Bromberg; Mark Robson; Catherine Van Poznak; Katherine S. Panageas; Marietta Atienza; Larry Norton; and Clifford Hudis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Advertising Installation Rates (rates include printing costs) Ads can be purchased at two-week or monthly intervals. Clients can request to have ads removed before the end of the scheduled display dates; however, clients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advertising Installation Rates (rates include printing costs) Ads can be purchased at two are responsible for designing all advertisements. Approved ads must be 11 inches high and 17 inches wide. Allow Services will print, install and remove all ads. Submission Complete an advertising request form

Bennett, Gisele

351

Sequence stratigraphy, depositional environments, and regional mapping of the late Devonian interval, upper Three Forks Formation, Sanish Member, and lower Bakken Shale, U.S. portion of the Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cores of the Late Devonian upper Three Forks, Sanish, and lower Bakken units from eight wells were examined and described at the North Dakota core… (more)

Sesack, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

353

December 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2000 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2000 Short-Term Energy Outlook 12/18/00 Click here to start Table of Contents December 2000 Short-Term Energy Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Last Winter’s Price Spike Limited to Northeast Winter Residential Heating Oil Prices Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Regional Retail Gasoline Prices U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices U.S. Natural Gas - Working Gas in Underground Storage Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Average Natural Gas Spot Price Outlook Author: Mark J. Mazur, Acting Administrator

354

statrpp.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics 1 36. STATISTICS Revised September 2011 by G. Cowan (RHUL). This chapter gives an overview of statistical methods used in high-energy physics. In statistics, we are interested in using a given sample of data to make inferences about a probabilistic model, e.g., to assess the model's validity or to determine the values of its parameters. There are two main approaches to statistical inference, which we may call frequentist and Bayesian. In frequentist statistics, probability is interpreted as the frequency of the outcome of a repeatable experiment. The most important tools in this framework are parameter estimation, covered in Section 36.1, and statistical tests, discussed in Section 36.2. Frequentist confidence intervals, which are constructed so as to cover the true value of a parameter with a specified probability, are treated in Section 36.3.2. Note that in frequentist

355

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard

356

Statistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics 1 32. STATISTICS Revised April 1998 by F. James (CERN); February 2000 by R. Cousins (UCLA); October 2001, October 2003, and August 2005 by G. Cowan (RHUL). This chapter gives an overview of statistical methods used in High Energy Physics. In statistics we are interested in using a given sample of data to make inferences about a probabilistic model, e.g., to assess the model's validity or to determine the values of its parameters. There are two main approaches to statistical inference, which we may call frequentist and Bayesian. In frequentist statistics, probability is interpreted as the frequency of the outcome of a repeatable experiment. The most important tools in this framework are parameter estimation, covered in Section 32.1, and statistical tests, discussed in Section 32.2. Frequentist confidence intervals, which are constructed so as to cover the true value of

357

Microsoft Word - Price Probabilities Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 1 April 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Probabilities of Possible Future Prices 1 EIA introduced a monthly analysis of energy price volatility and forecast uncertainty in the October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). Included in the analysis were charts portraying confidence intervals around the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures prices of West Texas Intermediate (equivalent to light sweet crude oil) and Henry Hub natural gas contracts. The March 2010 STEO added another set of charts listing the probability of the future realized price exceeding or falling below given price levels (see Figures 1A and 1B for West Texas Intermediate crude oil price probabilities). These charts are also available as spreadsheets allowing users to input their own prices to

358

2003 CBECS RSE Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003rsetables_files/plainlink.css" cbecs/cbecs2003/detailed_tables_2003/2003rsetables_files/plainlink.css" type=text/css rel=stylesheet> Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > RSE Tables 2003 CBECS Relative Standard Error (RSE) Tables Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100. (More information on RSEs)

359

Presentation for National Governors’ Association  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Presentation for National Governors’ Association Presentation for National Governors’ Association 1/26/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Presentation for National Governors’ Association WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding Total OECD Oil Stocks* Fundamentals Explain High Prices U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Retail Propane Prices U.S. Natural Gas -. Working Gas in Underground Storage Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range

360

statrpp.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics 1 37. STATISTICS Revised September 2013 by G. Cowan (RHUL). This chapter gives an overview of statistical methods used in high-energy physics. In statistics, we are interested in using a given sample of data to make inferences about a probabilistic model, e.g., to assess the model's validity or to determine the values of its parameters. There are two main approaches to statistical inference, which we may call frequentist and Bayesian. In frequentist statistics, probability is interpreted as the frequency of the outcome of a repeatable experiment. The most important tools in this framework are parameter estimation, covered in Section 37.2, statistical tests, discussed in Section 37.3, and confidence intervals, which are constructed so as to cover the true value of a parameter with a specified probability, as described in Section 37.4.2. Note that in frequentist statistics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Argonne CNM Highlight: Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Deciphering Uncertainties in the Cost of Solar Energy Photovoltaic electricity is a rapidly growing renewable energy source and will ultimately assume a major role in global energy production. The cost of solar-generated electricity is typically compared with electricity produced by traditional sources with a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculation. Generally, LCOE is treated as a definite number, and the assumptions lying beneath that result are rarely reported or even understood. We shed light on some of the key assumptions and offer a new approach to calculating LCOE for photovoltaics based on input parameter distributions feeding a Monte Carlo simulation. In this framework, the influence of assumptions and confidence intervals becomes clear.

362

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nonthermal hard X-ray excess in the cluster Abell 2256 from two epoch observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After confirmation of the presence of a nonthermal hard X-ray excess with respect to the thermal emission in the Coma cluster from two independent observations, obtained using the Phoswich Detection System onboard BeppoSAX, we present in this Letter also for Abell 2256 the results of two observations performed with a time interval of about 2.5 yr. In both spectra a nonthermal excess is present at a confidence level of ~3.3sigma and ~3.7sigma, respectively. The combined spectrum obtained by adding up the two spectra allows to measure an excess at the level of ~4.8sigma in the 20-80 keV energy range. The nonthermal X-ray flux is in agreement with the published value of the first observation (Fusco-Femiano et al. 2000) and with that measured by a Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observation (Rephaeli & Gruber 2003).

Roberto Fusco-Femiano; Raffaella Landi; Mauro Orlandini

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Gout and Parkinson's Disease in Older People: An Observation in Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The goal of this study was to investigate the association between gout and Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan. Utilizing the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, this case–control study included 3854 patients aged 65 years or older with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease as the case group [mean age 75.0 years and standard deviation (SD) 5.0 years], and 15,416 patients without Parkinson's disease as the control group (mean age 74.0 years and SD 5.3 years). Multivariable logistic regression analysis detected no association between gout and Parkinson's disease in both sex [odds ratio (OR) = 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.86–1.12, in men and OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.88–1.21, in women, respectively]. We conclude that no association can be detected between gout and Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan.

Shih-Wei Lai; Chih-Hsueh Lin; Cheng-Li Lin; Kuan-Fu Liao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The angular power spectrum of NVSS radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the angular power spectrum of radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) using two independent methods: direct spherical harmonic analysis and maximum likelihood estimation. The results are consistent and can be understood using models for the spatial matter power spectrum and for the redshift distribution of radio galaxies at mJy flux-density levels. A good fit to the angular power spectrum can only be achieved if radio galaxies possess high bias with respect to mass fluctuations; by marginalizing over the other parameters of the model we derive a 68% confidence interval 1.53 radio galaxies and sigma_8 describes the normalization of the matter power spectrum. Our models indicate that the majority of the signal in the NVSS angular power spectrum is generated at low redshifts. Individual redshifts for the NVSS sources are thus required to alleviate projection effects and probe directly the matter power spectrum on large scales.

Chris Blake; Pedro G. Ferreira; Julian Borrill

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Classification of heart valve single leg separations from acoustic clinical measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our system classifies the condition (intact or single leg separated) of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of clinical heart valve opening sounds. We use spectral features as inputs to a two-stage classifier, which first classifies individual heart beats, then classifies valves. Performance is measured by probability of detection and probability of false alarm, and by confidence intervals on the probability of correct classification. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced techniques to real heart valve data, and extensions of published algorithms that enhance their applicability. We show that even when given a very small number of training samples, the classifier can achieve a probability of correct classification of 100%.

Clark, G.A.; Bowman, B.C.; Boruta, N.; Thomas, G.H.; Jones, H.E.; Buhl, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Expect the unexpected: non-equilibrium processes in brown dwarf atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brown Dwarf atmosphere are a chemically extremely rich, one example being the formation of clouds driven by the phase-non-equilibrium of the atmospheric gas. Cloud formation modelling is an integral part of any atmosphere simulation used to interpret spectral observations of ultra-cool objects and to determine fundamental parameters like log(g) and Teff. This proceeding to the workshop 'GAIA and the Unseen: The Brown Dwarf Question' first summarizes what a model atmosphere simulation is, and then advocates two ideas: A) The use of a multitude of model families to determine fundamental parameters with realistic confidence interval. B) To keep an eye on the unexpected, like for example, ionisation signatures resulting plasma processes

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

An optimized mean variance estimation method for uncertainty quantification of wind power forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A statistical optimized technique for rapid development of reliable prediction intervals (PIs) is presented in this study. The mean–variance estimation (MVE) technique is employed here for quantification of uncertainties related with wind power predictions. In this method, two separate neural network models are used for estimation of wind power generation and its variance. A novel PI-based training algorithm is also presented to enhance the performance of the MVE method and improve the quality of PIs. For an in-depth analysis, comprehensive experiments are conducted with seasonal datasets taken from three geographically dispersed wind farms in Australia. Five confidence levels of \\{PIs\\} are between 50% and 90%. Obtained results show while both traditional and optimized \\{PIs\\} are hypothetically valid, the optimized \\{PIs\\} are much more informative than the traditional MVE PIs. The informativeness of these \\{PIs\\} paves the way for their application in trouble-free operation and smooth integration of wind farms into energy systems.

Abbas Khosravi; Saeid Nahavandi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Exploiting Active Subspaces to Quantify Uncertainty in the Numerical Simulation of the HyShot II Scramjet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a computational analysis of the reactive flow in a hypersonic scramjet engine with emphasis on effects of uncertainties in the operating conditions. We employ a novel methodology based on active subspaces to characterize the effects of the input uncertainty on the scramjet performance. The active subspace re-parameterizes the operating conditions from seven well characterized physical parameters to a single derived active variable. This dimension reduction enables otherwise intractable---given the cost of the simulation---computational studies to quantify uncertainty; bootstrapping provides confidence intervals on the studies' results. In particular we (i) identify the parameters that contribute the most to the variation in the output quantity of interest, (ii) compute a global upper and lower bound on the quantity of interest, and (iii) classify sets of operating conditions as safe or unsafe corresponding to a threshold on the output quantity of interest. We repeat this analysis for two values of ...

Constantine, Paul; Larsson, Johan; Iaccarino, Gianluca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

On the muon neutrino mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the runs of the PS 179 experiment at LEAR of CERN, we photographed an event of antiproton-Ne absorption, with a complete pi+ -> mu+ ->e+ chain. From the vertex of the reaction a very slow energy pi+ was emitted. The pi+ decays into a mu+ and subsequently the mu+ decays into a positron. At the first decay vertex a muon neutrino was emitted and at the second decay vertex an electron neutrino and a muon antineutrino. Measuring the pion and muon tracks and applying the momentum and energy conservation and using a classical statistical interval estimator, we obtained an experimental upper limit for the muon neutrino mass: m_nu < 2.2 MeV at a 90% confidence level. A statistical analysis has been performed of the factors contributing to the square value of the neutrino mass limit.

N. Angelov; F. Balestra; Yu. Batusov; A. Bianconi; M. P. Bussa; L. Busso; L. Ferrero; R. Garfagnini; I. Gnesi; E. Lodi Rizzini; A. Maggiora; D. Panzieri; G. Piragino; G. Pontecorvo; F. Tosello; L. Venturelli

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Novel Approach to Reduce Ray Tracing Simulation Times by Predicting Number or Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A ray tracer, specifically designed for concentrating solar power systems, has been developed at the Solar Thermal Energy Research Group (STERG). In most ray tracers a simulation runs until a number of rays, predefined by the user, have been traced. In a novel approach the raytracer uses a user defined tolerable error and confidence interval to predict and automatically trace the required number of rays for a simulation. This reduces computational time as only the minimum required number of rays are traced. This method has not been incorporated into any of the openly available ray tracers. The method and algorithm incorporated into the STERG raytracer are described here. As a validation test case the Eurodish and optimised field layout of Planta Solar 10 plant have been simulated.

S.J. Bode; P. Gauché; D. Griffith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dynamic polarisation reveals differential steady-state stabilisation and capacitive-like behaviour in microbial fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper we present several preliminary results produced with a purposely-designed external-resistor (Rext) sweeping tool for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Fast sampling rates show that \\{MFCs\\} exhibit differential steady-state stabilisation behaviours depending on Rext, with consequences for time constant (tc) selection. At high Rext (35 k?), it is demonstrated that a tc ? 10 min avoids underestimation not overestimation, whilst at low Rext (100 ?) 5 min are sufficient, suggesting that sweeps with variable tc are possible. However, within the maximum power transfer range (2.5 k?), steady-states are only observed at 20 min tc but with a smaller confidence interval, questioning whether the polarisation technique is suitable to estimate maximum power transfer. Finally, a strategy towards the exploitation of a capacitive-like behaviour in \\{MFCs\\} is proposed, tapping into ?10 min periods with up to 50% higher current and energy transfer that could prove important for MFC-powered applications.

Pablo Ledezma; Nicolas Degrenne; Pascal Bevilacqua; François Buret; Bruno Allard; John Greenman; Ioannis Ieropoulos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

BioDoser: Improved dose-estimation software for biological radiation dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper introduces a software program that was developed with the aims to improve the efficiency and veracity of calibration curve fitting and data processing in radiation biological dosimetry and other biological experiments, and which is termed BioDoser. BioDoser uses least squares and loop testing of monotonicity method and algorithm of non-uniformed confidence interval. In addition, this program enables integration of multiple different biomarkers typically used in biological dosimetry. These include partial body exposure, minimum number of cells to be analyzed, G function correction modules that are helpful in dose estimation when using chromosome aberration frequencies, micronucleus rate, comet assay and other biological methods. The software is freely available at http://bit.ly/kKBSNR.

Hong Wang; Qiang Liu; Dandan Wan; Jian Xiang; Liqing Du; Yan Wang; Jia Cao; Yue Fu; Feiyue Fan; Markus Hecker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Measurement of radioactive samples: application of the Bayesian statistical decision theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The classical way of estimating the activity of radioactive samples does not give a correct value and uncertainty when the activity has the same order of magnitude or is smaller than the background radiation. We propose a method of solving the problem based on Bayesian decision theory. The a priori distribution used is Jeffreys' invariant obtained by taking into account the fact that the number of particles emitted and detected is Poisson distributed. In contrast to the classical approach, the Bayesian estimate is always positive and the result obtained is a whole distribution (a confluent hypergeometric function) that gives not only the mean value but also any confidence interval. For higher activities, the Bayesian and classical estimates are indistinguishable.

Jean-Pascal Laedermann; Jean-François Valley; François O Bochud

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Experimental bound on the charge radius of the electron neutrino  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A limit on the electron-neutrino charge radius |r| is derived from a measurement of the weak-neutral-current vector coupling constant gV obtained in electron-neutrino electron elastic scattering. The 90%-confidence interval for gV is -0.177

R. C. Allen; H. H. Chen; P. J. Doe; R. Hausammann; W. P. Lee; X. -Q. Lu; H. J. Mahler; M. E. Potter; K. C. Wang; T. J. Bowles; R. L. Burman; R. D. Carlini; D. R. F. Cochran; J. S. Frank; E. Piasetzky; V. D. Sandberg; D. A. Krakauer; R. L. Talaga

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference NASEO Energy Outlook Conference 2/26/01 Click here to start Table of Contents NASEO Energy Outlook Conference Retail Product Prices Are Driven By Crude Oil WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand Balance U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001 Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs Propane prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas

379

First joint Gravitational Waves search by the Auriga-Explorer-Nautilus-Virgo collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of the search for coincident burst excitations over a 24 hours long data set collected by AURIGA, EXPLORER, NAUTILUS and Virgo detectors during September 2005. The search of candidate triggers was performed independently on each of the data sets from single detectors. We looked for two-fold time coincidences between these candidates using an algorithm optimized for a given population of sources and we calculated the efficiency of detection through injections of templated signal waveforms into the streams of data. To this purpose we have considered the case of signals shaped as damped sinusoids coming from the galactic center direction. In this framework our method targets an optimal balance between high efficiency and low false alarm rate, aiming at setting confidence intervals as stringent as possible in terms of the rate of the selected source models.

Auriga-Explorer-Nautilus-Virgo collaborations

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans from Very Large Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global return values of marine wind speed and significant wave height are estimated from very large aggregates of archived ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time. Long lead time ensures that the forecasts represent independent draws from the model climate. Compared with ERA-Interim, a reanalysis, the ensemble yields higher return estimates for both wind speed and significant wave height. Confidence intervals are much tighter due to the large size of the dataset. The period (9 yrs) is short enough to be considered stationary even with climate change. Furthermore, the ensemble is large enough for non-parametric 100-yr return estimates to be made from order statistics. These direct return estimates compare well with extreme value estimates outside areas with tropical cyclones. Like any method employing modeled fields, it is sensitive to tail biases in the numerical model, but we find that the biases are moderate outside areas with tropical cyclones.

Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A E M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Efficacy of memantine in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A double-blind, randomised, controlled trial with 6-month follow-up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fibromyalgia (FM) is a prevalent and disabling chronic disease. Recent studies have found elevated levels of glutamate in several brain regions, leading to hypotheses about the usefulness of glutamate-blocking drugs such as memantine in the treatment of FM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of memantine in the treatment of pain and other clinical variables (global function, clinical impression, depression, anxiety, quality of life) in FM patients. A double-blind, parallel randomised controlled trial was developed. A total of 63 patients diagnosed with FM were recruited from primary health care centres in Zaragoza, Spain. Memantine was administered at doses of 20 mg/d after 1 month of titration. Assessments were carried out at baseline, posttreatment, and 3- and 6-month follow-up. Compared with a placebo group, memantine significantly decreased ratings on a pain visual analogue scale (Cohen’s d = 1.43 at 6 months) and pain measured with a sphygmomanometer (d = 1.05). All other secondary outcomes except anxiety also improved, with moderate-to-large effect sizes at 6 months. Compared with placebo, the absolute risk reduction obtained with memantine was 16.13% (95% confidence interval = 2.0% to 32.6%), and the number needed to treat was 6.2 (95% confidence interval = 3 to 47). Tolerance was good, with dizziness (8 patients) and headache (4 patients) being the most frequent side effects of memantine. Although additional studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are needed, this study provides preliminary evidence of the utility of memantine for the treatment of FM.

Bárbara Olivan-Blázquez; Paola Herrera-Mercadal; Marta Puebla-Guedea; Mari-Cruz Pérez-Yus; Eva Andrés; Nicolas Fayed; Yolanda López-Del-Hoyo; Rosa Magallon; Miquel Roca; Javier Garcia-Campayo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Tumor Epression of Major Vault Protein is an Adverse Prognostic Factor for Radiotherapy Outcome in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Vaults are multi-subunit structures that may be involved in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, with the major vault protein (MVP or lung resistance-related protein [LRP]) being the main component. The MVP gene is located on chromosome 16 close to the multidrug resistance-associated protein and protein kinase c-{beta} genes. The role of MVP in cancer drug resistance has been demonstrated in various cell lines as well as in ovarian carcinomas and acute myeloid leukemia, but nothing is known about its possible role in radiation resistance. Our aim was to examine this in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Archived biopsy material was obtained for 78 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who received primary radiotherapy with curative intent. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect MVP expression. Locoregional failure and cancer-specific survival were estimated using cumulative incidence and Cox multivariate analyses. Results: In a univariate and multivariate analysis, MVP expression was strongly associated with both locoregional failure and cancer-specific survival. After adjustment for disease site, stage, grade, anemia, smoking, alcohol, gender, and age, the estimated hazard ratio for high MVP (2/3) compared with low (0/1) was 4.98 (95% confidence interval, 2.17-11.42; p 0.0002) for locoregional failure and 4.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.85-9.95; p = 0.001) for cancer-specific mortality. Conclusion: These data are the first to show that MVP may be a useful prognostic marker associated with radiotherapy resistance in a subgroup of patients with HNSCC.

Silva, Priyamal; West, Catharine M. [Department of Academic Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Slevin, Nick F.R.C.R. [Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Valentine, Helen [Department of Academic Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Ryder, W. David J. Grad. I.S. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hampson, Lynne; Bibi, Rufzan [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Gynaecological Oncology Laboratories, St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sloan, Philip; Thakker, Nalin [Dental Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Homer, Jarrod [Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Academic Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hampson, Ian [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Gynaecological Oncology Laboratories, St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ian.hampson@manchester.ac.uk

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Uncertainty evaluation of reliability of safety grade decay heat removal system of Indian prototype fast breeder reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deterministic and probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power reactor technology is very important in assuring that the design is robust and safety systems perform as per requirement. The parameters required as input data for such analysis have uncertainties associated with them. Their impact is to be assessed on the results obtained for such analyses and it affects the overall decision making process. Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) is one of the safety systems in fast breeder reactors and itremoves decay heat after reactor shutdown. It is a critical safety system; hence failure frequency for SGDHR is targeted to be less than 1.0 × 10?7 per reactor year. By bringing diversity in some of the components of SGDHRS, such as sodium-to-sodium decay heat exchanger (DHX), sodium to air heat exchanger (AHX) and valves, one can achieve the targeted low failure frequency of SGDHRS. We perform uncertainty analysis of the reliability of such SGDHRS here. Uncertainty in failure rate (of components of SGDHRS) is assumed to follow the log-normal distribution with error factor of three. Monte Carlo method of sampling is used in MATLAB environment. Results are obtained in terms of mean, median and standard deviation values of failure frequency. Percentile and confidence interval analysis of mean values are also obtained. These provide 95 and 98 percentile and confidence interval values of 98%, 99% and 99.8%. It is found that error factor of failure frequency of SGDHRS is found to be less than 3 in all the cases except the one in which DHX, AHX and Valves are designed with diversity in design. It is to be noted here that error factor of all input parameters distribution is taken as 3.

H.L. Kumawat; Om Pal Singh; Prabhat Munshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Respiratory hospitalizations of children and residential exposure to traffic air pollution in Jerusalem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although exposure to traffic-related air pollution has been reported to be associated with respiratory morbidity in children, this association has not been examined in Israel. Jerusalem is ranked among the leading Israeli cities in transport-related air pollution. This case–control study examined whether pediatric hospitalization for respiratory diseases in Jerusalem is related to residential exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Cases (n = 4844) were Jerusalem residents aged 0–14 years hospitalized for respiratory illnesses between 2000 and 2006. These were compared to children admitted electively (n = 2161) or urgently (n = 3085) for non-respiratory conditions. Individual measures of exposure included distance from residence to nearest main road, the total length of main roads, traffic volume, and bus load within buffers of 50, 150, and 300 m around each address. Cases were more likely to have any diesel buses passing within 50 m of their home (adjusted odds ratios = 1.16 and 1.10, 95% confidence intervals 1.04–1.30 and 1.01–1.20 for elective and emergency controls, respectively). Our findings indicated that older girls (5–14) and younger boys (0–4) had increased risks of respiratory hospitalization, albeit with generally widened confidence intervals due to small sample sizes. Our results add to the limited body of evidence regarding associations between diesel exhaust particles and respiratory morbidity. The findings also point to possible differential associations between traffic-related air pollution and pediatric hospitalization among boys and girls in different age groups.

Ronit Nirel; Michal Schiff; Ora Paltiel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, {>=}3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week <64 cm{sup 3} and V10 Gy/week <54 cm{sup 3}. At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week ({>=}64 vs. <64 cm{sup 3}) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is <50-60 cm{sup 3}. These data warrant prospective validation.

Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gsangui1@jhmi.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Zeng Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Endres, Eugene J. C [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Brack, Collin [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Physics, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Sormani, Maria Pia [Biostatistics Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Parker, Brent [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Vitamin D status and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractPurpose Several studies have reported increased risk of preeclampsia when 25-hyrdoxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are low. The extent to which 25(OH)D may lower risk for hypertensive disorder during pregnancy remains unclear. Methods Among women enrolled in the Project Viva prenatal cohort in Massachusetts, we examined associations of 25(OH)D levels obtained at 16.4–36.9 weeks of gestation (mean 27.9 weeks) with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, including preeclampsia (56/1591, 3.5%) and gestational hypertension (109/1591, 6.9%). Results We did not detect an association between plasma 25(OH)D concentration (mean 58, standard deviation 22 nmol/L) and preeclampsia. For each 25 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D, the adjusted odds ratio for preeclampsia was 1.14 (95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.67). By contrast and contrary to hypothesis, higher 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher odds of gestational hypertension: adjusted odds ratio for gestational hypertension was 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.72) per each 25 nmol/L increment in 25(OH)D. Vitamin D intake patterns suggest that this association was not because of reverse causation. Although the elevated hypertension risk may be due to chance, randomized trials of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy should monitor for gestational hypertension. Conclusions These data do not support the hypothesis that higher 25(OH)D levels lower the overall risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Heather H. Burris; Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman; Susanna Y. Huh; Ken Kleinman; Augusto A. Litonjua; Emily Oken; Janet W. Rich-Edwards; Carlos A. Camargo Jr.; Matthew W. Gillman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Toward a Classical Thermodynamic Model for Retro-cognition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Retro-cognition--a human response before a randomly determined future stimulus--has always been part of our experience. Experiments over the last 80 years show a small but statistically significant effect. If this turns out to be true, then it suggests a form of macroscopic retro-causation. The 2nd Law of Thermodynamics provides an explanation for the apparent single direction of time at the macroscopic level although time is reversible at the microscopic level. In a preliminary study, I examined seven anomalous cognition (a.k.a., ESP) studies in which the entropic gradients and the entropy of their associated target systems were calculated, and the quality of the response was estimated by a rating system called the figure of merit. The combined Spearman's correlation coefficient for these variables for the seven studies was 0.211 (p = 6.4x10{sup -4}) with a 95% confidence interval for the correlation of [0.084, 0.332]; whereas, the same data for a correlation with the entropy itself was 0.028 (p = 0.36; 95% confidence interval of [-0.120-0.175]). This suggests that anomalous cognition is mediated via some kind of a sensory system in that all the normal sensory systems are more sensitive to changes than they are to inputs that are not changing. A standard relationship for the change of entropy of a binary sequence appears to provide an upper limit to anomalous cognition functioning for free response and for forced-choice Zener card guessing. This entropic relation and an apparent limit set by the entropy may provide a clue for understanding macroscopic retro-causation.

May, Edwin C. [Laboratories for Fundamental Research, 330 Cowper Street, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

(RPP_standards.ps)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 10 20 30 40 50 70 100 0.001 0.002 0.005 0.010 0.020 0.050 0.100 0.200 0.500 1.000 Confidence level CL for fits α for confidence intervals 3 4 2 6 8 10 15 20 25 30 40 50 n = 1 χ 2 DEG's Macintosh: Adobe Illus Files/RPP_standards.ps Graphics symbols: 4.25 inches (Sports section) 2.60 inches 3.36 inches (m 1 +m 3 ) 2 10 pt captions 10 pt labels set font basic; set mode vector=off set window x 2 6.5 y 2 5.5 set labels size 1.2 set title size 1.29 set tics size 0.05 4.50 inches (Minireviews) TOPDRAWER template: PARTICLE DATA GROUP NOTES PDG-93-05 10 November 1993 Standards for Adobe Illustrator figures in the Review of Particle Properties

391

SRC-I naphtha octane study. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Octane numbers were measured by the engine method (RON and MON) and were calculated from gas chromatograms for eighteen gasoline samples comprising SRC-I and petroleum-derived raw gasoline, reformates, and selected blends of these materials. Conclusions derived from this work are: (1) Research and Motor Octane Numbers for blends of SRC-I liquids and of SRC-I liquids with petroleum gasoline components closely agree with the values calculated from linear combination of the measured RON and MON of the individual blend components. Although some interactions among the blend components were observed, these are not major and in all cases the 95% confidence interval of all of the individual points fall within the 95% confidence limits of linear blend correlation; (2) On the basis of octane numbers and blending characteristics, SRC-I straight run gasoline and SRC-I reformates are useful as blending components for the motor gasoline pool. In the case of the straight run gasoline, however, other factors such as its high sulfur content will impose a limitation to its direct use in the pool; and (3) Research Octane Numbers calculated from gas chromatograms agree closely with engine RON data for SRC-I gasolines. Accordingly, the GC method may be equally applicable to coal-derived and petroleum gasoline components.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The topology and size of the universe from CMB temperature and polarization data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze seven year and nine year WMAP temperature maps for signatures of three finite flat topologies M{sub 0} = T{sup 3}, M{sub 1} = T{sup 2} × R{sup 1}, and M{sub 2} = S{sup 1} × R{sup 2}. We use Monte-Carlo simulations with the Feldman-Cousins method to obtain confidence intervals for the size of the topologies considered. We analyze the V, W, and Q frequency bands along with the ILC map and find no significant difference in the results. The 95.5% confidence level lower bound on the size of the topology is 1.5L{sub 0} for M{sub 0}, 1.4L{sub 0} for M{sub 1}, and 1.1L{sub 0} for M{sub 2}, where L{sub 0} is the radius of the last scattering surface. Our results agree very well with the recently released results from the Planck temperature data. We show that the likelihood function is not Gaussian in the size, and therefore simulations are important for obtaining accurate bounds on the size. We then introduce the formalism for including polarization data in the analysis. The improvement that we find from WMAP polarization maps is small because of the high level of instrumental noise, but our forecast for Planck maps shows a much better improvement on the lower bound for L. For the M{sub 0} topology we expect an improvement on the lower bound of L from 1.7L{sub 0} to 1.9L{sub 0} at 95.5% confidence level. Using both polarization and temperature data is important because it tests the hypothesis that deviations in the TT spectrum at small l originate in the primordial perturbation spectrum.

Aslanyan, Grigor [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S., E-mail: g.aslanyan@auckland.ac.nz, E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu, E-mail: ayadav@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Search for decays of stopped long-lived particles produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search has been performed for long-lived particles that could have come to rest within the CMS detector, using the time intervals between LHC beam crossings. The existence of such particles could be deduced from observation of their decays via energy deposits in the CMS calorimeter appearing at times that are well separated from any proton-proton collisions. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.6 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, and a search interval corresponding to 281 hours of trigger livetime, 10 events are observed, with a background prediction of $13.2^{+3.6}_{-2.5}$ events. Limits are presented at 95% confidence level on gluino and top squark production, for over 13 orders of magnitude in the mean proper lifetime of the stopped particle. Assuming a cloud model of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass $\\lesssim$1000 GeV and a top squark with mass $\\lesssim$525 GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 1 $\\mu$s and 1000 s. These results are the most stringent c...

CMS Collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos Canyon 21 B well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ?2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ?1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gas hydrate saturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gas hydrate saturation in the target sand section in the AC21-B well can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett; K.A. Lewis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths April 20, 2011 - 6:17pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What does this mean for me? Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a wide range of green energy technologies ranging from windmills to electric vehicles One of their primary uses is in permanent magnets, which amount to over a $4 billion global industry Ames Laboratory recently discovered a way to make these magnets cheaper and greener and signed a cooperative research and development agreement with Molycorp Inc. -- the Western hemisphere's only producer of rare-earth oxides. China holds about 36 percent of world's rare-earth reserves, (compared to 13 percent in the U.S.), but it currently produces 95 percent

398

2012 goals and Initiatives BI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LM LM Targets for FY 2012 EMS Program Team Embracing the Environment E M S NVIRONMENTAL ANAGEMENT YSTEM The DOE Office of Legacy Management maintains a joint EMS program that is equally supported by the Federal and contractor employees. Complete installation of cost-effective electric meters in FY 2012. Program 1: Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases Increase purchase of renewable energy credits by 10 percent. Program 2: Renewable Energy Implement two water efficiency improvements. At least one improvement will be implemented at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. Program 3: Water Conservation Advance sustainable acquisition by striving for 95 percent of new contract actions, including task/release and blanket orders, but excluding all credit card purchases, for products and services

399

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-use Sector, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

400

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

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401

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 7: Gold & Silver  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy 7 Gold & Silver Gold has played a prominent role in world economic and political events. Most of the gold mined over the past 6000 years exists mainly in the form of refined gold held by governments as monetary reserve assets or by individuals in the form of jewelry, bullion coins, or small bars held as insurance against currency devaluation. In modern usage, gold is also used worldwide in numerous electronic, industrial, and dental applications, but more than three-fourths of the world's total annual demand goes toward the fabrication of jewelry and the minting of coins. Silver has three primary applications: industrial and decorative uses, photography, and jewelry and silverware. Together, these categories represent more than 95 percent of

402

Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 First Quarter 2008 Key Findings Net Income $28.3 billion Revenues $343.4 billion Highlights Major energy companies reported an 18-percent increase in net income relative to first quarter of 2007 (42-percent increase relative to the first-quarter average for 2003- 2007). Return on sales (net income ÷ revenue) fell from 9.5 percent in the first quarter of 2007 to 8.2 percent in the first quarter of 2008 due to the 37 percent increase in revenue. The effects of higher oil and natural gas prices overwhelm lower worldwide oil production and U.S. refining margins. Overview Nineteen major energy companies [1] reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.3 billion on revenues of $343.4 billion during the first quarter of 2008 (Q108). The level of net income for Q108 was 18-

403

Data:58c80c0e-c2fe-417a-bd25-5ed2f33e8033 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c2fe-417a-bd25-5ed2f33e8033 c2fe-417a-bd25-5ed2f33e8033 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Ellwood City, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Heat Sector: Residential Description: Available for single family residential service supplied through one meter where electricity is the single source of heat and where at least 95 percent of the electrical consumption is within the residence. When service is used through the same meter for both residential and commercial purposes, the applicable commercial rate schedule shall apply. This rate schedule is not available to commercial, institutional or industrial customers.

404

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

On This Page On This Page Regional Greenhouse Gas... California GHG... 1. Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 megawatts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [9]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap would be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from

405

september2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2010 July 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in July 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 19.9 percent above the July normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 9.5 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.3 percent. For the 12-month period ending July 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 1.4 percent over the previous 12-month period ending July 2009. In July 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 9.2 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.4 percent, and natural gas generation increased 11.4 percent. Petroleum

406

Energy-Efficient Product Procurement for Federal Agencies (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* EPAct 2005 mandates Federal agen- * EPAct 2005 mandates Federal agen- cies to incorporate energy efficiency criteria into relevant contracts and specifications. * The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 [amend- ing NECPA Section 8259b], E.O. 13423, and E.O. 13221 require Federal agencies to purchase energy- consuming products with a low standby power level of 1 watt or less. * E.O. 13514 requires 95 percent of new contract actions, task orders, and delivery orders for products and services to be energy efficient, water efficient, bio-based, envi- ronmentally preferable [Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified], non-ozone depleting, contain recycled content, or non-toxic or less toxic alternatives where such products meet agency performance requirements.

407

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

408

Kansas Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction Kansas Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction January 7, 2010 - 2:37pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? After 95 percent of Greensburg, Kan., was leveled by a tornado, a major dealership employing 1,500 Kansans rebuilds to achieve energy savings of nearly 50 percent over similar structures built to code. Ninety-five percent of Greensburg, Kan., was leveled by a tornado with 250-mile-per-hour winds in May 2007. One of the many businesses destroyed that spring was the Bucklin Tractor & Implement-Greensburg John Deere dealership, a component of the agricultural community that about 1,500 Kansans call home. The dealership owners, brothers Kelly and Mike Estes, knew the rebirth of their community depended greatly on access to farm equipment and services,

409

FR PI Report April-June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2012 9, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION _L7 _ r 95 percent of

410

Energy-Efficient Product Procurement for Federal Agencies (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EPAct 2005 mandates Federal agen- EPAct 2005 mandates Federal agen- cies to incorporate energy efficiency criteria into relevant contracts and specifications. * The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 [amend- ing NECPA Section 8259b], E.O. 13423, and E.O. 13221 require Federal agencies to purchase energy- consuming products with a low standby power level of 1 watt or less. * E.O. 13514 requires 95 percent of new contract actions, task orders, and delivery orders for products and services to be energy efficient, water efficient, bio-based, envi- ronmentally preferable [Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified], non-ozone depleting, contain recycled content, or non-toxic or less toxic alternatives where such products meet agency performance requirements.

411

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

412

Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Flowsheet model for the electrochemical treatment of liquid radioactive wastes. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the modeling and optimization procedure for the electrochemical removal of nitrates and nitrites from low level radioactive wastes. The simulation is carried out in SPEEDUP{trademark}, which is a state of the art flowsheet modeling package. The flowsheet model will provide a better understanding of the process and aid in the scale-up of the system. For example, the flowsheet model has shown that the electrochemical cell must be operated in batch mode to achieve 95 percent destruction. The flowsheet model is detailed in this report along with a systematic description of the batch optimization of the electrochemical cell. Results from two batch runs and one optimization run are also presented.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Prasad, S.; Farell, A.E.; Weidner, J.W.; White, R.E. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

Iwasaki, Iwao

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F-1 F-1 APPENDIX F PROJECT HISTORY Waste History/Description From 1970 through the early 1980's the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) accepted over 65,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and alpha- contaminated waste from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These wastes were placed in above ground storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEEL. The wastes are primarily laboratory and processing wastes of various solid materials, including paper, cloth, plastics, rubber, glass, graphite, bricks, concrete, metals, nitrate salts, and absorbed liquids. Over 95 percent of the waste was generated at DOE's Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado and transported to the INEEL by rail in bins, boxes, and drums. All 65,000 cubic meters was

416

Energy Economy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 7, 2010 January 7, 2010 Kansas Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction After 95 percent of Greensburg, Kan., was leveled by a tornado, a major dealership rebuilds to achieve energy savings of nearly 50 percent over similar structures built to code. January 5, 2010 Maine Company Growing with Weatherization Work Maine's BIOSAFE Environmental Services expands into weatherization, assisting low-income families with their services and creating jobs as business grows. December 9, 2009 Weatherization Fueling Iowa Job Opportunities A community action agency usually weatherizes 91 homes each year in four counties -- which they expect to rise to about 650 with the help of federal stimulus money -- creating jobs for laid-off manufacturing workers. December 4, 2009 Business on Track with Focus on Energy Efficiency

417

TRAINING DATA SELECTION BASED ON CONTEXT-DEPENDENT STATE MATCHING Olivier Siohan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothesized transcript, a neces- sary condition for successful training. Selecting high confidence ut

Tomkins, Andrew

418

American Mineralogist, Volume 79, pages 909-920, 1994 TEM-AEM observations of Cl-rich amphibole and biotite and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- positional heterogeneities with confidence. * Present address: GeoTrans, Inc., 4888 Pearl East Circle, Suite

Zhu, Chen

419

Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Use of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar to Determine Adult Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Escapement in the Secesh River, Idaho ; Annual Report, January 2008 – December 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1992 (NMFS 1992). The Secesh River represents the only stream in the Snake River basin where natural origin (wild) salmon escapement monitoring occurs at the population level, absent a supplementation program. As such the Secesh River has been identified as a long term salmon escapement and productivity monitoring site by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management. Salmon managers will use this data for effective population management and evaluation of the effect of conservation actions on a natural origin salmon population. The Secesh River also acts as a reference stream for supplementation program comparison. Dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) was used to determine adult spring and summer Chinook salmon escapement in the Secesh River in 2008. DIDSON technology was selected because it provided a non-invasive method for escapement monitoring that avoided listed species trapping and handling incidental mortality, and fish impedance related concerns. The DIDSON monitoring site was operated continuously from June 13 to September 14. The first salmon passage was observed on July 3. DIDSON site total estimated salmon escapement, natural and hatchery fish, was 888 fish {+-} 65 fish (95% confidence interval). Coefficient of variation associated with the escapement estimate was 3.7%. The DIDSON unit was operational 98.1% of the salmon migration period. Adult salmon migration timing in the Secesh River occurred over 74 days from July 3 to September 14, with 5,262 total fish passages observed. The spawning migration had 10%, median, and 90% passage dates of July 8, July 16, and August 12, respectively. The maximum number of net upstream migrating salmon was above the DIDSON monitoring site on August 27. Validation monitoring of DIDSON target counts with underwater optical cameras occurred for species identification. A total of 860 optical camera identified salmon passage observations were identical to DIDSON target counts. However, optical cameras identified eight jack salmon (3 upstream, 5 downstream) less than 55 cm in length that DIDSON did not count as salmon because of the length criteria employed ({ge} 55 cm). Precision of the DIDSON technology was evaluated by comparing estimated net upstream salmon escapement and associated 95% confidence intervals between two DIDSON sonar units operated over a five day period. The DIDSON 1 salmon escapement was 145.7 fish ({+-} 2.3), and the DIDSON 2 escapement estimate was 150.5 fish ({+-} 5). The overlap in the 95% confidence intervals suggested that the two escapement estimates were not significantly different from each other. Known length salmon carcass trials were conducted in 2008 to examine the accuracy of manually measured lengths, obtained using DIDSON software, on high frequency files at a 5 m window length. Linear regression demonstrated a highly significant relationship between known lengths and manually measured salmon carcass lengths (p < 0.0001). A positive bias in manual length measurement of 6.8% to 8% existed among the two observers in the analysis. Total Secesh River salmon escapement (natural origin and hatchery) in 2008 was 912 fish. Natural origin salmon escapement in the entire Secesh River drainage was 847 fish. The estimated natural origin spawner abundance was 836 fish. Salmon spawner abundance in 2008 increased by three fold compared to 2007 abundance levels. The 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance was 538 salmon and was below the recommended viable population threshold level established by the ICTRT (2007). One additional Snake River basin salmon population was assessed for comparison of natural origin salmon spawner abundance. The Johnson Creek/EFSF Salmon River population had a 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance of 254 salmon. Salmon spawner abundance levels in both streams were below viable population thresholds. DIDSON technology has been used in the Secesh River to determine salmo

Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Measurement of CP observables in B+- --> D_CP K+- decays and constraints on the CKM angle gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the entire sample of 467 million Y(4S) --> BBbar decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we perform a "GLW" analysis of B+- --> D K+- decays, using decay modes in which the neutral D meson decays to either CP-eigenstates or non-CP-eigenstates. We measure the partial decay rate charge asymmetries for CP-even and CP-odd D final states to be A_CP+ = 0.25+-0.06+-0.02 and A_CP- = -0.09+-0.07+-0.02, respectively, where the first error is the statistical and the second is the systematic uncertainty. The parameter A_CP+ is different from zero with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations, constituting evidence for direct CP violation. We also measure the ratios of the charged-averaged B partial decay rates in CP and non-CP decays, R_CP+ = 1.18+-0.09+-0.05 and R_CP- = 1.07+-0.08+-0.04. We infer frequentist confidence intervals for the angle gamma of the (db) unitarity triangle, for the strong phase difference delta_B, and for the amplitude ratio r_B, which are related to the B- --> DK- decay amplitude by r_Be^{i(delta_B-gamma)} = A(B- --> anti-D0 K^-)/A(B- --> D0 K-). Including statistical and systematic uncertainties, we obtain 0.24confidence level.

The BABAR Collaboration; P. del Amo Sanchez

2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Title A Method to Estimate the Chronic Health Impact of Air Pollutants in U.S. Residences Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5267E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Start Page 216 Pagination 216-222 Date Published 11/2011 Keywords air toxics, criteria pollutants, DALYs, exposure, impact assessment, indoor air pollutants, indoor air quality Abstract Background: Indoor air pollutants (IAPs) cause multiple health impacts. Prioritizing mitigation options that differentially impact individual pollutants and comparing IAPs to other environmental health hazards requires a common metric of harm. Objectives: The objective was to demonstrate a methodology to quantify and compare health impacts from IAPs. The methodology is needed to assess population health impacts of large-scale initiatives - including energy efficiency upgrades and ventilation standards - that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Methods: Available disease incidence and disease impact models for specific pollutant-disease combinations were synthesized with data on measured concentrations to estimate the chronic heath impact, in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), due to inhalation of a subset of IAPs in U.S. residences. Model results were compared to independent estimates of DALYs lost due to disease. Results: PM2.5, acrolein, and formaldehyde accounted for the vast majority of DALY losses caused by IAPs considered in this analysis, with impacts on par or greater than estimates for secondhand tobacco smoke and radon. Confidence intervals of DALYs lost derived from epidemiology-based response functions are tighter than those derived from toxicology-based, inter-species extrapolations. Statistics on disease incidence in the US indicate that the upper-bound confidence interval for aggregate IAP harm is implausibly high. Conclusions: The demonstrated approach may be used to assess regional and national initiatives that impact IAQ at the population level. Cumulative health impacts from inhalation in U.S. residences of the IAPs assessed in this study are estimated at 400-1100 DALYs annually per 100,000 people.

424

The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated lesions (p > 0.05). Agreement between allocated lesion scores for 2D mammography and those for the tomosynthesis series was poor. Conclusions: The realistic appearance of the 3D models of microcalcification clusters, whether malignant or benign clusters, was confirmed for 2D digital mammography images and the breast tomosynthesis datasets; this database of clusters is suitable for use in future observer performance studies related to the detectability of microcalcification clusters. Such studies include comparing 2D digital mammography to breast tomosynthesis and comparing different reconstruction algorithms.

Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Three-dimensional echocardiographic determination of left ventricular volumes and function by multiplane transesophageal transducer: dynamic in vitro validation and in vivo comparison with angiography and thermodilution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to validate 3-dimensional echocardiography by multiplane transesophageal transducer for the determination of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in an in vitro experiment and to compare the method in vivo with biplane angiography and the continuous thermodilution method. In the dynamic in vitro experiment, we scanned rubber balloons in a water tank by using a pulsatile flow model. Twenty-nine measurements of volumes and ejection fractions were performed at increasing heart rates. Three-dimensional echocardiography showed a very high accuracy for volume measurements and ejection fraction calculation (correlation coefficient, standard error of estimate, and mean difference for end-diastolic volume 0.998, 2.3 mL, and 0.1 mL; for end-systolic volume 0.996, 2.7 mL, and 0.5 mL; and for ejection fraction 0.995, 1.0%, and ?0.4%, respectively). However, with increasing heart rate there was progressive underestimation of ejection fraction calculation (percent error for heart rate below and above 100 bpm 0.59% and ?8.6%, P<.001). In the in vivo study, left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction of 24 patients with symmetric and distorted left ventricular shape were compared with angiography results. There was good agreement for the subgroup of patients with normal left ventricular shape (mean difference ±95% confidence interval for end-diastolic volume 5.2±6.7 mL, P<.05; for end-systolic volume ?0.5±8.4 mL, P=not significant; for ejection fraction 2.4%±7.2%, P=not significant) and significantly more variability in the patients with left ventricular aneurysms (end-diastolic volume 23.1±56.4 mL, P<.01; end-systolic volume 5.6±41.0 mL, P=not significant; ejection fraction 4.9%±16.0%, P<.05). Additionally, in 20 critically ill, ventilated patients, stroke volume and cardiac output measurements were compared with measurement from continuous thermodilution. Stroke volume as well as cardiac output correlated well to thermodilution (r=0.89 and 0.84, respectively, P<.001), although both parameters were significantly underestimated by 3-dimensional echocardiography (mean difference ±95% confidence interval =?6.4±16.0 mL and ?0.6±1.6 L/min, respectively, P<.005)

Harald P. Kühl; Andreas Franke; Uwe Janssens; Marc Merx; Jürgen Graf; Winfried Krebs; Helmut Reul; Günter Rau; Rainer Hoffmann; Heinrich G. Klues; Peter Hanrath

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Volume-Based Parameters of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Improve Disease Recurrence Prediction in Postmastectomy Breast Cancer Patients With 1 to 3 Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether volume-based parameters on pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without adjuvant radiation therapy are predictive of recurrence. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 93 patients with 1 to 3 positive axillary nodes after surgery, who were studied with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for initial staging. We evaluated the relationship between positron emission tomography parameters, including the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and clinical outcomes. Results: The median follow-up duration was 45 months. Recurrence was observed in 11 patients. Metabolic tumor volume and TLG were significantly related to tumor size, number of involved nodes, nodal ratio, nuclear grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and triple negativity (TN) (all P values were <.05). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, MTV and TLG showed better predictive performance than tumor size, ER status, or TN (area under the curve: 0.85, 0.86, 0.79, 0.74, and 0.74, respectively). On multivariate analysis, MTV was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 34.42, 95% confidence interval 3.94-882.71, P=.0008) and disease-free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio 13.92, 95% confidence interval 2.65-103.78, P=.0018). The 3-year DFS rate was 93.8% for the lower MTV group (<53.1; n=85) and 25.0% for the higher MTV group (?53.1; n=8; P<.0001, log–rank test). The 3-year DFS rate for patients with both ER-positive status and MTV <53.1 was 98.2%; and for those with ER-negative status and MTV ?53.1 it was 25.0% (P<.0001). Conclusions: Volume-based parameters improve recurrence prediction in postmastectomy breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive nodes. The addition of MTV to ER status or TN has potential benefits to identify a subgroup at higher risk for recurrence.

Nakajima, Naomi, E-mail: haruhi0321@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Sugawara, Yoshifumi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Ochi, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kiyoto, Sachiko; Ohsumi, Shozo [Department of Breast Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

How Effective Are Clinical Pathways With and Without Online Peer-Review? An Analysis of Bone Metastases Pathway in a Large, Integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Clinical pathways are an important tool used to manage the quality in health care by standardizing processes. This study evaluated the impact of the implementation of a peer-reviewed clinical pathway in a large, integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network. Methods: In 2003, we implemented a clinical pathway for the management of bone metastases with palliative radiation therapy. In 2009, we required the entry of management decisions into an online tool that records pathway choices. The pathway specified 1 or 5 fractions for symptomatic bone metastases with the option of 10-14 fractions for certain clinical situations. The data were obtained from 13 integrated sites (3 central academic, 10 community locations) from 2003 through 2010. Results: In this study, 7905 sites were treated with 64% of courses delivered in community practice and 36% in academic locations. Academic practices were more likely than community practices to treat with 1-5 fractions (63% vs. 23%; p < 0.0001). The number of delivered fractions decreased gradually from 2003 to 2010 for both academic and community practices (p < 0.0001); however, greater numbers of fractions were selected more often in community practices (p < 0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that a significantly greater selection of 1-5 fractions developed after implementation online pathway monitoring (2009) with an odds ratio of 1.2 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.4) for community and 1.3 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) for academic practices. The mean number of fractions also decreased after online peer review from 6.3 to 6.0 for academic (p = 0.07) and 9.4 to 9.0 for community practices (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to examine the efficacy of a clinical pathway for radiation oncology in an integrated cancer network. Clinical pathway implementation appears to be effective in changing patterns of care, particularly with online clinical peer review as a valuable aid to encourage adherence to evidence-based practice.

Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Flickinger, John C.; Rakfal, Susan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rodgers, Edwin [Via Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between ±2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between ±4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and ±4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogério, E-mail: roger@iqm.unicamp.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Barão Geraldo, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Barão Geraldo, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Pereira, Douglas Henrique [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Barão Geraldo, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil) [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Barão Geraldo, P.O. Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Ciências Exatas e Biotecnológicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins (Brazil)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of renewable energy sources like solar wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS) calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos? FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors overestimating surface radiation but that after the proper statistical corrections using a relationship between the model?predicted cloud fraction the ground?level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5? W / m 2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215? W / m 2 (maximum in October: 260? W / m 2 ).

Otacilio Leandro de Menezes Neto; Alexandre Araújo Costa; Fernando Pinto Ramalho; Paulo Henrique Santiago de Maria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Spontaneous fetal death among multigravid fertile women in relation to sport fish consumption and PCB exposure, New York State Angler Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spontaneous fetal death, a sentinel event for environmental reproductive toxicity, has been observed among various mammalian species following polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure. This exposure-based cohort study assessed the relationship between PCB exposure due to consumption of contaminated Lake Ontario sport fish and spontaneous fetal death. Using 1,820 women from the 1990-1991 New York State Angler Study, fish consumption data were obtained from food frequency questionnaires and reproductive histories from live birth certificates. A reliability study demonstrated an excellent level of agreement between the exact number of spontaneous fetal deaths recorded on the birth certificate compared with telephone interview data (kappa = 0.83). Women who had never eaten Lake Ontario sport fish were unexposed (n = 979) and 841 women reported various levels of exposure. Analyses were stratified by maternal gravidity and controlled for smoking status and maternal age. No significant increases in risk for spontaneous fetal death were seen for any estimate of PCB exposure including lifetime estimate of PCB exposure based on species-specific PCB levels, years of fish consumption, and kilograms of fish consumed, either in the 1990-1991 season or in a lifetime estimate. The only significant finding was a slight risk reduction for women of gravidity three or more with years of fish consumption (odds ratio = 0.97; p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval = 0.94-0.99). These findings suggest that PCB exposure from contaminated sport fish does not increase the risk of spontaneous fetal death.

Mendola, P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Methylene chloride exposure and birthweight in Monroe County, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined the relationship between birthweight and exposure to emissions of methylene chloride (DCM) from manufacturing processes of the Eastman Kodak Company at Kodak Park in Rochester, Monroe County, New York. County census tracts were categorized as exposed to high, moderate, low or no DCM based on the Kodak Air Monitoring Program (KAMP) model, a theoretical dispersion model of DCM developed by Eastman Kodak Company. Birthweight and information on variables known to influence birthweight were obtained from 91,302 birth certificates of white singleton births to Monroe County residents from 1976 to 1987. No significant adverse effects of exposure to DCM on birthweight were found. Adjusted birthweight in high exposure census tracts was 18.7 g less than in areas with no exposure (95% confidence interval for the difference between high and no exposure - 51.6, 14.2 g). Problems inherent in the method of estimation of exposure, which may decrease power or bias the results, are discussed. Better methods to estimate exposure to emissions from multiple industrial point sources are needed.

Bell, B.P.; Franks, P.; Hildreth, N.; Melius, J. (Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Childhood nervous system tumors--an evaluation of the association with paternal occupational exposure to hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paternal occupational exposures to hydrocarbons have been associated with childhood nervous system cancer, but study results have not been consistent. This population-based case-control study was designed to examine this association using a large sample size to increase the precision of risk estimates. The birth certificates of 499 children who died in Texas from intracranial and spinal cord tumors were compared with 998 control certificates randomly selected from all Texas live births. Information on parental job title and industry at the time of birth was obtained from the birth certificates. No significant associations were identified for the dichotomized variable of all hydrocarbon-related occupations combined, as variously defined in previous studies, or for most of the specific jobs affiliated with exposures to hydrocarbons. Significant, relatively stable odds ratios (OR) were found for printers and graphics arts workers (OR = 4.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-14.7) and chemical and petroleum workers with high exposure levels (OR = 3.0; CI = 1.1-8.5). A discussion of the biases involved in this type of study design is presented.

Johnson, C.C.; Annegers, J.F.; Frankowski, R.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Buffler, P.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

ESCH, R.A.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ebola outbreak in Conakry, Guinea: Epidemiological, clinical, and outcome features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjectives The authors studied the epidemiological, clinical, and outcome features of the Ebola virus disease in patients hospitalized at the Ebola treatment center (ETC) in Conakry to identify clinical factors associated with death. Materials and methods A prospective study was conducted from March 25 to August 20, 2014. The diagnosis of Ebola virus infection was made on real-time PCR. Results Ninety patients, with a positive test result, were hospitalized. Their mean age was 34.12 ± 14.29 years and 63% were male patients. Most worked in the informal sector (38%) and in the medical and paramedical staff (physicians 12%, nurses 6%, and laboratory technicians 1%). Most patients lived in the Conakry suburbs (74%) and in Boffa (11%). The main clinical signs were physical asthenia (80%) and fever (72%). Hemorrhagic signs were observed in 26% of patients. The comparison of clinical manifestations showed that hiccups (P = 0.04), respiratory distress (P = 0.04), and hemorrhagic symptoms (P = 0.01) were more frequent among patients who died. Malaria (72%) and diabetes (2%) were the most frequent co-morbidities. The crude case fatality rate was 44% [95% confidence interval (33–54%)]. The average hospital stay was 7.96 ± 5.81 days. Conclusion The first Ebola outbreak in Conakry was characterized by the young age of patients, discrete hemorrhagic signs related to lethality. Its control relies on a strict use of preventive measures.

M. Barry; F.A. Traoré; F.B. Sako; D.O. Kpamy; E.I. Bah; M. Poncin; S. Keita; M. Cisse; A. Touré

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The systemic velocities of four long-period cataclysmic variable stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although a large number of orbital periods of cataclysmic variable stars (CVs) have been measured, comparison of period and luminosity distributions with evolutionary theory is affected by strong selection effects. A test has been discovered which is independent of these selection effects and is based upon the kinematics of CVs (Kolb & Stehle, 1996). If the standard models of evolution are correct then long-period (P_orb > 5 hrs) CVs should be typically less than 1.5 Gyr old, and their line-of-sight velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_\\gamma$) should be small. We present results from a pilot study which indicate that this postulate is indeed true. Four long-period dwarf novae (EM Cyg, V426 Oph, SS Cyg and AH Her) were observed over a complete orbit, in order that accurate radial velocities be obtained. We find values of -1.7, 5.4, 15.4 and 1.8 km/s with uncertainties of order 3 km/s, referred to the dynamical Local Standard of Rest (LSR), leading to a dispersion of ~ 8 km/s. Calculation of a 95 per cent confidence interval gives the result 4 < \\sigma_\\gamma < 28 km/s compared to a prediction of 15 km/s. We also have an improved determination of mass donor spectral type, K_2 and q for the four systems.

R. C. North; T. R. Marsh; U. Kolb; V. S. Dhillon; C. K. J. Moran

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Search for gravitational wave radiation associated with the pulsating tail of the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004 using LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have searched for Gravitational Waves (GWs) associated with the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004. This event, originating from a Galactic neutron star, displayed exceptional energetics. Recent investigations of the X-ray light curve's pulsating tail revealed the presence of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 30 - 2000 Hz frequency range, most of which coincides with the bandwidth of the LIGO detectors. These QPOs, with well-characterized frequencies, can plausibly be attributed to seismic modes of the neutron star which could emit GWs. Our search targeted potential quasi-monochromatic GWs lasting for tens of seconds and emitted at the QPO frequencies. We have observed no candidate signals above a pre-determined threshold and our lowest upper limit was set by the 92.5 Hz QPO observed in the interval from 150 s to 260 s after the start of the flare. This bound corresponds to a (90% confidence) root-sum-squared amplitude h_rssdet^90% = 4.5e-22 strain Hz^-1/2 on the GW waveform strength in the...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

DWPF STARTUP FRIT VISCOSITY MEASUREMENT ROUND ROBIN RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A viscosity standard is needed to replace the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) glasses currently being used to calibrate viscosity measurement equipment. The current NIST glasses are either unavailable or less than ideal for calibrating equipment to measure the viscosity of high-level waste glasses. This report documents the results of a viscosity round robin study conducted on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup frit. DWPF startup frit was selected because its viscosity-temperature relationship is similar to most DWPF and Hanford high-level waste glass compositions. The glass underwent grinding and blending to homogenize the large (100 lb) batch. Portions of the batch were supplied to the laboratories (named A through H) for viscosity measurements following a specified temperature schedule with a temperature range of 1150 C to 950 C and with an option to measure viscosity at lower temperatures if their equipment was capable of measuring at the higher viscosities. Results were used to fit the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher and Arrhenius equations to viscosity as a function of temperature for the entire temperature range of 460 C through 1250 C as well as the limited temperature interval of approximately 950 C through 1250 C. The standard errors for confidence and prediction were determined for the fitted models.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Russell, Renee L.; Workman, Phyllis J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Smith, Donald E.; Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Acute effect of ambient air pollution on heart failure in Guangzhou, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem of increasing importance. The association between acute exposure to air pollution and HF has been well established in developed countries, but little evidence was available in developing countries where air pollution levels were much higher. We conducted a time-series study to investigate the short-term association between air pollution and overall emergency ambulance dispatches (EAD) due to HF in Guangzhou, China. Methods Daily data of EAD due to HF from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012 were obtained from Guangzhou Emergency Center. We applied the over-dispersed Poisson generalized addictive model to analyze the associations after controlling for the seasonality, day of the week and weather conditions. Results We identified a total of 3375 EAD for HF. A 10-?g/m3 increase in the present-day concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 ?m, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide corresponded to increases of 3.54% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35%, 5.74%], 5.29% (95% CI: 2.28%, 8.30%) and 4.34% (95% CI: 1.71%, 6.97%) in daily EAD for HF, respectively. The effects of air pollution on acute HF were restricted on the concurrent day and in the cool seasons. Conclusions Our results provided the first population-based evidence in Mainland China that outdoor air pollution could trigger the exacerbation of HF.

Changyuan Yang; Ailan Chen; Renjie Chen; Yongqing Qi; Jianjun Ye; Shuangming Li; Wanglin Li; Zijing Liang; Qing Liang; Duanqiang Guo; Haidong Kan; Xinyu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Measurement of the CP-violating phase $\\beta$ in $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and limits on penguin effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-dependent CP violation is measured in the $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ channel for each $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ resonant final state using data collected with an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ in $pp$ collisions using the LHCb detector. The final state with the largest rate, $J/\\psi\\rho^0(770)$, is used to measure the CP-violating angle $2\\beta^{\\rm eff}$ to be $(41.7\\pm 9.6_{-6.3}^{+2.8})^{\\circ}$. This result can be used to limit the size of penguin amplitude contributions to CP violation measurements in, for example, $B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi$ decays. Assuming approximate SU(3) flavour symmetry and neglecting higher order diagrams, the shift in the CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ is limited to be within the interval [$-1.05^\\circ$, +$1.18^\\circ$] at 95% confidence level. Changes to the limit due to SU(3) symmetry breaking effects are also discussed.

Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Helena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Pyrolysis of polycyclic perhydroarenes. 3: 1-n-decylperhydropyrene and structure-reactivity relations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naphthenic (perhydroarene) moieties decorated with n-alkyl substituents exist in heavy hydrocarbon resources such as coal, heavy oils, and asphaltenes. 1-n-Decylperhydropyrene (DPP) was pyrolyzed neat at temperatures between 400 and 475 C. DPP disappearance followed first-order kinetics, and the Arrhenius parameters for the first-order rate constant were A (s{sup {minus}1}) = 10{sup 9.55.0} and E = 42.9 {+-} 16.5 kcal/mol, where the uncertainties are the 95% confidence intervals. DPP pyrolysis generated numerous primary products, and the primary products with the highest initial selectivities were, in order of decreasing abundance, perhydropyrene plus 1-decene, methylene perhydropyrene plus n-nonane, tetradecahydropyrene plus n-decane, and methylperhydropyrene plus nonene. This ordering of product pairs is completely analogous to that observed from pyrolysis of an alkylcyclohexane, but it differed from that observed for the pyrolysis of other polycyclic n-alkylnaphthenes. Eight other n-alkylperhydroarenes were pyrolyzed at temperatures between 400 and 450 C. The resulting kinetics data were used to test three structure-reactivity correlations in the literature for the pyrolysis kinetics of saturated cyclic compounds and to update one of these correlations so that it becomes consistent with the kinetics of long-chain n-alkylperhydroarenes.

Savage, P.E.; Ratz, S.; Diaz, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Short-term solar irradiance forecasting using exponential smoothing state space model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We forecast high-resolution solar irradiance time series using an exponential smoothing state space (ESSS) model. To stationarize the irradiance data before applying linear time series models, we propose a novel Fourier trend model and compare the performance with other popular trend models using residual analysis and the Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin (KPSS) stationarity test. Using the optimized Fourier trend, an ESSS model is implemented to forecast the stationary residual series of datasets from Singapore and Colorado, USA. To compare the performance with other time series models, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), linear exponential smoothing (LES), simple exponential smoothing (SES) and random walk (RW) models are tested using the same data. The simulation results show that the ESSS model has generally better performance than other time series forecasting models. To assess the reliability of the forecasting model in real-time applications, a complementary study of the forecasting 95% confidence interval and forecasting horizon of the ESSS model has been conducted.

Zibo Dong; Dazhi Yang; Thomas Reindl; Wilfred M. Walsh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A consistent framework for Horton regression statistics that leads to a modified Hack's law  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A statistical framework is introduced that resolves important problems with the interpretation and use of traditional Horton regression statistics. The framework is based on a univariate regression model that leads to an alternative expression for Horton ratio, connects Horton regression statistics to distributional simple scaling, and improves the accuracy in estimating Horton plot parameters. The model is used to examine data for drainage area A and mainstream length L from two groups of basins located in different physiographic settings. Results show that confidence intervals for the Horton plot regression statistics are quite wide. Nonetheless, an analysis of covariance shows that regression intercepts, but not regression slopes, can be used to distinguish between basin groups. The univariate model is generalized to include n > 1 dependent variables. For the case where the dependent variables represent ln A and ln L, the generalized model performs somewhat better at distinguishing between basin groups than two separate univariate models. The generalized model leads to a modification of Hack's law where L depends on both A and Strahler order ?. Data show that ? plays a statistically significant role in the modified Hack's law expression.

Peter R. Furey; Brent M. Troutman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Carotid intima-media thickness is associated with incidence of hospitalized atrial fibrillation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is a measure of arterial thickening and a risk predictor for myocardial infarction and stroke. It is unclear whether IMT also predicts atrial fibrillation (AF). We explored the association between IMT and incidence of first AF hospitalization in a population-based cohort. Methods IMT was measured in 4846 subjects from the general population (aged 46–68 years, 60% women) without a history of AF, heart failure or myocardial infarction. The Swedish in-patient register was used for retrieval of AF cases. IMT was studied in relation to incidence of AF. Results During a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 353 subjects (181 men, 172 women, 4.8 per 1000 person-years) were hospitalized with a diagnosis of AF. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio (HR) for incidence of AF was 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14–2.27) for 4th vs. 1st quartile of IMT in the common carotid artery. This relationship was also independent of occurrence of carotid plaque. The results were similar for IMT in the bifurcation. Conclusion Carotid IMT was independently associated with incidence of hospitalized AF in this study of middle-aged subjects from the general population. The results suggest that arterial thickening can predict future AF.

Samuel Adamsson Eryd; Gerd Östling; Maria Rosvall; Margaretha Persson; J. Gustav Smith; Olle Melander; Bo Hedblad; Gunnar Engström

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I{sup 125} or Pd {sup 103} brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I{sup 125} or Pd{sup 103} brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts.

Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostate.com; Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Millar, Jeremy [Department Radiation Oncology, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Orio, Peter F. [Department Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Skoglund, Scott [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Idaho Supplementation Studies : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Adult and jack chinook salmon escapement were indexed by redd counts and weir returns. Escapement in 1994 was low and in some cases approached the lowest on record. Although stream flow conditions and parr abundance were conducive to precise parr population estimates, some streams continued to exhibit wide confidence intervals. Different methods used to calculate the estimates yielded inconsistent results with regard to increasing or decreasing the population estimate and improving the precision of the estimates. No single method appeared definitively better for all streams. Emigrant traps captured 78,138 chinook salmon fry, parr, and smolts in 1994. Application of a weekly trap efficiency adjusted for stream flow produced emigration estimates that were up to 30% larger than when a seasonal trap efficiency was used. Detection rates for smolts tagged in some streams were similar to detection rates for parr tagged during the fall of the previous year. This was unexpected because overwinter mortality usually results in a lower detection rate for fall-tagged fish. Low escapement in 1994 severely hampered Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) broodstock development. The inability to develop local broodstocks for supplementation is the most important factor threatening the implementation of the ISS.

Nemeth, Doug; Plaster, Kurtis; Apperson, Kimberly A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Impact of Preradiation Residual Disease Volume on Time to Locoregional Failure in Cutaneous Merkel Cell Carcinoma—A TROG Substudy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of margin status and gross residual disease in patients treated with chemoradiation therapy for high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell cancer (MCC). Methods and Materials: Data were pooled from 3 prospective trials in which patients were treated with 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary lesion and draining lymph nodes and 2 schedules of carboplatin based chemotherapy. Time to locoregional failure was analyzed according to the burden of disease at the time of radiation therapy, comparing patients with negative margins, involved margins, or macroscopic disease. Results: Analysis was performed on 88 patients, of whom 9 had microscopically positive resection margins and 26 had macroscopic residual disease. The majority of gross disease was confined to nodal regions. The 5-year time to locoregional failure, time to distant failure, time to progression, and disease-specific survival rates for the whole group were 73%, 69%, 62%, and 66% respectively. The hazard ratio for macroscopic disease at the primary site or the nodes was 1.25 (95% confidence interval 0.57-2.77), P=.58. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences in time to locoregional failure were identified between patients with negative margins and those with microscopic or gross residual disease. These results must, however, be interpreted with caution because of the limited sample size.

Finnigan, Renee [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Hruby, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle (Australia)] [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Rischin, Danny [Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Poulsen, Michael, E-mail: michael_poulsen@health.qld.gov.au [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482-0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390-0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587-0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156-2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

Shawyer, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.shawyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)] [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Fotiadis, Nicos I., E-mail: fotiadis.nicholas@gmail.com [Royal Marsden Hospital, Radiology Department, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Namagondlu, Girish, E-mail: girish.namagondlu@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom)] [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom); Iyer, Arun, E-mail: arun.iyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)] [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Blunden, Mark, E-mail: mark.blunden@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Raftery, Martin, E-mail: martin.raftery@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Yaqoob, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.yaqoob@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom)] [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

MC21 analysis of the nuclear energy agency Monte Carlo performance benchmark problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the steadily decreasing cost and wider availability of large scale computing platforms, there is growing interest in the prospects for the use of Monte Carlo for reactor design calculations that are currently performed using few-group diffusion theory or other low-order methods. To facilitate the monitoring of the progress being made toward the goal of practical full-core reactor design calculations using Monte Carlo, a performance benchmark has been developed and made available through the Nuclear Energy Agency. A first analysis of this benchmark using the MC21 Monte Carlo code was reported on in 2010, and several practical difficulties were highlighted. In this paper, a newer version of MC21 that addresses some of these difficulties has been applied to the benchmark. In particular, the confidence-interval-determination method has been improved to eliminate source correlation bias, and a fission-source-weighting method has been implemented to provide a more uniform distribution of statistical uncertainties. In addition, the Forward-Weighted, Consistent-Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology has been applied to the benchmark problem. Results of several analyses using these methods are presented, as well as results from a very large calculation with statistical uncertainties that approach what is needed for design applications. (authors)

Kelly, D. J.; Sutton, T. M. [Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, P. O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States); Wilson, S. C. [Bertis Atomic Power Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, P. O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122-0079 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ?0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ''M. Merlin'' dell'Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Memantine for Lewy Body Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To clarify whether memantine is more efficacious in several outcomes and safer than placebo in patients with Lewy body disorders, we performed a meta-analysis of memantine in patients with Lewy body disorders. Methods The meta-analysis included randomized controlled trials of memantine for Lewy body disorders in all patients with Lewy body disorders. Motor function, activities of daily living, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Mini-Mental State Exam, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects were evaluated. Results No significant effects of memantine on motor function scores, Mini-Mental State Exam scores, Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores, and activity of daily living scores were found. However, memantine was superior to placebo in Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change scores (standardized mean difference: ?0.26; 95% confidence interval: ?0.51 to ?0.02; z = 2.08; p = 0.04; two studies; N = 258). Dropout due to all causes, inefficacy, or adverse events were similar in both groups. Moreover, no significant differences in serious adverse events, somnolence/tiredness, stroke, dizziness/vertigo, and confusion were found between the groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that memantine did not have a benefit for the treatment of Lewy body disorders in cognition and motor function. However, memantine may be superior to placebo for the overall impression of the disorders. Further, memantine is well tolerated.

Shinji Matsunaga; Taro Kishi; Nakao Iwata

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bayesian statistics in radionuclide metrology: measurement of a decaying source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most intuitive way of defining a probability is perhaps through the frequency at which it appears when a large number of trials are realized in identical conditions. The probability derived from the obtained histogram characterizes the so-called frequentist or conventional statistical approach. In this sense, probability is defined as a physical property of the observed system. By contrast, in Bayesian statistics, a probability is not a physical property or a directly observable quantity, but a degree of belief or an element of inference. The goal of this paper is to show how Bayesian statistics can be used in radionuclide metrology and what its advantages and disadvantages are compared with conventional statistics. This is performed through the example of an yttrium-90 source typically encountered in environmental surveillance measurement. Because of the very low activity of this kind of source and the small half-life of the radionuclide, this measurement takes several days, during which the source decays significantly. Several methods are proposed to compute simultaneously the number of unstable nuclei at a given reference time, the decay constant and the background. Asymptotically, all approaches give the same result. However, Bayesian statistics produces coherent estimates and confidence intervals in a much smaller number of measurements. Apart from the conceptual understanding of statistics, the main difficulty that could deter radionuclide metrologists from using Bayesian statistics is the complexity of the computation.

Fran?ois O Bochud; Claude J Bailat; Jean-Pascal Laedermann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Search for {ital CP} violation in {ital D}{sup 0} decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 2.7 fb{sup {minus}1} of data taken with the CLEO II detector, we have searched for {ital CP} violation in the charm system. We looked for asymmetries in the number of decays of {ital D}{sup 0}`s and {ital {bar D}}{sup 0}`s to the {ital CP} eigenstates {ital K}{sup +}{ital K}{sup {minus}}, {ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0}{phi}, and {ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. Confidence intervals (90%) on these asymmetries were found to be {minus}0.020{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital K}}{lt}0.180, {minus}0.182{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital S}}{sup 0}{phi}{lt}0.126, and {minus}0.067{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital S}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{lt}0.031, respectively.

Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S. [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; (CLEO Collaboration)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Response surface methodology based prediction of engine performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fuelled with canola oil methyl ester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fuel injection timing and engine speed on engine performance and exhaust emission parameters using a diesel engine running on canola oil methyl ester (COME). COME was produced by means of the transesterification method and tested at full load with various engine speeds by changing fuel injection timing (12 15 and 18?°CA) in a turbocharged direct injection (TDI) diesel engine. The experiments were designed using response surface methodology (RSM) which is one of the well-known design of experiment technique for predicting the responses engine performance and exhaust emission parameters from a second order polynomial equation obtained by modeling the relation between fuel injection timing (t) and engine speed (n) parameters. By using the second order full quadratic RSM models obtained from experimental results responses brake power brake torque brake mean effective pressure brake specific fuel consumption brake thermal efficiency exhaust gas temperature oxygen (O2) oxides of nitrogen (NOx) carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon monoxide (CO) and light absorption coefficient (K) affected from factors t and n were able to be predicted by 95% confidence interval.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Search for the Decay Modes D0 to e+ e-, D0 to mu+ mu-, and D0 to e+/- mu+/-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present searches for the rare decay modes D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} in continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}. These decays are highly GIM suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the Standard Model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman-Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) within [0.6, 8.1] x 10{sup -7}, and {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -7}.

Lees, J. P.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

Density Prediction of Uranium-6 Niobium Ingots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The densities of uranium-6 niobium (U-Nb) alloys have been compiled from a variety of literature sources such as Y-12 and Rocky Flats datasheets. We also took advantage of the 42 well-pedigreed, homogeneous baseline U-Nb alloys produced under the Enhanced Surveillance Program for density measurements. Even though U-Nb alloys undergo two-phase transitions as the Nb content varies from 0 wt. % to 8 wt %, the theoretical and measured densities vary linearly with Nb content. Therefore, the effect of Nb content on the density was modeled with a linear regression. From this linear regression, a homogeneous ingot of U-6 wt.% Nb would have a density of 17.382 {+-} 0.040 g/cc (95% CI). However, ingots produced at Y-12 are not homogeneous with respect to the Nb content. Therefore, using the 95% confidence intervals, the density of a Y-12 produced ingot would vary from 17.310 {+-} 0.043 g/cc at the center to 17.432 {+-} 0.039 g/cc at the edge. Ingots with larger Nb inhomogeneities will also have larger variances in the density.

D.F.Teter; P.K. Tubesing; D.J.Thoma; E.J.Peterson

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Anisotropy in the Microwave Sky: Results from the First Flight of BAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are reported from the first flight of a new balloon-borne instrument, BAM (Balloon-borne Anisotropy Measurement), designed to search for cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy. The instrument uses a cryogenic differential Fourier transform spectrometer to obtain data in five spectral channels whose central frequencies lie in the range 3.7 cm^{-1} to 8.5 cm^{-1}. The spectrometer is coupled to an off-axis prime focus telescope; the combination yields difference spectra of two regions on the sky defined by 0\\fdg 7 FWHM beams separated by 3\\fdg 6. Single differences obtained at ten sky positions show statistically significant fluctuations. Assuming Gaussian correlated anisotropy, for the band average 3.1 cm^{-1} to 9.2 cm^{-1}, one finds $\\Delta T/T = 3.1^{+3.1}_{1.1}\\times 10^{-5}$ (90% confidence interval) for a correlation angle of 1\\fdg 2. This corresponds to $Q_{flat} = 35.9^{17.7}_{6.3} \\mu K$ (1\\sigma).

G. S. Tucker; H. P. Gush; M. Halpern; I. Shinkoda; W. Towlson

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

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461

The impact of an unconditional tax credit for families on self-rated health in adults: Further evidence from the cohort study of 6900 New Zealanders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is hypothesized that unconditional (given without obligation) publicly funded financial credits more effectively improve health than conditional financial credits in high-income countries. We previously reported no discernible short-term impact of an employment-conditional tax credit for families on self-rated health (SRH) in adults in New Zealand. This study estimates the effect of an unconditional tax credit for families, called Family Tax Credit (FTC), on SRH in the same study population and setting. A balanced panel of 6900 adults in families was extracted from seven waves (2002–2009) of the Survey of Family, Income and Employment. The exposures, eligibility for and amount of FTC, were derived by applying government eligibility and entitlement criteria. The outcome, SRH, was collected annually. Fixed effects regression analyses eliminated all time-invariant confounding and adjusted for measured time-varying confounders. Becoming eligible for FTC was associated with a small and statistically insignificant change in SRH over the past year [effect estimate: 0.013; 95% confidence interval (CI) ?0.011 to 0.037], as was an increase in the estimated amount of FTC by $1000 (effect estimate: ?0.001; 95% CI ?0.006 to 0.004). The unconditional tax credit for families had no discernible short-term impact on SRH in adults in New Zealand. It did not more effectively improve health status than an employment-conditional tax credit for families.

Frank Pega; Kristie Carter; Ichiro Kawachi; Peter Davis; Tony Blakely

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cohort and case-control analyses of workers exposed to vinyl chloride: An update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mortality in a cohort of workers at a vinyl chloride polymerization plant has been updated, extending the period of observation in the original study from 1974 to 1986. Workers at this plant may have been exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and/or polyvinyl chloride dust, or may have had no exposure to either substance. Seventy-six percent of the work force worked in jobs with potential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. Among the total cohort, statistically significant excess risks were observed for liver, lung, and brain cancer. For the subcohort of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for liver cancer was 333 (90% confidence interval (CI) 202 to 521). However, there were no significant excesses of either brain (SMR = 145, 90% CI 78 to 249) or lung cancer (SMR = 115, 90% CI 96 to 141). To investigate dose response, nested case-control studies for liver, brain, and lung cancer were conducted among the total cohort (including the nonexposed). For these studies there were two exposure variables, cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer and cumulative dose of polyvinyl chloride dust. Cumulative dose was defined as the product of level and duration of exposure. The only significant association between disease risk and cumulative dose was for liver cancer and cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer. Further division of the liver cancers into angiosarcoma (n = 12) and other liver cancers (n = 7), based on review of death certificates and medical records, showed that the dose response existed only for angiosarcomas.

Wu, W.A.; Steenland, K.; Brown, D.; Wells, V.; Jones, J.; Schulte, P.; Halperin, W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Frequency analysis of the 7–8 December 2010 extreme precipitation in the Panama Canal Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The 7–8 December 2010 rainfall event in Panama produced record rainfall and streamflow that are about twice as much as for the previously observed large event in record. In this study we ask whether before the occurrence of this rainfall event, a return period estimate using the historical record and the commonly used statistical asymptotic distributions of extreme values could have indicated that such an event is probable. We examined the daily and 24-h mean areal rainfall over the entire Panama Canal Watershed with the Generalized Extreme Value, Gumbel, and Generalized Pareto distributions using the maximum likelihood approach for the parameter and uncertainty bounds estimation. We found that the solutions that maximized the log likelihood for these three distributions yield return period estimates that are larger than 2000 years. These return periods imply that the 2010 rainfall event was practically unforeseen. It is only the careful implementation of these distributions with full uncertainty analysis to define confidence intervals that yields estimates of return periods with substantial probabilities for such an event to occur. The GEV was found to be the most adequate distribution for this analysis, and the commonly-used Gumbel distribution, although indicated a good fit to the annual maxima series, attributed an extremely low probability for the occurrence of this event.

Eylon Shamir; Konstantine P. Georgakakos; Michael J. Murphy Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose in this paper an original technique to predict global radiation using a hybrid ARMA/ANN model and data issued from a numerical weather prediction model (ALADIN). We particularly look at the Multi-Layer Perceptron. After optimizing our architecture with ALADIN and endogenous data previously made stationary and using an innovative pre-input layer selection method, we combined it to an ARMA model from a rule based on the analysis of hourly data series. This model has been used to forecast the hourly global radiation for five places in Mediterranean area. Our technique outperforms classical models for all the places. The nRMSE for our hybrid model ANN/ARMA is 14.9% compared to 26.2% for the na\\"ive persistence predictor. Note that in the stand alone ANN case the nRMSE is 18.4%. Finally, in order to discuss the reliability of the forecaster outputs, a complementary study concerning the confidence interval of each prediction is proposed

Voyant, Cyril; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Estimation of seasonal correction factors through Fourier decomposition analysis—a new  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon concentrations in homes have been shown to vary considerably with season. It is important to account for this by applying a correction factor to any home radon measurement of less than one year. To date, Irish radon measurement services have used correction factors based on data derived for the UK in the 1980s. In the absence of similar data for Ireland at the time, these were considered suitable for use due to the similarities between the climates, house types and lifestyles in the two countries. In order to better estimate the long-term radon concentration, measurements from 5640 Irish homes were used to derive a set of correction factors specifically for Ireland. These were generated by means of Fourier decomposition analysis and the new correction factors compared, using 95% confidence intervals, to those derived for the UK using the same analysis and to those currently in use for Ireland. In both cases, a significant difference was found between 10 of the 12 monthly seasonal correction factors. This paper presents the methods used in detail and the results of the analysis.

Órlaith Burke; Stephanie Long; Patrick Murphy; Catherine Organo; David Fenton; Peter Anthony Colgan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy content of macrobenthic invertebrates: general conversion factors from weight to energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In ecological studies, especially in those dealing with energy circulation in nature, determinations of the energy content of organisms are inevitable. Energy determinations are, however, laborious and time-consuming. Average conversion factors based on different species form various areas and seasons may often be a shortcut for overcoming this problem. To establish general energy conversion factors for aquatic invertebrate groups, we used 376 values of J · mg?1 DW and 255 values of J · mg?1 AFDW, representing 308 and 229 species, respectively. The dry-weight-to-energy factors were highly variable both within and between taxonomic groups, e.g.: Porifera, 6.1 J · mg?1 DW; insect larvae, 22.4 J · mg?1 DW (median values). The energy-conversion factors related to AFDW showed a much smaller dispersion with a minimum median value of 19.7 J · mg?1 AFDW (Ascidiacea) and a maximum of 23.8 J · mg?1 AFDW (insect larvae). Within taxonomic groups, the 95% confidence intervals (AFDW) were only a few percent of the median values. The use of energy-conversion factors based on AFDW is preferable due to their lower dispersion. For aquatic macrobenthic invertebrates, a general conversion factor of 23 J · mg?1 AFDW can be used.

Thomas Brey; Heye Rumohr; Sven Ankar

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Patterns of Failure and Treatment-Related Toxicity in Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Treated Using Extended Field Radiotherapy With Curative Intent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in cervical cancer patients who had metastatic disease in common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent, using extended field radiotherapy (EFRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study involving 39 patients treated from January 1996 to June 2007, using EFRT with concurrent chemotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. EFRT consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Radiation to involved nodes was boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Primary tumor radiation was boosted to a dose of 80 Gy using brachytherapy. Results: Overall, 30 patients (77%) have relapsed. The 5-year OS rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11-44). The 5-year DFS rate was 19.4% (95% CI, 8-35). Only 3 patients (7.5%) experienced treatment failure exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 patients underwent salvage treatment. Grade 3 to 4 acute bone marrow and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in 10 (26%) and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and EFRT treatment was well tolerated. Most patients showed failure at multiple sites and outside the treatment field. Only 3/39 patients had failures exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 underwent salvage treatment.

Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi, E-mail: rchrishanthi@hotmail.co [Division of Oncology, Teaching Hospital, Batticaloa (Sri Lanka); Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas [Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland, and School of Medicine, University of Queensland (Australia); Barkati, Maroie; Narayan, Kailash [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Constraints on exotic dipole-dipole couplings between electrons at the micrometer scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions. For light bosons (mass $\\le$ 0.1 eV) we obtain $90\\%$ confidence intervals on pseudo-scalar and axial-vector mediated interaction strengths of $\\left|g_P^eg_P^e/4\\pi\\hbar c\\right|\\le 1.5\\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\left|g_A^eg_A^e/4\\pi\\hbar c\\right|\\le 1.2\\times 10^{-17}$, respectively. These bounds significantly improve on previous work for this mass range. Assuming CPT invariance, these constraints are compared to those on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. For axial-vector mediated interaction the electron-electron constraints are six orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron constraints. Bounds on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales.

Kotler, Shlomi; Kimball, Derek F Jackson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Mid-term follow up of thromboembolic complications in left ventricular endocardial cardiac resynchronization therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Endocardial left ventricular (LV) pacing for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been proposed as an alternative to traditional LV transvenous epicardial pacing with equal or superior cardiac performance. The risks of cerebral thromboembolism and possible interference with mitral valve function moderate its clinical application. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebral thromboembolic complications after LV endocardial lead placement. Mitral regurgitation (MR) was the secondary outcome measure. Methods CRT candidates with a failed coronary sinus approach or nonresponders to conventional CRT underwent endocardial LV lead implantation (45 atrial transseptal, 6 transapical). Coumarin was prescribed with a targeted international normalized ratio between 3.5 and 4.5. Patient records were checked and general practitioners were contacted regarding cerebral thromboembolic complications. MR was evaluated by echocardiography at baseline and after 6 months. Results In 7 patients, 6 ischemic strokes and 2 transient ischemic attacks occurred, corresponding to 6.1 thromboembolic events per 100 patient-years (95% confidence interval 3.4–15.8). One patient refused hospital admission; all other patients had a subtherapeutic anticoagulation level at the time of the event. No major bleeding complications occurred. There was no change in the grade of MR (grade 2, P = .727) after 6 months. Conclusion Endocardial LV lead placement in patients with advanced heart failure is associated with thromboembolic risk. However, all but 1 patient had a subtherapeutic level of anticoagulation. Endocardial LV lead placement is not associated with aggravation of MR.

Leonard M. Rademakers; Berry M. van Gelder; Mike G. Scheffer; Frank A. Bracke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers.

Nuzum, J.L.

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

472

Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation $?$ rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation $\\gamma$-rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to $3.01 \\times 10^{20}$ protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the $4-30$ MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is $1.55 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ with a 68\\% confidence interval of $(1.22, 2.20) \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of $2.01 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$.

K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; S. W. Bentham; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; I. Bertram; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodríguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; F. Dufour; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini Aguirre; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Gaudin; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; S. J. Ives; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; K. Koseki; Y. Koshio; I. Kreslo; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; S. Kumaratunga; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; K. P. Lee; C. Licciardi; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; M. Macaire; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; J. Marzec; E. L. Mathie; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; S. Mine; A. Missert; M. Miura; L. Monfregola; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nagasaki; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; T. Nakai; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; D. Naples; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; G. F. Pearce; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; F. Retiere; A. Robert; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. Sánchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; R. J. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; T. Szeglowski; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; K. Ueno; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. ?muda

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

NEAR-INFRARED LINEAR POLARIZATION OF ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on near-infrared J- and H-band linear polarimetric photometry of eight ultracool dwarfs (two late-M, five L0-L7.5, and one T2.5) with known evidence for photometric variability due to dust clouds, anomalous red infrared colors, or low-gravity atmospheres. The polarimetric data were acquired with the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope. We also provide mid-infrared photometry in the interval 3.4-24 {mu}m for some targets obtained with Spitzer and WISE, which has allowed us to confirm the peculiar red colors of five sources in the sample. We can impose modest upper limits of 0.9% and 1.8% on the linear polarization degree for seven targets with a confidence of 99%. Only one source, 2MASS J02411151-0326587 (L0), appears to be strongly polarized (P {approx} 3%) in the J band with a significance level of P/{sigma}{sub P} {approx} 10. The likely origin of its linearly polarized light and rather red infrared colors may reside in a surrounding disk with an asymmetric distribution of grains. Given its proximity (66 {+-} 8 pc), this object becomes an excellent target for the direct detection of the disk.

Zapatero Osorio, M. R. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Bejar, V. J. S.; Rebolo, R.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Pena Ramirez, K. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/. Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Goldman, B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Caballero, J. A., E-mail: mosorio@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: vbejar@iac.es, E-mail: rrl@iac.es, E-mail: jaa@iac.es, E-mail: amt@iac.es, E-mail: karla@iac.es, E-mail: goldman@mpia.de, E-mail: caballero@cab.inta-csic.es [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

474

Household transmission of pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus in Osaka, Japan in May 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryObjective To assess household transmission of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and effectiveness of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) of antiviral drugs among household contacts of patients during the first pandemic influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Osaka, Japan in May 2009. Methods Active surveillance of patients and their families was conducted. Public Health Center staff visited each home with an infected patient and advised every household member with regard to precautionary measures, and PEP was provided to household contacts to prevent secondary infection. We analyzed the effectiveness of PEP and characteristics of secondary infection. Results The secondary attack rate (SAR) among household contacts was 3.7%. The SAR among household contacts without PEP was 26.1%. However, the SAR among those with PEP was 0.6%. Only two of 331 household contacts with PEP became infected. One of the two was infected with an oseltamivir-resistant strain. Analysis of SAR by age group showed that those under 20 years of age were at higher risk than those over 20 (relative risk [RR] = 7.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.24–27.8). Significant differences with respect to sex, number of household contacts, and use of