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1

Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

E. S. Smith

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Confidence intervals for state probabilities of system capacity outages and for LOLP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONFID"NC. , INTERVALS FO- S'TATE PROBABILITIES OF SYSTEM CAPACITY OUTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thcsi. , bv ATHANASIOS STASINOS Submi. tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STA1'E PROBABILITIES OF STSTEM CAPACITY OVTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thesis by ATHANASIOS STASINOS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Stasinos, Athanasios

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY USING MCMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY and Computing Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana USA ABSTRACT Climate models that predict polar ice sheet behavior require accurate measurements of the bedrock-ice and ice-air bound- aries in ground

Menczer, Filippo

4

Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Investor Confidence Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects (under $1MM), Lighter engineering requirements – V1 Released September 2013 • Targeted Commercial – Single Measure or Non-Interactive Retrofits – Release Date Dec 2013 • Multifamily – Release Q1 2014 • Quality Assurance Protocol – Currently in BETA...Environmental Defense Fund’s Investor Confidence Project Delivering Investment Quality Energy Efficiency to Market ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Investor Confidence Project...

Golden, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

Traeger, Christian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity: Greenland mass loss acceleration confidence intervals GRACE a b s t r a c t We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed

8

Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce the confident voter two substates that correspond to different confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

Redner, Sidney

9

invariant support set interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 20, 2004 ... Observe that every transition point as a singleton is a special invariancy interval, because any ...... Management Science, 18-7, 406–422. 24 ...

10

Dynamics of acyclic interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 6 (2009) Dynamics of acyclic interval maps [16] D.orbits and bifurcation of maps of the interval. SIAM J.Dynamics of acyclic interval maps Morris W. Hirsch He who

Hirsch, Morris W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Resource Allocation with Time Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: resource allocation, proper intervals, unsplittable flow ... be positioned within a larger time interval) and call admission control, see [4] and [8] for ...

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

jfpe_425 1220..1233 BOOTSTRAP CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR THE KINETIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.073 m) was heated in a steam retort at 126.7C. Antho- cyanin retention was measured by high bands, allows more accurate process design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher-quality design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher- quality nutraceutical products. INTRODUCTION

13

PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval tests for gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005, 77:567-581. 23. Kallberg H, Padyukov L, Plenge RM, Ronnelid J, Gregersen PK, Helm-van Mil van der AHM, Toes REM, Huizinga TW, Klareskog L, Alfredsson L, et al: Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and smoking...

Peng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jinghua; Xue, Fuzhong

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals Efficiently Guillaume Blin1 Jens Stoye2 1Université Paris. stoye@techfak.uni-bielefeld.de G. Blin - gblin@univ-mlv.fr Finding Nested Common Intervals Efficiently

Blin, Guillaume

16

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes five wells dedicated to pumping drinking water and the Water Treatment Facility in Bldg. 624 (see-step process to remove iron at the Water Treatment Facil- ity (see photo essay on page 4). While being2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report This special edition of the Brookhaven Bulletin

17

Random selection as a confidence building tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. The first concern can be addressed by performing the measurements within the host facility using instruments under the host's control. Because the data output in this measurement scenario is also under host control, it is difficult for the monitoring party to have confidence in that data. One technique for addressing this difficulty is random selection. The concept of random selection can be thought of as four steps: (1) The host presents several 'identical' copies of a component or system to the monitor. (2) One (or more) of these copies is randomly chosen by the monitors for use in the measurement system. (3) Similarly, one or more is randomly chosen to be validated further at a later date in a monitor-controlled facility. (4) Because the two components or systems are identical, validation of the 'validation copy' is equivalent to validation of the measurement system. This procedure sounds straightforward, but effective application may be quite difficult. Although random selection is often viewed as a panacea for confidence building, the amount of confidence generated depends on the monitor's continuity of knowledge for both validation and measurement systems. In this presentation, we will discuss the random selection technique, as well as where and how this technique might be applied to generate maximum confidence. In addition, we will discuss the role of modular measurement-system design in facilitating random selection and describe a simple modular measurement system incorporating six small {sup 3}He neutron detectors and a single high-purity germanium gamma detector.

Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauck, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Prediction Intervals in Generalized Linear Mixed Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1. BLP Based Prediction Intervals………………………………………..……3.2. BP Based Prediction Intervals………………..………………………..……4.1.1. BLP Based Prediction Interval………………………………………. 4.1.2.

Yang, Cheng-Hsueh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPS EarnsWashington,Confidence

20

Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

Darby, John L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Confidence measures for hybrid HMM/ANN speech recognition.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we introduce four acoustic confidence measures which are derived from the output of a hybrid HMM/ANN large vocabulary continuous speech recognition system. These confidence measures, based on local posterior probability estimates...

Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Interval Computations Interval-Valued Inference in Medical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLINAID Ladislav J. Kohout and Isabel Stabile In a series of papers and a monograph [21], we have] - Clinaid. Clinaid - . c L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile, 1993 #12;Interval-Valued Inference substra- #12;90 L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile tum): 1. Diagnostic Unit (comprised of several parallel

Kearfott, R. Baker

25

Bootstrap Prediction Intervals for Time Series /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.5 Joint Prediction intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6 Generalized Bootstrap prediction1.8.1 Bootstrap Prediction Intervals Based on Studentized

Pan, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Empirical Prediction Intervals for County Population Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the determination and prediction of population forecastperformance of empirical prediction intervals? Table 5 shows26, 163–184. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County

Rayer, Stefan; Smith, Stanley K.; Tayman, Jeff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION Robi Polikar Department evaluation (NDE) applications resort to pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms for automated classification and characterization of NDE signals. Applications of such systems include defect identification

Polikar, Robi

28

Revisiting Interval Graphs for Network Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vertices of an interval graph represent intervals over a real line where overlapping intervals denote that their corresponding vertices are adjacent. This implies that the vertices are measurable by a metric and there exists a linear structure in the system. The generalization is an embedding of a graph onto a multi-dimensional Euclidean space and it was used by scientists to study the multi-relational complexity of ecology. However the research went out of fashion in the 1980s and was not revisited when Network Science recently expressed interests with multi-relational networks known as multiplexes. This paper studies interval graphs from the perspective of Network Science.

Loe, Chuan Wen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Spectral Statistics of RR Intervals in ECG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The statistical properties (fluctuations) of heartbeat intervals (RR intervals) in ECG are studied and compared with the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT). It is found that heartbeat intervals only locally exhibit the fluctuation patterns (universality) predicted by the RMT. This finding shows that heartbeat dynamics is of the mixed type where regular and irregular (chaotic) regimes coexist and the Berry-Robnik theory can be applied. It is also observed that the distribution of heartbeat intervals is well described by the one-parameter Brody distribution. The parameter $\\beta $ of the Brody distribution is seen to be connected with the dynamical state of the heart.

Martinis, M; Knezevic, A; Crnugelj, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves J.M. Aza¨is1, S. Bercu2, J, load curve. 1 Introduction In curve prediction, one is generally interested in deriving simultaneous this technique in the numerical context of load curve pre- diction: power producers like EDF, the electrical

Boyer, Edmond

32

STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

Katz, Richard

33

Frequency domain design of interval controller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant role in the analysis and design of interval systems. Its external properties are also discussed. The image set approach & frequency domain criteria can be used to calculate the IP stability margin. The frequency domain criteria are used...

Park, Wunyong

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Single Interval Rényi Entropy At Low Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Interval Data Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load)InternationalRenewable Energy Council IREC JumpInterval

37

Multiply Connected Topological Economics, Confidence Relation and Political Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the similar formulas of the preference relation and the utility function, we propose the confidence relations and the corresponding influence functions that represent various interacting strengths of different families, cliques and systems of organization. Since they can affect products, profit and prices, etc., in an economic system, and are usually independent of economic results, therefore, the system can produce a multiply connected topological economics. If the political economy is an economy chaperoned polity, it will produce consequentially a binary economy. When the changes of the product and the influence are independent one another, they may be a node or saddle point. When the influence function large enough achieves a certain threshold value, it will form a wormhole with loss of capital. Various powers produce usually the economic wormhole and various corruptions.

Yi-Fang Chang

2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quiz # 4, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, March 25, 2009 Q10 (Page 301). Each of the following is a confidence interval for = true average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@clarkson.edu #12;Q12 (Page 302). Heavy-metal pollution of various ecosystem is a serious environmen- tal threat

Sanyal, Suman

39

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS BY THE INTERVAL ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS. BY THE INTERVAL ANALYSIS APPROACH: THE BELGIUM NETWORK CASE. J. FRÉDÉRIC BONNANS ...

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WORKS ON INTERVAL COMPUTATIONS PUBLISHED IN RUSSIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the The Editorial Board of "Interval Computations". The Editorial Board of the International Journal "Interval/1993 of the journal "Interval Computations". In this version we keep numbering of references. All corrections methods for the synthesis of regulators. Coll. of scien. proc.", Saratov Polytechnic Institute, Saratov

Kearfott, R. Baker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures Daniel J. Nordman Dept. of Statistics prediction intervals for the number of failures that will be observed in a future inspec­ tion of a sample­based prediction intervals perform better than the alternatives. Key Words: Coverage probability, Prediction bounds

42

Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures Daniel J. Nordman Dept. of Statistics prediction intervals for the number of failures that will be observed in a future inspec- tion of a sample-based prediction intervals perform better than the alternatives. Key Words: Coverage probability, Prediction bounds

43

ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ENTROPY OF INTERVAL MAPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ENTROPY OF INTERVAL MAPS ALEXANDER BLOKH AND JOZEF BOBOK Abstract. We obtain upper estimates on the entropy of interval maps of given modality and Sharkovskii type. Following our results we formulate a conjecture on asymptotic behavior of the entropy of interval maps. 1

Blokh, Alexander

44

Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Steam turbine-generator outage interval extension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the industry`s growing competitive climate, utilities are seeking ways to tap the economic benefits to be derived from maximizing intervals between major turbine-generator (T-G) inspections and overhauls--while ensuring protection of these assets. EPRI and others have developed a substantial body of technology which addresses many of the condition assessment issues that underlie T-G inspection and overhaul decisions. Examples include remaining life determination of critical components such as rotors and blades. While the initial focus of this technology had previously been to support T-G run-repair-replace decision making, this technology can also serve as a basis for run-inspect decisions. This paper describes EPRI`s initiative to develop and implement a T-G Health Management System. By providing key status reports reflecting the on-line health of critical components, in terms of life consumption, performance degradation and probability of failure, this system will provide a means to justify extending T-G operations between inspections and overhauls.

McCloskey, T.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pollard, M. [Carolina Power & Light Company, Raleigh, NC (United States); Dewey, R.; Roemer, M. [Stress Technology Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

Maurer, Ueli

47

Confidence Valuation in a PublicKey Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confidence Valuation in a Public­Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

Maurer, Ueli

48

Role of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards in confidence building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, I will examine some attributes of confidence building and connect them with how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) interacts with its member states in carrying out its safeguards function. These interactions and the structure set up to define them help maintain and strengthen confidence between the IAEA and the member states and among these states. 3 refs.

Augustson, R.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Global optimization of pipe networks by the interval analysis approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 20, 2011 ... Global optimization of pipe networks by the interval analysis approach: the Belgium network case. J.F. Bonnans(Frederic.Bonnans ***at*** ...

J.F. Bonnans

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

MODELLING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE BY INTERVAL FEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the comparison operators and some collection of standard transcendental functions (like sin, cos, power, etc of real function, one can transform system of linear equation into system of linear interval equation K value, one can use interval global optimization [39] or other global optimization method (solon

Pownuk, Andrzej

51

Limulus amebocyte lysate: an evaluation as a method for biological wastewater process monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Relat1onsh1p between BDDS without nitrif1cation 1nhibitor and endotoxin concentration with a 95 percent confidence interval on Equation I Figure A-1. BOD w1thout n1trification 1nhibitor versus 5 total suspended solids. F1gure A-2. BOD without nitrif... percent of the initial dissolved oxygen content. Wagenhals, Theriault, and Hommon advocated that the best method available for estimating the strength of raw sewage was the BOD test. They felt the BOD test in conjunction with the suspended solids test...

Hawkins, Scott John

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Horizontal velocities in the central and eastern United States from GPS surveys during the 1987-1996 interval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Geodetic Survey and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission jointly organized GPS surveys in 1987, 1990, 1993, and 1996 to search for crustal deformation in the central and eastern United States (east of longitude 108{degrees}W). We have analyzed the data of these four surveys in combination with VLBI data observed during the 1979-1995 interval and GPS data for 22 additional surveys observed during the 1990-1996 interval. These latter GPS surveys served to establish accurately positioned geodetic marks in various states. Accordingly, we have computed horizontal velocities for 64 GPS sites and 12 VLBI sites relative to a reference frame for which the interior of the North American plate is considered fixed on average. None of our derived velocities exceeds 6 mm/yr in magnitude. Moreover, the derived velocity at each GPS site is statistically zero at the 95% confidence level except for the site BOLTON in central Ohio and the site BEARTOWN in southeastern Pennsylvania. However, as statistical theory would allow approximately 5% of the 64 GPS sites to fall our zero-velocity hypothesis, we are uncertain whether or not these estimated velocities for BOLTON and BEARTOWN reflect actual motion relative to the North American plate. We also computed horizontal strain rates for the cells formed by a 1{degrees} by 1{degrees} grid spanning the central and eastern United States. Corresponding shearing rates are everywhere less than 60 nanoradians/yr in magnitude, and no shearing rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level except for a grid cell near BEARTOWN whose rate is 57 {+-} 26 nanoradians/yr. Also corresponding areal dilatation rates are everywhere less than 40 nanostrain/yr in magnitude, and no dilatation rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level.

Snay, R.A.; Strange, W.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik 1 and S. Redner 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce two substates that correspond to di#erent confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

Redner, Sidney

54

UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduating Medical Students Entering EM Residency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

favorably viewed their EM Boot Camp experience and felt that57 UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduatinghave used some type of Boot Camp, modeled after military

Watson, L F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Differences in radar derived rainfall amounts due to sampling intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1986 Major Subject: Meteorology DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Approved as to style and content by: eorge L. Huebner (Chairman of Committee) CP~ CG~& Robert C...

Zdenek, David James

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya (Knoxville, TN); Chaum, Edward (Memphis, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tables for Trials and Failures with PD for Designated Confidence Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two attachments are provided for performance testing of sensors and other Physical Protection System (PPS) components.#2; The first attachment is a table of Trials and Failures, giving Probability of Detection (PD) for a designated confidence level and sorted by trials.#2; The second attachment contains the same data, sorted by failures.

Leach, Janice

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rapid Deployment with Confidence: Calibration and Fault Detection in Environmental Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid Deployment with Confidence: Calibration and Fault Detection in Environmental Sensor Networks for Embedded Networked Sensing, UCLA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT {nithya, kohler The presence of arsenic in groundwater has led to the largest environmental poisoning in history; tens

Nowak, Robert

62

A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-confidence Distributed Real-time and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over implementations of the same functional component with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption

Tuceryan, Mihran

63

A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-Confidence Distributed Real-Time and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption versus throughput). Addition- ally, two components

Gray, Jeffrey G.

64

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Neurocomputing 6566 (2005) 371378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurocomputing 65­66 (2005) 371­378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes Patrick Crotty making it possible to determine whether the information processing is at an energy-efficient optimum between successive spikes. We compare the frequency and energy-efficiency results to those obtained

Levy, William B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use of Utility Interval Meters in an Industrial Energy Audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a unique approach to an energy audit of a large tank farm. The audit was unusual in that it was located out-of-doors and the energy-using equipment was made up almost entirely of pumps. The auditors used the utility interval...

Wallace, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of iterated belief revision [5­7]. In the problem of belief set revision, the tpo can be thought of as extraOn the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders Richard Booth1 and Thomas) are often used in belief revision to encode an agent's strategy for revising its belief set in response

Meyer, Tommie

68

Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed, the relationship between some types of proton aurora (proton spots and proton flashes) and pulsations in the Pc1

California at Berkeley, University of

69

Quantum ergodicity for graphs related to interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove quantum ergodicity for a family of graphs that are obtained from ergodic one-dimensional maps of an interval using a procedure introduced by Pakonski et al (J. Phys. A, v. 34, 9303-9317 (2001)). As observables we take the L^2 functions on the interval. The proof is based on the periodic orbit expansion of a majorant of the quantum variance. Specifically, given a one-dimensional, Lebesgue-measure-preserving map of an interval, we consider an increasingly refined sequence of partitions of the interval. To this sequence we associate a sequence of graphs, whose directed edges correspond to elements of the partitions and on which the classical dynamics approximates the Perron-Frobenius operator corresponding to the map. We show that, except possibly for subsequences of density 0, the eigenstates of the quantum graphs equidistribute in the limit of large graphs. For a smaller class of observables we also show that the Egorov property, a correspondence between classical and quantum evolution in the semiclassical limit, holds for the quantum graphs in question.

G. Berkolaiko; J. P. Keating; U. Smilansky

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1 , Vladik Kreinovich2 , Pavel Sol´in2 advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher-order finite element methods (hp

Kreinovich, Vladik

71

GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

72

ECG beats classification using waveform similarity and RR interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECG beats classification using waveform similarity and RR interval Ahmad Khoureich Ka Abstract--This paper present an electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification method based on waveform similarity and RR. Heart beats of 128 samples data centered on the R peak are extracted from the ECG signal and thence

Boyer, Edmond

73

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Single Interval R\\'enyi Entropy At Low Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

Chen, Bin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ECG beats classification using waveform similarity and RR interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper present an electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification method based on waveform similarity and RR interval. The purpose of the method is to classify six types of heart beats (normal beat, atrial premature beat, paced beat, premature ventricular beat, left bundle branch block beat and right bundle branch block beat). The electrocardiogram signal is first denoised using wavelet transform based techniques. Heart beats of 128 samples data centered on the R peak are extracted from the ECG signal and thence reduced to 16 samples data to constitute a feature. RR intervals surrounding the beat are also exploited as feature. A database of annotated beats is built for the classifier for waveform comparison to unknown beats. Tested on 46 records in the MIT/BIH arrhythmia database, the method shows classification rate of 97.52%.

Ka, Ahmad Khoureich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Scar sarcoidosis with a 50-year interval between an accident and onset of lesions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

year interval between an accident and onset of lesions Hiramreported in scars of accidents [ 2 ], herpes zoster [ 1 ],

Jr, Hiram Larangeira de Almeida; Fiss, Roberto Coswig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Earning public trust and confidence: Requisites for managing radioactive wastes. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management was created in April 1991 by former Secretary James D. Watkins, who asked the group to analyze the critical institutional question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) might strengthen public trust and confidence in the civilian radioactive waste management program. The panel met eight times over a period of 27 months and heard formal presentations from nearly 100 representatives of state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and senior DOE Headquarters and Field Office managers. The group also commissioned a variety of studies from independent experts, contracted with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration to hold workshops on designing and leading trust-evoking organizations, and carried out one survey of parties affected by the Department`s radioactive waste management activities and a second one of DOE employees and contractors.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hand, Michael S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effects of two situational variables on the self-confidence of males and females in achievement settings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ~uivocal feedback on individuals' abilities, women do not have lower self-confidence than men. Feather and. Simon (1971) found no sex differences in conf1dence of passing a subsequent anagruns test when the subjects had been given feedback in the form oi..., 94 ) I ? 5. 28, yg . 01. A Scheffe's comparison of means revealed that subjects who were given clear feedback were significantly more conf1dent in same-sex competition (X= 4. 26) and less confident in oppos1te-sex competition (X= 2. 71), g g . 05...

Smith, Susan Marilyn Hartman

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aware interval caching Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: aware interval caching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Technical Report No. 11980001 University of Rhode Island Summary: Engineering Kingston, RI 02881, USA...

84

OPTIMAL EXTERNAL MEMORY INTERVAL MANAGEMENT # LARS ARGE + AND JEFFREY SCOTT VITTER #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e#cient external data structures. Key words. interval management, stabbing queries, I/O e/O) transmits one page of B elements. We measure the e#ciency of an algorithm in terms of the number of IOPTIMAL EXTERNAL MEMORY INTERVAL MANAGEMENT # LARS ARGE + AND JEFFREY SCOTT VITTER # SIAM J. COMPUT

Arge, Lars

85

Confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: A conceptual development for the cooperative monitoring of limited-force deployment zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of North and South Korea could decrease the risk of conflict on the Korean Peninsula and help create an environment in which to negotiate a peace regime. The Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA) and the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to identify potential CBMs and define associated monitoring. The project is a conceptual analysis of political and technical options for confidence building that might be feasible in Korea at some future time. KIDA first analyzed current security conditions and options for CBMs. Their conclusions are presented as a hypothetical agreement to strengthen the Armistice Agreement by establishing Limited Force Deployment Zones along the Military Demarcation Line. The goal of the hypothetical agreement is to increase mutual security and build confidence. The CMC then used KIDA`s scenario to develop a strategy for cooperative monitoring the agreement. Cooperative monitoring is the collecting, analyzing and sharing of agreed information among parties to an agreement and typically relies on the use of commercially available technology. A cooperative monitoring regime must be consistent with the agreement`s terms; the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors in the Korean setting; and the capabilities of monitoring technologies. This report describes the security situation on the Korean peninsula, relevant precedents from other regions, the hypothetical agreement for reducing military tensions, a monitoring strategy for the hypothetical Korean agreement, examples of implementation, and a description of applicable monitoring technologies and procedures.

Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center; Nam, M.K.; Moon, K.K.; Kim, M.J. [Korea Inst. for Defense Analyses, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Arms Control Research Center

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year Page 1 Certificate revision June 2014 AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE will not be circulated by the candidate #12;AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination

Kheifets, Anatoli

87

Monitoring molecular interactions using photon arrival-time interval distribution analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for analyzing/monitoring the properties of species that are labeled with fluorophores. A detector is used to detect photons emitted from species that are labeled with one or more fluorophores and located in a confocal detection volume. The arrival time of each of the photons is determined. The interval of time between various photon pairs is then determined to provide photon pair intervals. The number of photons that have arrival times within the photon pair intervals is also determined. The photon pair intervals are then used in combination with the corresponding counts of intervening photons to analyze properties and interactions of the molecules including brightness, concentration, coincidence and transit time. The method can be used for analyzing single photon streams and multiple photon streams.

Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA); Weiss, Shimon (Los Angels, CA)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

88

Computing Best Possible Pseudo-Solutions to Interval Linear Systems of Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Panyukov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia a_panyukov@mail.ru Valentin A. Golodov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia avaksa@gmail.com Abstract In the paper, we consider interval

Kearfott, R. Baker

89

Fast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Their Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering applications, we are interested in computing statistics. For example, in environmental analysis, a reasonable statistic for estimating the mean value of a probability distribution is the population average EFast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty

Kreinovich, Vladik

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive interval type-2 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the Design of Summary: and Their Use in the Design of Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems Hongwei Wu and Jerry M. Mendel, Fellow, IEEE... the uncertainty contained in...

91

Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Copyright ? 2005 by ASME CASE STUDIES IN USING WHOLE BUILDING INTERVAL DATA TO DETERMINE ANNUALIZED ELECTRICAL SAVINGS Mark Effinger James Anthony Lia Webster Engineer Engineer Senior Engineer Portland Energy Conservation, Inc... Portland, OR USA ABSTRACT Whole building interval analysis to determine savings from energy reduction measures is addressed in several guidelines. The whole building method has typically focused on measured savings where baseline regression...

Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

92

BAYESIAN CONFIDENCE LIMITS OF ELECTRON SPECTRA OBTAINED THROUGH REGULARIZED INVERSION OF SOLAR HARD X-RAY SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many astrophysical observations are characterized by a single, non-repeatable measurement of a source brightness or intensity, from which we are to construct estimates for the true intensity and its uncertainty. For example, the hard X-ray count spectrum from transient events such as solar flares can be observed only once, and from this single spectrum one must determine the best estimate of the underlying source spectrum I({epsilon}), and hence the form of the responsible electron spectrum F(E). Including statistical uncertainties on the measured count spectrum yields a 'confidence strip' that delineates the boundaries of electron spectra that are consistent with the observed photon spectrum. In this short article, we point out that the expectation values of the source brightness and its variance in a given photon energy bin are in general not (as has been assumed in prior works) equal to n, the number of counts observed in that energy bin. Rather, they depend both on n and on prior knowledge of the overall photon spectrum. Using Bayesian statistics, we provide an explicit procedure and formulas for determining the 'confidence strip' (Bayesian credible region) for F(E), thus providing rigorous bounds on the intensity and shape of the accelerated electron spectrum.

Emslie, A. Gordon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Massone, Anna Maria, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu, E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it [CNR-SPIN, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calculating Confidence, Uncertainty, and Numbers of Samples When Using Statistical Sampling Approaches to Characterize and Clear Contaminated Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the methodology, formulas, and inputs needed to make characterization and clearance decisions for Bacillus anthracis-contaminated and uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas using a statistical sampling approach. Specifically, the report includes the methods and formulas for calculating the • number of samples required to achieve a specified confidence in characterization and clearance decisions • confidence in making characterization and clearance decisions for a specified number of samples for two common statistically based environmental sampling approaches. In particular, the report addresses an issue raised by the Government Accountability Office by providing methods and formulas to calculate the confidence that a decision area is uncontaminated (or successfully decontaminated) if all samples collected according to a statistical sampling approach have negative results. Key to addressing this topic is the probability that an individual sample result is a false negative, which is commonly referred to as the false negative rate (FNR). The two statistical sampling approaches currently discussed in this report are 1) hotspot sampling to detect small isolated contaminated locations during the characterization phase, and 2) combined judgment and random (CJR) sampling during the clearance phase. Typically if contamination is widely distributed in a decision area, it will be detectable via judgment sampling during the characterization phrase. Hotspot sampling is appropriate for characterization situations where contamination is not widely distributed and may not be detected by judgment sampling. CJR sampling is appropriate during the clearance phase when it is desired to augment judgment samples with statistical (random) samples. The hotspot and CJR statistical sampling approaches are discussed in the report for four situations: 1. qualitative data (detect and non-detect) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 2. qualitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0 3. quantitative data (e.g., contaminant concentrations expressed as CFU/cm2) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 4. quantitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0. For Situation 2, the hotspot sampling approach provides for stating with Z% confidence that a hotspot of specified shape and size with detectable contamination will be found. Also for Situation 2, the CJR approach provides for stating with X% confidence that at least Y% of the decision area does not contain detectable contamination. Forms of these statements for the other three situations are discussed in Section 2.2. Statistical methods that account for FNR > 0 currently only exist for the hotspot sampling approach with qualitative data (or quantitative data converted to qualitative data). This report documents the current status of methods and formulas for the hotspot and CJR sampling approaches. Limitations of these methods are identified. Extensions of the methods that are applicable when FNR = 0 to account for FNR > 0, or to address other limitations, will be documented in future revisions of this report if future funding supports the development of such extensions. For quantitative data, this report also presents statistical methods and formulas for 1. quantifying the uncertainty in measured sample results 2. estimating the true surface concentration corresponding to a surface sample 3. quantifying the uncertainty of the estimate of the true surface concentration. All of the methods and formulas discussed in the report were applied to example situations to illustrate application of the methods and interpretation of the results.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Sego, Landon H.; Amidan, Brett G.

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

volumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies, suggesting that innovation and social learning propensities have evolved together. Species range size did not correlatevolumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing

Reader, Simon

95

Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ?18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ?18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ?18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ?18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ?18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ?18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.

Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

97

Estimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, uncertain systems, microalgae biofuel, neu- tral lipid. 1 Introduction Microalgae are a promising sourceEstimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers stress conditions, microalgae are known to accumulate large amounts of neutral lipids and carbohydrates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

40 Cognitive Science class intervals that are equally spread across the data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 Cognitive Science class intervals that are equally spread across the data range. For example and geographic visualization. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PearsonJPrentice Hall. COGNITIVE SCIENCE Cognitive science. Cognition includes perception, thinking, learning, memory, reasoning and problem solving, and linguistic

Montello, Daniel R.

99

Physiologically realistic modelling of a mechanism for neural representation of intervals of time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-8610, Japan c CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Saitama 332-0012, Japan Abstract A model, Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd., 430 Sakai, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 259-0157, Japan b Department as well as the difference stated above, will lead us to the idea that an interval of time, T

Fukai, Tomoki

100

Application of SAFER-PC program to determine turbine rotor boresonic inspection intervals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) used EPRI`s SAFER-PC Program to evaluate their HP/IP, LP, and generator rotors from Cherokee Station Unit 3, to determine appropriate boresonic re-inspection intervals. The program uses fracture mechanics to calculate critical crack sizes, which could lead to catastrophic failure of the rotors. Conservative stress and fracture mechanics analyses showed negligible fatigue crack growth of assumed bore surface cracks would occur over the proposed inspection interval of eighteen years. The evaluation assumed consistent operational start-up procedures for the inspection interval. If the unit experiences more severe operational procedures, the analysis may not be applicable, with smaller critical crack sizes and accelerated crack growth rates expected. The SAFER-PC analysis resulted in an extension of the previously recommended reinspection interval by eight years. By eliminating just this one inspection, PSCC achieved savings in the range of $100,000. Further savings are anticipated by utilizing the SAFER-PC Program to evaluate these and other PSCC rotors in the future.

Sachse, D.G.; Hellner, R.L.; Dupont, E.J. [Public Service Co., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Towards an interval-valued estimation of the density Bilal Nehme and Olivier Strauss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

belonging to the considered set. I. INTRODUCTION In the last ten years, there has been an increasing-valued pdf. This paper is organized as follows: section II introduces some necessary preliminary concepts. In section III we show how to built our interval-valued estimator based on a particular kernel. Section IV

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 26922700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurocomputing 70 (2007) 2692­2700 Inter-spike-intervals analysis of AER Poisson-like generator Sevilla, Spain Available online 10 May 2007 Abstract Address­Event­Representation (AER) is a communication). In developing AER-based systems it is very convenient to have available some means of generating AER streams

Barranco, Bernabe Linares

103

Original Research Article First Birth Interval, An Indicator of Energetic Status, Is a Predictor of Lifetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a shorter waiting time to the first birth (first birth interval, FBI), are able to afford higher costs was divided into tertiles based on the length of FBI. Results: Women with the shortest FBI had a higher number.06). Women who had ever given birth to twins had shorter FBI than women of singletons (20.1 and 26.1 months

Lummaa, Virpi

104

Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval-parameter-programming-based approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval A sophisticated biodiesel manufacturing study demonstrated methodological efficacy. a r t i c l e i n f o Article Simulation Uncertainty a b s t r a c t Biodiesel, a clean-burning alternative fuel, can be produced using

Huang, Yinlun

105

VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola Department of Physics ra- diation. This article examines at the variability of beam and global solar radiation over short solar radiation values with ground-based data. 1. INTRODUCTION It is difficult to evaluate solar

Oregon, University of

106

Markov Models for Automated ECG Interval Nicholas P. Hughes, Lionel Tarassenko and Stephen J. Roberts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markov Models for Automated ECG Interval Analysis Nicholas P. Hughes, Lionel Tarassenko and Stephen of real ECG features, and we investigate the use of hidden semi­Markov models for improved state duration which may be brought about by the drug. Of particular interest is the electrocardiogram (ECG 1

Hughes, Nick

107

Markov Models for Automated ECG Interval Nicholas P. Hughes, Lionel Tarassenko and Stephen J. Roberts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markov Models for Automated ECG Interval Analysis Nicholas P. Hughes, Lionel Tarassenko and Stephen of real ECG features, and we investigate the use of hidden semi-Markov models for improved state duration which may be brought about by the drug. Of particular interest is the electrocardiogram (ECG1

Roberts, Stephen

108

Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the analysis of a multi-target linear-quadratic control problem on semi-infinite time interval. .... m) gives the optimal value for the original problem (1). ... Theorem 1 Let C be an anti-stable n by n matrix (i.e. real parts of all eigen- values of C ...

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhen Life Gives

110

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers’ confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

Robert Youngblood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Genetic and interval mapping of the bovine X chromosome for quantitative trait loci using microsatellite markers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mapping MATERIALS AND METHODS . 16 16 17 18 19 20 20 22 22 23 25 Animals . Microsatellite markers Polymerase chain reaction Genetic/Linkage map QTL detection Phenotypic data Statistical analysis . 25 28 31 31 32 33 35 RESULTS... AND DISCUSSION 36 Microsatellite scoring . Linkage analysis . QTL analysis . Interval mapping . 36 37 51 52 CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED 65 VITA 85 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page A summary of bovine X-linked traits . 12 Structure and breed composition...

Yeh, Chen-Chen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Differential properties and attracting sets of a simplest skew product of interval maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a skew product of interval maps with a closed set of periodic points, the dependence of the structure of its {omega}-limit sets on its differential properties is investigated. An example of a map in this class is constructed which has the maximal differentiability properties (within a certain subclass) with respect to the variable x, is C{sup 1}-smooth in the y-variable and has one-dimensional {omega}-limit sets. Theorems are proved that give necessary conditions for one-dimensional {omega}-limit sets to exist. One of them is formulated in terms of the divergence of the series consisting of the values of a function of x; this function is the C{sup 0}-norm of the deviation of the restrictions of the fibre maps to some nondegenerate closed interval from the identity on the same interval. Another theorem is formulated in terms of the properties of the partial derivative with respect to x of the fibre maps. A complete description is given of the {omega}-limit sets of certain class of C{sup 1}-smooth skew products satisfying some natural conditions. Bibliography: 33 titles.

Efremova, Lyudmila S [N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Chaotic data analysis of heart R-R interval EKG data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cardiac beat-to-beat interval data is analyzed with a chaotic data analysis toolkit. The embedding dimension of ten data sets from healthy subjects is 7 or at most 8. Ten of the eleven pathological data sets have an embedding dimension of 9 or greater. Statistically, the first local minimum of average mutual information for healthy hearts is larger than the pathological cases. But, there is a large standard deviation for this metric that blurs the distinction between the healthy and pathological data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Frison, T.W. [Randle, Inc., P.O. Box 1010, Great Falls, Virginia 22066 (United States); Peng, C.K.; Goldberger, A. [Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Katz, R.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Factors affecting the relationship between calving interval of cows and weaning weights of calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that all F values of the additional variables were highly inflated. GESL was then deleted from the variables considered in the stepwise procedures, since DPCN and GESL form a linear combination for CI. These stepwise proce- dures also had similar... AS THE RESPONSE VARIABLE Variable a Abbreviation Interval INA INB INC IND INE INF ING INH IN I INJ INT INU INV INW INX INY 1NZ INAA INAB INAL INAM INAN INAO INAP INAQ INAR INAS INBB INBC INBD INBE INBF INBG Previous conception...

Doren, Philip Erich

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time...

Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quality characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef as affected by postmortem chill, storage temperature and storage interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the deoree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Animal Science QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF VACUUM-PACKAGED BEEF AS AFFECTED BY POSTMORTEM CHILL, STORAGE TEMPERATURE AND STORAGE INTERVAL A Thesis by SAMMY DENZIL BEEBE...

Beebe, Sammy Denzil

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXERCISE OVERLOADING IN THE EQUINE CARDIORESPIRATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSE TO A COMBINED LONG& SLOW, DISTANCE AND INTERVAL TRAINING EXERCISE REGIMEN A Thesis by LEANN FRANCINE DROZD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND INTERVAL TRAINING EXERCISE REGIMEN A Thesis by LEANN FRANCINE DROZD Approved as to style and content by: Gary . P er (Chair of Committee) George T. Jessup (Member) James G. Anderson (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT...

Drozd, Leann Francine

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Fuzzy IntervalValued Inference System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kohout Many­valued logic based interval reasoning plays increasingly important role in fuzzy and other

Kreinovich, Vladik

120

Interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-stochastic mixed-integer programming approach for environmental management under multiple uncertainties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, an interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-chance-constrained mixed-integer linear programming (ISIFCIP) approach is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste-management systems under multiple uncertainties in the City of Regina, Canada. The method improves upon the existing interval-parameter semi-infinite programming (ISIP) and fuzzy-chance-constrained programming (FCCP) by incorporating uncertainties expressed as dual uncertainties of functional intervals and multiple uncertainties of distributions with fuzzy-interval admissible probability of violating constraint within a general optimization framework. The binary-variable solutions represent the decisions of waste-management-facility expansion, and the continuous ones are related to decisions of waste-flow allocation. The interval solutions can help decision-makers to obtain multiple decision alternatives, as well as provide bases for further analyses of tradeoffs between waste-management cost and system-failure risk. In the application to the City of Regina, Canada, two scenarios are considered. In Scenario 1, the City's waste-management practices would be based on the existing policy over the next 25 years. The total diversion rate for the residential waste would be approximately 14%. Scenario 2 is associated with a policy for waste minimization and diversion, where 35% diversion of residential waste should be achieved within 15 years, and 50% diversion over 25 years. In this scenario, not only landfill would be expanded, but also CF and MRF would be expanded. Through the scenario analyses, useful decision support for the City's solid-waste managers and decision-makers has been generated. Three special characteristics of the proposed method make it unique compared with other optimization techniques that deal with uncertainties. Firstly, it is useful for tackling multiple uncertainties expressed as intervals, functional intervals, probability distributions, fuzzy sets, and their combinations; secondly, it has capability in addressing the temporal variations of the functional intervals; thirdly, it can facilitate dynamic analysis for decisions of facility-expansion planning and waste-flow allocation within a multi-facility, multi-period and multi-option context.

Guo, P., E-mail: guoping@iseis.or [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, G.H., E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.c [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

Petty, D.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Spatial Odyssey of the Interval Algebra: 1. Directed Intervals To appear in: Proceedings of the 17th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI'01), Seattle, WA, August 2001.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the underlying line. There are several differences of temporal and spatial intervals which have to be considered to the underlying line. We de- velop an algebra for qualitative spatial representa- tion and reasoning about of influence (such as safety margin, braking dis- tance, or reaction distance) could be represented

Renz, Jochen

124

Biotic dynamics and carbonate microfacies of the conspicuous Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) `Tljsten' interval, south-central Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) `Täljsten' interval, south-central Sweden Mats E. Eriksson a, , Anders Lindskog a , Mikael Calner of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden b School of Earth Sciences, Division Ordovician Kinnekulle Sweden Enclosed in the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) part of the reddish

Calner, Mikael

125

Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intra-set rest intervals (ALT) and traditional resistance (STD) training in hypertrophic resistance training. 22 males (25 +/- 5yrs, 179.71 +/- 5.0cm, 82.1 +/- 10.6kg, 13.6 +/- 4.3% fat, 6...

Oliver, Jonathan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Sol'in 2 ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Ÿ Sol advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher­order finite element methods (hp

Ward, Karen

127

ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

129

ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin

130

ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

131

APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Interval Fuzzy Data Processing: Case When  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an interval [0; 0:3] of possible values of d(A&B). This idea was proposed and used by L. Kohout. ffl Even

Kreinovich, Vladik

132

A study of the sensitivity of topological dynamical systems and the Fourier spectrum of chaotic interval maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lifting some topological properties from a given dynamical system (Y,S) to an- other (X,T). After studying some basic facts about topological dynamical systems, we move to the particular case of interval maps. We know that through the knowl- edge... discussion with some basic concepts of what a dynamical system is and how the dynamic is generated. Definition 2.1. A dynamical system (X,T) consists of a topological compact metric space X and a surjective, continuous map T : X ?X. The first thing we have...

Roque Sol, Marco A.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate Modeling: A Case Study on DDT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present and future concentrations of DDT in the environment are calculated with the global multi-media model CliMoChem. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the importance of uncertainties in substance property data, emission rates, and environmental parameters for model results. Uncertainties in the model results, expressed as 95percent confidence intervals of DDT concentrations in various environmental media, in different geographical locations, and at different points in time are typically between one and two orders of magnitude. An analysis of rank correlations between model inputs and predicted DDT concentrations indicates that emission estimates and degradation rate constants, in particular in the atmosphere, are the most influential model inputs. For DDT levels in the Arctic, temperature dependencies of substance properties are also influential parameters. A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach is used to update uncertain model inputs based on measurements of DDT in the field. The updating procedure suggests a lower value for half-life in air and a reduced range of uncertainty for KOW of DDT. As could be expected, the Bayesian updating yields model results that are closer to observations, and model uncertainties have decreased. The combined sensitivity analysis and Bayesian Monte Carlo approach provide new insight into important processes that govern the global fate and persistence of DDT in the environment.

Schenker, Urs; Scheringer, Martin; Sohn, Michael D.; Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

Faber, V.

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

EFFECTS OF AN ANTIDEPRESSANT DOSE OF KETAMINE ON PREFRONTAL ASPARTATE, GLUTAMINE AND GABA LEVELS IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS: ASSESSING THE POST-INFUSION INTERVAL WITH 1H-MRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS: ASSESSING THE POST-INFUSION INTERVAL WITH 1H-MRS Milan Scheidegger1,2 , Alexander Fuchs1 at investigating the neurometabolic changes in the 3-4 hour post-infusion interval when the antidepressant effect by a continuous infusion of 0.25 mg/kg/h over 40 minutes. Single voxel 1 H MRS data were acquired from a volume

137

Power law burst and inter-burst interval distributions in the solar wind: turbulence or dissipative SOC ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate for the first time the probability density functions (PDFs) P of burst energy e, duration T and inter-burst interval tau for a known turbulent system in nature. Bursts in the earth-sun component of the Poynting flux at 1 AU in the solar wind were measured using the MFI and SWE experiments on the NASA WIND spacecraft. We find P(e) and P(T) to be power laws, consistent with self-organised criticality (SOC). We find also a power law form for P(tau) that distinguishes this turbulent cascade from the exponential P(tau) of ideal SOC, but not from some other SOC-like sandpile models. We discuss the implications for the relation between SOC and turbulence.

M. P. Freeman; N. W. Watkins; D. J. Riley

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Validity of First-Order Approximations to Describe Parameter Uncertainty in Soil Hydrologic Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jasper A. Vrugt* and Willem Bouten ABSTRACT system under study. Confidence intervals on the cali- brated

Vrugt, Jasper A.

140

HIV-related sexual behaviors, drugs, and violence among high risk populations in Baja California, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude Odds Ratio Confidence Interval Sociodemographic characteristics Born in the United States Born in Mexico

Volkmann, Tyson Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the perforations which optimizes the critical oil production rate (xopt). Correlation for Two Phase Problem For. the two phase problem, the dimensionless critical oil production rate is correlated as a funct. ion of the dimensionless effective drainage radius...WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...

Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An evaluation of the B&W Owners Group BAW-10182 topical report: Justification for increasing the engineered safety features actuation system on-line test intervals. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Evaluation Report provides an evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B&WOG) Technical Specifications Committee Topical Report BAW-10182, entitled, ``Justification for Increasing Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) On-Line Test Intervals.`` This evaluation was performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The BAW-10182 report presents justification for the extension of on-line test intervals from the existing one-month interval to a three-month interval for the ESFAS system. In the BAW-10182 report, the B&WOG stated that ``{hor_ellipsis}the B&WOG proposes to increase the ESFAS test interval from one to three months and concludes that the effect on plant risk is insignificant.`` The proposed extension was based upon risk-based [i.e., probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)] methods such as reliability block diagrams, uncertainty analyses, and time-dependent system availability analyses. This use of PRA methods requires a detailed evaluation to determine whether the chosen methods and their application are valid in the context of the proposed test interval extension. The results of the evaluation agreed that the effect on plant risk is small if the ESFAS test interval is extended to three months for the ESFAS designs that were evaluated.

Smith, C.L.; Hansen, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy audit has been carried out at Hollings Campus ­ Manchester Metropolitan University. This report: UKE1520 MMU Hollings Energy Audit/SE/Rel 1 Date: December 2008 NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House.3 Brief Description of the Site 6 1.4 Acknowledgement 7 2.0 ENERGY AUDIT 8 2.1 Site Configuration 8 2

145

NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.murphy@nifes.co.uk Ref: UKE1520 Manchester Metropolitan University Energy Audit/SE/PM/ Rel 1 Date: May 2008 #12;NIFES 1.3 Brief Description of the Site 6 1.4 Acknowledgement 7 2.0 ENERGY AUDIT 8 2.1 Site Configuration MANAGEMENT MATRIX #12;3 NIFES Consulting Group EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An energy audit has been carried out

146

Building Confidence in LLW Performance Assessments - 13386  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance assessment process and incorporated input assumptions for four active and one planned DOE disposal sites were analyzed using a systems approach. The sites selected were the Savannah River E-Area Slit and Engineered Trenches, Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, Idaho Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, and Nevada National Security Site Area 5. Each disposal facility evaluation incorporated three overall system components (1) site characteristics (climate, geology, geochemistry, etc.), (2) waste properties (waste form and package), and (3) engineered barrier designs (cover system, liner system). Site conceptual models were also analyzed to identity the main risk drivers and risk insights controlling performance for each disposal facility. (authors)

Rustick, Joseph H.; Kosson, David S.; Krahn, Steven L.; Clarke, James H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235 (United States)] [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Anniversary Giving High School Students the Confidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RS) · Stream dynamics: velocity, depth, width, character, discharge, etc. · Stream flora, fauna, erosion, etc. · Stewardship/service projects: Hawaiian fishpond restoration, native habitat restoration

Olsen, Stephen L.

148

The CASL vision is to confidently predict  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 . TensileTevatronPortalThe art CASL

149

Election Auditing and Nonparametric Confidence Bounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ballot measure in Marin County, CA, a November 2008 bond measure in Yolo County California, with audits · Random selection · Hypothesis testing framework: the math · The realities · Examples: 2008 Yolo Measure W

Stark, Philip B.

150

EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

152

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfDepartment ofFramework for SCADA SecurityLLC

153

The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were not associated with late toxicity.

Leonard, Kara Lynne, E-mail: karalynne.kerr@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Hiatt, Jessica R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Dipetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Price, Lori Lyn [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

2013, Latin American Public Opinion Project www.AmericasBarometer.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suriname Guatemala Guyana 0 10 20 30 40 50 Trust in Iranian Government 95% Confidence Interval (Design

Bordenstein, Seth

155

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sonic anemometer (Campbell Scien- tific CSAT3). The vertical bar indicates the 95% confidence interval, calculated as described by Young (

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anemometer (Campbell Scien- tific CSAT3). The vertical bar indicates the 95% confidence interval, calculated as described by Young (

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Optimization Online Digest -- June 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Individual confidence intervals for true solutions to stochastic variational ... A polyhedral study of the diameter constrained minimum spanning tree problem

158

A parametric building energy cost optimization tool based on a genetic algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................64 Fig. 13. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals for genetic algorithm solution with population size P = 5.................................................67 Fig. 14. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals... for genetic algorithm solutions with population size P = 10 .............................................68 Fig. 15. Two decision variables case 95% confidence intervals for genetic algorithm solutions with population size P = 20...

Tan, Xiaowei

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Interval to Biochemical Failure Is Prognostic for Metastasis, Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality, and Overall Mortality After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer as a surrogate endpoint for distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality (OM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 575 patients treated with SRT after RP from a single institution. Of those, 250 patients experienced biochemical failure (BF), with the IBF defined as the time from commencement of SRT to BF. The IBF was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models for its association with DM, PCSM, and OM. Results: The median follow-up time was 85 (interquartile range [IQR] 49.8-121.1) months, with a median IBF of 16.8 (IQR, 8.5-37.1) months. With a cutoff time of 18 months, as previously used, 129 (52%) of patients had IBF ?18 months. There were no differences among any clinical or pathologic features between those with IBF ? and those with IBF >18 months. On log–rank analysis, IBF ?18 months was prognostic for increased DM (P<.0001, HR 4.9, 95% CI 3.2-7.4), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.4-7.1), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.1). Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other clinical variables demonstrated that IBF was independently prognostic for DM (P<.001, HR 4.9), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.0), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7). IBF showed minimal change in performance regardless of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use. Conclusion: After SRT, a short IBF can be used for early identification of patients who are most likely to experience progression to DM, PCSM, and OM. IBF ?18 months may be useful in clinical practice or as an endpoint for clinical trials.

Johnson, Skyler, E-mail: Skylerjohn3101@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jackson, William; Li, Darren; Song, Yeohan; Foster, Corey; Foster, Ben; Zhou, Jessica; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Feng, Felix; Hamstra, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Probing Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov dynamics in the dijet cross section at large rapidity intervals in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1800 and 630 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Received 15 December 1999) Inclusive dijet production at large pseudorapidity intervals (Dh) between the two jets has been sug- gested as a regime for observing Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) dynamics. We have mea- sured the dijet cross section... for large Dh in p?p collisions at p s H33527 1800 and 630 GeV using the D0 5723 VOLUME 84, NUMBER 25 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 19JUNE 2000 where E T 1 (E T 2 ) and h 1 (h 2 ) are the transverse energy and pseudorapidity h 1 2h 2 $ transfer during ing...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz co2 day of year 2006 licormotionmodel.m, licormotionmodel.pdf, 15-Jun-2006, 14:16:6 #12;0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 10 4 440 450 460 (24) concatenated (3-minute

Saltzman, Eric

162

1COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE DEVICE prICEBOOk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's changed What's gone ·Samsung Tab 4 10" ·Sony XperiaTM M2 ·BlackBerry® Q10 ·BlackBerry® Q5 ·Motorola G2 ·Nokia Lumia 625 ·Sony XperiaTM Z1 Compact ·Sony XperiaTM Z2 ·Samsung Tab 3 8" ·HTC One ·Sony XperiaTM M ·Sony XperiaTM Z1 ·Samsung Galaxy Fame EE Kestrel Sony XperiaTM M2 WHat'S HOt FOr May · 4GEE enabled

Burton, Geoffrey R.

163

Confidence-Driven Image Co-matting Linbo Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the task of estimating accurate foreground opacity from a given image, is a severely ill stack than applying state-of-the-art single image matting techniques individually on each image fore- ground opacity from natural images. Specifically, given an input image I, it estimates

Wang, Jue

164

Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are known as monitoring and control respectively. The relationship between accurate monitoring and improved control and performance has been borne out in multiple research studies. Unfortunately, people's metacognitive judgments are far from perfect; for low...

Miller, Tyler

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Detailed search Dutch ministers quietly confident about achieving Presidency priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of European cooperation in the field of research infrastructures, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and European technology platforms, explained the ministers. Speaking about the European Research Council, Ms

166

Informatively optimal levels of confidence for mesurement uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 13, 2011 ... netvision.net.il) ... "Informatively optimal combining, expanding, and establishing traceability in evaluating measurement uncertainties".

David Kisets

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

EU 'confident' of star power site By Jo Twist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 2007 to 2013. Fusion powers stars and is seen as a cleaner approach to energy production than, and holds the record for fusion energy production. Based at Culham in Oxfordshire, it is a collaboration

168

Confidence regions for maximum response and associated design optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BECAUSE I GF IRREGULAR (TIES IN THE DATA ) GO TG 1 6 STOP END SUBROUTINE iVEWT (ApB&C yD&E pXp I pN) 060 010 C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C 1 2 10 15 20 25 26 30 h I S 4 U. '. Clfr, =!~SICNAL ARRAY CF COEFFICIENTS. 8 I 5 TIJ...65?60 R 1=R5 GO TO 53 I=I+1 X( I)=85 GO TO 15 RETURN ENO SUBROUTINE SUBRTl (NgM?NM&Ct 8 ~ XKy Al) 380 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 THIS SUBRCUTINE SETS UP...

Hartmann, Norbert Alfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Confidence Sets for Network Structure Edoardo M. Airoldi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Received 2 November 2010; revised 4 June 2011; accepted 26 July 2011 DOI:10.1002/sam.10136 Published online, and school year as covariates. We employ a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm to fit a logistic regression model that includes these explanatory variables as well as a latent stochastic blockmodel

Needleman, Daniel

170

Simultaneous Parametric Confidence Bands for Cumulative Distributions from Censored Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), a function that is used to assess nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. Keywords: Bootstrap, likelihood example is the need to quantify nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. NDE methods are used

171

Confidence Boosting: Improving the Introspectiveness of a Boosted Classifier for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rudolph Triebel Hugo Grimmett Ingmar Posner Mobile Robotics Group, Dep. of Engineering Science, Univ ciency in terms of memory requirements, computation time and energy consumption as well as plasticity presented in [1]. Our modification specifically applies to the standard Ad- aBoost [2] algorithm. However

Cremers, Daniel

172

Characterization of Strategies for Obtaining Confident Identifications in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir Atmospheric Impacts. |

173

Watchdog: Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surveillance, human health monitoring, and obstacle detection in autonomous vehicles impose stringent detection accuracy during runtime while significantly reducing energy consumption. Through evaluation capability to runtime observations to save energy. Therefore, we are motivated to propose Watchdog

Zhou, Gang

174

Determining Confidence When Integrating Contributions from Multiple Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the typical assumption of independence among contribu- tions and the effect that unaccounted-for dependencies

Corkill, Daniel

175

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1ofRadiative Heating infor the8Identifications

176

A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSL ShellA Standard forAccurate Mass

177

Sandia National Laboratories: increase investor confidence in novel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the viability offuel

178

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommittee onGAS Act |Yuccaandon the Passing

179

Informatively optimal levels of confidence for measurement uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relate to the quality of measurement result and its informational sufficiency. Then principles and ..... conforming with nearly average of permissible redundancy, in terms of generally accepted rule of providing ..... Quality Assurance. Vol.

David

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Neural circuitry for recognizing interspike interval sequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week ending 14American Physical Society PRL 96, 148104 (2006) (a) PHYSICAL1 at t 0 and t 1 t 0 T 0 are PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL

Abarbanel, HDI; Talathi, Sachin S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Extremal properties of interval control systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the systems in Adr. Proof: The system shown in Fig. 5 is stable if and only if f, 0 det(I ? itI ) 0 fs (4. 1) is stable V f; stable and [] f; [ & 1 for i = [1, 2], 1 0 fzm? fzmzz det( ) 0 1 fzznzz fr mrs is stable, 30 (1 ? frmrr)(1 ? frmss) ? f..., fsmrrmsr is stable. Substitute for m, q = ~d', Vi, j C 2 and expand: d? 6(s) = (dlrdll ? flnl 1812)(dsld22 ? frn22d21) ? fr frnslnlsdlrd22 is stable. We apply the multilinear box theorem [2) recursively on 6(s) to obtain: where i, j, m, p, n, q, vi u...

Kamal, Faris Ragheb

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Interval Analysis for Unknown Dependencies and Genetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Power Systems Engineering Research Center Cornell University 428 Phillips Hall Ithaca, New York 14853 given to MidAmerican Energy for its support of this project. Thanks are also given to our industry advisors: · O. Dale Stevens, II, MidAmerican Energy Co. · John Thomas Chatelain, MidAmerican Energy Co. #12

183

Interval Analysis and Reliability in Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be highly reliable (i.e. for a robot used in surgical applications). The sources of uncertainties will restrict ourself in this paper to industrial robot. These type of robots have a base that is attached the mechanism motion). There are two main classes of industrial robots mechani- cal architecture: serial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

Pathogen-Host Associations and Predicted Range Shifts of Human Monkeypox in Response to Climate Change in Central Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security.Agriculture (http://ccafs-climate.org/ Ac- cessed September 2010) [44]. As the confidence intervals around climate change

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Childhood Obesity Among Children of Mexican Descent: A Binational Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and crude odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for weight status, CHAMACOS (Salinas, CA) and Proyecto Mariposa (Guanajuato, Jalisco, and Michoacan, Mexico)

Rosas, Lisa G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Relative Risks Analysis in Nutritional Epidemiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confidence intervals, something that can occur in Fieller's interval. Furthermore, we study the real Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) data set from the NIH-AARP Study of Diet and Health, consider a weighted logistic regression model in which...

Wang, Yanqing

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Uncertainty analysis of the Measured Performance Rating (MPR) method. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report was commissioned by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate the uncertainties in the energy monitoring method known as measured performance rating (MPR). The work is intended to help further development of the MPR system by quantitatively analyzing the uncertainties in estimates of the heat loss coefficients and heating system efficiencies. The analysis indicates that the MPR should detect as little as a 7 percent change in the heat loss coefficients and heating system efficiencies. The analysis indicate that the MPR should be able to detect as little as a 7 percent change in the heat loss coefficient at 95 percent confidence level. MPR appears sufficiently robust for characterizing common weatherization treatments; e.g., increasing attic insulation from R-7 to R-19 in a typical single-story, 1,100 sq. ft. house resulting in a 19 percent reduction in heat loss coefficient. Furnace efficiency uncertainties ranged up to three times those of the heat loss coefficients. Measurement uncertainties (at the 95 percent confidence level) were estimated to be from 1 to 5 percent for heat loss coefficients and 1.5 percent for a typical furnace efficiency. The analysis also shows a limitation in applying MPR to houses with heating ducts in slabs on grade and to those with very large thermal mass. Most of the uncertainties encountered in the study were due more to the methods of estimating the ``true`` heat loss coefficients, furnace efficiency, and furnace fuel consumption (by collecting fuel bills and simulating two actual houses) than to the MPR approach. These uncertainties in the true parameter values become evidence for arguments in favor of the need of empirical measures of heat loss coefficient and furnace efficiency, like the MPR method, rather than arguments against.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coherent structures and aeolian saltation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

map designate regions that are significant at the 5% level (95% confidence interval)................................................ 59 5-12 Results from the continuous wavelet transform using the Morlet wavelet base (top) of the demeaned... map designate regions that are significant at the 5% level (95% confidence interval) ..................................................................... 60 5-13 Wavelet map using the Mexican hat (top) and Morlet (bottom) wavelet bases...

Ellis, Jean Taylor

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

The measurement of attenuation from vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aligned on peak. VSPl . . . . . 38 Figure 15. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals computed form downhole data. VSP1 . . . . . 40 Figure 16. Amplitude ratios computed from downhole data. VSP1 41 Figure 17. Synthetic AGC section. VSP1 42... Figure 18. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals computed from synthetic data. VSP1 . . . . 44 Figure 19 Amplitude ratios computed from: (S) synthetic and (F) downhole data. VSP1 45 Figure 20. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence...

Davis, Francis Erwin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Estimating the Burden of Neurocysticercosis in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region (p< 0.05). The mean total number of DALYs lost due to NCC in Mexico was estimated to be 99,866 (95 percent CR: 43,187 –189,182), with a mean of 0.95 (95 percent CR: 0.4–1.8) DALYs lost per thousand persons per year....

Bhattarai, Rachana

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

192

Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/min (Bredel peristaltic pumps, model 505S; Watson-Marlow, Falmouth, Cornwall, UK) with Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution (in mM: NaCl 119, NaHCO3 25, KCl 4, KH2PO4 1.2, MgCl2 1, CaCl2 1.8, glucose Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: J. A. Fraser... . The anesthetized mice were placed on a heating pad with continuous monitoring of body temperature for three-lead ECG measurements in lead II for over 10 min using subcutaneous needle electrodes and a PowerLab 26T system (ADInstru- ments, Oxfordshire, UK...

Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Fraser, James A.

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Making Adaptive an Interval Constraint Propagation Algorithm Exploiting Monotonicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domains such as robotics design [10], dynamic systems in robust control or robot localization [8], robust([v]) := v - v denotes the size, or diameter, of [v]. A box [V ] = ([v1], ..., [vn]) represents the Cartesian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Variation in human gait intervals on a treadmill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce a map with uniform distribution. A fractal return map has a non-homogeneous distribution. There are regions with high concentrations of data points and regions containing no data points (even with large sample sizes). The data collection..., and four behavior is indicated by clusters of one, two, or four points. The return maps produced from the chaotically dripping faucet have a definite fractal structure. A random signal would not produce a map with a fractal structure, but would tend...

Abrams, Mark Alan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Interval-Valued Fuzzy Control in Space Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kohout. Before we proceed to explain how to use them in fuzzy control, let us first explain why we need

Kreinovich, Vladik

197

Integrity Zone Computation using Interval Analysis Vincent Drevelle, Philippe Bonnifait,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

department. His current research interests are in In- telligent Vehicles and Advanced Driving Assistance to a decision linked to safety. The snapshot GNSS localization problem consists in inverting a non-linear pseudo-range observation function, with often redundant measurements. This is generally solved as a non-linear Least

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG

199

An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquids consumption by region,Purchases211Alabama -Residential

200

The {ital COBE} Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background. I. Limits and Detections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer ({ital COBE}) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 {mu}m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 64 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level) and at 240 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 28 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 {mu}m data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 {mu}m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 {mu}m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of {nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} = 25 {plus_minus} 7 and 14 {plus_minus} 3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1} at 140 and 240 {mu}m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 {mu}m, 10.3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust production since the decoupling of the cosmic microwave background from matter. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

Hauser, M.G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Arendt, R.G. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reach, W.T. [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pei, Y.C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lubin, P. [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Smoot, G.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weiss, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilkinson, D.T. [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wright, E.L. [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)] [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

Shadfan, Adam

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of dietary factors associated with spontaneous pancreatitis in dogs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dogs through a telephone questionnaire conducted from November 2006 through January 2007. Descriptive statistics were calculated, tabular analyses performed, and logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI...

Lem, Kristina Yvonne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effects of Exogenously Applied Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) to Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

micronaire, fiber length, length uniformity, fiber strength and elongation. Statistical analysis was done using SAS 9.2 with a mixed model and means were separated with Fisher LSD at a 95% confidence interval. Results and Discussion There were...

Clement, Jenny D.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case control study using life grid interviews.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study....

Edwards, R; Pless-Mulloli, T; Howel, D; Chadwick, TJ; Bhopal, Raj; Harrison, R N; Gribbin, H

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE CONFIDENCE IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEAR TRANSIENTS BY A BAGGED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this respect, a large number of diagnostic methods have been proposed in the past decade for application to NPP identification, which has been proposed by the authors in a previous work [11]. Bagging [12] is used to construct

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

Process for estimating likelihood and confidence in post detonation nuclear forensics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) must provide answers to questions of concern to the broader community, including an estimate of uncertainty. There is significant uncertainty associated with post-detonation TNF. The uncertainty consists of a great deal of epistemic (state of knowledge) as well as aleatory (random) uncertainty, and many of the variables of interest are linguistic (words) and not numeric. We provide a process by which TNF experts can structure their process for answering questions and provide an estimate of uncertainty. The process uses belief and plausibility, fuzzy sets, and approximate reasoning.

Darby, John L.; Craft, Charles M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million research programme. Peter Rosen, head of the high energy and nuclear physics office a Ministry of Science -- something the cross-party group of MPs does not agree with. But Peter Cotgreave, director of Save British Science, said elevating the position of the science minister would be "a decent

McDonald, Kirk

208

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cheap talk and credibility: The consequences of confidence and accuracy on advisor credibility and persuasiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con?ict in judge-advisor decision making. Organizationaland expertise in a judge- advisor system. Organizational= .71, p = .40. Unlike the advisor credibility rating, there

Sah, Sunita; Moore, Don A; MacCoun, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Defining a Technical Basis for Confidence in PV Investments - A Pathway to Service Life Prediction (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four levels of accelerated test standards for PV modules are described in the context of how the community can most quickly begin using these.

Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Jordan, D.; Miller, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Selecting high-confidence predictions from ordinary differential equation models of biological networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many cellular processes are governed by large and highly-complex networks of chemical interactions and are therefore difficult to intuit. Computational modeling provides a means of encapsulating information about these ...

Bever, Caitlin Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SAFETY MARGINS CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION FOR A PASSIVE RESIDUAL HEAT REMOVAL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are traditionally performed for the verification of the safety performance of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) under, Italy enrico.zio@polimi.it 2 INET, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology Tsinghua University, Beijing,100084, China ABSTRACT For licensing purposes, safety cases of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) must

Boyer, Edmond

214

Challenging government: institutional arrangements, policy shocks, and no-confidence motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

makes governments more likely to be targeted by other states in international conflicts. In the conclusion I summarize the key findings, present the broad implications for the study of parliamentary decision making, and discuss avenues for future...

Williams, Laron Kenneth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Skin tone of targets, lineup type, and confidence levels in cross-racial identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current experiment investigated facial recognition memory for own and other-race faces. Two variations (light-skin and dark-skin) were presented for the Black targets. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the effect of skin variations...

Williamson, Jessica Lynne

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Learning-based Approach to Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption. Watchdog can use different machine learning techniques to learn the sensing Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869 KEALLY, College of William and Mary GANG ZHOU, College of William and Mary GUOLIANG XING, Michigan State

Zhou, Gang

217

HISTOGRAM OF CONFIDENCES FOR PERSON DETECTION Lee Middleton, James R. Snowdon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this work. Typical industrial environments are harsh for image processing. They suffer from rapid lighting This paper focuses on the problem of person detection in harsh industrial environments. Different image work we adapt a previously trained classifier to improve its performance in the industrial environment

218

Key challenges to model-based design : distinguishing model confidence from model validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-based design is becoming more prevalent in industry due to increasing complexities in technology while schedules shorten and budgets tighten. Model-based design is a means to substantiate good design under these ...

Flanagan, Genevieve (Genevieve Elise Cregar)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Resampling confidence regions and test procedures for second degree stochastic efficiency with respect to a function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

�s utility function. By maximizing expected utility, an agent seeks to balance expected returns with the inherent risk in each investment alternative. This can be accomplished by ranking prospects based on the certainty equivalent associated with each...

Schumann, Keith Daniel

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Model-Based Methodology for Building Confidence in a Dynamic Measuring System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the special case in which a newly developed dynamic measurement system must be characterized when an accepted standard qualification procedure does not yet exist. In order to characterize this type of system, both physical...

Reese, Isaac Mark

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Increasing Confidence of LC-MS Identifications by Utilizing Ion Mobility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270

223

Method for Confidence Metric in Optic Disk Location in Retinal Images -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergy StorageAdvancedMetamaterialsInnovationEnergy Innovation

224

Development of Decision Support Software to Estimate the Cost of Transporting and Ginning of Seed Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distance to modules (D). ................................... 37 Table 11. Results of ANOVA showing that average distance and %U did not result in a statistically significant change in variable costs per mile at a 95% confidence interval for a module... in variable costs per mile at a 95% confidence interval for a semi-tractor trailer. .......................................... 46 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION, LITERATURE REVIEW, AND OBJECTIVES Texas has experienced a reduction in the total...

Grier, Jordan Lee

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Simulation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the WRF Model at the Southern Great Plains Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for his assistance early on with getting me starting using the WRF model and helping me fix and debug problems with the model as they arose. At BNL, I would like to thank Dr. Yangang Liu and Dr. Wuyin Lin for their help pertaining to my questions... with 95% confidence intervals for cloud, rain, and ice water .................................... 76 19 Average vertical velocity in cloudy regions over the entire time period for Case A with 95% confidence intervals for the strongest updraft...

Vogel, Jonathan 1988-

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

FURTHER INVESTIGATION OF THE TIME DELAY, MAGNIFICATION RATIOS, AND VARIABILITY IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with independent measurements carried out at the same epoch (Biggs et al. 1999), lending confidence in a confidence intervals that are somewhat larger than those of Biggs et al., probably because we adopt a more in relation to the lens mass model of Biggs et al., our best­fit time delay implies a Hubble constant of H o

Hewitt, Jacqueline H.

227

Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Curious Source of Extended X-ray Emission in the Outskirts of Globular Cluster GLIMPSE-C01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of an unusual source of extended X-ray emission CXOU J184846.3-013040 (`The Stem') located on the outskirts of the globular cluster GLIMPSE-C01. No point-like source falls within the extended emission which has an X-ray luminosity L_X =10^{32} ergs/s and a physical size of 0.1 pc at the inferred distance to the cluster. These X-ray properties are consistent with the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of an unseen pulsar located within the 95-percent confidence error contour of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 0FGL J1848.6-0138. However, we cannot exclude an alternative interpretation that postulates X-ray emission associated with a bow shock produced from the interaction of the globular cluster and interstellar gas in the Galactic plane. Analysis of the X-ray data reveals that `The Stem' is most significant in the 2-5 keV band, which suggests that the emission may be dominated by non-thermal bremsstrahlung from suprathermal electrons at the bow shock. If the bow shock interpretation is correc...

Mirabal, N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effects of aggregate gradation and angularity on VMA and rutting resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 85 percent of hot mix asphalt (HMA) by volume and 95 percent of HMA by weight consists of mineral aggregate. The Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) research effort concentrated on properties and testing of asphalt binders...

Park, Dae-Wook

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Figure 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Low Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig6.jpg (41132...

231

Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig7.jpg (43335 bytes) Source...

232

Environments Journal of Arid Environments 69 (2007) 633657  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Bioturbation; Ecohydrology; Hydraulic conductivity; Mojave Desert ARTICLE IN PRESS www hydraulic properties. Separate measurements were made in shrub undercanopy and intercanopy microsites horizons in intercanopy soils in which saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) decreased 95 percent from

Ahmad, Sajjad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Economic implications of natural gas vehicle technology in U.S. private automobile transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation represents almost 28 percent of the United States' energy demand. Approximately 95 percent of U.S. transportation utilizes petroleum, the majority of which is imported. With significant domestic conventional ...

Kragha, Oghenerume Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

235

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Uniform Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings and Increasing Electric Utility Confidence in Reported Savings Now Available  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published protocols for estimating energy savings for residential and commercial energy efficiency programs and measures through the recently released “The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures.”

237

Driving confidence and in-vehicle telematics : a study of technology adoption patterns of the 50+ driving population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-vehicle telematics is a term that encompasses a wide range of technologies, which aid the driving function through features assisting in safety and service tasks. These technologies are designed to give the operator and ...

Hutchinson, Thomas E. (Thomas Ely), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Unifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Key Lab. of High Confidence Software Tech.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of modeling. The architecture combines agent-oriented models of software systems in which service providers of service-oriented architectures is the dynamic service composition through discovering and invokingUnifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Zhi Jin Key Lab. of High

Zhu, Hong

239

Feeling of Another's Knowing: Does Speaker-Specific Information Have an Effect on Judgements of Confidence and Correctness?   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous research has established that feeling of another’s knowing (FOAK) can be judged from the paralinguistic cues present in speakers’ utterances (Brennan & Williams, 1995). The current study investigates whether this ...

Forrest, Claire L

2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Self-motivated readers and confident writers : how literacy in ASL can help develop written English literacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cookie do you eat? Can you help me? How are you? you canExplain that this will help them become better readers, bythe illustrations? Do they help you to better understand the

Wudel, Madelyn Celeste

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A survey of education and confidence level among graduating anesthesia residents with regard to selected peripheral nerve blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proficiency in interscalene anesthesia-how many blocks areJE: A survey of exposure to regional anesthesia techniquesin American anesthesia residency training programs. Reg

Moon, Tiffany; Lim, Eunjung; Kinjo, Sakura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste Confidence Update Imboden.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of the Yucca MountainSourceUsers Training Meeting

243

The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the questionnaire within 7 days and received two email reminders and a phone call between days 7 and 14 if they did not respond. The baseline questionnaire has been designed to take approximately 15 minutes to complete and includes the following: 1. Compulsory... haematology analyser (Sysmex UK Limited, Milton Keynes, UK) to generate an extended profile of blood cell indices. Full blood count results of all participants were reviewed by the Haematology Review Group to identify clinically significant results...

Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impact of a modified data capture period on Liu comorbidity index scores in Medicare enrollees initiating chronic dialysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation coefficient was es- timated, along with 95% confidence intervals. To further evaluate the Modified Liu Index 1–90 as an estimate of the original Liu Index, we conducted a one-sample t-test of the score difference to test for bias (indicated... of subjects whose differences were zero, within one, two, three, four, and five were estimated along with their corresponding 95% Wald confidence intervals. A histogram of the scorescores ± standard deviation for the original index and the modified index were...

Rigler, Sally K.; Wetmore, James B.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Dong, Lei; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Shireman, Theresa I.

2013-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to semiparametric GARCH-in-Mean models. ” University ofWe estimate the following GARCH(1,1) model y ct = µ c + ?Method CCRM CRM TS MTS GARCH-N (99%) GARCH-N (99.5%) GARCH-

Lin, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

An analysis of the relationship of heart sound time intervals to respiratory sinus arrhythmia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be close to the clinically significant left ventricular ejection time (LVET). These results were obtained in a laboratory setting. Recording heart sounds at the trachea was not easy. The heart sound signal was not very stable. In order for a useful... VALVE R - LEFT VENTRICLE Figure 1. Crossectional view of the heart showing the four chambers and the four valves. l20 X IOO E E 80 oI 60 In 40 Aornc volve opens PROTODIASTOLE EJECTION~ COIJTRACTION~ I, r Aortic valve closes r ISOMETRIC...

Schorsch, Eric Todd

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Multiple Interval Mapping for Gene Expression QTL and Zhao-Bang Zeng,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis on the 5182 eQTL we declared from the yeast data. The mapping results are available at http

Zeng, Zhao-Bang

249

The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the use of CCTV systems has been diversified. The cameras, today, not only provide views, but also perceive objects, and, therefore, some traffic cameras can monitor the speed and detect speeding cars (Norris and Armstrong 1998). Besides, some more...

Choi, Ji Won

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

STATISTICA INFERENZIALE SHEDA N. 2 INTERVALLI DI CONFIDENZA PER IL VALORE ATTESO E LA FREQUENZA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dati campionari. In questa scheda costruiremo un intervallo nel quale ci aspettiamo stia il parametro

Rogantin, Maria Piera

252

Random Interval Generator v.3.x Russell T. Hurlburt, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If the device is left unattended, it enters a battery- saving "chirp" mode. Dimensions (inches): 4.15 X .85 X 2.40. Weight including batteries: 4.5 oz. The end and side views shown below are actual size. Controls outside Switch Bank Report Mode below.) 2. On/Off/Volume thumbwheel: Volume of both the onboard and earphone

Ahmad, Sajjad

253

New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11] [12FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-I fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

Aickelin, Uwe

254

New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-1 fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

Granada, Universidad de

255

Approximations for Aligned Coloring and Spillage Minimization in Interval and Chordal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Douglas Carroll1 , Adam Meyerson2 , and Brian Tagiku2 1 Raytheon Company. E-mail: decarroll@raytheon.com 2

Meyerson, Adam W.

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic interval training Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the proper operation and maintenance of on-site wastewater treatment systems... , rainwater harvesting, and bacterial sources in water. Provided a homeowner training...

257

Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurs when a natural gas provider wants to build a most profitable transportation system to send natural 100190, China Abstract. Given a graph G = (V, E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex gas from a station to some customers on scattered locations, where each link (segment of pipleline

Bermond, Jean-Claude

260

Case Studies in Using Interval Data Energy Models for Savings Verification: Lessons from the Grocery Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsible for driving energy use at the five stores. However, it?s recognized that poor regressions, defined by low R2 and high CV(RMSE), may still produce ?accurate? savings or at least savings that are good enough for some situations. Since many... to evaluate accuracy throughout this research. SAVINGS ANALYSIS This section outlines the process for determining the regression model specifications. Included is an analysis of possible driving variables and data resolution as well as an evaluation...

Effinger, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con- centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc- tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

Kreinovich, Vladik

262

Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con­ centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc­ tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

Kreinovich, Vladik

263

Congruences involving product of intervals and sets with small multiplicative doubling modulo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Theorem 1 is based on ideas and results of Bourgain, Konya- gin and Shparlinski [2]. Nevertheless

Cilleruelo, Javier

264

Optimizing control flow in loops using interval and dependence analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?

Ghodrat, Mohammad Ali; Givargis, Tony; Nicolau, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Miller, D. (2000). Econometric Foundations. CambridgeRegression Models,” Econometric Reviews. Vol. 8, pp. 217-De- pendent Bootstrap,” Econometric Reviews. Vol. 23, pp.

Lin, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Interval-Based Model-Predictive Control for Uncertain Dynamic Systems with Actuator Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for the control of the thermal behavior of high-temperature fuel cell stacks. This application scenario uncertainty due to limited measurement facilities in the interior of the fuel cell stack can be expressed performance by the minimization of suitable cost functions in real time. These criteria typically take

Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

267

Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

training. B~AW i ht. T hl 4 h th tth h dy lght rth h did t change as a result of either training regimen, While in the conventional treatment, the horses consumed 2% of their mean body weight per day which resulted in a mean digestible energy intake...

Haney, Elizabeth anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Common variants at ten loci influence QT interval duration in the QTGEN Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hofman4,16, Susan R Heckbert9,12,17, Christopher J O'Donnell3,18,19, Andre´ G Uitterlinden4,8,16, Bruce M Psaty9,10,12,17,20, Thomas Lumley5,23, Martin G Larson3,7,23 & Bruno H Ch Stricker4,8,15,16,21,23 QT

de Bakker, Paul

269

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? • A data acquisition system. • Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? • Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

Herrin, D. G.

270

Timing analysis of logic=level digital circuits using uncertainty intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfiability problem and is a known NP complex problem. Despite this several procedures have been developed and applied to the path sensitization problem. Many of these solutions come f'rom automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) research 17 which has...-algorithm, but a systematic enumeration of the search space required for false paths is still computationally expensive. The ATPG technique of FAN [17] has also been applied to the path sensitization problem. This technique is an improvement over both the D...

Bell, Joshua Asher

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute anaerobic interval Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Donovan, Deborah - Department of Biology, Western Washington University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Generating Methane Gas From Manure...

272

Finding limiting flows of batch extractive distillation with interval Erika R. Fritsa,b*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Hungary, e-mail: ufo@mail.bme.hu b HAS ­ BUTE Research Group of Technical Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest, P

Csendes, Tibor

273

Reliable Computing 1 (2) (1995), pp. 109-140 Parallel interval-basedreasoning in medical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based system Clinaid LADISLAVJ. KOHOUT, ISABEL STABILE,HASAN KALANTARt MARIA F. SAN-ANDRES, and JOHN ANDERSON Record Unit. 4. Co-ordination and Planning Unit. (~) U J. Kohout, I. Stabile, H Kalantar,M. F San

Kearfott, R. Baker

274

Oa Horizon 0-15 cm 30-60 cm Depth Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a large spike of carbon-14 in 1999 (Trumbore et al. 2002). This labeling event (Figure 1) allows a unique. the short-, medium-, and long-term sequestration of C in roots and other forms of soil C 4

275

An analysis of beef cattle weights and gains measured at varying intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be computed with the effect of fill removed. The type of ration being fed has a decided influence on fill as illustrated by Neyer et al. (1965). Their results indicated that reticulo-rumen fill was inversely correlated with energy intake. Their high energy...

Fox, James David

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerrSpring:7)An Assessment

277

Somatotopic distortion of tactile temporal interval estimation Shinobu Kuroki1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that sluggish neural signal, caused by transient luminance noise [2], impaired the accuracy of timing judgment events are crucial for human sensory and motor system, we focused whether this modification mechanism.1 Apparatus To avoid the negative effect of finger skin vibration, we used an

Tachi, Susumu

278

Statistical Genetic Interval-Valued Type-2 Fuzzy System and its Application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years, the type-2 fuzzy sets theory has been used to model and minimize the effects of uncertainties in rule-base fuzzy logic system. In… (more)

Qiu, Yu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

screened intervals (415421 m and 689695 m; Figure 2) in the observations wells will be useful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies.We thank Bayshore Concrete and Ray Otten of the Sustainable Technology Park for access Chesapeake Bay Crater,522 pp.,Springer-Verlag, New York. Rieke,H.H.,and G.V.Chilingarian (1974),Compaction.Edwards,and Jean M. Self-Trail,USGS,Reston,Va.; and Roger H.Morin, USGS,Lakewood,Colo. For additional information

Sprintall, Janet

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic interval training Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources which provide more detailed infor- mation on anaerobic digesters are listed. Biogas... Technology Biomethane (biogas) is an alternative and renewable energy source...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SEP Request for Approval Form 1 - Modeling of Data at Finer Intervals than  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 Roadmap forDKT. NO. 14-98-LNG3365 |LLCVenture

282

File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSanEnergy0).pdfLongValleyInformationSkystreamTip Speed

283

Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

285

Inhibition of invasive breast cancer cell growth by selected peach and plum phenolic antioxidants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Fr I and Fr II (from BY00P6653) on cell number of MDA-MB-435 estrogen receptor-negative (A), and MCF-7 estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell line (B). Data are means of three replicates. The error bars correspond to 95% confidence interval...

Vizzotto, Marcia

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Machine Learning ! ! ! ! ! Srihari Parameter Estimation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Bayesian Approach ­Thumbtack vs Coin Toss · Uniform Prior vs Beta Prior ­Multinomial · Dirichlet Prior 2 · Statistical estimation theory deals with Confidence Intervals ­E.g., in election polls 61 + 2 percent plan

287

BOOK REVIEWS 143 attention to covariate-conditioned average and quantile effects, along with as-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confidence intervals and testing hypotheses. Their method is applied to a study of the impact of crude oil prices on gasoline prices. Hendry developed the general-to-specific (GETS) procedure for model se, for example, asset prices, whose marginal distributions display strong nonnormal features such as skewness and

Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

288

A Bootstrap Approach to Computing Uncertainty in Inferred Oil and Gas Reserve Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops confidence intervals for estimates of inferred oil and gas reserves based on bootstrap procedures. Inferred reserves are expected additions to proved reserves in previously discovered conventional oil and gas fields. Estimates of inferred reserves accounted for 65% of the total oil and 34% of the total gas assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of oil and gas in US onshore and State offshore areas. When the same computational methods used in the 1995 Assessment are applied to more recent data, the 80-year (from 1997 through 2076) inferred reserve estimates for pre-1997 discoveries located in the lower 48 onshore and state offshore areas amounted to a total of 39.7 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 293 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas. The 90% confidence interval about the oil estimate derived from the bootstrap approach is 22.4 BBO to 69.5 BBO. The comparable 90% confidence interval for the inferred gas reserve estimate is 217 TCF to 413 TCF. The 90% confidence interval describes the uncertainty that should be attached to the estimates. It also provides a basis for developing scenarios to explore the implications for energy policy analysis.

Attanasi, Emil D. [US Geological Survey MS 956 (United States)], E-mail: attanasi@usgs.gov; Coburn, Timothy C. [Abilene Christian University, Department of Management Science (United States)

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Optimal Deployment of Direction-finding Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this dissertation have been or will be published in refereed journals, which will hold the associated copyrights. vi NOMENCLATURE AOI Area of Interest CI Confidence Interval CVaR Conditional VaR DF Direction Finder FL Forward Line GIS Geographic... .................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Background .................................................................................................. 1 1.2. Related objectives ......................................................................................... 3 1.3...

Kim, Suhwan

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Research Article Environmetrics Received: 15 August 2013, Revised: 14 November 2013, Accepted: 2 January 2014, Published online in Wiley Online Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the gamma distribution to environmental data. In industrial exposure assessment, the sample sizes are often. INTRODUCTION Gamma distributions are widely used for the analysis of meteorological data, pollution data-parameter gamma distribution to fit annual maximum flood series data in order to construct confidence intervals

Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

291

ONE-WAY ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE: GPA BY SEAT LOCATION EXAMPLE There are 384 students in the dataset. Y = GPA and there is one categorical variable, "Seat" which is a response to the question "Where do you  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.001391 ** Residuals 381 113.778 0.29863 #12;Here is how you get the Tukey simultaneous confidence intervals (default in means being positive, making them easier to read and understand. > TukeyHSD(Model, ordered = T) Tukey mean GPAs for those two groups do not differ significantly. The plot to the left is created using: plot(Tukey

Utts, Jessica

292

An ecological study of lymphatic cancer mortality in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

income were analyzed. In the logistic regression model, after controlling for pesticide and income, the odds ratio for QTRI (the top quartile of pesticide releases versus the lower 3 quartiles) if 4.30. The confidence interval ranges from 1.33 to 13...

Noel, Lawrence Brooks

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Prevalence of autism in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessed using a meta-regression model. Results There were 25 studies eligible for review, 18 of which were suitable for inclusion in a meta-analysis. Pooled prevalence of childhood autism was 11.8 per 10,000 individuals (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.2...

Sun, Xiang; Allison, Carrie; Matthews, Fiona E; Sharp, Stephen J; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Brayne, Carol

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

10.18 a. 90% (See Table 10.1) b. 95% (or 95.44%)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the sample that prefers sitting in the middle. (There are 239 students in the data set, but one student gave school in California are truly representative of that population on the question of where they'd like population of interest and is not a sample from a larger group. A confidence interval is unnecessary because

Hunter, David

295

Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher David S. Tuch Jonathan J; confidence interval; fiber orientation; fractional anisotropy Running head. The wild bootstrap in DTI 1 #12. In contrast to the regular bootstrap, the wild bootstrap method can be applied to such protocols in which

Whitcher, Brandon

296

June 2010 Visual Sample Plan Version 6.03.1 3.0 Sampling Plan Development Within VSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a confidence interval on a mean and places them on the map. Locate Hot Spots Use systematic grid sampling a predetermined threshold and places them on the map. This is called a one-sample problem. Compare Average mean or median and places them on the map. This is typically used when a reference area has been

297

Robust Decision Making using a Risk-Averse Utility Set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 17, 2012 ... Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences .... Monotonicity and boundedness are usually assumed to be basic properties of utility functions ..... approach is to treat personal choices as i.i.d. samples and a confidence interval is thus built to be ... In contrast, we present a linear program-.

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Johns Hopkins University Fun Facts " The public is sensitive to little things, and they wouldn't have full confidence in a college that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at a now-demolished rink on North Avenue in Baltimore, Johns Hopkins played Yale in the first intercollegiate ice hockey game, which ended in a 2-2 tie. In 1916, the Faculty of Philosophy (now known

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

299

A Comparison of Education, Business, and Engineering Undergraduate Students’ Internet Use and their Experience, Confidence, and Competence in Using New Literacies of the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and engineering majors .............................................................................. 24 3.2 Number and percent of education students? majors ................................... 25 3.3 Number and percent of business students? majors... ............................................................. 33 4.1 Number and percent of underclassmen?s high school-related Internet use: Overall frequency of Internet use .............................................................. 35 4.2 Number and percent of underclassmen...

Kim, Su Yeon

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Countless resources exist to connect businesses and corporations with talent. When you partner with Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), you gain the confidence that comes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity. The Galvin Center is bringing together researchers, industry, government, and innovators to "plug and the environment. Robert W. Galvin Center for Electricity Innovation · The mission of the Galvin Center is to pursue groundbreaking work in the generation, transmission, distribution, management, and consumption

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Home Site Map Make Your Home Page Suggestions Enquiry JD(S) should have honoured agreement with BJP in Karanataka: JD(U) Yediyurappa confident of BJP returning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Envionmental Impact Assessment Environmental Policy & Audit www.bradley-enviro.co.uk Childsafe Protecting your Envionmental Impact Assessment Environmental Policy & Audit www.bradley-enviro.co.uk Mothercare Online Store the impact on mothers in developed nations, they claim that their findings may still be very relevant

Lummaa, Virpi

302

The Effect of Nursing Faculty Presence on Students' Level of Anxiety, Self-Confidence, and Clinical Performance During a Clinical Simulation Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nursing schools design their clinical simulation labs based upon faculty's perception of the optimal environment to meet the students' learning needs, other programs' success with integrating high-tech clinical simulation, ...

Horsley, Trisha Leann

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Statement of position of the United States Department of Energy in the matter of proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste (waste confidence rulemaking)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this proceeding is to assess generically the degree of assurance that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, to determine when such disposal or off-site storage will be available, and to determine whether wastes can be safely stored on-site past license expiration until off-site disposal/storage is available. (DLC)

None

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

The use of temperature data from poorly sited stations can lead to a false sense of confidence in the robustness of multidecadal surface air temperature trend assessments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; BLISS AND DOESKEN--Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; CAI PIELKE SR., JOHN NIELSEN-GAMMON, CHRISTOPHER DAVEY, JIM ANGEL, ODIE BLISS, NOLAN DOESKEN, MING CAI University, Fort Collins, Colorado; HUBBARD AND LIN--School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska

Pielke, Roger A.

305

The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing -looking back on 40 years of excellence; looking forward with a confident vision and strategic direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the direct provision and satellite derived products to facilitate emergency response. Recent examples include again to the position of the national DFO Director of Oceanography and Climate Science research programs commanded six HMC Ships for various periods at sea, Port Security Unit Four and HMCS CARLETON, Canada

306

Kiran Chandra Sapkota Livelihood strategies and vulnerability of urban poor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of drinking water. 97.7 percent HHs have got the electricity and entertainment facilities, electric charge, etc. This study has tried to show five capital assets of urban poor in Khadi Pakha in local social institution but not represented in local government. Above 95 percent HHs involved

Richner, Heinz

307

241-AZ Farm Annulus Extent of Condition Baseline Inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of the comprehensive annulus visual inspection for tanks 241- AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 performed in fiscal year 2013. The inspection established a baseline covering about 95 percent of the annulus floor for comparison with future inspections. Any changes in the condition are also included in this document.

Engeman, Jason K.; Girardot, Crystal L.; Vazquez, Brandon J.

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Decision Making under Interval Uncertainty: What Can and What Cannot Be Computed in Linear Time and in Real Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the expected utility, then we should generate the list of all these best alternatives. In other words, we need consequence, we assign a numerical values called its utility, and we select the alternative for which the expected value of the utility is the largest. An important advantage of this approach is that it can

Kreinovich, Vladik

309

Percentile Norms and Accompanying Interval Estimates from an Australian General Adult Population Sample for Self-Report Mood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Adelaide, South Australia, 3 School of Psychology, University of NSW, and 4 University of Kurdistan Hawler

Crawford, John R.

310

Reliable Prediction of Phase Stability Using an Interval Newton Method James Z. Huaa, Joan F. Brenneckeb and Mark A. Stadtherra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mathematics, for the solution of the phase stability problem for the Margules equation and the NRTL equation

Stadtherr, Mark A.

311

A comparison of the regular interval, varying start technique of work sampling with the completely random technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. D. HE Denholm whereby the "p oharts" of statistical ouality control are used to maintain sta- tistical control. 1. Brisleyp C. L. y "How You Can Put Work Sampling to Work, " FactorI Management and Maintenance, Vol. 110, No. 7, July N l~d, pp. H... 2 tt tttt2, 9 l. 76, N . 2, P trtprp, 1954, pp. ~331-33 1 the th h, 1954, te e r ~re t r ~Nehe e t ehd Maintenance, Mr. John M. Alderidgs presented and demon- strated. ths use of two nomographs for the calculations involved ln work sampling...

Poage, Scott Tabor

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of Alfaprostol, Lasalocid and Once Daily Suckling on postpartum interval in Brahman and Brahman crossbred cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 7 +3. 8 vs 87. 4+ 3. 9) and positively influenced the cumulative frequency of return to estrus (CFE; P& . 04) in cows and heifers. Alfaprostol did not affect PPI in cows or heifers but did increase (P& . 02) CFE by 90 days postpartum in heifers.... Lasalocid did not affect PPI or CFE in cows or heifers. First service conception and overall pregnancy rates did not differ between treatments. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like to extend his gratitude and utmost respect to Dr. R. D. Randel who...

Del Vecchio, Ronald Paul

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Abstract--EEG inter-burst interval (IBI) and its evolution is a robust parameter for grading hypoxic encephalopathy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[2, 3]. The degree of hypoxic brain injury and recovery is mainly determined by the severity and duration of insults [4]. However, secondary injury also develops over a time-period of several hours of the newborn. For this purpose, recovery of the IBI is again the most frequently used parameter. In [9

314

Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting NEW IMPROVED SYSTEM FOR WWVB BROADCAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by use of a binary coded decimal (BCD) format, allowing the reception of a time-of-day code. However The WWVB broadcast of the time-code signal has undergone no major changes in its communications protocol

315

APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Functional Programming and Interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increases. Nowadays, software already controls nuclear plants, weapons, etc. Human lives, and even to guarantee reliability is to test a pro­ gram for all possible cases. Usually, there are many possible inputs, so testing all of them is always dif­ ficult, and most of the time practically impossible. If we test

Kreinovich, Vladik

316

Analysis of Cardiac Micro-Acceleration Signals for the Estimation of Systolic and Diastolic Time Intervals in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

error and coefficient stability. Models for mitral valve closing, aor- tic valve closing and opening, fitted between CMA features and echo timings, were eval- uated with their correlation coefficient, model instants showed satisfactory results, whereas the estimation of the opening instant of the mitral valve

Boyer, Edmond

317

Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Aspects of the life history of the southern Kingfish, Menticirrhus americanus, in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used to predict initial and final sizes for growth increments are those in Figure 4 and Table 3. Equation and Interval of Collection Dates Predicted Initial and Pinal Total Len th Nean 99$ Confidence Interval on Observations Tl. me... one or two spawned groups normally predominated at any one time and no more than three cooccurred wi. th few possible exceptions. Observed mean sizes were 138 mm TL at 6 mo, and 192 and 272 mm at age I and II. Typical maximum size was 296-308 mn...

Harding, Stephen Michael

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Solar Census - Perfecting the Art of Automated, Remote Solar Shading Assessments (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To validate the work completed by Solar Census as part of the Department of Energy SunShot Incubator 8 award, NREL validated the performanec of the Solar Census Surveyor tool against the industry standard Solmetric SunEye measurements for 4 residential sites in California who experienced light to heavy shading. Using the a two one-sided test (TOST) of statistical equivalence, NREL found that the mean differences between the Solar Census and SunEye mean solar access values for Annual, Summer, and Winter readings fall within the 95% confidence intervals and the confidence intervals themselves fall within the tolerances of +/- 5 SAVs, the Solar Census calculations are statistically equivalent to the SunEye measurements.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A meta-analytic study of the Profile of Mood States in sport and exercise research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

teammates or competitors, (2) elite athletes versus non-athletes, and (3) average athletes versus non-athletes. The results revealed mean effect sizes for each comparison category on the six mood scales which generally support the concept... States Sport and Exercise Research Meta-analysis METHOD Identification of Studies Comparison Groups Variables Coded Effect Size Calculation RESULTS 12 14 14 18 Stem-leaf Plots of Effect Sizes Mean Effect Size Confidence Intervals Comparison...

Vaughan, Kristen Lea

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A comparison of D statistic approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the traditional D statistic with a ratio estimator (R) of the true material discrepancy in the verification of nuclear material accounts. The purpose of the paper is to discuss whether there is any practical advantage in using R in place of D. The paper discusses D and R in terms of bias, standard deviation and its` estimation, reliability of confidence intervals and information requirements for implementation.

Franklin, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy. The integrated carbon sequestration in 1994 was 2.1 t C ha-l y-l with a 90% confidence interval due to sampling an overall uncertainty on the annual carbon sequestration in 1994 of --0.3to +0.8 t C ha-l y-l. Keywords

Rose, Michael R.

323

A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Versatile P(acman) BAC Libraries for Transgenesis Studies in Drosophila melanogaster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We constructed Drosophila melanogaster BAC libraries with 21-kb and 83-kb inserts in the P(acman) system. Clones representing 12-fold coverage and encompassing more than 95percent of annotated genes were mapped onto the reference genome. These clones can be integrated into predetermined attP sites in the genome using Phi C31 integrase to rescue mutations. They can be modified through recombineering, for example to incorporate protein tags and assess expression patterns.

Venken, Koen J.T.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Schulze, Karen L.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Spokony, Rebecca; Wan, Kenneth H.; Koriabine, Maxim; de Jong, Pieter J.; White, Kevin P.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hoskins, Roger A.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

S. Africa: ESKOM's Massive investment hits new snag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ESKOM, the government-owned company that generates nearly 95 percent of the power in South Africa, has been facing serious capacity shortages for some time, forcing it to resort to mandatory rationing of major industrial users and occasional outages. A combination of rapid economic growth and chronic underinvestment in infrastructure resulted in the disappearance of a once plentiful capacity surplus. Considerable rate increases and emphasis on conservation are planned.

NONE

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To better understand the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINO background, ten plastic scintillator detectors were installed at the CUORICINO siteand operated during the final 3 months of the experiment. From these measurements, an upper limit of 0.0021 counts/(keV.kg.yr) (95percent c.l.) was obtained on the cosmicray induced background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region of interest. The measurements were also compared to Geant4 simulations.

Andreotti, E.; Arnaboldi, C.; Avignone III, F. T.; Balata, M.; Bandac, I.; Barucci, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Bloxham, T.; Brofferio, C.; Bryant, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Carrettoni, M.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Domizio, S. Di; Dolinski, M. J.; Ejzak, L.; Faccini, R.; Farach, H. A.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Guardincerri, E.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Kraft, S.; Kogler, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Maiano, C.; Maruyama, R. H.; Martinez, C.; Martinez, M.; Mizouni, L.; Morganti, S.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; Orio, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Risegari, L.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Salvioni, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Schaeffer, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Tomei, C.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Differences in Mexican-American and Anglo-American Women's Response to a Modified Clothing TAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise conclusions in the statistical sense, could be drawn. For the Mexican-American women studied, there was a direct relationship between cloth- ing awareness and social status scores (P. = 75-90 per- ' cent), occupational rating (no statistical....5 percent). Area of ma jnr socialization did not affect Mexican-American ~z-omen'( cognizance of clothing. Anglo-Americans were more likely to have Iliqher clothing awareness scores (P. = 95 percent) than werr the Mexico-born women. Although...

Bathke, Carol Sander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Constructivist-Based Asynchronous Tutorial to Improve Transfer between Math and Chemistry Domains: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of the Impact of ReMATCH on General Chemistry Course Performance and Confidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The two-year implementation of ReMATCH, a web-based math and problem-solving tutorial, in a traditionally arranged general chemistry classroom at the University of Kansas examined the impact of a designed intervention to assist students...

Barker, M. Danielle

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(La Luna Formation) main source rock in the basin (Bertagne et al., n.d.). During the Santonian to Maestrichtian time, the sedimentation took place in an open marine (oxic) condition represented by the thick shales of the Colon Formation which consists..., in the southwest of the basin, non-marine shale, sandstone, and coal of the Orocue Formation were deposited. Among its three members, the Catatumbo, Barco, and Los Cuervos Members, the lower Catatumbo and the upper Barco contain coal that is a secondary source rock...

Arzuman, Sadun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effects of application intervals and levels of N, P, and K on cold hardiness relationships in Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.) and St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

direct relationship between N-K and N-P. As tissue N levels increased, the P and K levels increased also, Tifgreen bermudagrass grown under different nutrient levels, con- trolled conditions, and artificially frozen in a growth chamber showed...-inch round plastic containers, surrounded with sand, and moved to the greenhouse where the temperature was maintained at approximately 75-80 F. Immediately after transplanting, one plug from each block was artificially frozen in a Sherer growth...

Reeves, Sim Adair

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Subsurface Geology of Arsenic-Bearing Permian Sedimentary Rocks in the Garber-Wellington Interval of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer, Cleveland County, Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Central Oklahoma Aquifer is an important source of drinking water in central Oklahoma. The major formations making up the aquifer, the Garber Sandstone and… (more)

Abbott, Ben Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

David B. Wood

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

ENTOMOLOGY O.B. Kovanci et al. (2005) Phytoparasitica 33(4):334-342 Effects of Application Rate and Interval on the Efficacy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENTOMOLOGY O.B. Kovanci et al. (2005) Phytoparasitica 33(4):334-342 Effects of Application Rate sustain themselves in apples alone in NC, Received Nov. 22, 2004; accepted March 12, 2005; http://www.phytoparasitica

334

APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Interval Computations 1 Error Estimate of the Result of Measuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, when we need the signal to go only in one direction and do not want to waste energy on the broad beams of light of every ele­ ment of this matrix; ffl to compute the total energy I of the laser beam by adding­ ameter consists of placing a matrix of pho­ toelements on its way, measuring the energy (power) in each

Kreinovich, Vladik

335

Understanding the Impact of Open-Framework Conglomerates on Water-Oil Displacements: Victor Interval of the Ivishak Reservoir, Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Victor Unit of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is characterized by high net-to-gross fluvial sandstones and conglomerates. The highest permeability is found within sets of cross-strata of open-framework conglomerate (OFC). They are preserved within unit bar deposits and assemblages of unit bar deposits within compound (braid) bar deposits. They are thief zones limiting enhanced oil recovery. We incorporate recent research that has quantified important attributes of their sedimentary architecture within preserved deposits. We use high-resolution models to demonstrate the fundamental aspects of their control on oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. We found that when the pressure gradient is oriented perpendicular to the paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller, than when it is oriented parallel to paleoflow. The pressure differe...

Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Comment on the Word 'Cooling' as it is Used in Beam Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

Sessler, Andrew M.

2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

A soil moisture budget analysis of Texas using basic climatic data while assuming a possible warming trend across the state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the slope (dashed lines) of the regression line of precipitation on mean temperature for the Lower Valley. 35. Isopleths of MTRANGE (in 'F) for Texas during August. 71 36. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control... are significant at the 95% confidence interval. 74 37. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control), I' F, 2'F, 3'F, and 4'F increase in the mean annual temperature of Texas. Mean monthly temperatures increase non...

Bjornson, Brian Matthew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Prairie View A&M University Whole Campus Energy Report Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the April 1990 savings level continues for the duration of the period. Confidence intervals to indicate the uncertainty of the estimates were also calculated. Texas A&M University February 1992 -Update Report DRAFT Prairie View A&M Campus Energy Study p. 22...). A 12-monlh moving average was used for both coincident and non-coincident peak electric demand. Texas A&M University February 1992 -Update Report ::; 'A DRAFT Prairie View A&M Campus Energy Study p. 24 A.4. Campus Square Footage Next, the annual...

Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cross-sectional study of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in market-age swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the prevalence of apramycin-resistant Salmonella infection was greater among swine that received apramycin in the first 21 days post-birth than among those that did not, this difference was not significant (odds ratio (OR)=2, 3, 95'/o confidence interval (CI...): 0. 8 ? 7. 1). Streptomycin-resistant Salmonella infection also was more prevalent among pigs that received apramycin, but this difference was nonsignificant Wer adjusting for somatic serogroup (OR=1. 7, 955o CI: 0. 8 ? 3. 4) and serovar (OR=1. 3...

Farrington, Leigh Anne

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Coverage Study of the CMSSM Based on ATLAS Sensitivity Using Fast Neural Networks Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the coverage properties of confidence and credible intervals on the CMSSM parameter space inferred from a Bayesian posterior and the profile likelihood based on an ATLAS sensitivity study. In order to make those calculations feasible, we introduce a new method based on neural networks to approximate the mappin between CMSSM parameters and weak-scale particle masses. Our method reduces the computational effort needed to sample the CMSSM parameter space by a factor of ~10^4 with respect to conventional techniques. We find that both the Bayesian posterior and the profile likelihood intervals can significantly over-cover and trace back the origin of this effect to physical boundaries in the parameter space and overly-simplified likelihood functions.

Bridges, M; Feroz, F; Hobson, M; de Austri, R Ruiz; Trotta, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nevada Transportatoion Options Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence of rail is restricted to approximately twelve, without upgrading public highways. There is high uncertainty as to what road upgrades and security/escorts the Nevada Department of Transportation would require to obtain an overweight/overdimensional permit. In addition, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has indicated that a larger cask weight than that analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement may be required for naval shipments, resulting in additional costs for heavy-haul transport. These uncertainties result in a high cost and schedule risk. Option 3 assumes that the start of rail construction will be delayed until after construction authorization is received from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Similar to Option 2, Option 3 uses legal-weight truck shipments and limited heavy haul truck shipments to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as Option 1, until rail becomes available. By using heavy-haul truck for two years, Option 3 contains the same uncertainties and resultant high cost and schedule risk as Option 2. The cost and schedule of legal-weight truck transport are not included in this report as that will be evaluated in the report on national transportation.

P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Non-parametric Analysis of the CMB Power Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature power spectra from the BOOMERANG, MAXIMA, and DASI experiments. We non-parametrically estimate the true power spectrum with no model assumptions. This is a significant departure from previous research which used either cosmological models or some other parameterized form (e.g. parabolic fits). Our non-parametric estimate is practically indistinguishable from the best fit cosmological model, thus lending independent support to the underlying physics that governs these models. We also generate a confidence set for the non-parametric fit and extract confidence intervals for the numbers, locations, and heights of peaks and the successive peak-to-peak height ratios. At the 95%, 68%, and 40% confidence levels, we find functions that fit the data with one, two, and three peaks respectively (0 8 sigma level. If we assume that there are three peaks in the data, we find their locations to be within l_1 = (118,300), l_2 = (377,650), and l_3 = (597,900). We find the ratio of the first peak-height to the second (Delta T_1)/(Delta T_2)^2= (1.06, 4.27) and the second to the third (Delta T_2)/(Delta T_3)^2= (0.41, 2.5). All measurements are for 95% confidence. If the standard errors on the temperature measurements were reduced to a third of what they are currently, as we expect to be achieved by the MAP and Planck CMB experiments, we could eliminate two-peak models at the 95% confidence limit. The non-parametric methodology discussed in this paper has many astrophysical applications.

Christopher J. Miller; Robert C. Nichol; Christopher Genovese; Larry Wasserman

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Representative Doses to Members of the Public from Atmospheric Releases of 131I at the Mayak Production Association Facilities from 1948 through 1972  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping epidemiologic studies performed by researchers from the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute revealed an excess prevalence of thyroid nodules and an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among residents of Ozersk, Russia, who were born in the early 1950s. Ozersk is located about 5 km from the facilities where the Mayak Production Association produced nuclear materials for the Russian weapons program. Reactor operations began in June 1948 and chemical separation of plutonium from irradiated fuel began in February 1949. The U.S.–Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research conducted a series of projects over a 10-year period to assess the radiation risks in the Southern Urals. This paper uses data collected under Committee projects to reconstruct individual time-dependent thyroid doses to reference individuals living in Ozersk from 131I released to the atmosphere. Between 3.22×1016 and 4.31×1016 Bq of 131I released may have been released during the 1948–1972 time period, and a best estimate is 3.76×1016 Bq. A child born in 1947 is estimated to have received a cumulative thyroid dose of 2.3 Gy for 1948–1972, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.51–7.3 Gy. Annual doses were the highest in 1949 and a child who was 5 years old in 1949 is estimated to have a received an annual thyroid dose of 0.93 Gy with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19–3.5 Gy.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Robust Determination of the Time Delay in 0957+561A,B and a Measurement of the Global Value of Hubble's Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photometric monitoring of the gravitational lens system 0957+561A,B in the g and r bands with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope during 1996 shows a sharp g band event in the trailing (B) image light curve at the precise time predicted from the observation of an event during 1995 in the leading (A) image with a delay of 415 days. This success confirms the "short delay," and the lack of any feature at a delay near 540 days rejects the "long delay" for this system, resolving a long-standing controversy. A series of statistical analyses of our light curve data yield a best fit delay of 417 +/- 3 days (95% confidence interval). Recent improvements in the modeling of the lens system (consisting of a galaxy and cluster) allow us to derive a value of the global (at z = 0.36) value of Hubble's constant H_0 using Refsdal's method, a simple and direct distance determination based on securely understood physics and geometry. The result is H_0 = 63 +/- 12 km/s/Mpc (for Omega = 1) where this 95% confidence interval is dominated by remaining lens model uncertainties.

Tomislav Kundic; Edwin L. Turner; Wesley N. Colley; J. Richard Gott, III; James E. Rhoads; Yun Wang; Louis E. Bergeron; Karen A. Gloria; Daniel C. Long; Sangeeta Malhotra; Joachim Wambsganss

1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Razo, Luz Maria del [Toxicology Departament, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo [School of Medicine, Durango State Juarez University, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca [Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Incorporating Wind Generation Forecast Uncertainty into Power System Operation, Dispatch, and Unit Commitment Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, an approach to evaluate the uncertainties of the balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration requirements is proposed. The approach includes three steps: forecast data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of grid balancing requirements for a specified time horizon and a given confidence level. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on histogram analysis, incorporating sources of uncertainty of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the "flying-brick" technique is developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation process is used to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals. To demonstrate the validity of the developed uncertainty assessment methods and its impact on grid operation, a framework for integrating the proposed methods with an EMS system is developed. Demonstration through integration with an EMS system illustrates the applicability of the proposed methodology and the developed tool for actual grid operation and paves the road for integration with EMS systems from other vendors.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of pH on the uptake and activity of acifluorfen and 2,4-D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and ammonium chloride (34). Addition of diammonium phosphate and urea-ammonium nitrate fertilizer solution to bentazon (3-(1-methyl- ethyl) ? (1H) -2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazin-4 (3H) -one 2, 2-dioxide) has been shown to increase its uptake and foliar activity... varies with weed species. Common cocklebur degraded 55 percent of the applied acifluorfen compared to 45 percent degradation in common ragweed after seven days. Frear (11) found that 85 to 95 percent of acifluorfen was degraded in 24 h by soybeans...

Simpson, David Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demonstration program for coal-oil mixture combustion in an electric utility boiler - Category III A. 1978 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1978 annual report covers New England Power Service Company's participation in the Department of Energy coal-oil mixture (COM) program. Continued world-wide unrest resulting in an unstable fuel oil supply coupled with rapidly inflating costs have caused continued interest in a demonstrable viable solution. NEPSCO's program, while not attaining all the milestones forecast, has made considerable progress. As of January 31, 1979, ninety-five (95% percent of engineering and design has been completed. Construction of facilities and installation of required equipment was approximately 75% complete and the six-week Feasibility Testing program was expected to commence during April 1979.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dörr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universität Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

Francis, Jasmine H., E-mail: francij1@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Brodie, Scott E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sequence stratigraphy, depositional environments, and regional mapping of the late Devonian interval, upper Three Forks Formation, Sanish Member, and lower Bakken Shale, U.S. portion of the Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cores of the Late Devonian upper Three Forks, Sanish, and lower Bakken units from eight wells were examined and described at the North Dakota core… (more)

Sesack, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over specific intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data Histogram A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over energies. Before you start you should know that: o This set of instructions only assumes a very minimal

357

Broken Isotropy from a Linear Modulation of the Primordial Perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A linear modulation of the primordial perturbations is proposed as an explanation for the observed asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. A cut sky, reduced resolution third year "Internal Linear Combination" (ILC) map was used to estimate the modulation parameters. A foreground template and a modulated plus unmodulated monopole and dipole were projected out of the likelihood. The effective chi squared is reduced by nine for three extra parameters. The mean Galactic colatitude and longitude, of the modulation, with 68%, 95% and 99.7% confidence intervals were 56^{+17 +36 +65}_{-17 -35 -51} and 63^{+28 +59 +105}_{-26 -58 -213}. The mean percentage change of the variance, across the pole's of the modulation, was 62^{+18 +35 +57}_{-18 -35 -47}. Implications of these results and possible generating mechanisms are discussed.

Christopher Gordon

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Classification of heart valve single leg separations from acoustic clinical measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our system classifies the condition (intact or single leg separated) of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of clinical heart valve opening sounds. We use spectral features as inputs to a two-stage classifier, which first classifies individual heart beats, then classifies valves. Performance is measured by probability of detection and probability of false alarm, and by confidence intervals on the probability of correct classification. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced techniques to real heart valve data, and extensions of published algorithms that enhance their applicability. We show that even when given a very small number of training samples, the classifier can achieve a probability of correct classification of 100%.

Clark, G.A.; Bowman, B.C.; Boruta, N.; Thomas, G.H.; Jones, H.E.; Buhl, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Direct measurement of the cosmic acceleration by 21cm absorption systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

So far there is only indirect evidence that the universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances, and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle, and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the {\\it same} objects separate by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a $\\Lambda$CDM universe with $\\sim 6\\sigma$ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing, and cannot be recovered retroactively.

Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Exploiting Active Subspaces to Quantify Uncertainty in the Numerical Simulation of the HyShot II Scramjet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a computational analysis of the reactive flow in a hypersonic scramjet engine with emphasis on effects of uncertainties in the operating conditions. We employ a novel methodology based on active subspaces to characterize the effects of the input uncertainty on the scramjet performance. The active subspace re-parameterizes the operating conditions from seven well characterized physical parameters to a single derived active variable. This dimension reduction enables otherwise intractable---given the cost of the simulation---computational studies to quantify uncertainty; bootstrapping provides confidence intervals on the studies' results. In particular we (i) identify the parameters that contribute the most to the variation in the output quantity of interest, (ii) compute a global upper and lower bound on the quantity of interest, and (iii) classify sets of operating conditions as safe or unsafe corresponding to a threshold on the output quantity of interest. We repeat this analysis for two values of ...

Constantine, Paul; Larsson, Johan; Iaccarino, Gianluca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Tank 241-AX-103, cores 212 and 214 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AX-103 push mode core segments collected between July 30, 1997 and August 11, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AX-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Comer, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), plutonium 239 (Pu239), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Conner, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne transmission of infectious agents and associations of indoor air pollutants with respiratory illnesses are well documented. We hypothesized that energy conservation measures that tighten buildings also increase risks of respiratory infection among building occupants. At four Army training centers during a 47-month period, incidence rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were compared between basic trainees in modern (energy-efficient design and construction) and old barracks. Rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were significantly higher among trainees in modern barracks (adjusted relative risk estimate, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.46 to 1.56), and relative risks were consistent at the four centers. These results support the hypothesis that tight buildings with closed ventilation systems significantly increase risks of respiratory-transmitted infection among congregated, immunologically susceptible occupants.

Brundage, J.F.; Scott, R.M.; Lednar, W.M.; Smith, D.W.; Miller, R.N.

1988-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Statistical factors to qualify the superconducting magnets for the SSC based on warm/cold correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All of the SSC production magnets will be measured at room temperature (warm), but only a fraction of these will be measured at liquid helium temperature (cold). The fractional information will then be analyzed to determine warm acceptance criteria for the field quality of the SSC magnets. Regarding predictors of the field quality based on partial information, there are several observations and studies based on the warm/cold correlation. A different facet of the acceptance test is production control, which interprets the warm/cold correlation to adjust the process parameters. For these applications, we are evaluating statistical techniques relying on asymptotic estimators of the systematic errors and random errors, and their respective confidence intervals. The estimators are useful to qualify the population magnets based on a subset of sample magnets. We present the status of our work, including: (i) a recapitulation of analytic formulas, (ii) a justification based on HERA magnet experience, and (iii) a practical interpretation of these estimators.

Kim, K.; Devred, A.; Coles, M.; Tompkins, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

Tsybychev, Dmitri

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fast computation of the performance evaluation of biometric systems: application to multibiometric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance evaluation of biometric systems is a crucial step when designing and evaluating such systems. The evaluation process uses the Equal Error Rate (EER) metric proposed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/IEC). The EER metric is a powerful metric which allows easily comparing and evaluating biometric systems. However, the computation time of the EER is, most of the time, very intensive. In this paper, we propose a fast method which computes an approximated value of the EER. We illustrate the benefit of the proposed method on two applications: the computing of non parametric confidence intervals and the use of genetic algorithms to compute the parameters of fusion functions. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed EER approximation method in term of computing time, and the interest of its use to reduce the learning of parameters with genetic algorithms. The proposed method opens new perspectives for the development of secure multibiometrics systems by speedi...

Giot, Romain; Rosenberger, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Tank 241-T-112, cores 185 and 186 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-112 push mode core segments collected between February 26, 1997 and March 19, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-112 Push Mode Core Samplings and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding and are not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

LONG TERM AGING AND SURVEILLANCE OF 9975 PACKAGE COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the 9975 package, originally designed only for transportation of radioactive materials, has been broadened to include storage at the Savannah River Site. Two components of this package, namely the containment vessel O-rings and fiberboard overpack, require continued integrity assessment under the storage conditions. The performance of the components over time is being evaluated using accelerated-aging studies. Compression stress relaxation (CSR) and leak testing are being used to measure the performance of O-rings. The performance of the fiberboard is being evaluated using compression strength, thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and other physical properties. Models developed from the data collected provide an initial prediction of service life for the two components, and support the conclusion that normal service conditions will not degrade the performance of the package beyond specified functional requirements for the first assessment interval. Increased confidence in this conclusion is derived from field surveillance data and destructive evaluation of packages removed from storage.

Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

The angular power spectrum of NVSS radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure the angular power spectrum of radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) using two independent methods: direct spherical harmonic analysis and maximum likelihood estimation. The results are consistent and can be understood using models for the spatial matter power spectrum and for the redshift distribution of radio galaxies at mJy flux-density levels. A good fit to the angular power spectrum can only be achieved if radio galaxies possess high bias with respect to mass fluctuations; by marginalizing over the other parameters of the model we derive a 68% confidence interval 1.53 radio galaxies and sigma_8 describes the normalization of the matter power spectrum. Our models indicate that the majority of the signal in the NVSS angular power spectrum is generated at low redshifts. Individual redshifts for the NVSS sources are thus required to alleviate projection effects and probe directly the matter power spectrum on large scales.

Chris Blake; Pedro G. Ferreira; Julian Borrill

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans from Very Large Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global return values of marine wind speed and significant wave height are estimated from very large aggregates of archived ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time. Long lead time ensures that the forecasts represent independent draws from the model climate. Compared with ERA-Interim, a reanalysis, the ensemble yields higher return estimates for both wind speed and significant wave height. Confidence intervals are much tighter due to the large size of the dataset. The period (9 yrs) is short enough to be considered stationary even with climate change. Furthermore, the ensemble is large enough for non-parametric 100-yr return estimates to be made from order statistics. These direct return estimates compare well with extreme value estimates outside areas with tropical cyclones. Like any method employing modeled fields, it is sensitive to tail biases in the numerical model, but we find that the biases are moderate outside areas with tropical cyclones.

Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A E M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT ? sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval ?7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (?12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

Huddart, Robert A., E-mail: robert.huddart@icr.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden NHSFT (National Health Service Foundation Trust) (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); Hussain, Syed A. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jenkins, Peter [Gloucestershire Hospitals NHSFT (United Kingdom); Rawlings, Christine [South Devon Healthcare NHSFT (United Kingdom); Tremlett, Jean [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals (United Kingdom); Crundwell, Malcolm [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Adab, Fawzi A. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Sheehan, Denise [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Syndikus, Isabel [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHSFT (United Kingdom); Hendron, Carey [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); James, Nicholas D. [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Decline in Tested and Self-Reported Cognitive Functioning After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation for Lung Cancer: Pooled Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Trials 0212 and 0214  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on self-reported cognitive functioning (SRCF), a functional scale on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0214 randomized patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer to PCI or observation; RTOG 0212 randomized patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer to high- or standard-dose PCI. In both trials, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)-Recall and -Delayed Recall and SRCF were assessed at baseline (after locoregional therapy but before PCI or observation) and at 6 and 12 months. Patients developing brain relapse before follow-up evaluation were excluded. Decline was defined using the reliable change index method and correlated with receipt of PCI versus observation using logistic regression modeling. Fisher's exact test correlated decline in SRCF with HVLT decline. Results: Of the eligible patients pooled from RTOG 0212 and RTOG 0214, 410 (93%) receiving PCI and 173 (96%) undergoing observation completed baseline HVLT or EORTC QLQ-C30 testing and were included in this analysis. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was associated with a higher risk of decline in SRCF at 6 months (odds ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval 2.34-6.37, P<.0001) and 12 months (odds ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.84-6.44, P<.0001). Decline on HVLT-Recall at 6 and 12 months was also associated with PCI (P=.002 and P=.002, respectively) but was not closely correlated with decline in SRCF at the same time points (P=.05 and P=.86, respectively). Conclusions: In lung cancer patients who do not develop brain relapse, PCI is associated with decline in HVLT-tested and self-reported cognitive functioning. Decline in HVLT and decline in SRCF are not closely correlated, suggesting that they may represent distinct elements of the cognitive spectrum.

Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: vgondi@chicagocancer.org [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States) [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wolfson, Aaron [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sun, Alexander Y. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Clinical Evaluation of Stereotactic Target Localization Using 3-Tesla MRI for Radiosurgery Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Increasing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength can improve image resolution and quality, but concerns remain regarding the influence on geometric fidelity. The objectives of the present study were to spatially investigate the effect of 3-Tesla (3T) MRI on clinical target localization for stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 patients were enrolled in a research ethics board-approved prospective clinical trial. Imaging (1.5T and 3T MRI and computed tomography) was performed after stereotactic frame placement. Stereotactic target localization at 1.5T vs. 3T was retrospectively analyzed in a representative cohort of patients with tumor (n = 4) and functional (n = 5) radiosurgical targets. The spatial congruency of the tumor gross target volumes was determined by the mean discrepancy between the average gross target volume surfaces at 1.5T and 3T. Reproducibility was assessed by the displacement from an averaged surface and volume congruency. Spatial congruency and the reproducibility of functional radiosurgical targets was determined by comparing the mean and standard deviation of the isocenter coordinates. Results: Overall, the mean absolute discrepancy across all patients was 0.67 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.83), significantly <1 mm (p < .010). No differences were found in the overall interuser target volume congruence (mean, 84% for 1.5T vs. 84% for 3T, p > .4), and the gross target volume surface mean displacements were similar within and between users. The overall average isocenter coordinate discrepancy for the functional targets at 1.5T and 3T was 0.33 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.48), with no patient-specific differences between the mean values (p >.2) or standard deviations (p >.1). Conclusion: Our results have provided clinically relevant evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3T MRI for use in stereotactic radiosurgery under the imaging conditions used.

MacFadden, Derek [University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhang Beibei; Brock, Kristy K. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hodaie, Mojgan [Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laperriere, Normand [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tsao, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Stainsby, Jeffrey [Applied Science Laboratories, GE Healthcare, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mikulis, David [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: cynthia.menard@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

none,

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

ON THE ESTIMATION OF RANDOM UNCERTAINTIES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard technique for measurement of random uncertainties of star formation histories (SFHs) is the bootstrap Monte Carlo, in which the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is repeatedly resampled. The variation in SFHs measured from the resampled CMDs is assumed to represent the random uncertainty in the SFH measured from the original data. However, this technique systematically and significantly underestimates the uncertainties for times in which the measured star formation rate is low or zero, leading to overly (and incorrectly) high confidence in that measurement. This study proposes an alternative technique, the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), which samples the probability distribution of the parameters used in the original solution to directly estimate confidence intervals. While the most commonly used MCMC algorithms are incapable of adequately sampling a probability distribution that can involve thousands of highly correlated dimensions, the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is shown to be extremely effective and efficient for this particular task. Several implementation details, such as the handling of implicit priors created by parameterization of the SFH, are discussed in detail.

Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon Company, Tucson, AZ, 85734 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

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381

A Robust Determination of the Time Delay in 0957+561A,B and a Measurement of the Global Value of Hubble's Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photometric monitoring of the gravitational lens system 0957+561A,B in the g and r bands with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope during 1996 shows a sharp g band event in the trailing (B) image light curve at the precise time predicted from the observation of an event during 1995 in the leading (A) image with a delay of 415 days. This success confirms the "short delay," and the lack of any feature at a delay near 540 days rejects the "long delay" for this system, resolving a long-standing controversy. A series of statistical analyses of our light curve data yield a best fit delay of 417 +/- 3 days (95% confidence interval). Recent improvements in the modeling of the lens system (consisting of a galaxy and cluster) allow us to derive a value of the global (at z = 0.36) value of Hubble's constant H_0 using Refsdal's method, a simple and direct distance determination based on securely understood physics and geometry. The result is H_0 = 63 +/- 12 km/s/Mpc (for Omega = 1) where this 95% confidence...

Kundic, T; Colley, W N; Gott, J R; Rhoads, J E; Wang, Y; Bergeron, L E; Gloria, K A; Long, D C; Malhotra, S; Wambsganss, J; Kundic, Tomislav; Turner, Edwin L.; Colley, Wesley N.; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Yun; Bergeron, Louis E.; Gloria, Karen A.; Long, Daniel C.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wambsganss, Joachim

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

The topology and size of the universe from CMB temperature and polarization data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze seven year and nine year WMAP temperature maps for signatures of three finite flat topologies M{sub 0} = T{sup 3}, M{sub 1} = T{sup 2} × R{sup 1}, and M{sub 2} = S{sup 1} × R{sup 2}. We use Monte-Carlo simulations with the Feldman-Cousins method to obtain confidence intervals for the size of the topologies considered. We analyze the V, W, and Q frequency bands along with the ILC map and find no significant difference in the results. The 95.5% confidence level lower bound on the size of the topology is 1.5L{sub 0} for M{sub 0}, 1.4L{sub 0} for M{sub 1}, and 1.1L{sub 0} for M{sub 2}, where L{sub 0} is the radius of the last scattering surface. Our results agree very well with the recently released results from the Planck temperature data. We show that the likelihood function is not Gaussian in the size, and therefore simulations are important for obtaining accurate bounds on the size. We then introduce the formalism for including polarization data in the analysis. The improvement that we find from WMAP polarization maps is small because of the high level of instrumental noise, but our forecast for Planck maps shows a much better improvement on the lower bound for L. For the M{sub 0} topology we expect an improvement on the lower bound of L from 1.7L{sub 0} to 1.9L{sub 0} at 95.5% confidence level. Using both polarization and temperature data is important because it tests the hypothesis that deviations in the TT spectrum at small l originate in the primordial perturbation spectrum.

Aslanyan, Grigor [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S., E-mail: g.aslanyan@auckland.ac.nz, E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu, E-mail: ayadav@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Search for decays of stopped long-lived particles produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search has been performed for long-lived particles that could have come to rest within the CMS detector, using the time intervals between LHC beam crossings. The existence of such particles could be deduced from observation of their decays via energy deposits in the CMS calorimeter appearing at times that are well separated from any proton-proton collisions. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.6 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, and a search interval corresponding to 281 hours of trigger livetime, 10 events are observed, with a background prediction of $13.2^{+3.6}_{-2.5}$ events. Limits are presented at 95% confidence level on gluino and top squark production, for over 13 orders of magnitude in the mean proper lifetime of the stopped particle. Assuming a cloud model of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass $\\lesssim$1000 GeV and a top squark with mass $\\lesssim$525 GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 1 $\\mu$s and 1000 s. These results are the most stringent c...

CMS Collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy)] ['Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Salvage HDR Brachytherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Previous Definitive Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Evaluate efficacy and toxicity of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 52 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDRB between 1998 and 2009 for locally recurrent prostate cancer after previous definitive RT. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, patients received 36 Gy in 6 fractions. Twenty-four patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before salvage, and no patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Determination of biochemical failure after salvage HDRB was based on the Phoenix definition. Overall survival (OS) and bF distributions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4), were documented. Results: Median follow-up after salvage HDRB was 59.6 months. The 5-year OS estimate was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80%-97%) with median survival not yet reached. Five-year biochemical control after salvage was 51% (95% CI: 34%-66%). Median PSA nadir postsalvage was 0.1 (range: 0-7.2) reached at a median of 10.2 months after completing HDRB. As for complications, acute and late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in only 2% and 2%, respectively. No grade 2 or higher acute GI events and 4% grade 2 GI late events were observed. On univariate analysis, disease-free interval after initial definitive RT (P=.07), percent of positive cores at the time of diagnosis (P=.08), interval from first recurrence to salvage HDRB (P=.09), and pre-HDRB prostate-specific antigen (P=.07) were each of borderline significance in predicting biochemical control after salvage HDRB. Conclusions: Prostate HDRB is an effective salvage modality with relatively few long-term toxicities. We provide potential predictors of biochemical control for prostate salvage HDRB.

Chen, Chien Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack; Nash, Marc; Gottschalk, Alexander; Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

Iwasaki, Iwao

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Monthly energy review, March 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Energy production during December 1997 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8 percent increase from the level of production during December 1996. Coal production increased 9.5 percent, natural gas production increased 3.9 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.9 percent from the level of production during December 1996.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus: Effect of Strain A On Corn Inbreds, Single- and Double-Cross Hybrids.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of harvest, according to the following scale: Seed set rating 1. No apparent effect of MDMV - 95 to 100 percent. 2. Slight reduction in seed set - 75 to 95 percent. 3. Severe reduction in seed set - 25 to 75 percent. 4. Very poor seed set - Less than 25....71 kl 57.48 gh 62.59 de 51.08 i j 60.50 fgh 60.73 fgf 56.39 ghi 57.56 gh 42.32 kl 56.95 gh 81.03 b 95.89 a Uni{IOCU 1 ated 42.95 k** 48.54 j** 65.74 ef** 65.61 ef 48.54 j 72 .64 cd** 61.98 fg 59.11 gh 74.40 c** 57.51 gh** 55.70 hi...

Toler, R.W.; Bockholt, A.J.; Alston, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Approaches to sheltered-water oil spills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology has produced more effective and efficient oil removal equipment for on-water cleanup in the past five years. Much of the innovation has been to increase recovery capacity to meet the planning volumes required to government regulations. However, more than 95 percent of the spills are relatively small. Large equipment, often requiring large platforms, is not very useful and is difficult/expensive to operate on small spills. In addition, damage from spills results when oil impacts shorelines. The emphasis on spill response should address the ability of the equipment to remove oil in a nearshore environment. Clean Seas has been attempting to address this need since the Avila Pipeline spill in 1992, in which a 180 barrel spill resulted in about $18 million damage/cleanup cost.

Jacobs, M.A.; Waldron, D.M. [Clean Seas LLC, Carpinteria, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

TRAINING DATA SELECTION BASED ON CONTEXT-DEPENDENT STATE MATCHING Olivier Siohan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothesized transcript, a neces- sary condition for successful training. Selecting high confidence ut

Tomkins, Andrew

394

Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ? 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS?s non-detected result of 1.56 ? 0.59 pCi/L. NFS?s data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC?s request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

none,

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 1 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 22, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses. The comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ? 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty. The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties. Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. A comparison of split sample results, using the DER equation, indicates one set with a DER greater than 3. A DER of 3.1 is calculated for gross alpha results from ORAU sample 5198W0003 and NFS sample MCU-310212003. The ORAU result is 0.98 ± 0.30 pCi/L (value ± 2 sigma) compared to the NFS result of -0.08 ± 0.60 pCi/L. Relatively high DER values are not unexpected for low (e.g., background) analyte concentrations analyzed by separate laboratories, as is the case here. It is noted, however, NFS uncertainties are at least twice the ORAU uncertainties, which contributes to the elevated DER value. Differences in ORAU and NFS minimum detectable activities are even more pronounced. comparison of ORAU and NFS split samples produces reasonably consistent results for low (e.g., background) concentrations.

David A. King, CHP, PMP

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Departments of Radiology and Biostatistics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1077 and Comprehensive Access and Delivery Research and Evaluation (CADRE) Center, Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa 52246-2208 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(?)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(?). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (?1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(?) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(?) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(?) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(?) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(?) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(?) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(?) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(?) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(?) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12 weeks after treatment. Post radiation neck dissection is advisable for all non-CR HPV(?)/non-CR N3 HPV(+) cases, but it may be avoided for selected non-CR N2 HPV(+) cases with a significant LN involution if they can undergo continued imaging surveillance. The role of positron emission tomography for response assessment should be investigated.

Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei; Zhao, Helen [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Duo-duo [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Razak, Albiruni [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery/Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dawson, Laura A.; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, B.C. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Goldstein, David; Gullane, Patrick [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery/Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan [Department of Pathology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Waldron, John, E-mail: John.Waldron@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with metastatic cancer, especially for patients previously treated with WBRT. A KPS of {>=}80 predicts for an improved outcome.

Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated lesions (p > 0.05). Agreement between allocated lesion scores for 2D mammography and those for the tomosynthesis series was poor. Conclusions: The realistic appearance of the 3D models of microcalcification clusters, whether malignant or benign clusters, was confirmed for 2D digital mammography images and the breast tomosynthesis datasets; this database of clusters is suitable for use in future observer performance studies related to the detectability of microcalcification clusters. Such studies include comparing 2D digital mammography to breast tomosynthesis and comparing different reconstruction algorithms.

Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Measurement of the CP violating phase beta_s in B_s->J/psi phi decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} is measured in decays of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. This measurement uses 5.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF Run-II detector. CP violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system is predicted to be very small in the Standard Model. However, several theories beyond the Standard Model allow enhancements to this quantity by heavier, New Physics particles entering second order weak mixing box diagrams. Previous measurements have hinted at a deviation from the Standard Model expectation value for {beta}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} with a significance of approximately 2{sigma}. The measurement described in this thesis uses the highest statistics sample available to date in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decay channel, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. Furthermore, it contains several improvements over previous analyses, such as enhanced signal selection, fully calibrated particle ID and flavour tagging, and the inclusion of an additional decay component in the likelihood function. The added decay component considers S-wave states of KK pairs in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup +}K{sup -} channel. The results are presented as 2-dimensional frequentist confidence regions for {beta}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and {Delta}{Lambda} (the width difference between the B{sub s}{sup 0} mass eigenstates), and as a confidence interval for {beta}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} of [0.02,0.52] {union} [1.08, 1.55] at the 68% confidence level. The measurement of the CP violating phase obtained in this thesis is complemented by the world's most precise measurement of the lifetime {tau}{sub s} = 1.53 {+-} 0.025 (stat.) {+-} 0.012 (syst.) ps and decay width difference {Delta}{Lambda} = 0.075 {+-} 0.035 (stat.) {+-} 0.01 (syst.) ps{sup -1} of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, with the assumption of no CP violation.

Oakes, Louise Beth; /Oxford U.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Robust parameter estimation for compact binaries with ground-based gravitational-wave observations using the LALInference software library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin operation in the coming years, with compact binary coalescence events a likely source for the first detections. The gravitational waveforms emitted directly encode information about the sources, including the masses and spins of the compact objects. Recovering the physical parameters of the sources from the GW observations is a key analysis task. This work describes the LALInference software library for Bayesian parameter estimation of compact binary signals, which builds on several previous methods to provide a well-tested toolkit which has already been used for several studies. We show that our implementation is able to correctly recover the parameters of compact binary signals from simulated data from the advanced GW detectors. We demonstrate this with a detailed comparison on three compact binary systems: a binary neutron star, a neutron star black hole binary and a binary black hole, where we show a cross-comparison of results obtained using three independent sampling algorithms. These systems were analysed with non-spinning, aligned spin and generic spin configurations respectively, showing that consistent results can be obtained even with the full 15-dimensional parameter space of the generic spin configurations. We also demonstrate statistically that the Bayesian credible intervals we recover correspond to frequentist confidence intervals under correct prior assumptions by analysing a set of 100 signals drawn from the prior. We discuss the computational cost of these algorithms, and describe the general and problem-specific sampling techniques we have used to improve the efficiency of sampling the compact binary coalescence parameter space.

John Veitch; Vivien Raymond; Benjamin Farr; Will M. Farr; Philip Graff; Salvatore Vitale; Ben Aylott; Kent Blackburn; Nelson Christensen; Michael Coughlin; Walter Del Pozzo; Farhan Feroz; Jonathan Gair; Carl-Johan Haster; Vicky Kalogera; Tyson Littenberg; Ilya Mandel; Richard O'Shaughnessy; Matthew Pitkin; Carl Rodriguez; Christian Röver; Trevor Sidery; Rory Smith; Marc Van Der Sluys; Alberto Vecchio; Will Vousden; Leslie Wade

2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Idaho Supplementation Studies : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Adult and jack chinook salmon escapement were indexed by redd counts and weir returns. Escapement in 1994 was low and in some cases approached the lowest on record. Although stream flow conditions and parr abundance were conducive to precise parr population estimates, some streams continued to exhibit wide confidence intervals. Different methods used to calculate the estimates yielded inconsistent results with regard to increasing or decreasing the population estimate and improving the precision of the estimates. No single method appeared definitively better for all streams. Emigrant traps captured 78,138 chinook salmon fry, parr, and smolts in 1994. Application of a weekly trap efficiency adjusted for stream flow produced emigration estimates that were up to 30% larger than when a seasonal trap efficiency was used. Detection rates for smolts tagged in some streams were similar to detection rates for parr tagged during the fall of the previous year. This was unexpected because overwinter mortality usually results in a lower detection rate for fall-tagged fish. Low escapement in 1994 severely hampered Idaho Supplementation Studies (ISS) broodstock development. The inability to develop local broodstocks for supplementation is the most important factor threatening the implementation of the ISS.

Nemeth, Doug; Plaster, Kurtis; Apperson, Kimberly A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the proportion of elderly prostate cancer patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,001 men diagnosed in 2004-2007 with localized prostate cancer, aged 66 to 79 years, were included. We characterized the proportion of men who received treatment concordant with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, stratified by risk group and age. Logistic regression was used to examine covariates associated with receipt of guideline-concordant management. Results: Guideline concordance was 79%-89% for patients with low- or intermediate-risk disease. Among high-risk patients, 66.6% of those aged 66-69 years received guideline-concordant management, compared with 51.9% of those aged 75-79 years. Discordance was mainly due to conservative management—no treatment or hormone therapy alone. Among the subgroup of patients aged ?76 years with no measured comorbidity, findings were similar. On multivariable analysis, older age (75-79 vs 66-69 years, odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.57) was associated with a lower likelihood of guideline concordance for high-risk prostate cancer, but comorbidity was not. Conclusions: There is undertreatment of elderly but healthy patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the most aggressive form of this disease.

Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: Ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Carpenter, William R. [Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bainbridge, John [Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wang, Andrew Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nielsen, Matthew E. [Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Urology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); and others

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Impact of Preradiation Residual Disease Volume on Time to Locoregional Failure in Cutaneous Merkel Cell Carcinoma—A TROG Substudy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of margin status and gross residual disease in patients treated with chemoradiation therapy for high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell cancer (MCC). Methods and Materials: Data were pooled from 3 prospective trials in which patients were treated with 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary lesion and draining lymph nodes and 2 schedules of carboplatin based chemotherapy. Time to locoregional failure was analyzed according to the burden of disease at the time of radiation therapy, comparing patients with negative margins, involved margins, or macroscopic disease. Results: Analysis was performed on 88 patients, of whom 9 had microscopically positive resection margins and 26 had macroscopic residual disease. The majority of gross disease was confined to nodal regions. The 5-year time to locoregional failure, time to distant failure, time to progression, and disease-specific survival rates for the whole group were 73%, 69%, 62%, and 66% respectively. The hazard ratio for macroscopic disease at the primary site or the nodes was 1.25 (95% confidence interval 0.57-2.77), P=.58. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences in time to locoregional failure were identified between patients with negative margins and those with microscopic or gross residual disease. These results must, however, be interpreted with caution because of the limited sample size.

Finnigan, Renee [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Hruby, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle (Australia)] [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Rischin, Danny [Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Poulsen, Michael, E-mail: michael_poulsen@health.qld.gov.au [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sashasenthi@msn.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Link, Emma [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)] [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ?0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ''M. Merlin'' dell'Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Search for {ital CP} violation in {ital D}{sup 0} decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 2.7 fb{sup {minus}1} of data taken with the CLEO II detector, we have searched for {ital CP} violation in the charm system. We looked for asymmetries in the number of decays of {ital D}{sup 0}`s and {ital {bar D}}{sup 0}`s to the {ital CP} eigenstates {ital K}{sup +}{ital K}{sup {minus}}, {ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0}{phi}, and {ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. Confidence intervals (90%) on these asymmetries were found to be {minus}0.020{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital K}}{lt}0.180, {minus}0.182{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital S}}{sup 0}{phi}{lt}0.126, and {minus}0.067{lt}{ital A}{sub {ital K}{ital S}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{lt}0.031, respectively.

Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S. [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; (CLEO Collaboration)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Search for the Decay Modes D0 to e+ e-, D0 to mu+ mu-, and D0 to e+/- mu+/-  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present searches for the rare decay modes D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} in continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}. These decays are highly GIM suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the Standard Model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman-Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) within [0.6, 8.1] x 10{sup -7}, and {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -7}.

Lees, J. P.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

Density Prediction of Uranium-6 Niobium Ingots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The densities of uranium-6 niobium (U-Nb) alloys have been compiled from a variety of literature sources such as Y-12 and Rocky Flats datasheets. We also took advantage of the 42 well-pedigreed, homogeneous baseline U-Nb alloys produced under the Enhanced Surveillance Program for density measurements. Even though U-Nb alloys undergo two-phase transitions as the Nb content varies from 0 wt. % to 8 wt %, the theoretical and measured densities vary linearly with Nb content. Therefore, the effect of Nb content on the density was modeled with a linear regression. From this linear regression, a homogeneous ingot of U-6 wt.% Nb would have a density of 17.382 {+-} 0.040 g/cc (95% CI). However, ingots produced at Y-12 are not homogeneous with respect to the Nb content. Therefore, using the 95% confidence intervals, the density of a Y-12 produced ingot would vary from 17.310 {+-} 0.043 g/cc at the center to 17.432 {+-} 0.039 g/cc at the edge. Ingots with larger Nb inhomogeneities will also have larger variances in the density.

D.F.Teter; P.K. Tubesing; D.J.Thoma; E.J.Peterson

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation $?$ rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation $\\gamma$-rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to $3.01 \\times 10^{20}$ protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the $4-30$ MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is $1.55 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ with a 68\\% confidence interval of $(1.22, 2.20) \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of $2.01 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$.

K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; S. W. Bentham; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; I. Bertram; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodríguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; F. Dufour; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini Aguirre; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Gaudin; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; S. J. Ives; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; K. Koseki; Y. Koshio; I. Kreslo; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; S. Kumaratunga; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; K. P. Lee; C. Licciardi; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; M. Macaire; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; J. Marzec; E. L. Mathie; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; S. Mine; A. Missert; M. Miura; L. Monfregola; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nagasaki; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; T. Nakai; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; D. Naples; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; G. F. Pearce; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; F. Retiere; A. Robert; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. Sánchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; R. J. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; T. Szeglowski; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; K. Ueno; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. ?muda

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I{sup 125} or Pd {sup 103} brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I{sup 125} or Pd{sup 103} brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts.

Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostate.com; Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Millar, Jeremy [Department Radiation Oncology, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Orio, Peter F. [Department Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Skoglund, Scott [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cohort and case-control analyses of workers exposed to vinyl chloride: An update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mortality in a cohort of workers at a vinyl chloride polymerization plant has been updated, extending the period of observation in the original study from 1974 to 1986. Workers at this plant may have been exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and/or polyvinyl chloride dust, or may have had no exposure to either substance. Seventy-six percent of the work force worked in jobs with potential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. Among the total cohort, statistically significant excess risks were observed for liver, lung, and brain cancer. For the subcohort of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for liver cancer was 333 (90% confidence interval (CI) 202 to 521). However, there were no significant excesses of either brain (SMR = 145, 90% CI 78 to 249) or lung cancer (SMR = 115, 90% CI 96 to 141). To investigate dose response, nested case-control studies for liver, brain, and lung cancer were conducted among the total cohort (including the nonexposed). For these studies there were two exposure variables, cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer and cumulative dose of polyvinyl chloride dust. Cumulative dose was defined as the product of level and duration of exposure. The only significant association between disease risk and cumulative dose was for liver cancer and cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer. Further division of the liver cancers into angiosarcoma (n = 12) and other liver cancers (n = 7), based on review of death certificates and medical records, showed that the dose response existed only for angiosarcomas.

Wu, W.A.; Steenland, K.; Brown, D.; Wells, V.; Jones, J.; Schulte, P.; Halperin, W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose in this paper an original technique to predict global radiation using a hybrid ARMA/ANN model and data issued from a numerical weather prediction model (ALADIN). We particularly look at the Multi-Layer Perceptron. After optimizing our architecture with ALADIN and endogenous data previously made stationary and using an innovative pre-input layer selection method, we combined it to an ARMA model from a rule based on the analysis of hourly data series. This model has been used to forecast the hourly global radiation for five places in Mediterranean area. Our technique outperforms classical models for all the places. The nRMSE for our hybrid model ANN/ARMA is 14.9% compared to 26.2% for the na\\"ive persistence predictor. Note that in the stand alone ANN case the nRMSE is 18.4%. Finally, in order to discuss the reliability of the forecaster outputs, a complementary study concerning the confidence interval of each prediction is proposed

Voyant, Cyril; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Constraints on exotic dipole-dipole couplings between electrons at the micrometer scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions. For light bosons (mass $\\le$ 0.1 eV) we obtain $90\\%$ confidence intervals on pseudo-scalar and axial-vector mediated interaction strengths of $\\left|g_P^eg_P^e/4\\pi\\hbar c\\right|\\le 1.5\\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\left|g_A^eg_A^e/4\\pi\\hbar c\\right|\\le 1.2\\times 10^{-17}$, respectively. These bounds significantly improve on previous work for this mass range. Assuming CPT invariance, these constraints are compared to those on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. For axial-vector mediated interaction the electron-electron constraints are six orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron constraints. Bounds on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales.

Kotler, Shlomi; Kimball, Derek F Jackson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Uncertainties of isoprene emissions in the MEGAN model estimated for a coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest in Southern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using local observed emission factor, meteorological data, vegetation 5 information and dynamic MODIS LAI, MEGANv2.1 was constrained to predict the isoprene emission from Dinghushan forest in the Pearl River Delta region during a field campaign in November 2008, and the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimates were quantified by the Monte Carlo approach. The results indicate that MEGAN can predict the isoprene emission reasonably during the campaign, and the mean value of isoprene emission is 2.35 mg m-2 h-1 in daytime. There are high uncertainties associated with the MEGAN inputs and calculated parameters, and the relative error can be as high as -89 to 111% for a 95% confidence interval. The emission factor of broadleaf trees and the activity factor accounting for light and temperature dependence are the most important contributors to the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimated for the Dinghushan forest during the campaign. The results also emphasize the importance of accurate observed PAR and temperature to reduce the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimated by model, because the MEGAN model activity factor accounting for light and temperature dependence is highly sensitive to PAR and temperature.

Situ, S.; Wang, Xuemei; Guenther, Alex B.; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Huang, Minjuan; Fan, Qi; Xiong, Zhe

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The orbit and dynamical evolution of the Chelyabinsk object  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The orbit of the Chelyabinsk object is calculated, applying the least-squares method directly to astrometric positions. The dynamical evolution of this object in the past is studied by integrating equations of motion for particles with orbits from the confidence region. It is found that the majority of the Chelyabinsk clones reach the near-Sun state. 67 percent of these objects have collisions with the Sun for 15 Myr in our numerical simulations. The distribution of minimum solar distances shows that the most probable time for the encounters of the Chelyabinsk object with the Sun lies in the interval from -0.8 Myr to -2 Myr. This is consistent with the estimate of a cosmic ray exposure age of 1.2 Myr (Popova et al 2013). A parent body of the Chelyabinsk object should experience strong tidal and thermal effects at this time. The possible association of the Chelyabinsk object with 86039 (1999 NC43) and 2008 DJ is discussed.

Emel'yanenko, Vacheslav V; Jenniskens, Peter; Popova, Olga P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Global Sensitivity Measures from Given Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulation models support managers in the solution of complex problems. International agencies recommend uncertainty and global sensitivity methods as best practice in the audit, validation and application of scientific codes. However, numerical complexity, especially in the presence of a high number of factors, induces analysts to employ less informative but numerically cheaper methods. This work introduces a design for estimating global sensitivity indices from given data (including simulation input–output data), at the minimum computational cost. We address the problem starting with a statistic based on the L1-norm. A formal definition of the estimators is provided and corresponding consistency theorems are proved. The determination of confidence intervals through a bias-reducing bootstrap estimator is investigated. The strategy is applied in the identification of the key drivers of uncertainty for the complex computer code developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) assessing the risk of lunar space missions. We also introduce a symmetry result that enables the estimation of global sensitivity measures to datasets produced outside a conventional input–output functional framework.

Elmar Plischke; Emanuele Borgonovo; Curtis L. Smith

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: CO/sub 2/ miscible flood predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CO/sub 2/ Miscible Flood Predictive Model (CO2PM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the US Department of Energy and was used in the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The CO2PM is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO/sub 2/ injection or water-alternating-gas (WAG) processes. In the CO2PM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed, the results of which are passed to the economic calculations. To estimate multi-pattern project behavior a pattern development schedule is required. After-tax cash flow is computed by combining revenues with costs for drilling, conversion and well workovers, CO/sub 2/ compression and recycle, fixed and variable operating costs, water treating and disposal costs, depreciation, royalties, severance, state, federal and windfall profit taxes, cost and price inflation rates, and the discount rate. A lumped parameter uncertainty model is used to estimate risk, allowing for variation in computed project performance within an 80% confidence interval. The CO2PM is a three-dimensional (layered, five-spot), two-phase (aqueous and oleic), three component (oil, water, and CO/sub 2/) model. It computes oil and CO/sub 2/ breakthrough and recovery from fractional theory modified for the effects of viscous fingering, areal sweep, vertical heterogeneity and gravity segregation. 23 refs., 19 figs., 57 tabs.

Ray, R.M.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NEAR-INFRARED LINEAR POLARIZATION OF ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on near-infrared J- and H-band linear polarimetric photometry of eight ultracool dwarfs (two late-M, five L0-L7.5, and one T2.5) with known evidence for photometric variability due to dust clouds, anomalous red infrared colors, or low-gravity atmospheres. The polarimetric data were acquired with the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope. We also provide mid-infrared photometry in the interval 3.4-24 {mu}m for some targets obtained with Spitzer and WISE, which has allowed us to confirm the peculiar red colors of five sources in the sample. We can impose modest upper limits of 0.9% and 1.8% on the linear polarization degree for seven targets with a confidence of 99%. Only one source, 2MASS J02411151-0326587 (L0), appears to be strongly polarized (P {approx} 3%) in the J band with a significance level of P/{sigma}{sub P} {approx} 10. The likely origin of its linearly polarized light and rather red infrared colors may reside in a surrounding disk with an asymmetric distribution of grains. Given its proximity (66 {+-} 8 pc), this object becomes an excellent target for the direct detection of the disk.

Zapatero Osorio, M. R. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Bejar, V. J. S.; Rebolo, R.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Pena Ramirez, K. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/. Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Goldman, B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Caballero, J. A., E-mail: mosorio@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: vbejar@iac.es, E-mail: rrl@iac.es, E-mail: jaa@iac.es, E-mail: amt@iac.es, E-mail: karla@iac.es, E-mail: goldman@mpia.de, E-mail: caballero@cab.inta-csic.es [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Dark matter annihilation and decay in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The classical and ultrafaint dSphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are prime targets for present and future gamma-ray telescopes hunting for indirect signals of particle dark matter. The interpretation of the data requires careful assessment of their dark matter content in order to derive robust constraints on candidate relic particles. Here, we use an optimised spherical Jeans analysis to reconstruct the `astrophysical factor' for both annihilating and decaying dark matter in 21 known dSphs. Improvements with respect to previous works are: (i) the use of more flexible luminosity and anisotropy profiles to minimise biases, (ii) the use of weak priors tailored on extensive sets of contamination-free mock data to improve the confidence intervals, (iii) systematic cross-checks of binned and unbinned analyses on mock and real data, and (iv) the use of mock data including stellar contamination to test the impact on reconstructed signals. Our analysis provides updated values for the dark matter content of 8 `classical' and 13 `ultrafaint' dSphs, wi...

Bonnivard, V; Daniel, M; Funk, S; Geringer-Sameth, A; Hinton, J A; Maurin, D; Read, J I; Sarkar, S; Walker, M G; Wilkinson, M I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Spontaneous fetal death among multigravid fertile women in relation to sport fish consumption and PCB exposure, New York State Angler Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spontaneous fetal death, a sentinel event for environmental reproductive toxicity, has been observed among various mammalian species following polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure. This exposure-based cohort study assessed the relationship between PCB exposure due to consumption of contaminated Lake Ontario sport fish and spontaneous fetal death. Using 1,820 women from the 1990-1991 New York State Angler Study, fish consumption data were obtained from food frequency questionnaires and reproductive histories from live birth certificates. A reliability study demonstrated an excellent level of agreement between the exact number of spontaneous fetal deaths recorded on the birth certificate compared with telephone interview data (kappa = 0.83). Women who had never eaten Lake Ontario sport fish were unexposed (n = 979) and 841 women reported various levels of exposure. Analyses were stratified by maternal gravidity and controlled for smoking status and maternal age. No significant increases in risk for spontaneous fetal death were seen for any estimate of PCB exposure including lifetime estimate of PCB exposure based on species-specific PCB levels, years of fish consumption, and kilograms of fish consumed, either in the 1990-1991 season or in a lifetime estimate. The only significant finding was a slight risk reduction for women of gravidity three or more with years of fish consumption (odds ratio = 0.97; p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval = 0.94-0.99). These findings suggest that PCB exposure from contaminated sport fish does not increase the risk of spontaneous fetal death.

Mendola, P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Methylene chloride exposure and birthweight in Monroe County, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined the relationship between birthweight and exposure to emissions of methylene chloride (DCM) from manufacturing processes of the Eastman Kodak Company at Kodak Park in Rochester, Monroe County, New York. County census tracts were categorized as exposed to high, moderate, low or no DCM based on the Kodak Air Monitoring Program (KAMP) model, a theoretical dispersion model of DCM developed by Eastman Kodak Company. Birthweight and information on variables known to influence birthweight were obtained from 91,302 birth certificates of white singleton births to Monroe County residents from 1976 to 1987. No significant adverse effects of exposure to DCM on birthweight were found. Adjusted birthweight in high exposure census tracts was 18.7 g less than in areas with no exposure (95% confidence interval for the difference between high and no exposure - 51.6, 14.2 g). Problems inherent in the method of estimation of exposure, which may decrease power or bias the results, are discussed. Better methods to estimate exposure to emissions from multiple industrial point sources are needed.

Bell, B.P.; Franks, P.; Hildreth, N.; Melius, J. (Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Childhood nervous system tumors--an evaluation of the association with paternal occupational exposure to hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paternal occupational exposures to hydrocarbons have been associated with childhood nervous system cancer, but study results have not been consistent. This population-based case-control study was designed to examine this association using a large sample size to increase the precision of risk estimates. The birth certificates of 499 children who died in Texas from intracranial and spinal cord tumors were compared with 998 control certificates randomly selected from all Texas live births. Information on parental job title and industry at the time of birth was obtained from the birth certificates. No significant associations were identified for the dichotomized variable of all hydrocarbon-related occupations combined, as variously defined in previous studies, or for most of the specific jobs affiliated with exposures to hydrocarbons. Significant, relatively stable odds ratios (OR) were found for printers and graphics arts workers (OR = 4.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-14.7) and chemical and petroleum workers with high exposure levels (OR = 3.0; CI = 1.1-8.5). A discussion of the biases involved in this type of study design is presented.

Johnson, C.C.; Annegers, J.F.; Frankowski, R.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Buffler, P.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

ESCH, R.A.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (USA))

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effects of air pollution on children's respiratory health in three Chinese cities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the winter of 1988--1989, parents of 2,789 elementary-school students completed standardized questionnaires. The students were 5--14 y of age and were from three urban districts and one suburban district of three large Chinese cities. The 4-y average ambient levels of total suspended particles in the three cities differed greatly during the period 1985--1988: Lanzhou, 1,067 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; urban Wuhan, 406 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; Guangzhou, 296 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and suburban Wuhan, 191 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The authors constructed unconditional logistic-regression models to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prevalences of several respiratory symptoms and illnesses, adjusted for district, use of coal in the home, and parental smoking status. There was a positive and significant association between total suspended particle levels and the adjusted odds ratios for couch, phlegm, hospitalization for diseases, and pneumonia. This association was derived from only the 1,784 urban children and, therefore, the authors were unable to extrapolate it to the suburban children. The results also indicated that parental smoking status was associated with cough and phlegm, and use of coal in the home was associated only with cough prevalence.

Qian, Z.; Chapman, R.S.; Tian, Q.; Chen, Y.; Lioy, P.J.; Zhang, J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Respiratory symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the respiratory health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among 13,369 white children 8 to 12 years old from 24 communities in the United States and Canada between 1988 and 1991. Each child`s parent or guardian completed a questionnaire. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for a 1-year period. We used a two-stage logistic regression model to analyze the data, adjusting for the period confounding effects of sex, history of allergies, parental asthma, parental education, and current smoking in the home. Children living in the community with the highest levels of particle strong acidity were significantly more likely [odds ratio (OR) = 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.48] to report at least one episode of bronchitis in the past year compared to children living in the least-polluted community. Fine particulate sulfate was also associated with higher reporting of bronchitis (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.12-2.42). No other respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in association with any of the air pollutants of interest. No sensitive subgroups were identified. Reported bronchitis, but neither asthma, wheeze, cough, nor phlegm, were associated with levels of particle strong acidity for these children living in a nonurban environment. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Dockery, D.W. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)]|[Channing Lab., Boston, MA (United States); Cunningham, J.; Damokosh, A.I. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pyrolysis of polycyclic perhydroarenes. 3: 1-n-decylperhydropyrene and structure-reactivity relations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naphthenic (perhydroarene) moieties decorated with n-alkyl substituents exist in heavy hydrocarbon resources such as coal, heavy oils, and asphaltenes. 1-n-Decylperhydropyrene (DPP) was pyrolyzed neat at temperatures between 400 and 475 C. DPP disappearance followed first-order kinetics, and the Arrhenius parameters for the first-order rate constant were A (s{sup {minus}1}) = 10{sup 9.55.0} and E = 42.9 {+-} 16.5 kcal/mol, where the uncertainties are the 95% confidence intervals. DPP pyrolysis generated numerous primary products, and the primary products with the highest initial selectivities were, in order of decreasing abundance, perhydropyrene plus 1-decene, methylene perhydropyrene plus n-nonane, tetradecahydropyrene plus n-decane, and methylperhydropyrene plus nonene. This ordering of product pairs is completely analogous to that observed from pyrolysis of an alkylcyclohexane, but it differed from that observed for the pyrolysis of other polycyclic n-alkylnaphthenes. Eight other n-alkylperhydroarenes were pyrolyzed at temperatures between 400 and 450 C. The resulting kinetics data were used to test three structure-reactivity correlations in the literature for the pyrolysis kinetics of saturated cyclic compounds and to update one of these correlations so that it becomes consistent with the kinetics of long-chain n-alkylperhydroarenes.

Savage, P.E.; Ratz, S.; Diaz, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

Potters, Louis, E-mail: LPotters@nshs.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yu Changhong [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Search for gravitational wave radiation associated with the pulsating tail of the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004 using LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have searched for Gravitational Waves (GWs) associated with the SGR 1806-20 hyperflare of 27 December 2004. This event, originating from a Galactic neutron star, displayed exceptional energetics. Recent investigations of the X-ray light curve's pulsating tail revealed the presence of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 30 - 2000 Hz frequency range, most of which coincides with the bandwidth of the LIGO detectors. These QPOs, with well-characterized frequencies, can plausibly be attributed to seismic modes of the neutron star which could emit GWs. Our search targeted potential quasi-monochromatic GWs lasting for tens of seconds and emitted at the QPO frequencies. We have observed no candidate signals above a pre-determined threshold and our lowest upper limit was set by the 92.5 Hz QPO observed in the interval from 150 s to 260 s after the start of the flare. This bound corresponds to a (90% confidence) root-sum-squared amplitude h_rssdet^90% = 4.5e-22 strain Hz^-1/2 on the GW waveform strength in the...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Research | Children’s Health Thyroid Function and Perchlorate in Drinking Water: An Evaluation among California Newborns, 1998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) has been detected in groundwater sources in numerous communities in California and other parts of the United States, raising concerns about potential impacts on health. For California communities where ClO 4 was tested in 1997 and 1998, we evaluated the prevalence of primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels among the 342,257 California newborns screened in 1998. We compared thyroid function results among newborns from 24 communities with average ClO 4 concentrations in drinking water> 5 µg/L (n = 50,326) to newborns from 287 communities with average concentrations ? 5 µg/L (n = 291,931). ClO 4 concentrations obtained from the California Drinking Water Program provided source-specific data for estimating weighted average concentrations in community water. Fifteen cases of PCH from communities with average concentration> 5 µg/L were observed, with 20.4 expected [adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.40–1.19]. Although only 36 % of all California newborns were screened before 24 hr of

Patricia A. Buffler; Michael A. Kelsh; Edmund C. Lau; Charlotte H. Edinboro; Julie C. Barnard; George W. Rutherford; Jorge J. Daaboul; Lynn Palmer; Fred W. Lorey

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441

Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposure–response risk estimates per 10 µg/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 3–34] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21–107), but this was

Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

442

Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans From Very Large Forecast Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global return value estimates of significant wave height and 10-m neutral wind speed are estimated from very large aggregations of archived ECMWF ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time from the period 2003-2012. The upper percentiles are found to match ENVISAT wind speed better than ERA-Interim (ERA-I), which tends to be biased low. The return estimates are significantly higher for both wind speed and wave height in the extratropics and the subtropics than what is found from ERA-I, but lower than what is reported by Caires and Sterl (2005) and Vinoth and Young (2011). The highest discrepancies between ERA-I and ENS240 are found in the hurricane-prone areas, suggesting that the ensemble comes closer than ERA-I in capturing the intensity of tropical cyclones. The width of the confidence intervals are typically reduced by 70% due to the size of the data sets. Finally, non-parametric estimates of return values were computed from the tail of the distribution. These direct return estimates compare very well with Ge...

Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mass Properties Testing and Evaluation for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass properties (MP) measurements were performed for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), serial number (S/N) 0X730401, the power system designated for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Measurements were made using new mounting fixtures at the mass properties testing station in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Space and Security Power Systems Facility (SSPSF). The objective of making mass properties measurements was to determine the generator’s flight configured mass and center of mass or center of gravity (CG). Using an extremely accurate platform scale, the mass of the as-tested generator was determined to be 100.117 ± 0.007 lb. Weight accuracy was determined by checking the platform scale with calibrated weights immediately prior to weighing the MMRTG.a CG measurement accuracy was assessed by surrogate testing using an inert mass standard for which the CG could be readily determined analytically. Repeated testing using the mass standard enabled the basic measurement precision of the system to be quantified in terms of a physical confidence interval about the measured CG position. However, repetitious testing with the MMRTG itself was not performed in deference to the gamma and neutron radiation dose to operators and the damage potential to the flight unit from extra handling operations. Since the mass standard had been specially designed to have a total weight and CG location that closely matched the MMRTG, the uncertainties determined from its testing were assigned to the MMRTG as well. On this basis, and at the 99% confidence level, a statistical analysis found the direct, as-measured MMRTG-MSL CG to be located at 10.816 ± 0.0011 in. measured perpendicular from the plane of the lower surface of the generator’s mounting lugs (Z direction), and offset from the generator’s long axis centerline in the X and Y directions by 0.0968 ± 0.0040 in. and 0.0276 ± 0.0026 in., respectively. These uncertainties are based simply on the statistical treatment of results from repetitive testing performed with the mass standard and included position variations that may have occurred during several mounting/dismounting operations of both the mass standard and mounting fixtures. Because of the limited data available, the computed uncertainty intervals reported are likely, although not assuredly, wider than the intervals that would have been found had more extensive data been available. However, these uncertainties do not account for other contributors to measurement uncertainty that might be applicable. These include potential weighing errors, possible tilt of the as-mounted test article, or translation of the measurement results from the MP instrument coordinates to those of the test article. Furthermore, when testing heat producing test articles such as the MMRTG, measurement degradation can occur from thermal expansion/contraction of the mounting fixtures as they heat up or cool and cause a subtle repositioning of the test article. Analyses for such impacts were made and additional uncertainty allowances were conservatively assigned to account for these. A full, detailed description is provided in this report.

Felicione, Frank S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. The design evolution relied heavily on computational fluid dynamic predictions of design alternatives. The final design features modular separate radiant cells, each with one and two-side fired vertical tubes. The convection section configuration is vertical tube banks enclosed in the radiant channels. Commercial modular plate air preheaters are used. The predicted performance for the integrated advanced heater and Callidus burner is 95 percent efficiency with 9 ppm NOx emissions firing natural gas, and 12 ppm firing refinery gas. The total erected cost is less than a conventional heater with combustion air preheat.

Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San; Martin, Matthew

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

BPA Metering Services Editing and Estimating Procedures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Editing and Estimating Interval Data 1. Introduction This section defines the meter interval data editing and estimation techniques performed by BPA's Metering Services...

446

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changeis set aside in one energy market interval is then releasedto be dispatched in a later energy market interval, whereas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

anatomical mapping analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Markov Interval Maps CERN Preprints Summary: We set up a multiresolution analysis on fractal sets derived from limit sets of Markov Interval Maps. For this we consider the ...

448

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an accidental release was calculated for a release of about 1,500 Ci HTO that occurred in October 1954. The likely dose for this release was probably less than 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem), but, because of many unknowns (e.g., release-specific meteorological and accidental conditions) and conservative assumptions, the uncertainty was very high. As a result, the upper confidence limit on the predictions, considered a dose that could not have been exceeded, was estimated to be 2 mSv (200 mrem). The next highest dose, from the 1970 accidental release of about 290,000 Ci (10,700 TBq) HT when wind speed and wind direction were known, was one-third as great. Doses from LLNL accidental releases were well below regulatory reporting limits. All doses, from both routine and accidental releases, were far below the level (3.6 mSv [360 mrem] per year) at which adverse health effects have been documented in the literature.

Peterson, S

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

DARPA Efforts and Interests in Composites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Improved properties Open Manufacturing * Technology Insertion Program * Bonded Composite Confidence * InformaticsProbabilistic Process Modeling * Composites Manufacturing...

450

Stat 231 Exam 2 Spring 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sided confidence limits for the difference in long-run factions of defective vials detected (experienced minus

Vardeman, Stephen B.

451

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 {+-} 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS?s result of -0.567 {+-} 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS?s data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 {+-} 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

none,

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.

Hunter, C.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

454

Matter Power Spectrum for the Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model: The Newtonian Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We model the cosmic medium as the mixture of a generalized Chaplygin gas and a pressureless matter component. Within a neo-Newtonian approach (in which, different from standard Newtonian cosmology, the pressure enters the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics) we compute the matter power spectrum. The 2dFGRS data are used to discriminate between unified models of the dark sector (a purely baryonic matter component of roughly 5 percent of the total energy content and roughly 95 percent generalized Chaplygin gas) and different models, for which there is separate dark matter, in addition to that accounted for by the generalized Chaplygin gas. Leaving the corresponding density parameters free, we find that the unified models are strongly disfavored. On the other hand, using unified model priors, the observational data are also well described, in particular for small and large values of the generalized Chaplygin gas parameter $\\alpha$. The latter result is in agreement with a recent, more qualitative but fully relativistic, perturbation analysis in Gorini et al.

J. C. Fabris; S. V. B. Goncalves; H. E. S. Velten; W. Zimdahl

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

455

Northeast regional biomass program. Retrospective, 1983--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten years ago, when Congress initiated the Regional Biomass Energy Program, biomass fuel use in the Northeast was limited primarily to the forest products industry and residential wood stoves. An enduring form of energy as old as settlement in the region, residential wood-burning now takes its place beside modern biomass combustion systems in schools and other institutions, industrial cogeneration facilities, and utility-scale power plants. Biomass today represents more than 95 percent of all renewable energy consumed in the Northeast: a little more than one-half quadrillion BTUs yearly, or five percent of the region`s total energy demand. Yet given the region`s abundance of overstocked forests, municipal solid waste and processed wood residues, this represents just a fraction of the energy potential the biomass resource has to offer.This report provides an account of the work of the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) over it`s first ten years. The NRBP has undertaken projects to promote the use of biomass energy and technologies.

Savitt, S.; Morgan, S. [eds.] [Citizens Conservation Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Air/water oxydesulfurization of coal: laboratory investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air/water oxidative desulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major US coal basins. This experimentation has shown that the reaction proceeds effectively for pulverized coals at temperatures of 150 to 200/sup 0/C with air at a total system pressure of 500 to 1500 psig. Above 200/sup 0/C, the loss of coal and product heating value increases due to oxidative consumption of carbon and hydrogen. The pyritic sulfur solubilization reactions are typically complete (95 percent removal) within 15 to 40 minutes at temperature; however, significant apparent organic sulfur removal requires residence times of up to 60 minutes at the higher temperatures. The principal products of the reaction are sulfuric acid, which can be neutralized with limestone, and iron oxide. Under certain conditions, especially for high pyritic sulfur coals, the precipitation of sulfur-containing compounds from the products of the pyrite reaction may cause anomalous variations in the sulfur form data. The influence of various parameters on the efficiency of sulfur removal from coal by air/water oxydesulfurization has been studied.

Warzinski, R. P.; Friedman, S.; Ruether, J. A.; LaCount, R. B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Design Of Hydel Power Plant At Mid- Pennar Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-hydro-electric power is both an efficient and reliable form of clean source of renewable energy. It can be an excellent method of harnessing renewable energy from small rivers and streams. The micro-hydro project designed to be a run-of-river type, because it requires very little or no reservoir in order to power the turbine. The water will run straight through the turbine and back into the river or stream to use it for the other purposes. This has a minimal environmental impact on the local ecosystem. The design procedure of micro-hydro power plant was implemented practically. The choice of the turbine type depending mainly on the site head and flow rate. The turbine power and speed were directly proportional with the site head, but there were specific points for maximum turbine power and speed with the variation of the site water flow rate. The head losses in the penstock could range from 5 to 10 percent of the gross head, depending on the length of the penstock, quantity of water flow rate and its velocity. The turbine efficiency could range from 80 to 95 percent depending on the turbine type, and the generator efficiency about 90 percent. The design study showed that construction of micro-hydroelectric project was feasible in the project site and there were no major problems apparent at the design and implementation stages of the micro-hydro-electric power plant.

P. Nagendra; Dr. G. Prasanthi

458

Multiway Range Trees: Scalable IP Lookup with Fast Updates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on prefix lengths'' [9], ``Lulea compressed tries'' [1], or ``binary search on intervals'' [5] perform

Varghese, George

459

Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

Aaltonen, T.; et al.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane's model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow's model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system's reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane's postulation as well as Crow's postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was -3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward improved reliability. The MTBF was 592 seeds, which implied that several prostate seed implantation cases would be possible without encountering any critical failure. The shape parameter for the MTBF was 0.3859 (<1), suggesting a positive reliability growth of this robotic system. At 95% confidence, the reliability for deposition of 65 seeds was more than 90%. Conclusions: Analyses of failure mode strongly indicated a gradual improvement of reliability of this autonomous robotic system. High MTBF implied that several prostate seed implant cases would be possible without encountering any critical failure.

Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center (NCI-designated), Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "95-percent confidence interval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

G. Grammer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

Kurtz, Goldie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gingras-Hill, Geneviève [Clinical Research Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, Haiyan [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko V. [UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Roach, Mack [UCSF, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Clopidogrel Responsiveness in Patients Undergoing Peripheral Angioplasty  

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Purpose: To investigate the incidence and clinical significance of platelet responsiveness in patients receiving clopidogrel after peripheral angioplasty procedures. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included patients receiving antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel 75 mg after infrainguinal angioplasty or stenting and who presented to our department during routine follow-up. Clopidogrel responsiveness was tested using the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay. Patients with residual platelet reactivity units (PRU) {>=} 235 were considered as nonresponders (NR group NR), whereas patients with PRU < 235 were considered as normal (responders [group R]). Primary end points were incidence of resistance to clopidogrel and target limb reintervention (TLR)-free survival, whereas secondary end points included limb salvage rates and the identification of any independent predictors influencing clinical outcomes. Results: In total, 113 consecutive patients (mean age 69 {+-} 8 years) with 139 limbs were enrolled. After clopidogrel responsiveness analysis, 61 patients (53.9 %) with 73 limbs (52.5 %) were assigned to group R and 52 patients (46.1 %) with 66 limbs (47.5 %) to group NR. Mean follow-up interval was 27.7 {+-} 22.9 months (range 3-95). Diabetes mellitus, critical limb ischemia, and renal disease were associated with clopidogrel resistance (Fisher's exact test; p < 0.05). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, TLR-free survival was significantly superior in group R compared with group NR (20.7 vs. 1.9 %, respectively, at 7-year follow-up; p = 0.001), whereas resistance to clopidogrel was identified as the only independent predictor of decreased TLR-free survival (hazard rate 0.536, 95 % confidence interval 0.31-0.90; p = 0.01). Cumulative TLR rate was significantly increased in group NR compared with group R (71.2 % [52 of 73] vs. 31.8 % [21 of 66], respectively; p < 0.001). Limb salvage was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Clopidogrel resistance was related with significantly more repeat interventions after peripheral angioplasty procedures.

Pastromas, Georgios, E-mail: geopastromas@gmail.com; Spiliopoulos, Stavros, E-mail: stavspiliop@upatras.gr; Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios, E-mail: adiamantopoulos@gmail.com; Kitrou, Panagiotis, E-mail: panoskitrou@gmail.com; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios, E-mail: karnaby@med.upatras.gr; Siablis, Dimitrios, E-mail: siablis@med.upatras.gr [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Greece)] [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Greece)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Qualification of the Savannah River National Laboratories Coulometer, Model SRNL-Rev. 2 (Serial # SRNL-003 Coulometer) for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometer  

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This report discusses the process used to prove in the SRNL-Rev.2 coulometer for isotopic data analysis used in the special plutonium material project. In May of 2012, the PAR 173 coulometer system that had been the workhorse of the Plutonium Assay team since the early 1970s became inoperable. A new coulometer system had been purchased from Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and installed in August of 2011. Due to funding issues the new system was not qualified at that time. Following the failure of the PAR 173, it became necessary to qualify the new system for use in Process 3401a, Plutonium Assay by Controlled Coulometry. A qualification plan similar to what is described in PQR -141a was followed. Experiments were performed to establish a statistical summary of the performance of the new system by monitoring the repetitive analysis of quality control sample, PEOL, and the assay of plutonium metals obtained from the Plutonium Exchange Program. The data for the experiments was acquired using work instructions ANC125 and ANC195. Figure 1 shows approximately 2 years of data for the PEOL material obtained using the PAR 173. The required acceptance criteria for the sample are that it returns the correct value for the quality control material of 88.00% within 2 sigma (95% Confidence Interval). It also must meet daily precision standards that are set from the historical data analysis of decades of data. The 2 sigma value that is currently used is 0.146 % as evaluated by the Statistical Science Group, CCS-6. The average value of the PEOL quality control material run in 10 separate days on the SRNL-03 coulometer is 87.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.04 at the 95% Confidence interval. The date of data acquisition is between 5/23/2012 to 8/1/2012. The control samples are run every day experiments using the coulometer are carried out. It is also used to prove an instrument is in statistical control before any experiments are undertaken. The total number of replicate controls run with the new coulometer to date, is n=18. This value is identical to that calculated by the LANL statistical group for this material from data produced by the PAR 173 system over the period of October 2007 to May 2011. The final validation/verification test was to run a blind sample over multiple days. AAC participates in a plutonium exchange program which supplies blind Pu metal samples to the group on a regular basis. The Pu material supplied for this study was ran using the PAR 173 in the past and more recently with the new system. Table 1a contains the values determined through the use of the PAR 173 and Table 1b contains the values obtained with the new system. The Pu assay value obtained on the SRNL system is for paired analysis and had a value of 98.88+/-0.07% RSD at 95% CI. The Pu assay value (decay corrected to July 2012) of the material determined in prior measurements using the PAR173 is 99.05 +/- 0.06 % RSD at 95% CI. We believe that the instrument is adequate to meet the needs of the program.

Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colletti, Lisa M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drake, Lawrence R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Elmer J. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam 2008-2009  

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This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2008 and early spring 2009, respectively. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). Operating the sluiceway reduces the potential for hydropower production. However, this surface flow outlet may be the optimal non-turbine route for fallbacks in late fall after the sluiceway is typically closed for juvenile fish passage and for overwintering summer steelhead and kelt passage in the early spring before the start of the voluntary spill season. The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines, and their movements in front of the sluiceway at TDA to inform fisheries managers’ and engineers’ decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study periods were from November 1 to December 15, 2008 (45 days) and from March 1 to April 9, 2009 (40 days). The study objectives were to 1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA during the two study periods, respectively, and 2) assess the behavior of these fish in front of sluice entrances. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics and fish behavior data using acoustic imaging. For the overwintering summer steelhead, fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. We estimated that a total of 1790 ± 250 (95% confidence interval) summer steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices during November 1 to December 15, 2008. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, without the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of steelhead may have fallen back through turbines. Run timing peaked in late November, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for overwintering steelhead fallbacks was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. Therefore, sluiceway operations should not be based on diel distribution. For the early spring study, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 40-day study period. A total of 1766 ± 277 (95% confidence interval) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, as with steelhead fallback, not having the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of overwintering steelhead and kelts may use the turbines for downstream passage before the start of the spill season. Run timing peaked in late March; however, relatively large numbers of kelt-sized targets passed the dam on March 2 and March 6 (162 and 188 fish, respectively). Horizontal distribution indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Again, no clear pattern was seen for diel distribution of overwintering steelhead and early out-migrating kelt passage.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.  

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The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z